By on July 24, 2013

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“Quality means doing it right when no one is looking.” – Henry Ford

Anyone who aspires to review cars should give Mary Walton’s “Car: A Drama of the American Workplace“ a careful examination. In 392 pages, Walton introduces us to the men and women who went through the gruelling task of designing, engineering and planning DN101, the second-generation Ford Taurus that was meant to dethrone the Toyota Camry once and for all from its spot as America’s favorite car. Only the hardest of hearts would fail to identify with the Ford staffers who spent billions of dollars and countless hours slaving away at a project that ultimately flopped in the marketplace. I know it gave me pause for a long time when it came time to review a car. I began to second guess whether it was right to harp on some poorly fitting trim or wonky steering feel or a carried-over powertrain. Surely, someone wanted to do better, but budget constraints, infighting or other external factors must have conspired to taint their platonic ideal of an automobile.

And then I spoke to someone who worked at Ford and told me the story of their mother’s car shopping experience. “I went to the Lincoln dealer with her to look at a new MKZ,” he told me. “I was there, wearing my Ford jacket, picking the car apart on the showroom floor, cussing and spitting tobacco into a cup. There was flash (extra plastic that hasn’t been filed away) on the fascia. The fit was poor. My mom ended up buying a Lexus.”

Suddenly I didn’t feel so bad anymore.

Forty seven thousand six hundred and sixty-five dollars. Take a second to visualize that. For most Americans, that is a lot of money. Quite possible their salary for the year. Maybe even a nice starter home on a rural route in an economically hard-hit part of the country.

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That’s also how much you’ll have to fork over, before any incentives or rebates, for this car. A car that is approaching $50,000, but has a fuel filler door that spontaneously pops open every morning and hangs like a limp appendage.

I did my best to overlook the glaring quality issue that was staring me right in the face at 6 AM every day, but even the supposed selling points of the MKZ ended up pissing me off even more. Take the full length retractable sunroof, something that Lincoln’s marketing guys can’t get enough of.

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When fully retracted, it effectively blocks off half of your rear window field of view, reducing the already poor rear visibility. The brochure picture (above) downplays this effect but believe me, the chunky section just below the glass panel combined with the dark tinted glass gives you a field of view worse than the first generation Chrysler 300′s windshield. Luckily, this is an option that can be avoided, but so much of Lincoln’s sales proposition as a premium car seems to be based on this feature. Lest we forget previous issues surrounding fit and finish with this feature.

So, that’s two major issues before we’ve even turned on the car. Starting it is a bit like using an ATM. You hit the starter button on the center stack, then hit Reverse to back out, then Drive to go forward. All of this is done via a column of push buttons, like an old Chrysler, except there’s a discernible lag with this system that you don’t find elsewhere. Having never really experienced it before, I found it a bit disconcerting. The MyLincoln Touch system was as crappy as ever, slow to respond and awkward to use thanks to its haptic controls. The boys at Allen Park ought to start looking very closely at UConnect, and how easy it is to make a touch screen system that actually works. The 2.0 Ecoboost engine returned a whopping 16 mpg in city driving, while the turbo took forever to spool up when the accelerator was pressed. So much for downsizing engines to achieve greater fuel economy.

Most cars seem to have one redeeming feature that saves them from the depths of vehicular Hades. This has none. It does nothing better than a Fusion, costs as much as a decently equipped 3-Series, and displays the kind of QC issues that one would have expected from a Korean auto maker a decade ago. In such a competitive marketplace, this is a disgrace. The Lincoln MKZ is one of the most poorly executed cars in recent memory. There is literally nothing redeeming about it. I can think of more reasons to avoid it than to buy it. And I’m not the only one – Lincoln had so little faith in this car, that they had to pump up early driving impressions by putting Ferrari 599 GTO-spec Michelin Pilot Super Sport  tires on the car. Even then, nobody was fooled.

Once upon a time, Lincoln stood for something. It was the car of choice for pimps and presidents and every high-profile individual in between, whether your name was Iceberg Slim or John F. Kennedy. The MKZ, however, is for the kind of person Iceberg Slim would deride as a “mark” or a “sucker” – someone too dumb or brand loyal to go buy anything else. In the words of Nino Brown, another famous pimp, Ford ought to “cancel this bitch” and get back to making something worthy of the brand.

Lincoln provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review.

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276 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2013 Lincoln MKZ...”


  • avatar

    As I’ve said many times. There’s no good reason to buy anyblincoln branded vehicle. What pimp would drive such shit nowadays? What hoe would ride in it? And in the case of Kennedy, would Marilyn respect him if he rode in an MKZ?

    • 0 avatar

      How do you feel about the new 300 and new XTS?

      My retiree family refuses to buy anything not branded Lincoln. One of them leased a 2013 MKS ecoboost to replace a 2009- which replaced a 2007 MKZ.

      The other- a Navigator – with a wife still in an LS who isn’t satisfied by the MKZ and wants an MKC(if it ever happens).

      Atheir main complaint is the lack of V8 engines and lackluster performance variants. The 2nd uncle might go for a CTS-V or a Corvette.

      • 0 avatar
        SomeGuy

        Okay, that is anecdotal evidence. Like the reviewer said, only dumb people or brand loyalist would consider the car.

        Sales numbers don’t lie, this brand either needs to have major surgery or just shut it down and start over with a new brand.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Since you brought it up, I just have to chime in here.

          We bought a brand new Lincoln Towncar Executive for my wife in 1992 and kept it until July 2008 when we replaced it with a 2008 Japan-built Highlander Limited.

          The Towncar had the typical Ford issues but I kept it running by replacing the broken or worn-out parts myself, in my driveway. Me and Autozone! BFF! Ditto with the 2006 F150 XLT 5.4 that was my daily driver. Me and Autozone again. BFF!

          I had no problem selling either one of those vehicles to private parties; as it happened, both of which who were young Airmen getting out of the service and going back to their home states where they initially came from four years earlier.

          Both of those guys got an excellent deal on vehicles that had just about everything that could break down already replaced by me with new parts.

          So that sorta makes us Ford and Lincoln seasoned. But would we buy either of those vehicles today? No way!

          There’s much, much better in the market place so why would we want to reward Ford and Lincoln for our less-than-satisfactory ownership experience?

          We bought my wife a 2012 Grand Cherokee but still kept her old 2008 Highlander around because it never failed us. And I am a 2011 convert to Tundra with that magnificent 5.7.

          I don’t see either my wife or I ever going back to Ford and/or Lincoln.

          • 0 avatar
            Nick

            ‘The Towncar had the typical Ford issues but I kept it running by replacing the broken or worn-out parts myself’

            Glad someone else got to feel ‘the Panther love’. My dad’s Crown Vic, about the same vintage as your TC, was a piece of crap. If Canada had lemon laws similar to America, it would have been got rid of 3x over.

            Given the fondness some people have for them, I can only assume it improved over the years.

            As for Lincoln, it’s not just a question of their shortcomings, it’s how much better could Ford do with their Ford branded offerings if all the Lincoln resources were diverted to the parent brand?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Nick, that was one of the reasons we (reluctantly) joined the mass exodus away from the US-domestic brands; the maintenance and repair to keep them running.

            At that time my wife was in Real Estate and needed dependable transportation for her business. She racked up the miles. Keeping our American vehicles running took its toll on my time and body.

            I’m too old for that maintenance and repair rigor now, so we converted to Toyota, and loved it! Oh, what a feeling!

            Interestingly enough, in Nov 2011 I bought her a 2012 Grand Cherokee and it has also been a problem-free vehicle, so far, and on par with our 2008 Highlander.

            But Chrysler must expect problems because they keep emailing me to offer a further extension on my already extended warranty I purchased………

          • 0 avatar
            ohiodale

            I swithced to Ford about 20 years ago. I honestly had two repairs on the ford I have owned. The total cost for both of the repairs was less than $500 and this was over 20 years. I bought a 2011 MKZ and love it. Never had a single issue with it the interior looks great,it rides very quiet, has great pickup and for the price no other car has similar options. I discount this review because he is not being objective which is evident that he found not one good thing about the car. To say he only got 16 mpg with a 2.0 liter engine was a lie and if he is lying about this the entire article is a lie. I get 22 mpg with a 3.5 L engine. My Mustang GT got 19 MPG city. Go drive a new MKZ and see for yourself this article is fraudalent. I find it odd how people hate certain car manufacturers and only those who agree with them jump on the bandwagon. I find the new MKZ better looking than many of the rivals. I do not hate nor will I trash the other rivals because I like to be objective and I have not driven one.

      • 0 avatar
        ohiodale

        I bought my first lincoln and love it. The corvette or Caddy are nice cars but they are way more expensive. You could buy 3 lincolns for the price of two caddies.

    • 0 avatar
      sparkyandsimba

      Here is my question? When you make your last payment after 5 or 6 years , how long till the turbo explodes?

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        *sigh* I don’t know why people think that modern turbochargers are somehow problematic. Fact of the matter is that today’s turbos are virtually bulletproof. A turbo will probably outlast just about everything else on the car.

    • 0 avatar
      kolonelpanik

      @Ethan Gaines, this post is disrespectful to your readers, in its tone, content, grammar and spelling; to the people you are stereotyping; to a dead POTUS; and to the very notion of human intelligence and decency. You should wish to withdraw it. As for the author of the article, he too should grow up.
      PS: Your implied disrespect of the magnificent MKZ “motorcar,” is right on.

  • avatar
    TheOtherLew

    Would it kill you to spell “forty-seven” correctly? Or find a copy editor who can?

    • 0 avatar
      morbo

      It would definately literally kill them to have a tech writer.

      …(bad grammer make head asplode)…

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      Would it kill you to not pick such nits?

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        Yeah nah I have to admit grammar mistakes that aren’t obvious typos are bothersome, yet a missing hyphen seems hardly worth the nit. However, ignorant use of ‘your’ instead of ‘you’re’ and ‘there or their’ instead of ‘they’re’ drives me bat-shit and will cause me to rave harder than Lindsey Lohan on a full bender.

        • 0 avatar
          Ron

          +1

        • 0 avatar
          gslippy

          @dolorean – Agreed.

        • 0 avatar
          GoesLikeStink

          then/than is my biggest peeve

          • 0 avatar
            redav

            I could support capital punishment for screwing up then & than.

          • 0 avatar
            Brunsworks

            While I am not a fan of mistakes involving “you’re/your,” “there/they’re/their,” or “then/than,” my biggest current peeves include the verb “lead” being used as its own past tense (the past tense of “lead” is “led”), and people referring to a “____-year anniversary.” “Anniversary” comes from the Latin for “returning yearly,” so adding “year” to it is a glaring redundancy that practically shouts “WE DON’T KNOW WHAT THIS WORD MEANS!”

            Bridging back to the topic, it seems clear that the Lincoln “Motor Company” has forgotten what quality means.

          • 0 avatar
            burgersandbeer

            So long as The Wire videos are appearing on TTAC, here is Judge Phelan explaining then vs than to McNulty: http: //www.youtube.com /watch?v=KICPv7mqlis

      • 0 avatar
        Silvy_nonsense

        gslippy, I think it is very fair for TheOtherLew to harp on Derek’s quality issues. TTAC regularly harps on quality in many forms – the work of other journalists, cars, auto company strategy, etc. – but often fails to demonstrate quality in its own work. TTAC is the Lincoln of automotive websites; lots of ambition and good intentions that are undermined by execution failures.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Your agenda is as clear as any of the other Ford apologists (in French; “fanbois”).

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            I wonder what ever happened to his shadow 85SN2001 or whatever his handle was? They were a good pair together.

          • 0 avatar
            J.Emerson

            Silvy’s posting history doesn’t speak to any particular loyalty that I can see.

            On the other hand, it’s impossible for TTAC to a review of any Ford product without us getting a 1,000 word monologue from you about how terrible it is. Being a diehard brand hater requires no more intellectual independence or insight than slavish idolatry.

          • 0 avatar
            tuffjuff

            @DeadWeight

            I’d rather be an apologist (if being an apologist means that while I loved my 2012 Focus hatch, I’d avoid anything with a 1.6 or 2.0 EcoBoost like the plague, if only because of the numerous fire-related recalls) than see a brand’s name and automatically hate every single thing they sell, based on principal, i.e. “be you.”

            I seem to recall an argument on the EcoBoost Edge review you and I had where you tried telling me the Cadillac SRX your relative bought was had with the luxury package for something like $32k, despite the MSRP being $44k out the door (before incentives) and that anybody who would buy an Edge of any pedigree, EcoBoost or not, was a fool because they were buying a Ford, and Ford was garbage.

        • 0 avatar
          Toad

          TTAC is free. The MKZ is $47k +.

          Complaining about stuff you get for free is beyond self-entitled. If you want to volunteer your time to proofread every article in real time/as they are submitted I’m sure TTAC will take you up on the offer.

          • 0 avatar
            gmichaelj

            Well that is the problem with being a Critic: everyone jumps on you for your mistakes.

            Nevertheless, it does seem reasonable that articles could be peer reviewed by another staff writer, and that such a review would take on the order of less than an hour to do.

            I don’t think that it being “free” to the readers is an adequate refuge. My understanding is that the writers get paid to do their job.

            As for the review – I think

            the transmission and poor engine fuel economy are the real issues;

            the fuel door could be easily fixed and is probably a defect to just this car; and

            the sunroof – rear view issue is an obvious trade-off many buyers will accept for this “cool” feature.

          • 0 avatar
            Jimal

            Price is irrelevant and the criticism is not self-entitled. It costs exactly zero more to get it right. If you’re going to do something – anything – in life, particularly when it is for public consumption, have some pride and do it right.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            I can say this. If I had a gig that allowed me to test drive cars on someone else’s dime in exchange for me writing about it I would make damned sure that my writing was proofread and no review would contain the phrase “crappy as ever.” You had this car for a week and I now know you didn’t care for the sunroof, the gas cap may open on occasion and there is some plastic flash on the bumper. To call this a review is being pretty generous in my opinion but it is a nice hit piece that will get the comments going.

            And BTW, I would be happy to volunteer my services as an English Major and car guy to get in on said gig.

          • 0 avatar

            Email me editors at ttac dot com and the gig is yours

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Derek I reread that and I came off like a real Ass so my apologies. The thing is I just recently went car shopping and I was surprised at how little real information many of the reviews contained when I went back and pulled them by make and model. This was not always the case with this site. However, as a regular reader I really shouldn’t complain too much about the content since, well, I am a regular reader of said content and generally enjoy your work.

            Now if you are serious about the gig I’d love to give it a shot…perhaps a few reviews under the olf Farago rules?

          • 0 avatar

            Mkirk,

            I’m serious, if you want to help copy edit, email me at that address and we can get started. Someone else volunteered their services today as well, and he’ll be writing about his E30 in addition. I am not sure if people realize the scale of the work here at TTAC. I am the one that keeps the place running as a full time job. Everyone else has a day job. It’s no excuse, but things do slip through the cracks when it’s a one (sometimes two or three) man operation.

          • 0 avatar

            Everyone’s a critic. A fact of life. Still, I wonder how many people who take the effort to complain about an improperly placed apostrophe or lack of a hyphen have ever written anything for publication with their real name attached to it.

            If I can never critique something because my own work is not 100% perfect all of the time in all aspects, well, then, nobody can critique anything.

            When people point out a factual error in my work, I think them. When they ignore what I have to say and focus instead on a spelling or syntax error, they’re just being silly.

            I don’t like looking stupid. Silly or insane I don’t mind, but looking stupid offends my ego, so I try not to make mistakes in public. I make a good faith effort to edit my copy and when I catch a mistake after it’s published, I have it edited. My colleagues here do the same.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Will do. I have no issue helping out as this site provided me much entertainment on several long shifts on my past deployment to Afghanistan.

          • 0 avatar

            That made my day

    • 0 avatar
      Autoadd

      I read it as stylistic exaggeration , maybe poor hyperbole to illustrate the excessive purchase price. I’m ok with it.

    • 0 avatar
      kolonelpanik

      @TheOtherLew, the dude did OK with sixty-five!

  • avatar
    old5.0

    I’m a lifetime Ford man(for reasons I can’t explain, even to myself), but the sad fact is that if I had to choose one word to sum up Ford’s history, that word would be “hapless.”

    • 0 avatar

      Really? My word would be “decline”.

      • 0 avatar
        Silvy_nonsense

        Except in trucks, where Ford has been number one for a very long time.

      • 0 avatar
        old5.0

        The story goes that at Mullaly’s first meeting with the big chiefs after his hiring, he opened discussion with the statement “We’ve been going out of business for 40 years.” I’d suggest he was dead on, except that it’s been longer than 40 years.

        GM and Chrysler have certainly both made their share of boneheaded decisions through the years, but with both companies a reasonable person can almost follow the logic that led them to those decisions. With Ford… I don’t know, I can’t come up with any reasonable explanation for many of Ford’s decisions that doesn’t involve a dartboard and a blindfold. It is as if there is “logic” and “Ford Logic” and the two are completely unrelated.

        Ford has a pattern of doing something absolutely brilliant, and then coasting along on that momentum for a decade or two while completely screwing up everything they touch, and then, at the last moment, saving themselves from the brink of oblivion with one of those rare flashes of brilliance.

        • 0 avatar
          Omnifan

          +1 on the last paragraph.

          By the way, in the original article, it’s the “boys in Dearborn” and not “Allen Park.”

          • 0 avatar

            Ford has a number of facilities in Allen Park, including an emissions testing lab and an engine development lab so it’s quite possible that their infotainment software is developed there as well. Allen Park is right next to Dearborn.

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        @BTS

        Ford still makes some great product, but it sure is hard to see it behind all the engines on fire, sub-par infotainment systems and super-random-becoming-common quality issues.

  • avatar
    SV

    In the sense that it doesn’t do anything a Fusion can’t do, I get the hate. But it’s really not that bad of a car. The QC glitches (or rather, glitch – the shifter, MFT and sunroof are design issues more than quality ones) are a bit worrying and seem to be something affecting Ford as a whole. But the MKZ Is selling pretty well and according to one fairly objective source (Consumer Reports) is actually pretty good. Like the Malibu I think this car is becoming the latest whipping boy for the automotive press.

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      I want to like Lincoln, I really, really, really do. But these kinds of niggling QC problems are simply unacceptable in today’s market and at these prices.

      The MKZ is a whipping boy, for sure, but I find it hard to argue with much of the disdain. I’ve sat in a few new MKZs but not driven them. Regardless, each time I did, then looked at the price tag I always left with the same thought: While nice, I would never, ever, put down my own money for this car when a comparable BMW or Audi is available.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        I have to wonder if the QC issues are more attributable to first year teething issues. I’ve owned a few automobiles over the years that have been the first year of a new rebuild and have always found QC problems. Best example was the ’08 Grand Caravan 4.0L bought brand new that year, which spent more time in the shop for automatic doors that refused to open fully or at all, warped front brake rotors at 30K miles, entertainment system gremlins, and worst of all the power fold and go seats in the rear which refused to flop or go. Couldn’t wait to ditch that pig, which was a shame because otherwise it was a great Mini-van.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          What Derek speaks of would be bad enough in a 22k Accord or Dodge Charger.

          That this car has such shitty build quality and quality, in general, at twice that price point, is nothing less than Exhibit A in the failure of the revival of The Lincoln Horseless Carriage Company.

          It is astounding that they actually aren’t embarrassed to let these cars be seen in this condition (see Ronnie’s article about the bizarre structural defects) let alone actually sell them as is (especially at their price point).

          This car is yet another in a long list of recently released Ford vehicles which puts the emphasis on Consumer Report’s conclusion that Ford is now manufacturing the 2nd least reliable vehicles, saved from last place by JLR (and CR drills down in the dreadful assembly quality that both Derek and Ronnie have made specific references to).

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            Those ‘structural defects’ can be taken in different ways. The termination of the brazing looks uniform to me. But to others it doesn’t. I still think it looks better than cheap ditch moulding that competitors slap on their vehicles’ roof structure welds.

            The rest of your post is just sensationalism.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            How, exactly, is pointing out Ford-Lincoln’s latest ranking in Consumer Report’s reliability index “sensationalism?”

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            What makes up CR’s criteria, and the fact that the gap isn’t all that big when you put things into perspective (i.e. have a memory that lasts longer than 5 years).

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            The largest ongoing vehicle owner (verified by VIN) database feedback study, by far, over the longest stretch of time, that’s done by any entity independent of the manufacturers.

            Those who’ve taken a college level course in statistics (and in particular, scientific sampling) realize the “significance” & utility of having access to such vast pools of data.

            I could forgive some of the abundant fail of the MKwhatever Lincolns if they used refined motors, or at the very least, didn’t sell 4 bangers that feel every bit the part while obtaining V6 or even V8 levels of fuel economy, while being far less reliable.

            Even the MkS has abundant eco-fail under the hood.

            At least there was a time when Lincoln made vehicles with a plush ride. That’d be the Lincoln I’m rooting for.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            It’s their binning of issues that I disagree with. ‘Reliability’ is too strong of a term for what they include in that index. I wish they would actually categorize their feed back but from the last review I read they hadn’t. I no longer have access to their subscription via work and wish I did.

            I’m not apologizing for the product, mind you (above post). I just prefer objective criticism.

          • 0 avatar
            Firestorm 500

            A 22K Accord, or any Accord for that matter, will not have defects like that.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            tres, Consumer Reports is dinging the reliability of many Ford & Lincoln models for fragile ecoboost motors, fragile transmissions, fragile cooling systems, shoddy fit and assembly, etc.

            There’s not a single economist motor they rate as average or above reliability.

            And Ford now sells 6 of the 10 LEAST RELIABLE vehicles one can purchase today according to the latest data from Consumer Reports:

            http://www.autoguide.com/auto-news/2013/05/top-10-least-reliable-cars-and-trucks.html

            Ford produces the LEAST RELIABLE lineup of cars & trucks, with the sole exception of Jaguar:

            http://www.autoblog.com/2012/10/29/ford-tumbles-to-second-worst-in-consumer

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            DW: It’s called MyFordTouch and MyLincolnTouch. CR doesn’t go off on ecoboost like you do. The article you linked resembles a rant rather than journalism.

            http://www.mlive.com/auto/index.ssf/2012/08/consumer_reports_upgraded_myfo.html

            Its no secret why those trim levels tanked – they’re loaded out to the teeth with MFT and the upgraded mill. If you honestly think the ecoboost motors are the reason, you are belligerent.

            Everyone knows that MFT is junk. Please do not correlate it with your hate of turbo’s. FYI I bought a 5.0 F-150 base level trim (no MFT). I agree with your points, but only because I drive my cars into the ground. I would have bought the 3.5 GTDI had it not been for the fact I get better fuel economy with the 5.0 (20 mpg mixed driving).

            Back when I had access to the data, the majority of complaints were related to MFT, the dual dry clutch and miscellaneous BS. It’s fact.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            tres, this is from the Annual Auto Issue of Consumer Reports, dated April 2013 -

            Not a single Ford or Lincoln scored average or above in terms of reliability, for MANY reasons, and there are black circles or black half circles all around for ecoboost motors, whether 4 or 6 cylinders, across the board.

            They also gave the black or half black circle to transmissions in most newer Ford vehicles.

            In the March 2013 edition of Consumer Reports, they had a separate article specifically discussing that every one of the multiple Fusions they took delivery of had misaligned doors, misaligned hood panels, lumpy and ragged headliners, sharp edges on plastic molding on interior trim pieces, etc. (page 54).

            So, it’s definitely not just FMT/LMT, and that myth needs to be put down for good.

            It’s unreliable core, major components, and overall build and assembly defects, that have dragged Ford so far down their reliability rankings.

          • 0 avatar

            Just to clarify I never said they were structural defects. The flaw I discussed was a cosmetic issue relating to not grinding down what is either body filler or weld in the back window along the back edge of the roof.

          • 0 avatar
            JREwing

            If I’m putting down $47,000 on a vehicle (an amount that’s three times more than I’ve spent on any vehicle in my entire life), I want some damn craftsmanship and durability as part of the deal. That goes double for anything whose pedigree (or lack thereof) ensures poor resale value to go along with it.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            DW:
            I will be hunting for that issue. I would love to see the data for the ecoboost scores.

            The fit and finish I believe. Guess who DK is referencing in the article?

            Also, I now work for a Japanese corp.

          • 0 avatar
            timmm55

            How this reviewer screwed up is amazing. He even brought up the performance handling package (that out handled a BMW what?) 245/40 19 summer only tire. It’s $1595 BTW. That TTAC missed it the first time, and now a second time is inexcusable for a reporter/critic. Lincoln was GIVING you a preview and TTAC was too dumb to figure it out. Ever dumber to not ask the questions.

            I read your Autoguide link. Pure BS…..quoting a comment there:

            Consumer reports rated the reliability as well as a bunch of features. It is the dolts at Autoguide that decided to throw all those other features into an article that was supposed to be about reliability. It also happens that CR doesn’t like Ford’s Infotainment system and autoguide decided to throw that in, they are not related.

            (If you can’t figure out MFT/MLT you’ve got to be a Luddite or a moron. Or someone at CR apparently).

    • 0 avatar
      tallnikita

      Are you suggesting that Derek is less of an objective source than Consumer Reports? Because that’s what it sounds like.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Note to SV (and so many, many others)– It might be more of a car, or less of a car, but “not that bad of a car” makes no sense. Please strike “of” and all is well again. This little language virus is becoming prevalent, and I’m not taking it lying down. It matters more to me than a little extra flash on the dash..

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Note to SV (and so many, many others)– It might be more of a car, or less of a car, but “not that bad of a car” makes no sense. Please strike “of” and all is well again. This little language virus is becoming prevalent, and I’m not taking it lying down. It matters more to me than a little extra flash on the dash.

  • avatar
    Chicago Dude

    Any chance you could send the car over to Alex so we can get a real review?

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      What would a ‘real review’ reveal to make this car more appealing?

      Severe turbo lag, wonky transmission, poor fuel economy, poor visibility, poor quality… but you’ll buy it because you like the seats or something?

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      Any chance you could gather some common sense?

      Why have sex with someone with HIV?

      Why waste your time with a car with blatant quality issues?

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      Agreed.

      This reads more like a rant and less like a review. [Maybe I am unclear on the difference the \"capsule\" part makes in terms of series].

      I respect and trust your opinion, Derek. But I think a review NEEDS to incorporate other people’s point of view. In a sense, we are left to conclude that only suckers buy these cars out there. Well, I don’t like that conclusion, but you haven’t helped me. What do they see that I don’t?

      My two cents: 80% CONTEXT first, 20% opinion last. And sleep it over before firing away…

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        How would other non-blind (literally) peoples’ points of views differ?

      • 0 avatar
        gslippy

        Derek did mention blind brand loyalty as a reason someone might buy one, as BTR states exists in his own family.

        It would be interesting to know how many Lincoln buyers have come from other brands, but I suspect the flow is in the other direction.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          That last of the blind Lincoln buyers are either dead, or nearly there. They’re just not present in the numbers they were in the ’90s when the Town Car was the king of the RWD sales charts.

          I truly believe that Lincoln is hitting their target demo with the Jimmy Fallon tweet curating BS. The young professional couple nearby who bought one had a heck of a time figuring out the Park button, start button and interlock system as the car sat half in/out of the driveway, but they seem to really like the car anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        I don’t understand the complaints with the content of the review. I thought the point of a car review is for someone who has driven the competition to offer an opinion of the car in question. Derek was pretty clear – he thinks the car sucks and you can get much better value for your $47k. What is this context you speak of that needs to occupy a ridiculous 80% of the review? Does everything have to be spelled out?

        To connect this with the editorial feedback, if I read something where the first paragraph is filled with blatant errors, I don’t continue reading trying to salvage the piece. Make enough errors at the start and I’m done. That sounds more or less like Derek’s thoughts on the MKZ.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I wish you would’ve talked about the driving experience a little more. Ride and handling wise. NVH. Also, more photos of bad quality!

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      You know, I thought the same thing, but then I thought: wait a second, if these QC issues are this blatant and things like the transmission change this unrefined and the rear visibility this impared, is it really necessary to actually drive the car?

      It’s already been eliminated from the running in my mind.

      • 0 avatar

        “You know, I thought the same thing, but then I thought: wait a second, if these QC issues are this blatant and things like the transmission change this unrefined and the rear visibility this impared, is it really necessary to actually drive the car?”

        Nailed it. The car is totally unremarkable to drive and all I could think about were the QC problems and the other assorted annoyances during my week with the car.

        • 0 avatar
          bomberpete

          A lot of these problems sound like what went wrong with the last 2002-2003 Thunderbird. Great concept, really lousy execution that killed it as soon as they were delivered.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I’m supposing its either exactly like that of the fusion, or so unnoteworthy that its not even worth mentioning.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    With a Dodge Dart rear end? Cadillac has come a long way.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      I like the Dart rear end a lot, and this one, too. But I see Lincoln has duplicated the problems from the Dart (turbo lag and quality issues).

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        What quality issues on the Dart?

      • 0 avatar
        gslippy

        @SC5door, danio3834:

        Edmunds has been running a long-term Dart for a while now. From memory, they’ve had a bad windshield, as door handle fall off, razor-sharp protrusions in the trunk, grabby brakes, and the driveability problems of the DDCT and 1.4T engine are already legendary. Their car was also recalled for a stalling engine. When I test drove a couple of them, their headlight switches were loose in the dashboard.

        Even $15k cars shouldn’t have these problems, let alone $47k cars.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          Duly noted. From what I’ve seen, those problems aren’t consistent. The DDCT and 1.4 drivability concerns are perceptive. The complaints are as valid as they are on the Focus, however. Some customers really hate it, and others just don’t care.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          The recall for the stalling engine was a very specific circumstance. I wouldn’t even call that as a quality issue.

          Touchy brakes? Sorry, don’t see that as an issue either.

          Bad windshield is an issue, but the only people will know what really happened to is is the manufacturer of the glass itself when they do the analysis and report back to Chrysler.

          The door handle? Yea that’s junk. Similar to my friends Cobalt which has 2 broken handles. It does appear to be a filler piece that takes place of the lock tumbler on a RH drive car. Handle worked though, although on the Cobalt is snapped completely off leaving nothing to grab onto.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheeljack

        I drive a 1.4L 6-speed manual Dart and with 7600 miles so far, there have been absolutely no problems. Yes, the engine needs to be revved to get into turbo boost, but I’m not afraid of using the gas pedal like some reviewers must be.

        I wouldn’t describe the brakes as “grabby” at all. In fact, they are some of the best brakes I’ve experienced on a mass-market car in a while. Plenty of stopping power and very confidence inspiring.

        I recently took the car on a trip to Denver and loaded the trunk up on the way back – I didn’t notice any sharp edges in there so I have no idea what that’s all about.

        The other issues with the door handle and the windshield sound like “launch” issues and don’t seem to be all that common based on a couple of Dart forums I frequented prior to getting the car. I think Karesh has said that so far the car is performing well in his surveys, but he doesn’t have a particularly huge sample size as yet.

  • avatar
    NN

    The shortcomings on build quality and real world MPG are inexcusable. This is the bad old Detroit reincarnated. Good looking car, poor execution.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That MPG is awful. I can do better than that on my V8 in the city all day long. They really ARE good looking. I’ve seen two or three in person, and they have presence whether stopped or moving. Slowly. Cause old people are buying them.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      It’s built like, drinks like, and looks like the $25,000 Fusion which it is.

      In a world where the Fusion didn’t exist it would look good enough to sell in spite of the car. Art and Science sold a lot of overpriced and badly put together Cadillacs. Because they didn’t look like anything else.

      But the Fusion does exist, and has existed long enough to look like the ubiquitous rental car that it is. Long enough to make this $50,000 Lincoln look like a rental car too.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Seriously, the panther was much larger and had a v8 that was capable of low to mid 20s all day long.
      How do they expect an anemic 4cyl to do well in a car this size at this price?

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        My sister has a 2012 Cadillac SRX with the 3.6 liter and it’s a pretty stout V6 with 308 horsepower.

        She has a massive lead foot and complained to me that she’s averaging only 19.something mpg a month ago, this in a vehicle that has way more power and is much heavier than the MKZ.

        Even by that relatively low threshold, there are Ford apologists still trying to justify the ecoboost.

        The ecoboost will go down as an strategic mistake when the final chapter is written, as all Ford is managing to do is piss off many buyers of its various products implementing it, regardless of current sales (when almost every carmaker is seeing sales growth).

    • 0 avatar
      Nick

      ‘real world MPG are inexcusable’

      I have to agree…16mpg? He’d better have been towing a trailer around San Francisco.

  • avatar
    JD321

    “Lincoln provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review”

    I doubt they will do that again…. :)

  • avatar
    joeveto3

    I’d like to comment on the car, with personal experience, but my visit to the local West Allis Lincoln dealer was so bad, I had to do a shoulder roll and then sprint for my car to escape. I knew I was in trouble when I drove up and saw the sales hacks all standing outside smoking, screwing around, waiting for an “up.”

    I had made an appointment, and yet I was still left feeling like a cute blonde at the bar just outside the assembly plant. At quitting time. On pay day.

    “Hey whattya lookin’ for, we got that, we got it all, anything you need, we’ll git for you, knowwhatimean?”

    I did a double take. I was certain I was in West Allis, WI, except, maybe I was caught in some strange warp and ended up in Jersey?

    They were big mosquitos in cheap shoes. I couldn’t get out of there fast enough.

    Just like the cute blonde in the bar, you cautiously say “no” and give your reasons, and then you wait for the fallout, the anger, their true colors. Anything that could have been previously mistaken as politeness is gone. The open cursing starts and the personal attacks. Really.

    I hate treatments that kill the patient in order to kill the disease. But if that’s what it takes, kill The Lincoln Motor Company. And with any luck, the dealerships will die with it.

    Kill it now.

    From this review of yours, enough already, the cars suck. And the dealer network is a joke.

    • 0 avatar
      Summicron

      ++ Magnificent.

    • 0 avatar
      gessvt

      Hide and watch: In a week, those mosquitoes will be selling mattresses or cell phones a mile down the street.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      What a shame. You’d think they could at least be nice to you before selling you a crappy car.

      • 0 avatar
        dolorean

        Or at the very least, buy you dinner and say they’ll call you the next day. They never call….

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Those are lot vultures.

          They’re a common species in Art Van furniture stores, too, where they’ve even been known to try and use artificial plants, floor room furniture, and structural columns near the front door as cover and concealment before pouncing.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I hate Art Van. I JUST WANT A LAY-Z-BOY RECLINER! I don’t care that if I buy a couch and a love seat, a terrible recliner and sub par TV come with it.

          • 0 avatar
            tresmonos

            Every time I’ve been in Art Van, I have some woman with a fake German accent preying on me. I got wise and and now buy stuff from cococohome.

          • 0 avatar

            My cousin by marriage is in the furniture biz, has a standalone store in a downriver Detroit suburb. When we wanted to buy good stuff, we went to him. He said that Art Van’s business model is selling one piece of furniture to everyone, and they don’t care if you don’t come back.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Art Van is Particle Board/MDF city, along the lines of a larger, more brightly lit Value-City furniture store.

            But cheap, disposable furniture on 48 month “same as cash “installment financing” is what the people can afford.

            Art Van and similar furniture stores are also a big part of the reason few people know the meaning or value of a dovetail joint, why old school makers of truly quality furniture in North Carolina went tits up, and high quality, solid hardwood furniture at antique stores and estate sales now commands top $$$.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’ve only seen a couple of these in the wild, one in brilliant white and the other in sort of a “metallic granite” color. Apparently they were ones that Ford had gone over with a fine tooth comb because they were stunning and even the one I got to ogle when parking next to at the grocery store looked like it didn’t have any fit and finish issues I could see.

    That constantly popping open gas door on the other hand? Old Henry must be rolling over in his grave (both Henry Ford and Henry Leland.) Bill Ford and Al Mulally should be down at the factory kicking butt and taking names over these sorts of issues.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      “Bill Ford and Al Mulally should be down at the factory kicking butt and taking names over these sorts of issues.”

      +1. Or they should be kicking butt at the engineering office, which is most likely where the trouble began.

  • avatar
    Kendahl

    That’s pathetic and disgusting especially in contrast to our 2013 Focus. There are some things on the Focus I would have done differently but everything is screwed together precisely and nothing has failed in the first 6k miles. It’s actually a bit better than my 2008 G37S which has always had a dash squeak the dealer the dealer can’t fix.

    • 0 avatar

      Our Focus is an early-production example and it has been unequivocally excellent through 20k miles, with no interior flaws or any examples of this sort of stupid fit-and-finish crap. Likewise my sister’s Fiesta. Both are top-notch.

      I keep thinking the issues with MKZ and Fusion are just a Hermosillo problem, or supplier problems, or just a result of trying to push too many cars out of one factory in a rush to meet demand, but I wonder if it goes deeper than that. Ford is adding an assembly line at Flat Rock to build these starting in (I think) September; it’ll be very interesting to see if those cars are consistently better than what we’ve seen so far.

      • 0 avatar

        From what I understand, most of the issues stem from suppliers.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          Most of the car comes from suppliers.

          It’s on Ford to specify something their suppliers are capable of building. It’s on Ford to reject defective parts.

          Or they could just screw in the MLT radio even though the software is still in alpha. If a gas door molding doesn’t match the hinge then just torque it down harder.

          Enterprise will never know the difference right? Move the metal!

          • 0 avatar

            It’s not that simple. Getting the suppliers to ramp up volume without major quality gaffes has been an industry-wide problem, at least with US-based suppliers. Surely you’ve seen the stories about how GM is sending retired engineers to baby-sit suppliers of key components on their new pickups, yes?

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          How did blaming Firestone work out with the Explorer tires? Ford is big enough to make their suppliers deliver components at any cost, but are they really stupid enough to think that they’ll get quality for what they’re paying?

    • 0 avatar
      kjb911

      50k now on my 2012 and still feels tight as a drum with the only annoyance was my headliner that ended up being reglued

  • avatar
    AMC_CJ

    Saw one of these on display recently. What a beautiful car, especially the rear, and I generally don’t like sedans that don’t have a trunk. Then came the price tag….. like said, $47,000. Wow. That’s a lot of damn money, for any car, especially one with a 4-banger and FWD.

    10 years from now it might make a great used buy off a little old lady. I’d spend $20k on a nice low mileage example.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The MKZ and Accord Sport will have the same 5 year blue book value in absolute dollars, despite the MKZ costing twice as much when new.

      True story.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Which makes the MKZ an awful new car to purchase, but perhaps a good used value. The last gen MKZs tend to be priced comparable to Fusions. If I needed a midsized car, I would look at one.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Yes I currently have saved on Auto Trader a search with MKZs and V6 Fusions with leather. A given year MKZ and the same year Fusion (highly optioned) are practically the same price on the used car market. Right now $15000 will by you a pretty nice used MKZ in my area with less than 75,000 miles. With the way cars a built today that gives you another 150,000 miles of life left in it very easily.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Its the same with the MKT and Flex as well. I wanted to buy a used Flex Ecoboost. A used MKT is cheaper, and Lincoln will add a 100K mile, basically full coverage warranty vs a CPO Flex with just a powertrain warranty.

            I usually perfer to buy used cars private party, but Lincoln dealers are pricing CPO MKTs like they are individual owners.

        • 0 avatar
          AMC_CJ

          My grandmother has a 06′-07′ish. V6 AWD, about fully loaded. Not a bad car if you ignore the purchase price when new.

      • 0 avatar
        Firestorm 500

        I’m surprised the Honda doesn’t book higher than the MKZ.

    • 0 avatar
      typhoon

      Really makes you wonder where all that money goes. It has surely the cheapest labor in its class—it’s the only luxury car I can think of (ever) that’s built in Mexico. It’s doesn’t have a bespoke platform like nearly all of its competitors (Acura is the only exception I can think of) and it shares all of its drivetrain components with the pedestrian Fusion (even Volvo has its own unique engine family). The Pontiac G8 was cheaper, built with more expensive labor, and probably makes for a more convincing luxury vehicle than this.

      Granted, I don’t know much about the inner workings of the industry, but you’d think it’d be a lot more competitive on price or would at least have a higher level of fit and finish.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Luxury vehicles hencho en Mexico:

        Cadillac SRX
        Cadillac Escalade EXT
        Lincoln MKZ
        Audi Q5 (2015/16 model)

        Nissan will be building the Mercedes CLA and an Infiniti version in Mexico. BMW will also be building a plant in Mexico for the 3-series and future FWD models. I wouldn’t be suprised if the Audi A3 eventually moves to Mexico for production. As time goes on, we will get less vehicles from Europe, and more from Mexico and Asia.

  • avatar
    npbheights

    A couple of weeks ago I brought in my 2010 Lincoln MKZ for service and the loaner car was a 2013 Lincoln MKZ with under 100 miles on it. It was a base model car. The first thing that I noticed was that the car did not have air conditioned seats. Air conditioned seats have been standard since the 2006 Lincoln Zephyr. It is one of the primary reasons I bought the car as I live in the tropics. The quality of the leather on the seats appeared to be of a lower quality than the Bridge of Weir leather seats in my car. They are also thiner and harder than my seats. The 2010 seats are big and thick and the 2013 seats look like sport seats in a riced out Honda. The swoopy dash did not bother me, and I had no problems with the My Lincoln Touch. My favorite part of the design of the ’13 was the side view mirrors. It reminded me of the part in that book CAR where the Taurus design team wanted to put the side view mirror on the door because it would create less wind noise, but someone in management insisted that it be put ahead of the door glass because that is what was popular at the time. I imagined that whoever wanted it placed on the door on the Taurus in the 1990′s finally got their way – nearly 20 years later. The wood trim on the dash was very disappointing. In my car, there is a swath of chrome trimmed blonde wood with deep and beautiful woodgraining across the dash and on the doors. The ’13 had a little bit of dark wood with very flat looking wood grain that just looked fake. I did not mind the gear shift buttons because it appears that they will hold up better than the cream colored leather with cream stitching on the shifter in the 2010. I make sure my hands are clean when I touch it, but I have gotten the car back from dealer service with grease all over it several times. When I complained, they wiped it off with a magic eraser and took the color off the leather. On this trip, they were replacing it under warranty for me. My 2010 has 3.5L 263hp V6 that was standard on all previous MKZs. In my car, this engine is a MONSTER. It is very powerful – actually quite faster than my wife’s 2008 MKZ with the same engine and transmission combo. The 2.0L turbo inline four in the ’13 felt like a four cylinder engine, was slower and had turbo lag, and returned about 21 mpg – identical to my big powerful six. One more issue that I had was with the power steering. While the electric steerings effort was adjustable, the steering system made a weird noise at parking lot speeds and completely failed while I was driving once. I pulled over and turned the car off and on again, and the power steering worked again. It was as if the power steering was running some version of Microsoft Windows. I was happy to return the car and get my car back. I now know what people felt like in the ’70s when new cars were not as good as the cars they replaced. My 2010 MKZ was like a late ’60s Mustang and the 2013 MKZ was like a ’74 Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      mechimike

      I’m reminded of a quote from a John MacDonald book:

      “There is something self-destructive about Western technology and distribution. Whenever any consumer object is so excellent that it attracts a devoted following, some of the slide rule and computer types come in on their twinkle toes and take over the store, and in a trice they figure out just how far they can cut quality and still increase the market penetration… Thus the very good things of the world go down the drain, from honest turkey to honest eggs to honest tomatoes. And gin.”

      And, apparently, Lincolns.

      • 0 avatar
        Summicron

        That’s just a defense of aristocracy.

        • 0 avatar
          mechimike

          Aristocracy is not the opposite of mediocrity.

          • 0 avatar
            Summicron

            Put it on a bell curve, where’s the aristocracy and where’s mediocrity?

            Democracies make money off the bulge. Mac Donald’s just found another way to say the masses are asses. Because he can’t sell them anything.

      • 0 avatar
        olddavid

        Wow, I haven’t thought of the “Busted Flush” for years. Thanks. Somehow appropriate when speaking of our dear lamented Lincoln. Just last week I finally came to the conclusion I will never figure out German engineering of the Opel dialect, and took my cherry low-mile Catera to Craig and listed it for sale. While there, I came across a “Buick Mark VIII”. Having owned a MarkVIII that pleased me, I had to look further at this weird combo. Turned out that two neighbors, one not versed in nomenclature of automobiles, but learned in the CL way, had advertised the car for his sight-challenged friend. A low mile two owner car that had only traveled 10k miles in the last 10 years. 1998 LSC, with no sunroof. It was like the used car factory had built it with me in mind. I am one of those cheap guys of a certain age that will buy his wife the best thing she wants, but insist my cars are cash only, and usually appearance and mechanically challenged with my labor and eye as the equity builder. I have been over this car hither and yon, and the usual engineering “what were they thinking” are refreshingly absent. Maybe I’m just more forgiving in my old age, and my previous experience with the quirky air suspension has de-mystified it somewhat, but to paraphrase the football coach – “it is what we thought it would be”. A simple luxury coupe, with amenities I can use easily, can maintain without an MA in mechanical engineering, with ample power and reasonable mileage. If they could get it so right 15 years ago, why the difficulty now? Maybe Travis McGee finally lured all the good Lincoln designers and builders to slip F-18.

      • 0 avatar
        David Hester

        Travis McGee. Nice.

    • 0 avatar
      AoLetsGo

      My mother has a 2012 MKZ with the V6, all-wheel drive, and sport wheels. It is fast (for it’s category), sure footed, plush, and good in the snow. When her two year lease is up it would be a steal with the drastic depreciation and little old lady driving to church low mileage — a great winter beater!

  • avatar
    jerseydevil

    I really like the way this car looks. The lines are perfect to my eyes. Id prefer it had the Fusion front end, but the mustasche is OK. THe design is really swoopy.

    I prefer small sports cars, so I wont be buying one, just looking at one. I prefer it to any lexus (yawn) , caddys (yikes!) or bmw (too snooty). Perhaps I’d cross shop a Mercedes, but hthts all.

  • avatar
    gessvt

    OK, I guess I’m out of touch. Iceberg Who??

  • avatar
    jmo

    How was it optioned? I just checked Edmunds and a well optioned ES 350 was $41k. It would seem that it should cost about 8-10k less than it does. A totally loaded Fusion Titanium is $33k… I can’t see how they are adding $14k worth of value.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I always considered the first unsuccessful Taurus to be the third, not second generation.

    The one I’ve always known as the second generation was the lightly-restyled 1992-1995 model, which remained the best selling car in the U.S. until the ovoid third-gen came along and ruined the magic formula.

    But yeah, for getting on for $50K, you’d better have sorted out the fuel door.

    I can’t fathom why such a clunky roof is meant to be the pièce de résistance of this car. It’s a glorified moonroof that kills rear visibility, and it necessitates an unsightly old-fashioned radio antenna on the rear fender

    I think the Pontiac G6′s louvered affair, while possibly more complicated, at least didn’t block rear visibility.

    Any past or present G6 owners out there who can attest to that roof’s durability?

    • 0 avatar
      dolorean

      I have the same affect on my ’08 Saturn Astra XR 5 door with the full sunroof. Somehow someone at GM figured out how to put a six foot long piece of glass with four feet of it that opens without covering the back hatch glass or ruining the aerodynamics of the little guy. I also have comfy, heated leather seats that have held up well for five years and get 32 mpg with the four pot moving the front wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      kjb911

      No but my cousin’s G6 has been an.absolute nightmare in service with the transmission replaced, twice, a blown head gasket at 60k, failed convertible top, seat frame failure and a gm mechanic who said that the g6 is more complicated than an evo x…yes I was there when he said it and I was awestruck

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I suspect that the transaction price will be well under $50K. People don’t even usually spend that much on the Lexus ES, which is the king of the FWD-luxury dogpile.

  • avatar
    EspritdeFacelVega

    Really disappointing. My wife and I had a good look at the new MKZ at a Lincoln PR event at an art show in Naples FL back in Jan. I was surprised at my own equivocal reaction given how much I like the new Fusion, and my wife, who did not take to the car at all, pointed out the unlivable nature of the sunroof (and she loves sunroofs!).

    I have not heard any complaints about Hermosillo quality, indeed just the opposite. The first-gen Fusion has a good track record and current Focus seems to have good quality. Could it be the MKZ was a bit, well, rushed? Lincoln needs to learn from its history; old-timers will remember the Lincoln Versailles.

    • 0 avatar
      Silvy_nonsense

      Many of the cars from Hermosillo were missing parts. That is a supplier problem, not a quality of assembly problem. The men and women of Hermosillo are doing a good job.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    The proof that Lincoln is stupid is that they provided a car for this review. Have they never read TTAC before? Like, for instance, the numerous articles trashing Lincoln?

    Still, I would have liked to read more about this car. Not the one that some guy’s mom looked at months ago. The quality control issues are old news. It’s also old news that Ford was taking steps to address them. Did they? Wouldn’t know from this article.

    More criticizing of Ecoboost fuel ecomony and MFT/MLT. Something that could have been cribbed from any review of any Ford built in the past year. I could have written that!

    There were only a few sentences about the roof and the push-butteon transmission, two features that are fairly unique to this car. Not really enough info on whether or not they’re worth the effort Ford put into them.

    How does the car drive? Are the seats comfortable? What about the materials? It probably doesn’t drive like a sports car, but does it drive like a luxury car? Is it a pleasant place to be?

    You guys really took the fun out of Lincoln-bashing with this article.

    • 0 avatar

      “The quality control issues are old news. It’s also old news that Ford was taking steps to address them. Did they? Wouldn’t know from this article.”

      Yes you would, because the second picture is of the gas tank door popped open and hanging by a thread.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        Keep in mind, these marketing units are most likely pre-production examples, made pretty.

      • 0 avatar
        Chicago Dude

        Did a previous journalist break the door? Did you break the door? Did it come from the factory with a broken door? Is it some electrical fault that keeps popping it open, or is there a broken piece of plastic that prevents it from latching? Is it instead a matter of bad alignment of some important piece of the assembly?

        Did you ask Lincoln about the door? What did they say? Did they offer to fix it? Did you ask them to fix it? Did they try to fix it and fail? Does the car have a warranty that would allow for broken fuel doors to be fixed at no cost to the owner?

        As the person that got a free car for a week, you are in the unique position to determine whether a problem is with the specific example of the car and irrelevant to discussions about the entire collection of 2013 Lincoln MKZs. You seem to imply that if I buy an MKZ that my fuel door is going to pop open every morning.

    • 0 avatar
      Summicron

      @TMA1

      Alex! Alex! Alex!

  • avatar
    Ion

    I don’t see the point in sun/moon roofs. As a driver I can’t look out them without leaning back and they offer none of the open air excitement that my convertible did. I suppose a giant opening roof is better than the expensive fixed one they offer on the mustang.

    I wouldnt complain about visibilty though. you can’t see out the back window in a vert with the top up, you can’t see out the back with a giant piece of glass in the way. Don’t get the options if you can’t deal with it.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I consider them an anti-feature, in that I hate getting glare from above while driving.

    • 0 avatar
      Demetri

      Depends on the car. In my Integra it was far enough forward that you got a bit of that open air convertible feel from it without the wind resistance of opening the side windows, but I’ve noticed in most other cars it’s too far back to do anything except let hot air out of the cabin.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Life is too short not to have a sunroof. My philosophy for the past 35 years.

      I looked briefly at the Escape on my recent car hunt…while a great looking vehicle, I didn’t want MFT or the elongated dash top. My wife’s Edge hasn’t impressed me over the past 70k miles as well.

      I would kill for an F-150 King Ranch however.

  • avatar
    J.Emerson

    Guys, starvation-wage third-world labor will definitely sweat the details on a $50k luxury car as much as well-compensated American, Japanese, and European workers. Honestly guys, I swear!

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Except for the fact Hermosillo has built high quality, reliable MKZs in the past, as recently as the 2012 model year. The workers at the assembly plant aren’t the problem. The people that should be sweating the details of a $50k luxury car are in Dearborn.

      • 0 avatar
        J.Emerson

        They did a pretty good job with the last Fusion/MKZ, but it’s not like either of those were real luxury cars. They didn’t require things like careful fitment of exterior and interior trim; they didn’t have panoramic sunroofs or other hard-to-get-right options. I don’t doubt that the new MKZ will prove to be at least decently reliable, but the workforce (and plant management) clearly doesn’t care enough to get the details right that actually matter to buyers in this segment. Cheap labor works great for the automotive equivalent of Tupperware; it’s not good enough for fine china.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          That could be the case. I don’t work in Hermosillo or know anyone that works there now.

          I do know someone who was an engineering plant manager in Hermosillo for the original Fusion luanch, and he cared very much about quality. He is now the IQS Manager for Audi in the United States and Canada. Anyone they have at plant managerment should care about quality just as much.

          I would hazard a guess that they are doing the best with what they have. The problems with the MKZ launch have more to do with Ford corporate and their suppliers (whos quality Ford is responsible for).

        • 0 avatar
          Toad

          Are you implying that Mexican workers are not capable of quality workmanship? Since prospective workers are lined up ready to take these assembly jobs the wages being paid do not appear to be an issue.

          The problem is in design, assembly, or management. Suggesting that Mexican workers as a group are inherently not capable of doing good work can most politely be described as xenophobic.

          • 0 avatar
            LectroByte

            Are you implying Ford moved production to Mexico to improve quality? Detroit would like a word with you and your disingenuous ways.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Lectro-

            No one is implying Ford moved production to Mexico to raise quality. It was to save money. However, auto company’s Mexican plants have built plenty of quality cars.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      If a guy shows up stoned after lunch at Hermosillo, how hard will his union work to keep him on the job?

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        CJ-

        Probably not as hard as the UAW did for the guys making Durangos and Jeep Grand Cherokees at Jefferson North.

      • 0 avatar
        J.Emerson

        They wouldn’t have to. According to this document (which admittedly is from 2005), the members of SINTRA don’t even bother to file grievances. The smart money says that this means that the whitecollars don’t even bother to manage in the first place.
        http://corporate.ford.com/doc/sr12-hr-assessment-hermosillo.pdf

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      bball is right, Mexican assembly plants have no issues consistently producing high assembly quality vehicles and have for years. Not just at Ford, but with just about every other manufacturer. The majority of them have operations there for good reason.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Pretty sure the guys at Hermosillo are making far above a starvation wage – and Mexico isn’t in the third world.

      I saw a 2007 report of $3/hr for assemblers, which is about 38 pesos.

      Assuming an 8 hour day, that’s about 4 times the Mexican minimum wage – and works out to well over the median wage for Mexican workers.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Last I saw, it was $8-10 an hour in wages and benefits for the average Ford line worker in Mexico, while its $60 and hour here in the US.

      • 0 avatar
        LectroByte

        LOL, I haven’t been to Mexico in 8 years or so, but when I was moving my company’s production lines there, I can assure you it is the third world, even compared to Smyrna TN.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    Not a good impression at all.

    Too bad, as this Lincoln is a very nice-looking car. They can’t ALL be that bad, could they? Anyway, I hope yours was just a blip and not the norm, as that would be a tragedy for Ford, and especially, Lincoln. I really don’t want any of the domestic brands to fail, but it just seems like once again, they’re falling back to the point of not being able to get out of their own way. Hope I’m wrong.

    Man, I’m glad I bought a cheap, out-of-date, last-W-body-Impala after all, huh?

    In the year I’ve owned and drove it, not one single issue, niggling or otherwise. Of course, it’s not exactly billed as a luxury car, either, so the stakes aren’t as high, but still…

    I guess they saved the best for me!

  • avatar
    fredtal

    Dealer and salesman were bad 5 years ago when I was shopping for a new car that I didn’t even bother with a test drive. I was barely interested then, and I haven’t seen anything to date that has changed my mind.

  • avatar

    So are you off the press list then.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    Everyone at Ford management is fist-pumping and puffing out their chests over 16 profitable quarters. Yet reading this, I’m very bothered by the fact that Flop-sweating Jim “Cousin of Chris” Farley and Mark “Mullet Boy” Fields are heading Lincoln and will be running the whole show when Mullaly retires.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Aren’t these the same cars that were taken to Mi. so they could “fix” quality issues with the interior? I guess the “fixers” did not do such an outstanding job.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I commented in the rental car thread how awful I think SYNC is compared to the U-Connect system in my Charger. I was a Ford guy for a period of time in the 80s-90s but I would never purchase one of these turds with my own money.

    I’d rather drive an ES. Ouch.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    It’s a beautiful car, too bad it has all the quality issues. It’s probably the first Lincoln in a while I would actually consider, since the Mark VIII. Of course, I wouldn’t dare buy one, but maybe lease. Technology + Big 3 = service nightmare. You don’t want to own one of these outside a warranty.

    My position has been that the only reason Cadillac and Lincoln can still compete in the luxury car market is the buyers usually have some sort “issues” with furin’ cars. Eventually, these buyers are going to die off and Lincoln and Cadillac is not going to have this advantage.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    I don’t understand why they can’t get MFT/MLT right. Its been three or four years.

    Both of my Ford vehicles that have manual HVAC controls have been rock solid either since purchased, or since 2012. The MFT on the C-Max has never frozen up or stopped working. My Focus was an early build, so its original version of MFT required a new APIM module among other updates.

    However, so many people are still having issues. It seems the vehicles that removed the manual HVAC units have the most problems. Some of the haptic feedback buttons are worse than MFT/MLT. If Derek is having issues with MLT, you better believe the average Lincoln buyer is too.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    The whole Ecoboost marketing campaign is so divorced from reality that it’s kicking Ford in the backside.

    C&D got 12mpg – worse than V8 – mpg in their test of the F150 truck. The EPA rating is for 42% better than that.

    Here’s one unhappy customer’s comment:
    “Ford’s done a BEAUTIFUL job pulling the wool over everyone-INCLUDING the magazines that are supposed to WARN us of this crap BEFORE we get sucked in.”
    http://www.caranddriver.com/reviews/2013-ford-f-150-limited-ecoboost-v-6-test-review-less-is-more-page-2

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Those of us in the know have been saying it for years. We’re saying it about light duty diesels too. No one really wants to listen to us, though. People really like being lied to.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      Actually, Ford is a victim of its own success . . . in designing and building to the parameters of the EPA test. Unfortunately for Ford, the EPA test apparently does a poor job of mirroring the way most people drive.

      CR did a pretty thorough take-down of Ford’s eco-boost 4 cylinder motors, showing that, at least in the hands of CR drivers, the engines not only produced fuel economy inferior to their comparable normally aspirated competitors but also performed worse (in 0-60 times) as well.

      Honda’s new “earth dreams” engines on the other hand . . .

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Why offer the 2.0 ecoboost at all?
    Do they not know the buyers?

    If a v8 powered RWD town car can get better MPG, while being a simpler, cheaper, more preferred option, why even waste the capital to produce a lesser option, in almost every aspect.

    If instead they had put the same V8 connected to a Fwd transmission in this car, they could have accomplished higher fuel economy then that of the town car, easily added power, had a cheaper option to attract more consumers, and have the advantage of a more reliable engine.

    I mean WTF.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The best advice is to buy the MKZ with the 3.7L V6. Its a good engine that has proven to be reliable. Too bad all signs point to the 3.7 not being around much longer.

      The hybrid powertrain is a good option too. I see no reason to get the 2.0T in the MKZ.

      • 0 avatar
        Ion

        My assumption is the 2.0T is for CAFE. I highly suspect the take rate for the v6 and the hybrid are higher.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Wouldn’t the 2.0t hurt the cafe standards seeing as how it gets worse mpg?

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            The difference is in how it is actually driven versus under predictable, controlled test conditions.

            Since the manufacturer knows the condutions under which the vehicle will be tested (if it ever is called to do so ala Hyundai), they can design the vehicle to get optimum fuel mileage under those conditions to boost the window sticker number. This can often be at the expense of or irrespective of conditions where actual buyers may operate them.

            That being said, we don’t really know exactly how Derek drove the vehicle to get such poor mileage.

          • 0 avatar
            Ion

            On paper the 2.0 gets better gas mileage than the 3.7. If they can sell enough of the 2.0 and the Hybrid it will drag down Lincolns whole average.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    I’ve been saying from the get-go that these Ford turbos were gonna come back to bit them is the a$$ as soon as the miles and the years pile on, now add to that the less than stellar mpg numbers and they really got a big mess in their hands, from which they won’t be able to escape, despite all the naysayers, GM is the one on the right track with their power trains.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Absolutely, some want to attack GM for taking it slow and observing, at the end of the day, GM will have the last laugh.

      • 0 avatar
        Summicron

        “GM for taking it slow and observing”

        I think GM has learned some things from Toyota-sensei.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Agreed. All of these relatively smart moves are becoming a nasty habit for the dinosaur we flogged as recently as five years ago.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            GM’s new motors are, in large part, very competitive.

            The 3.6 V6, the new LS, the 1.4 in the Cruze…

            In fact, GM is one of the few automakers I know of that has had no complaints of carbon buildup in their GDI motors, as well.

  • avatar
    pb35

    I was just on another site and clicked on a review of new BMW M6 Gran Coupe (which may be my new dream car btw) and the picture at the top of the story turned into an ad for an MKZ. I lol’ed.

  • avatar
    juror58

    >>>
    Lincoln provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review.
    <<<

    This is the most damning line in the whole article. Lincoln provided the vehicle knowing it was going to be driven for a week, and at the end of the week a review of the vehicle would be published. Yet it seems that they did nothing to ensure they, "put their best foot forward." They just took any old car off the line at the dealership and handed over the keys.

    If I were providing a product to a member of the fourth estate for a published review (it wouldn't matter what it was) I would be sure that it was gone over with a fine tooth flashlight, and that everything looked as good as it possibly could and worked like it was supposed to before handing it over for testing.

    I'm not sure if it's a case of arrogance or indifference on the part of Lincoln, but the result is the same… A substandard product was hung out there like so much dirty laundry.

    Anyway, Derek, I thought it was a good article, but next time don't hold back. Tell us how you really feel.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      You’ve made an excellent point about Lincoln’s carefree attitude.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Why are you assuming that they pulled “any old car” from a dealership?

      This car MAY have been a pre-production press/fleet car. And who knows what phase of pre-production it may came from.

    • 0 avatar
      DaveDFW

      But wouldn’t it be incredibly dishonest to supply a vehicle which had received some kind of fine-tooth-comb treatment? Think of the bad press Lincoln would receive if the sample vehicles they supply for testing differ significantly from those available to purchase.

      Or have they already committed this sin by providing expensive and unavailable tires?

    • 0 avatar
      Alex L. Dykes

      The press fleet is not a group of perfect cars with glossy paint and performance mods to make them faster than what you’d find at a dealer. In reality the modern press fleet is a high-class rental car service. The cars have no special attention taken before delivery other than making sure they are clean. I always compare press cars to what is on the lot and so far I have yet to see a difference with the exception of pre-production cars which usually suffer from plastics color mismatching or strange groupings of options that aren’t possible in the final product.

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        As someone who used to handle journalist requests for press fleet cars, I agree with Alex and Ronnie. This isn’t the Sixties when Pontiac sent the magazines GTOs, Firebirds and Catalina 2+2s prepared by Royal Bobcat. I’m sure Lincoln did their best here == that’s what is so sad and distressing about Derek’s review.

  • avatar
    tjominy

    DK, first love the Mary Walton reference. I must have read Car three times, a book that honed my desire to be in the auto industry. Now question about the execution of the moonroof: obviously there are examples of cars with features that severely limit rear visibility, 500C, Beetle convertible, Evoque, etc, but is the feature savable with better execution? Would the moonroof going back farther have created better visibility? Much like paddle shifters, my guess is that few people will use the feature more than the first day of ownership.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    None of any of this matters because they sell and sell well, up 30% over a year ago and April sold the most MKZs since inception. I doubt Ford would care what anyone here thinks, because they want to sell cars to make money and apparently they are. So while we “fix” Lincoln, they’ll be too busy making and selling them to pay attention

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      Cadillac & Lincoln both moved plenty of craptastic product in the past and paid for it later, dearly.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Where are you getting those numbers from? The new MKZ is not a sales success at all. It does better than the other Lincoln products, but it is no where near up 30%.

      Here’s the most recent numbers:

      http://media.ford.com/images/10031/June13sales.pdf

      It was 1.4% up June ’12 to June ’13. YTD down .7.

  • avatar
    alexndr333

    Having never driven this car, I thought the only problem was the styling of the duck-tail rear. But if this particular car is an accurate representation of Ford’s latest effort on behalf of the Lincoln brand, Mr. Mullaly might not be quite the hero we have been making him out to be. And Mr. Akerson’s ham-fisted comments about Lincoln a year or so ago might be disappointingly prescient.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I really want to see Lincoln succeed. As a young teen I remember when the Mark VII came out and I was thinking what a great cruisemobile it would be. The Mark VIII was even better looking, and overall has aged well.

    This is just a horrible review – and there is no margin for error in this segment because the bread and butter and near luxury segments are so damn good in this space. Never mind the ridiculous price point, there has to be a modicum of pride in fit and finish, materials, and performance.

  • avatar
    JKC

    I would like to know why so many people are getting such crap mileage with the EcoBoost engines. (I get that Ford seems to have engineered them more for the EPA cycle than for the real world…) But that said, I bought an Escape with the 2.oL turbo 3 months ago and I’m getting in the mid-20′s with mixed suburban/highway/city driving. I’m not hypermiling, either. Maybe I’m just lucky, but the mileage hasn’t been all that bad.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Completely depends on how they are driven. Under load, they require added boost pressure to make more power and burn more fuel. Because they can make equivalent power to a larger, naturally aspirated engine, they still require the same amount of fuel to make that power. Where they can make up some ground in fuel economy is under light load where large displacement isn’t needed. A turbocharger design can be selected with a pump curve that doesn’t cause the turbine to spool much at lower speeds, so they operate more like a naturally aspirated 4 cylinder under light load conditions.

      So in short, the people getting sh1tty fuel mileage are driving them just as hard as they used to drive their V8s and are therefore getting similar mileage.

  • avatar
    Summicron

    Awesome number of comments for a dead brand.

    Puzzling… I think there’s more fondness for Lincoln on TTAC than there is at the dealerships forced to host them.

  • avatar
    redav

    Question: Is this the same MKZ as everyone was oohing-n-aahing when the new Fusion was called a “game changer”? Did they really screw it up that badly?

    Sort of explains the whole Jimmy Fallon tie-in, doesn’t it?

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Perhaps if Mr. Fallon would curate some more tweets about the MKZ that would boost the morale of suppliers and factory workers to improve quality issues.

      Either that or Sid the Cussing Rabbit from “The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson” could drive an MKZ into a brick wall and set it on fire. That to me would be infinitely more interesting than Mr. Fallon.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I wonder if its too late to restart the previous gen tooling and keep building those until a real replacement can be built.

    “Ford ought to “cancel this bitch” and get back to making something worthy of the brand.”

    Dear FoMoCo,

    Seems like you need some help regarding the botched launch of your new MKFusion.

    1. Lincoln is not Mercury, period. Pretending it is to string along dealers and kick the can further does not nothing but hurt FoMoCo in the long run.

    2. No gas only “Lincoln” should ever have a std 4-cyl, especially one with subpar gas milage, you are not Mercedes. Hybrid cars give people the option if they want to sip gas, if they value this over power let them choose the hybrid. You’ve gone the turbo route with Ford, and while I think you’ll pay for that later, regardless Lincoln should not offer the same as Ford and vice-versa.

    3. Selling Volvo was correct but selling Jaguar was foolish from a branding standpoint, but hindsight is always 20/20. Lincoln is all you have, so do to it what you would have done with Jaguar. Worth a shot because, well see point #1.

    4. People like names, be bold and become the only near luxury brand outside of Buick and use them. Start with renaming MKS to “Continental” and restyling it somewhere between the mid 80s Fox Conti and mid 90s DN Conti, your current styling sucks monkey balls. The last Conti was FWD so keeping the model intact as-is should be ok from the sales standpoint, I’m sure the same 47 people will keep leasing year after year.

    5. You haven’t attempted to introduce a real Lincoln in at least a decade. Your last attempt, LS, was a half-hearted attempt to be wannabe BMW with a Jaguar platform and engine IIRC. This might have worked if you hadn’t bugled it, but you did. Time for real mainstream “Lincoln” to come out, MKFusion isn’t it.

    5. Cadillac was wise to come out with ATS when they did, its just the thing for enthusiasts but also seems to be popular in the mainstream crowd as well. I have been critical of GM in the past for the Cadiilac metamorphosis but I have to give them credit here because they understand 90% of the buying public is *incredibly stupid*. They like the idea of a “sporty” sedan to drive 23mph in traffic 2 hours a day, but the vast majority will NEVER drive them in they way they were intended. So they build a car that can meet those needs, thus making enthusiasts and the plebs happy for the twice a year they open it up. Your MKFusion is about a stones throw away from rental status simply because it is redundant in the wake of Fusion and MKTaurus. All three are FWD with AWD options, incredibly overpriced, and vary only in drive-train and styling.

    I suggest:

    1. Cancel MKFusion in the next 2 years and continue MKS as Continental in its place.
    2. Pull some other sort of platform out of your hat and designate it *Lincoln only*
    3. Offer this platform as RWD/AWD with std V6 and opt V8 as a sedan and coupe/conv option. You may already be moving in this direction, but if not get to it.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Great recommendations, but I doubt if Ford is even open to suggestions, although, eventually, even Ford had to concede that Mercury was redundant.

      I am suggesting that Lincoln is redundant as a separate brand and the fact that Lincoln (and Cadillac) want to compete against “luxury” brands like BMW, Mercedes, Audi, Lexus, Infiniti and Acura is just preposterous. Too much bad history there. Too many skeletons in the closet for way too many decades.

      I know the fan boys will loudly proclaim that there is a place for Lincoln and Cadillac, and I agree with that, but both are just tarted up vehicles based on lower-tier bread&butter cars. In the past each was a truly unique entity of its own with distinctive styling, ride, handling and power plants.

      Neither brand will sell enough copies to carry their manufacturer and compared to whatever else is available at those price points, neither are players. Wannabees, maybe. Players? No. They both share a special niche, all their own: “American luxo-iron. Reflections of a once-great class of cars rapidly fading.”

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        In what way are Cadillacs other than the XTS “based on lower-tier cars?” The ATS and CTS are both riding on a platform unique to Cadillac (for now). The SRX shares a few bones with the Equinox but is no more related to it than an Audi A6 is to a Euro Passat.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The SRX may not quite be the straight up Chevy clone Escalade was, but I’m sure if one goes looking many common components could be found. The two Sigma cars are unique to Cadillac, which was wise move for serial rebadger GM.

      • 0 avatar
        MLS

        Including Infiniti and Acura alongside BMW, MB, Audi, and Lexus is also just preposterous.

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        Good ideas. Mulally was open to such thinking and made similar lineup changes when he first took over. I’d hate to think that 16 profitable quarters has turned him as arrogant and tone-deaf as traditional Ford executives. Or that Mullet Boy, clearly the Chosen One, is ignoring the glaring problems and thinking he’s some kind of genius.

        Am I wrong to think that when FoMoCo stock hits $25, it will be a good time to cash out and put it into my daughter’s 529 plan?

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “Am I wrong to think that when FoMoCo stock hits $25, it will be a good time to cash out and put it into my daughter’s 529 plan?”

          No, you’re not wrong.

          I did something similar in 2008, at the height of the market, before GM and Chrysler died.

          But it took courage on my part to divest myself of something that I had invested and believed in for so long.

          What I did, was to get out of all my investment vehicles in toto, close my portfiolio and zero out my beta-risk by converting it all to cash, paid off all my life insurance policies and applied for social security retirement beginning at age 62 to supplement my military retirement and VA disability incomes.

          Everyone’s situation is different, but for me, pulling out of the markets was the best financial solution for me and my financial situation.

          So, I had a good outcome. Hope you do too.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      They had the platforms and thats what makes me sad. Why can’t a Lincoln Continental have similar underpinnings to an XJ. Why can’t there be a Mark IX or X based on the XF. Ford payed for the development of those platforms and got nothing out of it.

      An all aluminium Continental, with a Coyote V8, that looks like the recent Continental concept, would certainly be a start.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I am very much in agreement but one thing I learned from TTAC is auto mfgs need volume to survive and typically only produce the truly excellent halo cars/niche cars when the chips are way up. Ford is doing surprisingly well, but still faces an uncertain future. All they need is one scandal on the bread and butter cars and market share drops. Lincoln needs a entry/mid level volume car like MkFusion (or ATS or Verano in the GM stables) in order to survive. I suggest they go back to some of those awesome could-have-beens in the past ten years and build one.

  • avatar
    gottacook

    “Luckily, [the retractable roof] is an option that can be avoided, but so much of Lincoln’s sales proposition as a premium car seems to be based on this feature.”

    The emphasis on the roof to sell the car may be less today, according to the one metric that I hear most often: the “Lincoln Motor Company” sponsorship announcements on the local NPR affiliate. Used to include the phrase “Featuring a retractable roof on the Lincoln MKZ” (whether standard or optional wasn’t mentioned); today, it’s simply “Introducing the Lincoln MKZ” (never mind that this is the second introduction of the second body style for this car).

    I would be interested to know what proportion of MKZs are sold with this pricey option, and whether that’s changed over time.

  • avatar
    redliner

    If the sunroof is so bad you could, you know, just get a regular sunroof.

    And as to the rest of the issues, pictures/video or it didn’t happen.

  • avatar
    rickyc

    I wouldn’t buy any car(let alone a premium one) made in Mexico, Mexicans are good at many things building cars isn’t one of them.

  • avatar
    Halftruth

    Ok.. More vitriol for the poor MKZ. A friend bought one and I am going to visit soon (and hope to get a test drive so that I can share my experiences with it). I won’t jump on the bash-wagon just yet. They appear to be selling now that production has caught up and I do hope they fix the quality issues with the car. It’s not my cup of tea but folks are buying to some extent so there must be something to it.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    That’s a good-looking car. My neighbor has one that looks just like it (same color and everything) and he loves it. For an American car, I have to give it two thumbs up as far as the styling. Can’t say much else about it though.

  • avatar
    probert

    I recently rented a Ford escape eco and it is one of the worst cars I have ever driven. Press the weirdly heavy gas pedal- nothing – nothing – sudden surge. It was impossible to smoothly operate. By the end of my trip I was using the cruise control to accelerate and decelerate whenever possible.

    Throw in massive understeer and a flexible frame and – what with all the creaking and groaning – I felt I was driving my Aunt Edna.

    Then there were the geegaws. I think they threw everything in there and hoped something would stick. Charge a phone and warnings would come up “can’t synch etc.” OK shut up I’m just charging – 5 clicks later I’m back at the home screen. Then the radio turns on at random moments- just stfu.

    I was camping so I had to access the car at night – every light comes on – leds on the mirrors, rear tail, rear plate, front fog, interior, interior touch screens. No way to disable. Oh, the one light not included – an overhead in the rear cargo area – gee that might have helped.

    What a rolling piece if absolute shit. I finally came to pity it. I felt its groans and creaks were cries for help or just a plea to “kill me”. I was angry at the engineers for bringing such a horror to life and flinging it into the world where villagers will chase it with torches and it will know only scorn.

    Shame because it’s a pretty good looking car.

  • avatar

    I’m disappointed you didn’t test the hybrid powertrain. After all, that is offered at no extra charge, and it makes this a kinda interesting car – the only luxury marque vehicle with a hybrid offered at a relatively reasonable price.

    If I seek a luxury make with superior fuel economy, this seems like it should be something worth considering.

    Mercedes doesn’t have such a car, and BMW has a 3-series hybrid which seems outrageously expensive (and which I would like to see TTAC review).

    Judging by your much more favorable Fusion hybrid review, I would think the MKZ Hybrid at least has a chance at being an interesting car. Maybe you should wait a few months and see if they can fix their quality glitches over time.

    D

    • 0 avatar
      LectroByte

      > the only luxury marque vehicle with a hybrid offered at a relatively reasonable price.

      The Lexus ESh is a direct competior in price to the MKZ. But to be fair, the Lexus dealers usually don’t have “cash on the hood” like the Lincoln dealers, as they say here.

  • avatar
    noreaster

    Still? Before I bought my diesel Rabbit in the early 80′s, I shopped a Ford Escort. Obviously low power wasn’t a problem, but the transmission was. Shifting the manual felt like stirring a bowl of porridge, and with just about as much effect. I literally couldn’t tell a difference between the gears. Then, before I bought my Honda Accord in the early 90′s, I shopped the Taurus SHO… or tried to. Every one on the dealer’s lot was broken in some way. The only one drivable (barely) had a disconnected speedo and a broken sun roof. The sales guy wouldn’t let me take it over about 25 MPH for fear of it ripping off. There was all new cars, mind you. I’ve never shopped a Ford since… though I did sit in a F-150 once before coming to my senses. “Quality is Job One” seemed more like a warning than a boast, given the quality that I’ve encountered.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    CR found the Fusions they purchased to have “appalling” build quality. They did not have the same issue with the MKZ variation.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    Got one of these thru Enterprise after a botched online reservation left me with no car at the airport. QC was abysmal. Even worse than the usual Impalabus I’m used to driving–which seem to be derived directly from their pickup brethren.

    Rattle in the dash, crappy panel fit, drove about as well as a Camry or Accord. Wasn’t fast.

    The infotainment was incomprehensible and I couldn’t even get the radio to work without surfing the web with my phone and getting a youtube video explaining how to do so. Fuel econ was terrible.

    Slick tires were a nightmare in the late Spring Denver blizzards.

    I honestly thought this turd retailed for 25-30k. I nearly s^&* myself when I realized that these things sell for close to 50.

  • avatar
    fozone

    Wow, quite a review.

    I don’t know anything about Ford and its corporate structure, but I do know a little about large companies.

    Based on the apparent lack of care with the design and execution of the car, i’m almost wondering if Ford exiles their “B-team” to work on Lincolns vs their global brands? Like it is some form of corporate humiliation? “Hey, you hear Bob got sent over to Lincoln? …. No way, poor guy!”

  • avatar

    Wow! What a review Derek! I think writing reviews is not not your cup of tea. You had a car for a week and came up with this lame so called review? You are not a good writer you know that? And why not just take rental and give us real world review with relevant information?

    The whole thing reminds me the Hate Session from 1984 or hysteria around Zimmerman case. Someone said something and everybody jumps in to bash Ford, with vigor. I wonder how Ford is able to make record profits if there is so much vitriol against Ford in America.

    I recently test drove MKZ hybrid. But after reading all this garbage I have no interest in sharing my impressions anymore. I joined TTAC when Farago was still in charge and at that time comments here were the most intelligent ones you could find on the web. But it was in the past. Everything eventually gets old and dies. Either decent people left TTAC to better places or TTAC is now flooded with typical internet trolls who outnumber everyone else. Where are all good writers gone? Where is Michael Karesh? I enjoyed his reviews.

    • 0 avatar

      “I wonder how Ford is able to make record profits if there is so much bad feeling against Ford in America.”

      It’s called the F-150.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        That, and Ford is actually better received and evaluated than either GM or Chrysler.

        But I hasten to add that Chrysler’s Grand Cherokee and 300 are also cash cows for Fiat because of the engineering and design inputs from when Daimler owned Chrysler.

      • 0 avatar

        Of course, it is F-150, that clunky piece of junk. How I could forget. I know as a matter of fact that Ford sells all it’s substandart cars (except F-150) at loss and 80% of them go to fleets at huge discount and rest have industry record rebates on the hood.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    After reading this review, I decided to look into a MKZ as a replacement for my 1995 Altima. After a test drive comparing directly with my current wheels I gotta say, whatta car! See, it’s all relative.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I know exactly what you mean. I also had such an AHA! moment after test driving a 2010 Tundra 5.7 in Dec 2010, and then having to drive home in my clunky, rattle-trap 2006 F150.

  • avatar
    thomser

    Someone mentioned the Malibu .
    My experience is limited, I only drove a rental once for about 1k miles, years ago .

    No time to go into detail, sorry, but that’s easily been the worst car I ever had to drive .
    Apart from a Ford Ranger, but of course that thing makes everything look good .
    Brakes, engine, suspension, gearbox – weak comes to mind, unsafe, annoying and backwards .

    Before and after the Malibu and Ranger, there have been quite a few rental cars I had to drive, mainly in the US and Europe .

    Well, this car blog has gone from pretending to be international to US only recently, so I’m wasting your time I guess .

    Just saying, if driving a car is your thing, that Lincoln seems to be a lot like a Malibu . You make it go to your destination, just don’t try and drive it .

    Trouble is, guys in pickup trucks will tailgate you; if it’s a Ranger, they’ll go off the road very soon .
    If it’s something else, the weight might keep them on the road; but if they don’t run out of gas, and keep looking for trouble – steady eye contact is more than truck drivers can cope with .
    Just don’t race them – you don’t have the car to race a donkey , even when it’s a monkey with cheap tats and a scraggly beard riding it .

    Remember: no karma points for slapping around a fat or skinny hillbilly, bad ink is no excuse either .

  • avatar
    xavier1814

    I read the “review.” What’s interesting is that it seems as if the reviewer never drove the car. He talked about looking at the car. He discussed previous biases. He talked about opening the sunroof. Yet, he never once spoke about actually driving the car. Based on these facts, I can’t take his “review” seriously. It seems he had a preconceived opinion, looked at the car, and basically wrote hate mail. That is journalism at its worst.

    I have driven the car. It shares the same chassis as the Fusion, but I drove the 3.7 liter V6, which isn’t available on the Fusion. It’s a strong engine and the car drives nicely. It is not as sporty as an ATS, a 3 series, or a C-Class, but it doesn’t try to be. It has inferior handling to those cars, as well. It has a similar approach to luxury as a Lexus or an Acura. It actually drives better than either of those cars, each of which has an identical feel to its Toyota and Honda cousins. The V6 MKZ does not drive like a Fusion.

    The biased journalist also mentions that the sunroof impacts rear visibility. This is true, but it is an option. Anyone who chooses it, will know that. What he does not mention is that the driver can indeed see out of the rear window with the sunroof open. He also did not mention that the sunroof automatically opens wider at 60 mph to allow for better visibility on the highway. He also fails to mention that the open panoramic sunroof provides an impressive amount of light and air into the already airy interior.

    My point is that in two paragraphs, I’ve given a more thorough review than the weak attempt by the journalist. His review holds no validity because there is no proof that he has driven the car or seen it beyond the showroom.

    • 0 avatar

      “Fails the mention” – it perfectly characterizes this review. This low quality review would never pass in any serious publication. The whole things sounds like a bogus is if reviewer went to dealership, looked at the car and did not even test drove it. In any case, why Lincoln would provide defective car? Why would they provide any car to someone with no journalistic credentials from some web blog?

      • 0 avatar
        CelticPete

        I have to agree. Not convinced the reviewer even drove this car – nevermind that he had it for a week. This is the second time I have gotten that same feeling from a review..

        This site loves to bash the mainstream press but they seem to do a much better job of reviewing cars. I am sorry. I even like Jalopnik reviews better. Again you get the idea that they really drove the car.

        • 0 avatar
          CelticPete

          After reading the SRT review I am convinced Derek did drive this car. So I apologize for my previous comment.

          I’d like to read more about how the car drives and feels on the road – if its exactly like Fusion or if it softer etc.

          Its not a pure badge job so it should be a little different right? The way this capsule review was written really did sound like an angry Ford hater was bashing it.

          Now maybe it does deserve it but we need more backaround. I am of the opinion that most cars are good nowdays. The least favorite car I have driven of late was a Rental Altima. But it was still decent..

          The second least favorite was an Jetta with the 2.0 slow engine and the torsion spring rear. But you know what it handled pretty decently.

          Its so rare to find a 50k that flat out sucks. My g/f bough her self a 40k Audi – I was dubious at first but after driving it around its actually fairly fun to drive and comfortable – and feels put together well.

          Extraordinary claims demand extraordinary evidence..

  • avatar
    CelticPete

    I haven’t driven one yet. Hard to imagine its this bad though… I am generally down on Ford. Without the bailout they seem to be left at a comparative disadvantage compared to the other two car companies.

    Anyway stop reviewing this boring ass car – and review the new Corvette. We need a baseline car to see if its really the review or the reviewer at this point..

  • avatar
    RatherhaveaBuick

    I wouldn’t touch this car with a 20ft pole even if I had the money. The current MKS is a nicer car entirely, regardless of the Sync nonsense. This thing is just plain hideous, and as soon as I saw the first ads for it (Lincoln trying to be all hip and relevant…) I knew it would be a dud.

    The only folks I’ve seen driving them are elderly. I’m surprised they can even work the dashboard.

    I don’t like the XTS at all, terrible interior and whale like chubby styling.

    Regarding the full size American sedan, since the death of the last real Lincoln, the beloved Town Car, the Chrysler 300 seems to be the best choice.

    I like the Taurus as well, but its showing its age.

  • avatar
    IcoHolic

    This is quite possibly the worst car review I have ever read.

    1) The gas cap door opens…. what you’re suggesting is that at no time in the history of automobiles has the odd trivial thing ever broken? So you have a busted door on the car, get it fixed and move on.

    2) The roof does block the rear window, but you have side mirrors to see behind you at a distance. Your review mirror is more than adequate to see what’s behind you at a close distance. I guess you’re not all that good at driving a car.

    3) The push button shifting… the car isn’t a ferrari about to do a quarter mile. You seriously can’t wait 0.5 seconds for the car to start before pressing the button? At no point do you mention the positives of the push button system in regards to center console design and space.

    4) Saying this car does nothing better than the Fusion also proves you came into this review ready to hate the car.

    The interior is far more comfortable and luxurious, the dampening system of the car really changes the characteristics of the driving experience. The low interior noise is very welcomed. The audio system is very cool. The 3.7 AWD option you don’t get on the Fusion.

    Again, this review provides nothing factual outside of your inability to be unbiased.

    • 0 avatar
      mars3941

      I agree with you 100%,see my comments that followed yours. This reporter needs to get out of the automotive field. He doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

  • avatar
    mars3941

    Whoever wrote this report on the new Lincoln MKZ is an idiot. All the customer and owner feedbacks on this car has been outstanding and it was just named best entry level luxury car by Consumer Reports. It appears this writer has a vandetta towards Ford Motor Co and Lincoln Motor Co. in particular and they must have really pissed him off sometime in the past. As for pricing of this car, one can purchase a well equipped MKZ for under 40K with most of the luxury creature comforts people want and require and they will get a 4 year 50000 mile bumper to bumper warranty plus roadside assistance for 7 years 70000 miles.I own the previous generation MKZ and it is without a doubt the most trouble free and enjoyable car I have ever owned. I had many cars over the years and not one of them could hold a candle to the Lincoln.

  • avatar
    mars3941

    Derek, perhaps you should start your own cooking show and blog. I understand there’s an opening. It’s obvious you don’t know jack about automobiles

  • avatar
    Birkeland

    I drove this car with the V6 as a rental for 4000 miles this summer. I didn’t hate it, I actually really liked it. Should I write a review maybe? I can already see the beginning of the review. Headline: “4000 miles in TTAC’s most hated car.” “After the Pontiac Aztek has gotten some newfound love on TTAC, the 2013 MKZ sails up as the number one hate object on the site. But does it really suck that bad?” It would probably be a boring review. And since my DD is a ten year old Škoda and don’t have too many other things to compare the MKZ to, it would probably be a useless review as well. But I do believe the MKZ in many ways is pretty great.

  • avatar
    kenyon

    This review is a shame, very incomplete and biased, the author must be getting his paycheck from Japanese export association or similar. I own Lincoln MKZ (2013 hybrid version). MKZ doesn’t have issues with back or side view, no more issues with it than any other convertible or open-roof car. Reasonable people open the glass roof when they drive low-speed in the city, and close it on highway and the back view is the same as in all other sedans. The touch screen is very convenient no prints issue if you use the soft cloth once a month, and I love the “no-shift” push-button controls. The reviewer clearly didn’t drive other competitors or tried to price them: Lexus ES is at least $5K more loaded, BMW 3 series is at least 7K more loaded and Infinity beginner sedan is at least 10K more. Except for the Infinity (which comes 60K+ with same features as MKZ), Lincoln easily competes with rest of competitors: is a quiet as Audi A4 and A6 (BMW 3 series is a roaring disaster comparing to MKZ), is delivers a softer cushier ride than Lexus ES 350h and is cheaper. It has the same comfortable interior and is by far the most practical car among all of them. I have all features but the premium sound and I paid 42K for my MKZ, I was just doing my research of their specials and cash return programs. Our German friends also own MKZ hybrid and they never had any issues with it, in fact, they recommended us the car (although I was an Audi person before).

  • avatar
    mars3941

    Tomorrow, the 28th I’am taking my previous generation trouble free MKZ in for it’s 24K service and I’am going to look at, sit in, do a walkaround and maybe even drive one if the salesman offers so I’ll give you a real report, not some anti Lincoln MKZ pack of misinformed lies.

  • avatar
    segfault

    “And I’m not the only one – Lincoln had so little faith in this car, that they had to pump up early driving impressions by putting Ferrari 599 GTO-spec Michelin Pilot Super Sport tires on the car. Even then, nobody was fooled.”

    If they’re equipping press cars with summer tires that aren’t commonly available on retail vehicles, it’s a fraud on anyone who will read the review. Combine that with their phony MPG numbers on the C-max, and I think a few people at Ford need to reexamine their moral compass.

  • avatar
    jfinftw1982

    I just test-drove a fully loaded 3.7 MKZ, fwd. It drove great, looked great, but the interior was cheap. Also, I counted five different rattles in the car. I don’t know if it was because this car had the HUGE panoramic sunroof option, or not. It just rattled, and I was turned off. However, the transmission did thunk when put into ANY gear. Tell me why, a brand new $50,000 car that’s supposed to save a brand made the interior quality of my 2008 Saab 9-3 Aero seem PERFECT? I was left completely nonplussed.

  • avatar
    jrasero23

    So just picked up a CPO 2011 Lincoln MKZ AWD. So some background, I am 27 Asian and my last car was a 2010 Accord EX-L V6.

    I wouldn’t say I am in Lincoln’s typical demographic but I still believe the Lincoln name stands for something and I like the handsome toothy grill and loads of standard features.

    Living in the North East I felt like I needed an AWD car which Honda doesn’t make unless you upgrade to an Acura TL and I wanted to upgrade to a four door since the coupe life was becoming a pain.

    I’ve been to multiple Lincoln dealers and one of the questions I am asked is why I don’t want a “new” MKZ and my reasoning for buying a used MKZ is because Lincoln doesn’t hold it value well, so a new overpriced Lincoln after a few years becomes a good lower cost CPO car. Secondly while I love the new generations spaceship design and options, the new MKZ has some kinks that need to be ironed out.

    I asked how the new MKZ was selling and all the dealers said very well, and the problem is lack of stock. This could explain some quality issues, but I think its deeper than lack of quality control but rather lack of thought. The push to drive system is futuristic like the modern touch controls on the dash or even the spaceship styling, but it also might be ahead of its time. The average Lincoln buyer was at least 60, and was the type of person you associate with Lincoln, old and loyal and loves cars with power and comfort. With this being said it was funny to see salespeople try to explain the push to drive system to people. An older women test driving a car was in the parking lot for 25 minutes trying to get it in reverse. My point being, even if the push to drive system didn’t have lag, the system itself might be too advanced for the typical Lincoln customer right now, which is something Lincoln needed to think of.

    I have test driven the new Lincoln MKZ car and its very good, but there relies the problem, you can’t be just very good when your marketing yourself as a luxury car company and not near luxury and when you hope to compete directly with Lexus. Also, its one thing to have little things wrong with the paint or finish of the car, but then to ask a premium price similar to Japanese and German rivals is a very hard sell. Not that Buick is a business to totally emulate but, Lincoln needs to either bring a better complete product to the market or they need to compete with price like Buick, allowing new generations to buy into the Lincoln legacy.

    On another note, after driving my 2011 MKZ I feel that the MKZ has gotten a bad rap for being too close to the Fusion Sport. First little things like leather and interior are totally different in the MKZ, in a good way. The Fusion Sport to me came off cheap and toyish with its blue/red leather and dash. While the MKZ has real wood or aluminum trim and Bridge of Weir leather. Yes the car drives fairly similar, but my Accord drove 90% like a TL.

    So word of advise wait for the next years model for kinks to be smoothed out or get a CPO s you don’t ask yourself or have people asking you why you bought a Lincoln for $40K when you could have got a Japanese or German luxury car.


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