By on June 28, 2013

2014 Ford F-150 Tremor

The standard cab, short bed pickup is a rare breed these days. Most trucks that leave the dealer lot tend to be an extended cab, if not a four-door crew cab, with a longer bed and all the bells and whistles typically seen on a luxury vehicle. For a couple years, Ram has had the monopoly on a hot version of the standard cab with the Ram Express, a Hemi powered no-frills Ram, which starts at just $23,400. Not anymore.

Today, Ford announced the introduction of the F-150 Tremor. Silly moniker aside, the Tremor is a standard cab short bed truck that is explicitly aimed at “sport truck” enthusiasts. I always thought that crowd died away with the mini-truck era, but the combination of a 3.5L Ecoboost motor and a 4.10 rear axle ratio is an enticing one – don’t expect it to get anywhere near the vaunted fuel economy numbers that the taller-ratio equipped cars are apparently capable of. Power for the EcoBoost remains unchanged at 360 horsepower and 420 lb-ft of torque, while the car gets FX4-style black alloy wheels, Boss 302-esque graphics and some loud paint hues.

ramexpress

The Express is pretty much as different as it gets. Rather than the newfangled EcoBoost, there’s an old-fashioned Hemi V8 breathing through dual exhausts. The fancy 8-speed ZF auto available on other Ram models is not available, nor is the big UConnect touch screen or any sort of “soft touch” interior. It’s all black plastic and the most basic head unit, with a 6-speed automatic as the sole gearbox. Outside, it’s indistinguishable from any other mid-grade Ram. No badges, no stripes, no alloys. You can even get it in a crew cab if you want, though this pushes the price up another $10,000.

What would you take?

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89 Comments on “Ford F-150 Tremor Vs Ram Express: Battle Of The Standard Cabs...”


  • avatar
    Tomifobia

    Ram, thank you. I’m too old for silly striping packages, and I just can’t trust a turbo in the long-term, no matter what kind of fancy name they give it. Plus, Ford’s Tonka Truck styling just never appealed to me.

    • 0 avatar
      cwallace

      Yep. The Ram has the “chrome won’t get you home” swagger of a vehicle that doesn’t need tape stripes and spiffy wheels to get its point across.

    • 0 avatar
      ronhawk62

      I think the Ram would be my choice, not only because it looks much better but the thought of the turbo in the Ford scares me. I know the hemi wears like iron, the jury is still out on the Eco boost.

      • 0 avatar
        maxxcool7421

        I’d be MUCH more worried about the german tranny than the garret turbo.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Give it 2 to 3 years at most (it’s already actually started), and we’ll all look back and have a strong consensus view that Ford managed to destroy whatever reputation for reliability it may have once held with even a plurality of the car/truck buying public via the introduction and widespread use of ecoboosted motors.

          A high failure rate (and high cost of repair/replace rate) of Ecoboost motors + PowerShift Transmissions + various other MECHANICAL components is already beginning to create reams of the black circle of death in the reliability index of Consumer Reports, and we’re only in year 1 1/2 (in terms of mass produced, mass purchase purposes).

          That 3 to 5 year Ford vehicle reliability ranking is going to look nothing short of frightening.

          Does anyone wonder why Honda, Toyota, Mazda, etc. have never adopted wide scale use of turbocharged motors (instead offering those motors in very limited, niche application vehicles), despite the tremendous technical/engineering capabilities they possess?

          The correct answer is that it’s not easy nor cost-effective to adopt the widespread use of turbocharging in terms of mass market vehicles if long term reliability and longevity is the goal.

          Who wants to bet that Ford DID find a way to do what Honda, Toyota and Mazda dare not attempt, given their strong desire to keep their reliability rankings intact?

        • 0 avatar
          HeeeeyJake

          The Ram uses a Chrysler-designed and manufactured 545RFE automatic transmission that has no german parts or design lineage.

          The LX bodies (300, Charger) use an chryser design based in the mercedes WA5spd(but are being phased out for the german 8sp ZF transmission, also used by BMW Land Rover Jaguar and other high end makers as well as RAM trucks. This truck does not have that transmission: “The fancy 8-speed ZF auto available on other Ram models is not available…”

          So, basically, the ram, in the “as tested” configuration, has no “german tranny” as you describe, unless he/she is a passenger in the RAM, in which case your being worried is warranted.

          Regardless, I’d be very worried about the turbo.

          But which would be MORE FUN TO DRIVE?

  • avatar
    Pig_Iron

    No stick? No thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      noxioux

      +1

      I’d take the Ram in this case. But IMHO, a truck without a stick is only marginally more useless than a truck without 4×4.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        The only full size available with a stick these days, are HD rams with the Cummins. It’s a bloody insult, but then again insult is the world we live in.

        Of these two, I’d take the Ram. Ecoboost is cool for heavy towing, but in a Midnight Cowboy “attitude” truck, the Hemi roar is more important than ultimate low end tow torque.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I wonder why that F-150 looks quite like a toy model in the image…

  • avatar

    I think at one point Chrysler was offering a 6 speed manual with the 5.7 on a standard cab short-bed Ram. I would have taken that one, but none of these are of interest. If I must have a pickup, give me an F-150 Limited or whatever the equivalent is on the new GMC Sierra.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      John Rosevear,

      I’m fairly certain that Chrysler has never offered a manual transmission with the Hemi in the Ram 1500. You could get one for a time in a 2500/3500 but I do not think that is a possibility any longer. You could get a manual behind the 4.7L SOHC engine (I drive a 2002 model thus equipped, albeit a 5spd) but that went away a few years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        NMGOM

        cdotson – – –

        The only two “larger” pick-up trucks that I know about, with a 6-speed manual transmission (MT) option, here in America, are:
        1) Midsize: Nissan Frontier (which I bought for exactly that reason);
        2) Full-size: Ram 2500 (possibly 3500) with Cummins Diesel. See links:
        http://www.leftlanenews.com/new-car-buying/ram/2500/#
        http://www.caranddriver.com/news/2013-ram-2500-3500-hd-pickup-photos-and-info-news

        Although, for a while, I understood that the 2013 gasoline Ram 2500 could be ordered with the MT option too, but now I don’t see that officially available anymore. The current 6-speed in the diesel Ram 2500 is made by Daimler.

        http://www.ramtrucks.com/hostc/bmo/CUT201314DJ2H62A/2TG/options.do

        —————————–

    • 0 avatar
      ThirdOwner

      Just a couple of weeks ago a saw a printed ad for a 2013 2WD std cab Hemi-powered RAM with a 6-speed – in a Canadian newspaper. $19K advertised price.

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    Queue the “Egoboost” rants in 3…2…1…

  • avatar
    Spartan

    I knew this was coming. Great package for under $30k, at least I hope it’ll be under $30k. Should be a rocket with that 4.10 rear end and EB power.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The standard cab F-150 already tops out at $30K for the 5.0 V8 XLT. Which wouldn’t be a bad alternative to the Tremor. With the optional 3.73 limited slip of course.

      The Tremor brings a new level of luxury, electronics and performance to the standard cab F-150, though. And dealers will likely pile on the options like they do the Raptor. You’ll be lucky to get it for under $40K.

      • 0 avatar
        IHateCars

        Raptor comes pretty much loaded as is….only options really are beadlock wheels, a moonroof, interior accent bits and front camera.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Moonroof should really be standard on a truck that starts at $43,900, IMO. BTW EPA fuel ratings are 11/16 [!]

          • 0 avatar
            MLS

            While I like sunroofs, I suppose some people don’t. It’s not like anyone’s going to worry about compromising headroom in a pickup, though.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I suppose there will be customers who as you point out, would rather delete the sunroof in their truck. I think it should be standard and then if deleted be a credit for other options.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The EB being a rocket for a truck, is a bit like the latest Lambo being quite a two rig, for a sports car.

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    RAM. Even suspecting that the Ford could smoke it at a stoplight (I have been personally smoked by plenty of turbo 4s).

    The V8 rumble is beautiful.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    The Ram. I like the toned down look better, plus I’ve never been crazy about the current styling of the Ford.

  • avatar
    gessvt

    Ram Express? I see what you did there, Fiatsler.

  • avatar
    mikey

    I’m not a bg fan of any truck configuration,that doesn’t include an 8 ft box. My buddy has a mint 2000 Chevy sport side. A very pretty truck. However, a couple of lawn chairs, and a cooler of beer, and the truck is nearly full. The short box just doesn’t do it for me.

    I like what Ford, and Dodge, have done,but for looks, give me a Chevy. I’d love to see GM allow for more trim options on the reg cab. Leather would be a nice start.

    GM might want to take note of what Ford a Dodge are doing,with the regular cab.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Then put a rolltop in the 6.5 footer, and the cannister eats up another foot……

      The reg cab 6.5 footers are the maximum length they’ll let into many urban parking structures, though. They’re the size of a Tahoe, while the 8’ers are longer than Suburbans.

      For 6′ or so people planning on sleeping in their bed, under a cap, there is an enormous difference between the 6’6 1/2 inch beds Ford, GM and Toyota used, versus the 6’4″ bed Ram uses. It’s a big glaring fault of the Ram for for example hunters planning on staying out a couple of nights.

      Another difference is Bedside height. Ford and Toyota is a few inches taller than Ram. Which, for average sized people mean they have a much harder time reaching into the bed from the sides. And if they do manage to do it, all the dirt that accumulates on bedrails, will now add flavor to the sweat stains under their shirt’s armpits…. While the Ram guys, if installing a rolltop or tonneau, will soon realize that Mr. Murphy has arranged it so that absolutely everything they need to carry are just one inch too tall to close the top over….. GM’s bed sides are somewhere in the middle.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Only 8? Bring back the Longhorn.

    • 0 avatar

      You can step up to the SLT ram and get regular cab 8′ box Haven’t seen many around thou around here it’s sport truck buyers and landscape companies that buy reg cabs and the landscapers go for 3/4 tons

  • avatar
    JMII

    If the Tremor was really a “sport truck” it would be sitting about 4″ lower. A small family could hide in those wheel wells! I assume the Tremor is only available in 2 wheel drive so don’t tell me it needs this much ground clearance. Once again “sport truck” or just “stripped truck”… two different things. I once owned a Ranger Splash and it was a sport truck: short step side bed, 4.0l V6, shorter gears, loud graphics, bucket seats, etc.

  • avatar
    The Soul of Wit

    In times of $4 per gallon gas, these anachronistic thirsty beasts are not likely to sell well…

    • 0 avatar

      You’d think so, but even in Canada, where gas is closer to $5/gallon, the F-150 and Ram consistently top the sales charts

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        I am shocked by the number of full size trucks, right here in the Greater Toronto Area. It might be different in downtown. Out here in the Burbs..trucks rule. Some people just drive, what they want to drive, and they are willing to pay the price. I don’t see a problem.

        • 0 avatar

          There’s a lot of trucks downtown as well. Personally, I love full-size trucks. I’d take one over a BOF SUV.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Everyone and their brother drives Compensation Specials around here…

            3/4 or 1 ton, 4 door cab even if they drive the truck alone, off-road package even though the truck never touches dirt, diesel engine for un-needed pulling power…

            I don’t need to compensate for anything, but I would like an old F250 4×4 with the 300 I6.

          • 0 avatar
            Dimwit

            It’s the value proposition and the space. If you’ve never sat in the back of the crewcab it’s a revelation. Tons of space and with the vertical back the headroom is enormous. Yeah, kids don’t care but any adult loves it! And it’s a good value for the money. When the average SUV is going out the door for $40k and I saw a GC advertised for over $70K!!!!, it’s tough to look cross-eyed at a p/u going for $25-30K nicely optioned.

          • 0 avatar

            Oh I have. My friend who is 6’6 can extend his legs straight out while sitting in the back seat and the front seat is in my driving position. It’s overkill for what I need but like I said, it’s more compelling to me than a “real” SUV.

          • 0 avatar
            MLS

            Ah, the old “compensation” canard. How original!

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            If you don’t like trucks, blame government retardocrats setting speed limits for everyone low enough so that there is no dynamic penalty from driving a 1940s WW2 military truck around.

            People would still buy trucks, because they are great vehicles for lots of stuff. but it’s awfully hard to try “compensating” for something when everyone else flies by you like you’re standing still wherever you go.

            I don’t quite understand the monster cab, mini bed chrome sleds on 22s some people seem to gravitate to; particularly when one can have a perfectly good regular cab work truck IN ADDITION to an equally good minivan for the price of one of them. But till, the sad part is; why bother with dynamically superior vehicles when all you’ll ever get out of them are fines; and you still have to pay taxes to fix the roads that are being worn down by Midnight Cowboys, hauling the combined weight of their gut and over sized belt buckle, in some pimp’s fantasy of what a Smokey and the Bandit era Peterbilt would be like.

            And, government being what they are, I’m sure they’ll manage to neuter halftons, and perhaps even HDs, to the point where the belt buckle mafia will have to upsize to Class 6 diesels to feel confident enough to brave the roads. And those won’t be taxed as hard, because all good progressives have been told all their lives, that those guys somehow “need” to spew out pollutants, that the rest of us don’t. After all, those guys that own trucking companies can afford to send their kids to the same schools as politicians, contribute to campaigns and stuff…..

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @NoGoYo – Why is it OK for you to drive an OLD compensation and NOT OK for my brother or I to drive NEW compensations???

  • avatar
    jco

    i think short box standard cabs aren’t popular because there are better choices. if it’s your work truck, chances are you want the longer bed and/or an extended cab for secure storage. if you have a family and you’re limited to two cars for budget or space reasons, it gets hard to justify spending that money on something that not everyone can ride in. however tempting it may be to make the kids ride in the bed, it isn’t legal..

    to me it would be like having a roadster as your only car. 95% of the time you won’t have any problems, but that other 5% where you need to move more than one person does factor in. though at least with a truck you can’t use the “need to move stuff” argument.

    • 0 avatar
      Mandalorian

      I agree 100%. With truck being so expensive in this day and age, for many it is hard to justify buying two vehicles, and one that performs both roles is hard to not justify.

      • 0 avatar
        Firestorm 500

        Quote: “With truck being so expensive in this day and age…”

        I can buy new trucks all day long for $18K. That’s not expensive in this day and age.

        You can’t hardly buy a bare bones 4 pot car for that.

  • avatar
    LBJs Love Child

    I would have to drive them both to make a choice based on something other than brand allegiance.

  • avatar
    Searcher

    I’ll admit to being interested in the idea of the Tremor. I liked the First-gen Lightnings though the styling of the second didn’t do much for me. It was the fact that it IS a turbo engine that piqued my interest, not that the Hemi is bad or anything. Not caring for the stripe package but that’s what heat guns are for.

  • avatar
    Junebug

    Tremors? you mean that movie about those big worms that live underground – now that was first class sci-fy right there.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    The academic advantage goes to the Ford. The truck does not need the turbo all the time. In fact in regular daily use the turbo would contribute / run 10 to 15% making longevity issues moot.
    The Ram, on the other hand with the V7, because of the autobox, still has to feed gas to 8 cylinders all the time.
    Having said that my choice would be the Ram… Actually I would go for the V6 diesel discussed on another posting today ;-)

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Doesn’t the Ram have cylinder deactivation in addition to fuel cutoff any time crank shaft speed exceeds idle and the throttle is closed?

      • 0 avatar
        MLS

        Yes. And variable camshaft timing.

      • 0 avatar
        Beerboy12

        If so, I am not sure that would still beat a 6 cylinder. Each cylinder as a great deal of friction and mass that would save gas if De-activated but still require the remaining, firing cylinders to work a bit harder to carry their “dead” friends.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Well, pickuptrucks.com recently ran a big 1/2 ton test.

          An EB Ford with a 3.73 rear end got 22.3 MPG empty and 10.9 towing.

          A HEMI RAM 8-speed with a 3.55 rear end got 21.7 MPG empty and 10.4 towing.

          A new GMC Sierra 5.3 got 23.1 MPG empty and 12.5 towing.

          The GMC was about a second slower 0-60 than the RAM or Ford, which both had equal acceleration times.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Just got back from a trip to the Camp Pendleton/Oceanside/Fallbrook area, towing a 9X14 Haulmark utility trailer all the way. Roughly a 2700 mile roundtrip from beginning to end, and everything in between.

            I do not understand this obsession with 6-cyl trucks, no matter how they are dolled up.

            When I started with Inline6-cyl/3-on-the-tree manual tranny trucks way back when in the early sixties that was the norm. But with the advent of the V8/Automatic trucks, why would I ever want to go back to any 6-cyl fullsize halfton pickup truck?

            At present, my 2011 Tundra 5.7 is the best truck I have ever owned, bar none. If Tundra decides to drop the 5.7 in their future trucks because of EPA/CAFE mandates, I’ll trade mine for the best V8 truck I can find, when that time comes, no matter the brand, even if it turns out to be a 3/4-ton.

            BTW, fully loaded and pulling over mountain ranges and the desert flats on I-10, I AVERAGED 9.8mpg, and that’s with the AC set on high. I doubt seriously that an EB V6 would have fared as well.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    The point of sport trucks in the past was that pickups were the only good RWD platforms manufacturers had before the RWD resurgence. With the Mustang and Challenger there is no point to these except to spend more money to go slower, with much worse handling. And the rear seats in the Mustang and Challenger will be much more useful than the pickup bed that you can rent from U-Haul or Home Depot the one time a year it is needed.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I have a feeling that the Tremor is going to cost considerably more than the Express.

    If that’s a photo of the Canada Express, that’s a bit more downplayed than the US Express. Ours have HEMI badges, bright exhausts, body color grille, 20-in aluminum wheels (chrome optional), and usually white-letter tires. And, you can get Uconnect with a back-up camera on it.

    You don’t seem to get it in Canada, but in the US, Ram makes a “RAM R/T” for about $33K. It comes with a 4.10 rear end, a lot more exterior gingerbread, and more interior options. Probably a better comparison to the Ford.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    @MLS: Why else would a guy spend 60k on a glitzy diesel quad cab 4×4 that has capabilities beyond what he will ever need?

    I see plenty of guys using trucks like that at Lowe’s to pick up a few sheets of plywood, a couple bags of concrete, or other miscellaneous loads that a 1/2 ton would carry with ease.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      You CAN get a diesel with a proper tranny. Of course, you can also get proper trannies in midsize trucks, which would probably also fit a bag of concrete……..

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Yeah, I have nothing against the guys running landscaping crews or other such things that require a sizable rig, but if you’re sitting up there in your 60k truck by yourself, occasionally making trips to the local hardware store for random home projects, you must be compensating for something.

        Hell, these people are hauling loads that a Ranger could handle with ease.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          One nice thing about driving old, crude, solid axle turbo diesels with lag measured in minutes and non synchronized manuals; is that most people these days drive more dynamically capable cars so slowly and clumsily, that having a boat anchor of a truck makes it less frustrating to be stuck behind them. I’m still reeling from an incident of being stuck on a windy road behind a Panamera S. While driving a UHaul box van… And, at least in LA, everywhere you go, you’re basically just stuck behind someone driving their V8 “German sports sedan” in a manner that would insult a horse carriage operator back in more civilized times.

          Hence, the solution is; screw the speed limits. Once you can choose to commute to work in a bigrig, or get there twice as fast in a more appropriate car, things will sort themselves out.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Couldn’t I just buy a truck ’cause I like it? Why does there have to be a deep psychological reason for just wanting a truck? I bought an F-150 STX for my business years ago. When the business closed I kept the F-150 for years because I liked it, didn’t need it. Should I have gotten rid of it because someone thought they were a psycho-analyst and knew what my subconscious mind was really up to?… Does this person also know how I feel about people who claim to have me all figured out?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        NO you CANNOT own a truck just “’cause you like it”. Around here, you can ONLY own a 35 to 40 MPG FWD unless you want to be labeled a fool/insane/compensating/etc.

        But I guarantee you, the same asshats making all the noise about truck ownership, own a 5 or 7 series BMW of some vintage.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          I don’t…but if I bought a truck, I would only buy as much truck as I needed.

          I don’t run a business, I don’t haul things for a living, so I don’t need a diesel 1-ton quad cab…a regular cab half ton would suit me just fine.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            But if you liked the diesel 1-ton quad cab and you could afford it, shouldn’t you be able to buy it and enjoy it with out being scrutinized as to what manly shortcomings you must have? So, what do the well-endowed drive? ’cause maybe that’s what the rest of us should be driving to impress

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Looking at the volume of cars sold in the US compared to pickups it becomes apparent that there is more room for more manufacturers to sell pickups alongside the Big 3, Toyota and Nissan.

    Fiatsler Ram and Ford coming out with ‘small’ full size pickups indicates not only do they have extremely large model ranges, but also there is a large market for smaller pickups.

    So, my view let more midsizers in and have a closer look at Ford and Holden utes.

    Any increase in competition in the US pickup market should be welcomed by the consumer. This will not only give you more choice but will force the local US manufacturers to produce better product cheaper.

    The Ford and Ram look like nice pickups, but performance vehicles they are not. A Holden Maloo or even a Holden SS V8 ute would beat them on any race track. That’s if you want real performance from a pickup not just 0-60 and quarter mile times.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      You’ve gotta be fairly loopy to bring a pickup truck to a drag strip.

      To bring one to a racetrack, you’re about as far gone as someone heading for Moab in his new Ferrari.

      At least the drag strip does display some kind of motor strength that at least indirectly translates to hauling/towing power.

      But it would be kind of cool if the new fad for truck makers became doing timed runs around Nurburgring with a 20,000lb trailer in tow. If anything, that would get America’s hickbillies to pay some attention in German class….

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @stuki
        Have a look at these lap times and tell me if you wouldn’t like to own a Commodore Maloo ute. Check out the CARS it is nearly as quick as or quicker. It can still carry a couple of trail bikes or quad. This is something you don’t have in the US.

        I do think they have taken one around Nurburgring. Also, it’s the world’s quickest pickup (according to the Guiness World of Records).

        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Top_Gear_test_track_Power_Lap_Times

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @stuki
        This link works.

        List_of_Top_Gear_test_track_Power_Lap_Times

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @stuki – Have you been to a drag strip? There’s everything from motorized bar stools to motor homes and simi-trucks going down the strip.

        Trucks have always been part of the drag strip scene. A small part, but still.

        None of them are trying to set the track on fire. Just looking to see what they’ll do. Or against other similar.

        I know you’re kidding, but hard cornering any trailer sets up a jackknife situation or swinging the trailer around (and around).

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s not a matter of “Letting more midsizers in..”. What matters is: Do they really want to come to the US? They really did at one point. Then they really wanted to get the hell out!

      As far as a truck with great truck performance and a healthy amount of utility, you can’t have it both ways. Something’s got to give. Eventually, you have a 2 seater Mustang with a really big cargo area. Pointless anyway you look at it.

    • 0 avatar
      jimbob457

      In the USA pickup trucks are very popular in small towns. You gotta have a local dealership to sell a vehicle. This gives GM and Ford a big advantage in these markets. Chrysler and Toyota bring up the rear. Nissan and any potential newcomer. Forget it.

  • avatar
    George B

    I’d be more likely to buy the Ram Express with my own money. It retains most of the regular cab pickup truck virtues with great V8 engine sound. However, I’m not entirely sold on the idea of low-profile tires on a pickup truck. Gives up too much of the bad road/mild off-road capability on a vehicle that will never take advantage of a short sidewall. People who only drive on smooth paved roads will probably never understand why so many pickup trucks are sold.

  • avatar
    jftjr1982

    I’d take the Ram over the Ecoboost any day. The F-150 Tremor is a cool truck but I’m passed the point in my life where I want something that sporty. I want something reliable that I can do some light to moderate hauling, has a V8, gets decent gas mileage, 4 wheel drive, and can handle itself off road from time to time. I have no use for something with 4.10 gears. The gas mileage with that gear ratio is horrendous. I also would never trust a turbo charged gas engine and would never buy one. They don’t last. I know it’s not a Ford, but my Fiance has a turbo charged Volkswagen Beetle and we’ve had nothing but problems with it, (mainly with the cooling system) and every where we’ve taken from the dealer to different mechanics have said the same thing, “That’s a turbo engine for ya.” and no one wants to work on it unless you pay them an arm and a leg. The bottom line is unless you’re buying a diesel, turbo charged engines are unreliable.


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