By on February 1, 2013

The U.S. new car market was up strongly in January.  GM and Ford surprised analysts with double digit sales rates. Toyota, up 26.6 percent  also surprised.

GM is up 16 percent on very strong sales of the Equinox and its Silverado and Sierra pickups.

Ford prints a 22 percent increase, powered by the Fusion. Lincoln sales are down 18 percent while customers wait for the MKZ to arrive in quantity at their dealers.

Chrysler was up 16 percent, but jaded analysts expected more.

Detroit OEMs and analysts  expect the SAAR to be in the mid 15 million range

Final table (data courtesy Automotive News)

January U.S. New Auto Sales

Automaker Jan. 2013 Jan. 2012 Pct. chng. 1 month
2013
1 month
2012
Pct. chng.
BMW Group 20,233 19,771 2% 20,233 19,771 2%
    BMW division 16,513 16,405 1% 16,513 16,405 1%
    Mini 3,682 3,334 10% 3,682 3,334 10%
    Rolls-Royce 38 32 19% 38 32 19%
BMW Group 20,233 19,771 2% 20,233 19,771 2%
Chrysler Group 117,731 101,149 16% 117,731 101,149 16%
    Chrysler Division 20,696 17,604 18% 20,696 17,604 18%
    Dodge 43,227 31,454 37% 43,227 31,454 37%
    Dodge/Ram 64,214 49,924 29% 64,214 49,924 29%
    Fiat 2,503 1,911 31% 2,503 1,911 31%
    Jeep 30,318 31,710 –4% 30,318 31,710 –4%
    Ram 20,987 18,470 14% 20,987 18,470 14%
Chrysler Group 117,731 101,149 16% 117,731 101,149 16%
Daimler AG 24,059 21,725 11% 24,059 21,725 11%
    Maybach 4 –100% 4 –100%
    Mercedes-Benz 23,578 21,225 11% 23,578 21,225 11%
    Smart USA 481 496 –3% 481 496 –3%
Daimler AG 24,059 21,725 11% 24,059 21,725 11%
Ford Motor Co. 165,863 136,294 22% 165,863 136,294 22%
    Ford division 161,672 131,173 23% 161,672 131,173 23%
    Lincoln 4,191 5,121 –18% 4,191 5,121 –18%
Ford 165,863 136,294 22% 165,863 136,294 22%
General Motors 194,699 167,962 16% 194,699 167,962 16%
    Buick 13,463 10,208 32% 13,463 10,208 32%
    Cadillac 13,116 8,924 47% 13,116 8,924 47%
    Chevrolet 137,304 123,864 11% 137,304 123,864 11%
    GMC 30,816 24,966 23% 30,816 24,966 23%
General Motors 194,699 167,962 16% 194,699 167,962 16%
Honda (American) 93,626 83,009 13% 93,626 83,009 13%
    Acura 9,489 8,381 13% 9,489 8,381 13%
    Honda Division 84,137 74,628 13% 84,137 74,628 13%
Honda 93,626 83,009 13% 93,626 83,009 13%
Hyundai Group 80,015 78,211 2% 80,015 78,211 2%
    Hyundai division 43,713 42,694 2% 43,713 42,694 2%
    Kia 36,302 35,517 2% 36,302 35,517 2%
Hyundai Group 80,015 78,211 2% 80,015 78,211 2%
Jaguar Land Rover 5,229 4,190 25% 5,229 4,190 25%
    Jaguar 1,029 985 5% 1,029 985 5%
    Land Rover 4,200 3,205 31% 4,200 3,205 31%
Jaguar Land Rover 5,229 4,190 25% 5,229 4,190 25%
Maserati 172 154 12% 172 154 12%
Maserati 172 154 12% 172 154 12%
Mazda 21,319 23,996 –11% 21,319 23,996 –11%
Mazda 21,319 23,996 –11% 21,319 23,996 –11%
Mitsubishi 4,659 4,711 –1% 4,659 4,711 –1%
Mitsubishi 4,659 4,711 –1% 4,659 4,711 –1%
Nissan 80,919 79,313 2% 80,919 79,313 2%
    Infiniti 7,126 6,796 5% 7,126 6,796 5%
    Nissan Division 73,793 72,517 2% 73,793 72,517 2%
Nissan 80,919 79,313 2% 80,919 79,313 2%
Subaru 27,663 22,807 21% 27,663 22,807 21%
Subaru 27,663 22,807 21% 27,663 22,807 21%
Suzuki 1,486 1,505 –1% 1,486 1,505 –1%
Suzuki 1,486 1,505 –1% 1,486 1,505 –1%
Toyota 157,725 124,540 27% 157,725 124,540 27%
    Lexus 16,211 12,274 32% 16,211 12,274 32%
    Scion 4,893 3,535 38% 4,893 3,535 38%
    Toyota division 136,621 108,731 26% 136,621 108,731 26%
    Toyota/Scion 141,514 112,266 26% 141,514 112,266 26%
Toyota 157,725 124,540 27% 157,725 124,540 27%
Volkswagen 42,666 39,273 9% 42,666 39,273 9%
    Audi 10,056 9,354 8% 10,056 9,354 8%
    Bentley 188 118 59% 188 118 59%
    Lamborghini 46 43 7% 46 43 7%
    Porsche 3,358 2,550 32% 3,358 2,550 32%
    VW division 29,018 27,208 7% 29,018 27,208 7%
Volkswagen 42,666 39,273 9% 42,666 39,273 9%
Volvo Cars NA 4,875 4,461 9% 4,875 4,461 9%
Volvo Cars NA 4,875 4,461 9% 4,875 4,461 9%
    Other (estimate) 253 246 3% 253 246 3%
TOTAL 1,043,192 913,317 14% 1,043,192 913,317 14%

 

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

51 Comments on “U.S. Sales: This Was A VERY Strong January...”


  • avatar
    mike978

    I recall an article saying the Silverado/Sierra days of inventory figure was based on unrealistic numbers. Does January’s data help support that case?

    It was interesting to see VW “only” gain 7% – what with the Passat still being fairly news (although many new midsize cars have come out in the past 9 months).

    Also interesting how Cadillac grew 40+% – ATS and XTS driven I assume.

    • 0 avatar

      Re Cadillac, yes. These are year-over-year comparisons, and Cadillac’s model lineup was smaller in Jan 2012 than it is now.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        True, although they got criticised when sales fell (due to STS and DTS wind-up).
        Looking at the Buick numbers it is clear the regal is dead with only 1005 sales. The Verano is doing well and more than making up for the lost Regal volume. I don`t know how the profitability differs though.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @mike978

        Agreed the Regal is dead. Dead, dead, deadski. All the criticism was spot on. It’s too heavy, it’s over priced, it is under powered in each class it competes in, and it’s too small for its class.

        I know the critics also said the Verano wouldn’t sell. It is selling very well. I saw in Consumer Reports that the Verano was not recommended and has quality far below average, the dreaded black dot. Be curious on what zinged it (the 2.4L under the hood???) as the Cruze platform mate (but admittedly not a huge sharer of content) is on the Consumer Reports recommended list (as was the Sonic).

        I think John Rosevear is correct about Cadillac, which has a meatier product line than January of 2012.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        There’s a new Regal for 2014MY coming out later this year…what do you say you look at it before declaring the Regal dead?

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        Sunridge – I was saying the current Regal is dead. It has had reduced sales for quite a while. It was regularly selling 3000 or more up until December 2011 and since then sales have decreased such that for the past 5 months not even 2000 could be reached.

        Is the new MY2014 model a midcycle refresh. I was not aware that the Opel Insignia was being replaced by an all new model this year. If it is just a refresh then I will await to give judgement but some of the complaints (like limited rear headroom) need an all new model.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        @Mike

        GM is calling it ‘all new’ so I’m not really sure. I would imagine it will be revealed at Chicago or New York autoshow.

        They rearranged the packaging (read: increased prices)when the Verano came out and the ATP’s are way up.

        The same thing is happening to CTS sales because of ATS. For 2013MY Cadillac got rid of the base CTS and the 2014 CTS will be redesigned (and be more expensive) and sell at lower volumes and higher prices.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        Really, it’ll be a facelift. Still on the Epsilon II platform.

  • avatar
    lowsodium

    Glad everyone is still drinking the Toyota Koolaid. Even after beating everyone in recalls the last several years.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Toyota will be able to coast on thier reputation of unobtanium clad quality for years. You’ve got about 2 generations of toyota fans to go through before attitudes might change.

      IIRC, the domestic industry was able to do the same from the 50′s on to about the mid 70′s which btw is a good way to get me to laugh in a person’s face – tell me anything from the 50′s 60′s and 70′s is some good old american steel and if only they still made them that way.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Oh I think Detroit made compared to other global offerings solid pieces of iron until about 1970 or 1971. The completely, totally and absolutely blew it on the smaller car market. When pollution controls and the energy crisis kicked in, well we know the history.

        GM coasted through the 70′s and into the 80′s. By the 90′s most of what was being made (outside of pickup trucks and just a couple of barely bright spots on a couple of cars) were utter steaming piles of crap. Things started to look up by 2005 and the impact of Lutz on design was trickling through. I stress looking up, certainly not Toyota level. Plastic cladding was gone, the bean counter battles on interior and materials had engineering and product winning, and some platforms that were elderly (GM W-Bodies) were in the end, as solid as a boat anchor and as reliable as a sunrise [INSERT I KNOW THIS GUY WHO BOUGHT AN IMPALA AND THE ENGINE FELL OUT THE NEXT WEEK FOCUS GROUP OF ONE RANT HERE].

        But it was all too little too late. By 2008 we had the new Malibu (not the step backwards version we have today), the G8, the updated Equinox, the second Gen CTS, it was clear a change was coming.

        But GM pissed away 40 years of goodwill by building progressively worse crap through about 1999 or 2000. Things started getting better in 2001, but too little — way too late.

        Toyota I feel isn’t resting on its butt completely anymore (I would have said they were passionately 3 or 5 years ago). There is definitely signs of life at the Lazy T ranch (the Camry is a better drivers car than since the 80′s) and there are some gaffes (Scion iQ and Prius c). Honda. Honda is the one where I just shake my head with a sad face. They are totally phoning it in, at best, and they are destroying Acura.

        But I agree that just as GM, Ford and Chrysler coasted for decades, so can Toyota and Honda. The only thing accelerating the what the Hell are they thinking at Honda is their questionable design language and building of products that answer questions no one asked in the first place.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        Actually the domestic manufacturers were building steaming piles of crap well before the 70′s; there was just no other standard of reference. Domestic cars were notorious for poor quality engineering and assembly; parts literally falling off, water running in through windshields and door seams, engines grenading within days of delivery. Few cars were expected to last for 100,000 miles, and new car buyers only expected two or three years of ownership.

        However, buyers after WWII were comparing their new car to the model T only 20 years prior, and the horse before that. By that standard their expectations were pretty low. Talk to many drivers in their 70′s and older and they consider any car that starts on a cold day to be a quality vehicle.

        Honda and Toyota changed the paradigm; the drive train lasted well over 100,000 miles and repairs were generally minimal. The Big Three did not so much let quality slide as their new competitors changed customer expectations. Now we take quality for granted.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        …Honda and Toyota changed the paradigm; the drive train lasted well over 100,000 miles and repairs were generally minimal…

        The drive train might have made to 100K, but the bodies sure didn’t. Cancer on imports was infamous.

        And your judging 60′s cars by 2010 standards where the average car, even the “worst” car you can buy will likely go 150K to 200K miles without an issue.

        Cars in the 60′s were better than cars in the 50′s than cars in the 40′s (which for most of the decade were of 1938 to 1941 design) better than the 30′s…

        There were no meaningful imports by numbers in the 1960s from Japan, they were novelties – even into the 70′s.

        The biggest interest in Japanese iron was not quality (dude, really, the ’78 Accord with aluminum engine was lucky to last 12 months before the engine grenaded and/or the tranny fell out on the ground either right before or after the engine grenaded – and the force of the explosion would blow the rust off holding the body parts together – the ’78 Accord would be on my worst list, and is on others) but fuel economy after the oil shock.

        The “quality” came from ancient technology (the first Toyotas had two-speed automatics, try taking that on the freeway) and low content. Toyota quickly adapted to the US market (smart) after being a niche player largely on the west coast, and by 1980 Detroit quality was in full speed reverse, their attempts at small cars were an utter joke (while some manufacturers like Ford having more success overseas but for different reasons not bringing those better models to the US shores) and the Japanese were doing it better.

        But better also was born out of forced competition and thin R&D budgets. For example Toyota’s tooling of factories to build multiple product lines off the same line and cross-training of jobs was not born out of some genius plan to beat Detroit. They didn’t have the budget to build individual lines – and employees had to be cross-trained because if Hanto-san was out for the day because he had inoperable cancer, his house burned down AND his wife was giving birth (because if any of those TWO were going he would still show up to work) than someone had to be able to fill in the gap. There wasn’t someone down in the union office picking their nose (advantage Toyota) who had a 50% chance of saying, “ummm, that ain’t in my job description, but Floyd, he’s the one scratching his ass, he does that job – right Floyd?”

        Is a ’64 GTO as good as an ’09 G8 in quality. Well d’uh – no. But is the ’64 GTO better than say a ’37 Oakland. There is no question. Was a ’64 Beetle any better than the GTO? Well if you consider adjusting the valves manually every 1,000 to 2,000 miles “acceptable” and a complete lack of heat if you didn’t have a German Shepard in your lap I guess the Beetle was better. Now, is a ’13 Beetle better than a ’64 Beetle. Again – no question.

        From a rather pro-Toyota source…

        …By 1967, Toyota had become well established in the United States, albeit as a niche player. The Corona four-door sedan was seen as competing mainly against the Volkswagen Beetle, though this was hardly fair to the modern Corona, with its relatively large interior space and relatively comfortable ride. The Corona was known from its early days for quality as well as a low price, though rust was a serious problem until the late 1970s, causing more than one Corona to simply rust in half before it became old enough to have mechanical problems…

        http://www.toyoland.com/history.html

        I think you’re looking at ’70s Japanese cars with a rather romantic notion.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    And in January numbers we can clearly see a pattern of stuffed pickup truck inventory and declining sales at General…

    …awwwwwwwwwwwwwwww shucks.

    crunch – crunch – crunch – good popcorn.

    APaGttH – haven’t stirred the pot in a while…3…2…1…

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    So…people are finally getting tired of fixing up their old beaters? I wonder how many years at 15MM+ units it takes to push the average US car age back closer to normal.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      If ALL cars are so good now, as is often claimed by Detroit fans lamenting Detroit’s collapse of the last 3 or 4 decades, why would the average US car age “return to normal?” Extended vehicle life should mean increasing average vehicle age.

      • 0 avatar
        trumpet12345

        Reliability of an engine or major component versus other issues I’d assume. Many people have dings, dents, gauged panels that rust. The rest of the car could be fine, but rust in the wrong areas is straight to the crusher given a few years for many cars.

        How many people live in the salt briny winter areas that never hose off their under body or any part of the car? How many let paint chips go until rust bubbles a whole door’s worth and is traded in only to be repainted on the cheap and flipped?

        There are many reasons people trade in cars besides it dying. Given the choice, I think most would go for a new car whenever financially they could. I wouldn’t, but then again, how many of us posting her are not self selected biased members that are not the general car buying public?

      • 0 avatar
        chicagoland

        Interiors also get beat up and is another push to “I want a new one”, along with new designs.

        I know old car fans want to see favorites from 8-20 years ago on the road “forever”, but reality is machines do wear out and owners get sick of them.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      There’s a LOT of deferred purchasing out there at work. In the last six months, my family has traded away 340,000 miles of wear and tear, jettisoning two used cars and bringing an end, for now, to my old car habit. At the current interest rates, vs, the mounting costs of repairs, we could hardly afford not to.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Lincoln numbers are dreadful. Got their butt kicked by Volvo, for crying out loud.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    “Lincoln sales are down 18 percent while customers wait for the MKZ to arrive in quantity at their dealers.”

    Yep, that’s why. It has nothing to do with the fact that Lincoln’s customer base is dying off at that rate.

    • 0 avatar
      Sinistermisterman

      Dying off, turning off and tuning out. Perhaps curated Tweets by Jimmy Fallon are not to everyone’s taste. Or perhaps it’s the fact that unlike pretty much every other ‘luxury’ car brand out there, no one in their right mind would aspire to own a new Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      What’s the problem with Lincoln? Ask yourself: how many Lincoln ads have you seen in the last six months? How many of those ads featured an under-30 blonde with a 44 D-cup? There you go.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    - The Regal continues its nose-dive, with just 1,005 sold vs. three times as many Veranos.

    - The ATS just edged out the CTS for best-selling Cadillac sedan, though the SRX remains their bread-and-butter.

    - The Malibu outsold the Cruze in Jan. Didn’t see THAT coming. But yeah, the Equinox outsold both.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      There’s an all-new Regal coming in later this year. Some say it’s a refresh, but it could be the Malibu coupe that was killed to be reborn as the 2014 Regal. GM would do well to rework the sheet metal on the outgoing Impala and bring back the Lucerne or LeSabre. It would be bass-ackwards for Chevrolet to trickle UP to Buick, but the tri-shield really doesn’t have many models to sell.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        I know it’s a long-shot, but I’m hoping GM will make a 3.8L version of the new pickup truck V6 for use in Buicks.

        In fact, my desire for this to happen is so high I actually took the time to write Buick.

        Their response was “You never know…”

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      One of those was my 2013 Equinox, and I love it to death.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      It’s the same problem Acura has with the TSX – neither here nor there when it comes to size, has a cheaper model slotting underneath it and a bit pricey due to its Euro roots.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    The Dart is up 17% MoM to over 7100 units. Looks like it’s gaining some traction with shoppers.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Yes, now that shiftless Americans can get an automatic. If they’d just used the 2.4/4-speed auto from the old Avenger, they would have sold a lot more by now.

  • avatar
    sunridge place

    Interesting….Silverado/Sierra outsells F-150 for the second month in a row.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Honda reports 2013 Accord sales up over 75%. Toyota says Camry up over 12%.

    So did the Accord pass Camry?

  • avatar

    AND IN OTHER NEWS… post Hurricane Sandy cars with flood damage being sold at low low prices on the used car lots.

    You can buy a Fisker Karma for $25,000

  • avatar
    Bimmer

    Wow, Mitsubishi outsold Lincoln!

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Sales are actually running below December levels, and well below sales levels before 2007. Please, cut the STRONG hype.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      Do you have a clue about seasonality and the fact that December of year 20XX ALWAYS outsells January of year 20XX+1? Recession or no recession?

      • 0 avatar
        jimmyy

        With seasonality, January was slightly below December. Without seasonality, January was far below December. With seasonality, 2012 was far far below pre 2007 sales. But, the democratic controlled media does a great job telling the country how great mediocre car sales are while the dems are in charge. The media also seems to be happy with 7.9% unemployment under Obama while they complained about 4.5% unemployment under Bush.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        I don’t come here to talk about politics but you are commenting on a headline from a source that could hardly be called ‘democratic controlled’

        The dropoff in sales from Dec 2006-Jan 2007 was 24%….same as the dropoff from December 2012-Jan 2013.

        Plus, the OEM’s are a hell of a lot healthier in Jan 2013 vs Jan 2007.

  • avatar
    joeveto3

    From what I’m seeing (locally, online in the Chicago market), this increase of new car sales appears to be pushing used car prices back down to where they were, prior to the run-up driven by the decrease in new car sales.

    Steven Lang, if you’re out there, do you agree?

  • avatar

    Rule of thumb: If domestics gain in sales – it is because of fleet sales, if domestic loose in sales – because nobody wants ‘em. If imports gain- because customers love them, if they fall behind – it is because of production constraints.

    I thought Suzuki is gone – how they still have sales? Don’t you think Jaguar is in jeopardy? Cadillac and Buick are ahead of Infinity, Acura and Audi (because of fleet sales a guess). Is Volvo next SAAB or it is production constraints?

  • avatar
    roberto

    Are you that stupid this plant is up & running as we speak and the GM people have partnered up with the Chinese and the deal was made a long time ago. The have even built their reserch & development there and the China people own a large percent of it because the Dems. Have shipped all the jobs to China.

  • avatar
    Tstag

    Jaguar’s not in trouble at all. Sales are climbing and they have plenty of product in development. Plus Land Rover is booming and is about to double the size of its range. At some point Land Rover has to make more regular passenger cars and in Jag has the right brand to do it. Once they merge their dealer network Jag will be able to feed off Land Rovers success much more. The future is very bright for both brands they just need to keep going with their current plan. Lincoln by contrast is screwed

  • avatar
    skor

    Economic recovery? Or did it it take this long for the insurance companies to cut the checks for the quarter million cars that were washed into the Atlantic by Hurricane Sandy?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Sandy was probably a factor. A lot of those cars are going to be salting (in more ways than one) used car lots in the northeast and beyond, adding to road salt as a reason to visit a new car dealer. I wonder how much of the sales increase was from the northeast and road salt belt.

      A bigger impact is the large increase in average age of cars on the road. In 2008-2009, you could say “well, I’ll just keep the old cow running a couple more years – fixing it up is cheaper than buying new.” Well, the couple years are up, a lot of those cars weren’t fixed up but had deferred maintenance, and putting $1500 into a car worth $1500 doesn’t compute, especially when another $1500 may be needed at any time.

      A lot of people may have just concluded it’s time to move the fuzzy dice to another rear view mirror, with cash on the hood deals on last year’s models and low interest rates available now. As others mentioned elsewhere, the sales aren’t all 2013 models, but whatever’s available on the lot.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • Tycho de Feyter, China
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India