By on February 14, 2013

Chrysler will be the first truck maker to offer a diesel engine on a half-ton pickup, when the Ram 1500 gets an oil-burner in Q3 of this year.

The diesel will be the same 3.0L VM Motori engine as used in the Grand Cherokee, good for 240 horsepower and 420 lb-ft of torque in that application. USA Today, which broke the story, reported that Ram boss Fred Diaz would not disclose power figures or pricing information, the two big question marks for the new model.

Diesel options in heavy duty pickups typically cost thousands more as optional equipment. TrueCar’s Jesse Toprak suggested that offering a small premium, akin to Ford’s EcoBoost V6 in the F-150, would shake things up in the segment, but Diaz seemed to shrug off that notion. Regardless, Toprak felt that the diesel option could be good for as many as 10,000 units.

With this announcement, it will be interesting to see if any truck makers follow suit and offer a quarter-ton diesel option. Aside from wanting to combat Ram’s lock on this model, there will likely be positive implications as far as CAFE goes. VM Motori is half owned by GM, though the company will offer a new mid-size Colorado for fuel-economy conscious buyers (though in many markets, the Colorado can be had with a Duramax diesel).

 

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

86 Comments on “Ram 1500 To Get Diesel Engine...”


  • avatar
    CoastieLenn

    “Chrysler will be the first truck maker to offer a diesel engine on a half-ton pickup, when the Ram 1500 gets an oil-burner in Q3 of this year.

    Fixed.

  • avatar

    Finally an appealing option to the EcoBoost F-150, especially for a Mopar boy like myself. In my short lifetime, these are the best half-ton pickup trucks ever offered, all of the options, minus the Titan, are good options.

    • 0 avatar
      86SN2001

      Actually this is far better than the gas guzzling V6 Egoboost Ford puts in their “trucks”.

      This will actually provide the power, capability, and the fuel economy promised. The Egoboost cannot do that at all.

      • 0 avatar
        NormSV650

        F-150 Ecoboost is almost at 30 mpg.

        http://media.ford.com/article_display.cfm?article_id=35173

      • 0 avatar
        86SN2001

        No it’s not. The best it can do is a mediocre 22 MPG for a 2WD with a very tall 3.15 gear.

      • 0 avatar
        jaje

        What it gets in “tests” and in the real world are two very different things.

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        86SN2001

        #1) “Egoboosts” as you eloquently call them definitely have a difficult time reaching the factory touted economy numbers. A slightly lighter foot and an SCT tuner and they’re getting damn close to that magic 30 number.

        #2) It seems every article that comes up that even loosely can be a comparison of “the big three”… almost religiously you’ll be having something negative to say about Ford. Hey, thats all well and good but in the context of the above article, will you be saying the same things when inevitably this Ram diesel isn’t hitting the highway MPG number that Ram says (or hopes) it will? Rest assured, since this is undoubtedly going to be an “alternative to the ecoboost”, it’ll have to start with economy numbers that meet/exceed the advertised numbers from the Ford camp.

        I just want to maintain clarity and ensure even flogging across the board… not just toward Ford. It seems that might be a difficult proposition for you.

      • 0 avatar
        86SN2001

        Do you know why the Egoboost have an issue hitting their highly touted economy numbers?

        The EPA only requires one rear end gear to be tested per powertrain. So, in Ford’s case, while you can get the EB 3.5 with a 3.15, 3.31, 3.55, and 3.73 gears, the only one tested is the 3.15 as that gives the best numbers. Another interesting fact is that to get the unsafe 11,300 towing rating on the F-150, you need 3.73 gears, which significantly lowers your fuel economy numbers. So it’s not all bunnies and kittens like Ford portrays when it comes to capability and economy. It’s interesting to note that the EB 3.5 can be had with a fuel sipping 3.15 gear ratio. The tallest one the 5.0 can be purchased with, is a 3.31. Also, another interesting fact is that the 5.0 CANNOT pull the same, unsafe 11,300 pounds as the boat anchor 5.4 could…despite being more powerful. Frankly, I think Ford doesn’t offer a shorter ratio with the 5.0, or the same tow rating as the less powerful 5.4 because they’re purposely making the 5.0 look worse so that people purchase the more expensive and more complicated 3.5. It would be great to see what kind of mileage the 5.0 would get with the 3.15 gear that’s only offered in the 3.5

        Motor Trend did a test of two, identical F-150s. They had the same rear gear ratio (3.73) and were within a couple hundred pounds of each other (the EB truck was the lighter one though). One had the 5.0, the other the 3.5. The result? The V8 had the better mileage.

        Secondly, the diesel will have a FAR better chance of hitting the EPA highway figure than some high strung, problematic gas powerplant. I hope Dodge underestimates the fuel economy so that they don’t have to eat crow, butt time will tell.

      • 0 avatar
        tresmonos

        86sn2001:
        You are correct. The 3.15 comes with the smallest wheel diameter too, if I remember correctly. So the typical 1/2 buyer wouldn’t touch it as it doesn’t have the tonka truck look to it. When you pair them up, you do get some great fuel economy numbers if you drive accordingly.

      • 0 avatar
        CoastieLenn

        Wait… so now you’re saying you’re surprised that a marketing division is painting fuel economy figures inteded for viewing thru rose-colored glasses? I’m only 30 years old and I can tell you that this has been the case for decades.

        No matter the vehicle, there’s always the fine print blurb “fuel economy figures obtained using xx equipment in a controlled environment. Actual mileage will/may vary.”… or some other iteration of the same verbiage.

        Come on man. Your finger pointing should be done at marketing departments in general, not at one particular brand.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        The 2 Litre Ecoboost engine they put in the Falcon is a total failure. The Diesel in the Ram will make a lot of difference.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It was pretty much a given that the 5.0 V8 would be the better overall choice unless you mostly commute with some light hauling. Still, with so many choices, spec out a truck for your specific needs.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        Two things:

        1 Writing “Egoboost” is not clever or insightful; is just sounds dumb. Sarcasm and similar attempts at humor almost never work when written, and this is a good example. Writing “Faux News” has the same effect.

        2. Pointing our that higher rear end ratios allow for higher towing capacity and lower fuel economy is not a revelation to anybody who knows anything about trucks. Higher ratio = higher engine RPM at any given speed = lower fuel economy. Higher ratio = more torque to the pavement = higher towing capacity. If this is news you either slept through high school physics or never rode a bicycle with more than one gear.

        That being said, I hope the Ram diesel works out well; it is good to have choices. Given the latest JD Power quality report I won’t be one of the first buyers but if these motors prove themselves a pickup or Grand Cherokee getting over 30mpg sounds interesting.

    • 0 avatar
      TOTitan

      My 04 Titan has 130,000 miles on it, has no rattles, gets 65,000 miles on a set of tires, will use 1/4 quart of oil in 10,000 miles, and pulls a heavy trailer (7,000 lbs)up the grapevine at 65 mph easily. I recently met a guy with a 05 Titan that had 360,000 miles on it that achieved similar numbers. There are not any other 04-06 vintage 1/2 ton trucks that have that level of power and reliability. Granted Nissan hasnt done much updating, so the competition has advanced, but they will soon offer a 4 cyl Cummins diesel, and HD versions.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    The first 30 mpg on the highway? This example is advertising 25 mpg with lower output V6 option.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Problem with an Ecoboost truck is once you hook something to the back of it the MPG turns to shit. My Tahoe w/5.7 Vortec got better mileage towing 5500 lbs of boat than my compact Toyota w/3.0 V6 did pulling 3000 lbs of boat. Same deal w/Ecoboost, one you start working that little V6 engine you’d be much better off with a V8. Diesels are made to tow and this is where the Ram shine.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    I started cracking up when I read “quarter ton pickup.” He’s called them that before.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    I like this for so many reasons, namely a V-6 instead of a V-8.

    I know that I am reaching for the moon here, but an available manual transmission would be awesome!

  • avatar
    grzydj

    Hopefully the entire industry follows suit. I want a compact, or midsize truck with a diesel engine that’ll tow 5,000ish pounds and get high 20s or low 30s on the highway.

    Diesel engines are absolutely perfect for light duty truck applications.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I like the idea of this, but we’ll see how it comes to fruition. 420 lb-ft of torque and reasonable fuel consumption are pluses.

    Reductant fluid, DPF regeneration, high initial cost and additional maintenance costs are minuses.

  • avatar
    Michael S.

    Finally… Let’s hope they don’t screw the pooch on this one and steer the rest of the big three away from diesels.

  • avatar
    crtfour

    Chrysler the first to offer a diesel? I thought GM offered a diesel in half ton trucks back in the 90′s.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Amazing the transformation of Chrysler’s products and product line. The Dodge went from distant third to class leader depending on how you look at things. But the new interior, coil spring rear suspension and now a V6 diesel option puts the Dodge (OK, Ram)ahead of the Ford on my virtual shopping list. And I’ve always liked Fords way more than anyone else’s trucks. Too bad I have no need for a full size truck.

    I’d say Chrysler has fared better during the post-bailout era than GM. Certainly Fiat has helped, but still damn impressive for a company that really had nothing going for it in 2008. It’s not lost on me that we’ve been down this path before with Chrysler either, so fingers crossed.

    • 0 avatar
      moedaman

      “I’d say Chrysler has fared better during the post-bailout era than GM. Certainly Fiat has helped, but still damn impressive for a company that really had nothing going for it in 2008. It’s not lost on me that we’ve been down this path before with Chrysler either, so fingers crossed.”

      Exactly! Fiat brought in a new mindset to Chrysler while GM, although it has an outsider as CEO, is still basically run by the same people who screwed it up in the 1st place.

    • 0 avatar
      Acd

      Interesting that Fiat has been able to do more with Chrysler in the past four years than Daimler Benz did with them in the nine years they owned them.

      I can’t wait for the book to be written that tells the story of what really happened when the Germans occupied Auburn Hills.

  • avatar
    Junebug

    Now, if they could just ease up guv-ment interference an build a few more refineries (last one was 40 years ago), the price of diesel might, might, maybe… come down to what regular is selling for.

  • avatar
    Wacko

    If GM owns 50% why don’t they use these engines in any GM product??

  • avatar
    jaje

    Let’s get some facts out right now. Diesel has 30% greater energy density than gasoline (the same way gas has ~ 30% greater energy density than ethanol). Diesel makes its max torque at very low RPM and under heavy load it can get 50% better mpg than its gas equivalent and a reason why the entire world standardized on diesel for heavy duty work. Diesel costs an all time high of ~ 20% more than gas at the pump (supply restrictions and higher cost fuel [low sulfur content] are part of it).

    That aside this is the first real effort to bring a diesel engine to heavy pickups which need to lose weight, size and have a more efficient engine option.

    I own a Jeep GC diesel (which has the 3.0 benz CRD and I average 26 mpg loaded with family at 65 mph in it whereas others with the Hemi GC get at most 18 mpg highway at the same speed. Then when towing a car on a trailer (5k lbs) I get 20 mpg and I know the Hemi guys normally get low teens towing similar loads and sized trailers.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Finally a diesel option in a half ton! The Chrysler renaissance is simply amazing.

  • avatar

    Can’t wait for how this compares to the new GMTs.

  • avatar
    Mr Imperial

    Interesting that Fiat decided to go with a fellow Italian company, as Cummins did have a prototype 4.2 V6 and 5.6 V8 proposed for use in the 1500 Rams.

    I’d rather see a Cummins badge on my 1500, since that brand is so well established here in the US.

    http://www.dieselpowermag.com/tech/dodge/0612dp_new_cummins_v6_and_v8/viewall.html

  • avatar
    greaseyknight

    Its good that Chrysler finally got the message about smaller diesels. But the devil is in the details in getting the emissions/mpg/reliability up to par. Just look at the whole 6.0 and 6.4 Powerstroke fiasco, great motors that where ruined by emission equipment.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      If Chrysler really wants to set the industry on fire – the best thing they can do is offer this in the worktruck / tradesman package and don’t charge a high premium over the gas equivalent. Imagine a diesel 1/2 ton with short bed and wheelbase that you can drive w/o fear of running over mid size cars that you can’t see, or being able to park in a parking lot space without 3-5 point turns, or even able to park it in your garage where that garage can also have storage space for other crap.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        Wow someone finally figured it out. These things will sell like hotcakes and probably go for full MSRP initially. Ram will find Ford and GM light truck owners in their showrooms for the first time. RV owners, boaters and anyone that uses their truck for towing will be all over these. GM and Ford, you missed the boat big time!

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        If you want the regular cab, you’ll likely be forced a long-bed, and of course you want a long-bed for safer towing. Still, with several thousand dollars more left in your pocket, the Hemi V8 is the obvious choice. And has no wheel-base restrictions.

        A diesel 1/2 ton pickup will be rejected by the vast majority of buyers, for obvious reasons, but might be a collectible. Online, it’s a different story and all sorts of diesel fetish bloggers come out of the woodwork. You would think everybody wants a light duty diesel pickup, just like it seemed VW would sell a million TDI wagons with a manual trans each year in North America. Gotcha, VW!

      • 0 avatar
        jaje

        @ denvermike – again harping on the diesel as a “fad” or collectors only item. Do you work for Chrysler or Fiat and can affirm you statement that it will only come in the long wheelbase trim? To you anyone who supports diesel are obvious fetish bloggers who have little knowledge. Hmm – I recall a statement you made that the rest of the world is “FORCED TO USE” diesel – for you know like big rigs, barges, locomotives, etc. Oh btw the take rate on many TDI models is ~ 50%.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The 6.0L and 6.4L International engines were plagued by a lot more than just emissions related failures. There were a lot of emissions equipment related issues to be sure, but there was really nothing good about those motors from the very start.

      From HP oil system issues on the 6.0L to cooling system problems on the 6.4L, prospective diesel owners would be best advised to stay far far away from a Powerstroke from 2003 1/2 all the way to 2010.

      Exception would be if a 6.0L truck had all the receipts for head studs, oil cooler, EGR/cooler delete, recent turbo and intake cleaning, new HPP, IPR, injectors, branch tubes, stand pipes and oil rail seals and a coolant filter kit. OR if you wanted to tackle all this yourself, it could be a real smokin deal.

      6.4L? Forget it. No way, no exceptions, not with a 40 foot pole.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    A diesel is like that high maintenance girl you think you want to date. Great at first, but eventually it gets old, and you’ll wish for something way simpler.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      @Denver Mike when I looked at buying a TDI sport wagon there was a waiting list. So I thInk dead your wrong about how a 1/2 ton diesel truck will sell. A diesel in something heavy that you tow with makes a hell of a lot more sense than any car. I’ll bet Ram will sell more 1/2 ton diesels in the first 12 months than they do 3/4 tons.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “when I looked at buying a TDI sport wagon there was a waiting list”.

        The German aren’t known for ‘channel stuffing’, but if you believed the blogs prior, the TDI was going to set the world on fire..

        “I’ll bet Ram will sell more 1/2 ton diesels in the first 12 months than they do 3/4 tons.”

        I had to laugh out loud with that one, but OK, your on!

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Don’t count on big sales volume. This is the same engine that will be available, at a premium, in the Grand Cherokee.

        The higher cost of entry will deter a lot of buyers when they can get similar performance out of the Hemi. Cost of maintenance won’t have them buying more.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        You got that right. In an ironic twist, Chrysler’s fuel saving V6 engines (either today’s Pentastar or the new diesel) are/will be only available in the top-tier trim levels.

        The base/low-cost optional engines are now the V8s. Yeah, the gas mileage of the 4.7 and 5.7 V8s suck, but you can buy a lot of gas with the savings.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Carlson Fan,
        “Ram will sell more 1/2 ton diesels in the first 12 months than they do 3/4 tons”
        Agreed a lot of momentum as far diesels go in the US. In Australia our sales of diesel CARS has gone up 50% in 3 yrs.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “In an ironic twist, Chrysler’s fuel saving V6 engines (either today’s Pentastar or the new diesel) are/will be only available in the top-tier trim levels.

        The base/low-cost optional engines are now the V8s.”

        The irony is delicious.

  • avatar
    beefmalone

    Article is incorrect. Chevy offered the 6.5turbo diesel in 1/2ton trucks in the mid 90s. Owned one.

  • avatar
    Lynn E.

    Damn, more pretend cowboys driving around in their empty toy trucks making silly noises and bad smells. How many more U.S. soldiers will get killed and blown apart protecting our oil supplies?

    Oh wait. The Chinese and Indians just bought the new oil fields. Will your toy trucks make good planters?

    Before talking macho about what your toy trucks can haul or pull (if anyone ever actually uses one for work) please read, “The Big Flatline” by Rubin.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Lynn E. – Life is too short to spend being jealous about what others can afford to drive. If all the pick-ups in the US disappeared tomorrow you would find something else to bitch about.

      • 0 avatar
        chas404

        Amen. Love to hear city folks complain about big trucks but where do they think their house repairs come from? If one wants to buy a nicer version so what? Blame CAFE standards bec luxo cars had to pay $1500 tax and a $55k landcruiser at the time you paid nothing (plus gas was cheap).

        Now gas is high and yes the truck rides empty but those TIMES you need the bed pay off along with the strong resale of a highly optioned 4 door truck.

        Now if you do tons of work yea caddy truck is silly bec you will tear it up.

        Personally I think paying $25k for a hybrid that gets 50mpg instead of a $16k 40mpg econo car is more wastefull than any fancy pickup.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “Damn, more pretend cowboys driving around in their empty toy trucks making silly noises and bad smells.”

      This is true, but OK, so what’s your fetish?

      “How many more U.S. soldiers will get killed and blown apart protecting our oil supplies?”

      You do it’s an all volunteer military, no? And we CAN drill our way to oil independence?

      You do also know that fuel consumption has been on the steady decline since 2007 AND we continue to refine so much petroleum that it’s NOW our #1 export???

      Nail the gas and FLOOR IT, BB!!!

  • avatar
    blowfish

    one you start working that little V6 engine you’d be much better off with a V8. Diesels are made to tow and this is where the Ram shine.

    have tried towing my various mercs

    tow car w201 190 2.2D, w126 300sd and 2005 Dodge Dakota 4.7 V8 merc engine

    pulling a w123 300d and w126 300sd

    we found the Dodge even its has 4.7 and a high ratio/ short rear end has to struggle more when towing either of those diesel merc piggies.

    even the small eng of 190d 2.2 is not a powerful eng to start, with 70 so HP still able to pull the w123 pretty easy.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @Lynn E.
    Don’t worry, in Australia a few weeks ago they announce a possible 223 billion barrel oil find, the potential is about that of Saudi Arabia. Australia will provide war free oil to the US with the Canadians.

    Don’t worry about DenverMike, I’ll explain to him about the energy situation of the US.

    @DenverMike
    All I can say is I told you so a year ago. You are in denial, your are to the Americans what a arrogant Frenchman is to France.

    You should research and see how much oil the US imports. This greatly offsets any exports from the Saudi’s like Lynn E. more or less was describing. The US will become less reliant on imported oil and this will assist your economy. But this hasn’t occurred yet.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @Big Al from Oz – We could import much less oil, but the export of US surplus refined petroleum is one major cash cow.

      Oil is everywhere, but we pretend that it’s not. We can be oil self reliant, but I wish it were that simple. And it’s obviously not oil that we’re fighting for. If we were to pull out of the middle east and abandon all our military bases throughout, the Arabs would dump their US Dollars on the world market and trade oil in Euros from then on. This is common knowledge and the Dollar would become worthless paper with the streets littered with hundred dollar bills…

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I’m actually delighted to see an American producer providing a vehicle that will become popular.

    We used to have the anti-diesel set in Australia but they have more or less disappeared.

    The benefits will be enjoyed by who ever invests in one. Looking at our diesels I would hope it wouldn’t cost more than an extra $3 500 for one.

    If a six speed manual comes out it should be even cheaper, maybe on $2 000 more.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @DenverMike
    You are wrong again, you must read to much propaganda by the Tea Party or from other fringe political groups.

    Fox and Friends is great morning veiwing. My mother’s friend also believes Fox News is accurate, but she is getting very old and senile, but they make it simple for her to understand. You know the feeling?

    First off, the price of Brent has been high in relation to West Texas Crude because of demand by the US. The price of Brent will reduce as more US crude comes on line.

    The US currently is reliant on just under 50% of its crude from imports (not counting Canadian crude).

    The same in our region, because of China, Tapis is always $25+ above West Texas Crude. We pay roughly 25%+ more per barrel than the you do in the US. That’s why its hard to make accurate estimates on the price of oil world wide. Tapis a sweeter than most crudes though. Sweetness describes sulphur and contaminants in the oil.

    The US is currently has a massive shortfall on crude for its own need.

    The US has much oil, except the cost of recovery of the oil is high. The technology to frack oil is become cheaper. But, shale oil is “dirty” and requires more expensive refining techniques. The same will apply to the big Australian find several weeks ago.

    Also the figure used by the US consider Canadian oil in their estimates. But I do believe the Canadians will sell the the highest bidder. The Canadians are developing more business ties with the Chinese every day in relation to their resources.

    Again DenverMike you have proven you are a ill informed.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @Big Al from Oz – Trust me, they’re not serving tea at any of the parties I go.. And I’ve watched just enough Fox News to know they don’t want to hear anything I have to say, But I went there just for the skirt cleavage.

      If you think I’m repeating propaganda, you should look up the definition. Propaganda is there to shield you from the unpopular truth And is obviously working, judging by your reaction.

    • 0 avatar
      jaje

      @ Big Al from Oz
      According to this guy he thinks the rest of the world is forced to use diesel fuel over gasoline and that’s why the heavy transportation industry uses it. It’s hard to argue with ignorance.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Diesel car and light truck ownership is much more of a losing proposition in North America than it is for the rest of the world. The latest round of emissions just compounds it. The rest of the world is a different world and some models don’t even give you a gas option. Gas engine buyers have it too good in the US.

        I don’t see what heavy commercial trucks have to do with this. That’s a different ballgame and nothing else will do. Although, gas engines are becoming more popular in medium duty commercial applications like dump trucks and such. Of course that would only happen in North America. If this still puzzles you… Never mind.

      • 0 avatar
        jaje

        Complete ignorance of the subject and your “observations” do not trump science and reality. Simply stated diesel has a higher energy density than gasoline and it was chosen by the world’s industries for its use in heavy duty applications b/c of a 50% > efficiency under maximum load (and not b/c they are forced to or the fact that certain trucks didn’t have a gas power plant option).

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        With any vehicle below a 1 ton, diesels are more of fetish.. I’ll admit I’m totally into that manly “RATRATRATRAT…” and then taking off sounds like a Lear Jet “sssswooOOOOOSHHHHHHHH!!!” Yeah, I got to confess diesels are super cool in that respect, but that’s where it ends.

        you said:
        “Simply stated diesel has a higher energy density than gasoline and it was chosen by the world’s industries for its use in heavy duty applications…”

        When you’re dealing with 40,000 to 90,000 lbs vehicles you need explosive torque and tremendous engine braking. Plus can idle for several hours at a time and not overheat in hot desert temps. Gas engines obviously don’t cut it here. In cars and light trucks, diesels are far from necessary. Gas engines have the edge here, all things considered.

        Diesel energy density is irrelevant in cars and pickups because now you’re just talking mpg, diesel vs gas, and of course there’s a host of other expenses and losses to consider aside from upfront capital, diesel complexity, high maintenance, emissions additives, foul’d EGRs, wildly expensive repairs and so forth.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @DenverMike
    Because of your great EPA regulations to US has been forced to buy a massive quantity of ethanol from Brazil very recently.

    The unfortunate drought has affected the subsidised corn growers in your country.

    I can’t remember the figure but it is in the millions of barrels. Because of this demand the price of ethanol has risen.

  • avatar
    Lynn E.

    True, U.S. oil consumption has been going down since the economic downturn.
    True, more oil is being found.

    But most of that new oil is in difficult places to get to or not very sweet oil and the Chinese are building the pipelines in places like Canada and Venezuela to get that new oil.

    Yes, you have many more years to be pretend cowboys if you are willing to pay the addiction fee and make everyone in our country pay more because of your addiction.

    You are aware that oil is used for making plastics, heating our homes, providing some electricity, building roads, trains, planes, etc. Seems sad to burn it just so someone can drive around in an empty toy truck.

    Yes, I know you used your PU twice last year to carry a relative’s furniture when they moved – I just wish you hadn’t left the mattress on the side of the road.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      The more fuel I burn through, the less that gets exported to South America, so how does that affect what anyone in the US pays???

      Yeah I’m aware of all the uses for petroleum, but what does that have to with anything?

      On average, yeah US pickup owners haul a lot of air, but that includes compact and mid-size truck owners like Al in his BT50. So? Most coupe and sedan owners haul ghost passengers in the back seat most of the darn time. Why aren’t most of them driving ForTwos?? Luxury cars have even less backseat passenger sightings. And so what? Yes I could’ve got by with a BMW 5 or 7 series and flown completely below your radar while burning the same fuel.

      You’re super quick at judging a man in a pickup that you know absolutely nothing about. I live in an 800 sqft home and use my truck to help haul food staples and clothing to the poor living in remote isolated mountain locations about once a month. Go ahead and judge though, if it gets you off..

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @DenverMike
        How is it the more fuel you burn the less is imported? Even if you live in Texas what you burn can’t be “exported” to other regions of the US which is more reliant on imported fuel. Also the dirty crude that comes in from Venzuela is processed in the Gulf, isn’t it?

        Your house has shrunk also it used to be 10 squares. Plus you used to have a trucking operation.

        DenverMike, we had this diesel vs gasoline debate early last year. You are opposed to diesel and you stated “a trucking company is stupid to operate diesel” because costs are higher.

        Also, there is a significant difference between my ute and your V8 Fords, I would say I use 40% less fuel than you. I’m averaging about 30mpg. And if you try and tell me you are getting above 16-17mpg you are lying.

        Remember, we also have a considerable number of V8s in Australia.

        @Lynn E.
        I don’t think all pickup drivers are cowboys. Most pickups in the US are used as daily drivers/SUVs. But the people are only doing what the US’s regulations are promoting, that is wasteful use of energy.

        That’s why I think it is a farce that the US government states one of its big concerns is the energy security of the US.

        As the US loses it economic influence it will have to review most of its policies regarding energy.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        It’s the east coast that doesn’t export, but I didn’t get my truck to commute and have low miles. I don’t know anyone that uses their full-size for commuting, but my friends that have mid-size trucks do, and haul ass with a bed full of air both ways. Of course they fly under the radar or get a pass while getting the same mpg as my full-size. I get better mpg actually because I drive like there’s an egg under my foot. I have got 19, 20 and 21 mpg averages because of how I drive. It’s a 2wd extra cab as is most full-size in the US, but I cheat by running up to 50 psi in the tires (depending) and a zero toe alignment which I don’t recommend for the average driver.

        I didn’t know there was a sqft minimum for 106 yo houses, but my next new work trucks will be gas V10s in up F-650 configurations. Why do you ask?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @DenverMike
    I sorry I will not debate you anymore, particularly after what you wrote above.

    You are a stupid and dangerous person. Why would anyone deviate from the manufactures specifications regarding the use of a vehicle and a commercial vehicle carrying loads?

    And you claim to be a transport operator? What a selfish, ignorant, irresponsible jerk you are. You are a hazard to your community.

    I thought you stated that you use your V8 for work only. How can you possibly achieve those fuel figures.

    Or you are a troll and a real fool.

    I’m sorry if what I wrote offends other contributors on this site but this guy is a genuine loser.

    @Lynn E.
    I think you have nutted out DenverMike. I might not totally agree with your view of pickup drivers though.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Relax, Big Al from Oz

      I would never modify a commercial vehicle’s specs, come on! This is my personal vehicle/pickup! You know this and now you’re taking mellodramatic stance? So typical. I don’t drive like a maniac so there’s a lot of room to play with. When all other conditions are right, yeah I’ll fine tune my pickup’s rolling resistance. That’s it, not a big deal. Like for light snow, it gets icy in few spots where the sun is filtered out and nobody breaks out the snow chains, not even school buses. You just drive careful, that’s all. You may slide into a ditch, worst case, but again, no big deal. That’s when you run lower pressure around town to increase the contact patch. You’re such a drama queen sometimes.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Denvermike,
      ” It’s a 2wd extra cab as is most full-size in the US, but I cheat by running up to 50 psi in the tires (depending) and a zero toe alignment which I don’t recommend for the average driver.”

      You should be not on the road, completely reckless behavior.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @RobertRyan – “You should be not on the road, completely reckless behavior.”

        I’ve done some crazy things behind the wheel (in my youth), but this doesn’t even register. Seriously, you’re being silly.

  • avatar
    Moparman426W

    My belief is that most of these will be sold for fleet use, most half ton truck buyers are not into diesels here in the US.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Jaje said:
    “Complete ignorance of the subject and your “observations” do not trump science and reality. Simply stated diesel has a higher energy density than gasoline”

    Thanks for that it was going to be reply.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Denvermike said:
    “@RobertRyan – “You should be not on the road, completely reckless behavior.”

    I’ve done some crazy things behind the wheel (in my youth), but this doesn’t EVEN REGISTER. Seriously, you’re being silly.”

    So driving dangerously on the road, does not “even register” for you?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “So driving dangerously on the road, does not “even register” for you?”

      Depends on your definition of driving dangerous. I’m already more cautious than most because of the often precarious, top heavy and unbalanced loads I carry. You can’t dismantle and rearrange, you to deal with what you have and where you have.

      If I’m running minimum resistance settings on my F-150, I’ll drive with slightly more caution and so what? It’s always under the right conditions, but I drove a first generation Bronco II for many years on 35″ BFGs and 6″ of lift. No big deal, I just couldn’t drive it like a damn IROC and was always conscious of my surroundings. This deserves jail time, if it was up to you!


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Authors

  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India