By on February 16, 2013

Here’s our first look at the Chevrolet SS. Silly moniker aside, it looks like a home run.

My biggest fear with the car – that GM would add too much crap and excess detailing, ala the Corvette C7 – has been alleviated. The design looks clean and businesslike. I might be inclined to swap out the Monte Carlo SS-looking rims for something else, but I wouldn’t be embarassed to valet park an SS anywhere.

The one misstep is that Chevrolet didn’t offer a 6-speed manual with the 415 horsepower LS3. I’m sure it would have been easy to find a transmission, though cost issues relating to model mix may play a part here. I’m sure the take rate would be higher than it would be for a traditional sedan, but the 94-96 Impala SS didn’t offer a stick and it scarcely bothered the thousands of buyers who snapped up the entire run. The SRT 300C and Charger, the chief rivals of the SS, don’t offer a stick either.

Now all that’s left is a Jack Baruth track test.

 

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220 Comments on “2014 Chevrolet SS: Suck On This, CAFE...”


  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    They are only going to sell 5000 Holden VF Oooops Chevrolet SS models. So it will not have much of an impact on CAFE.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      The SS is such a weird stop gap. It is basically the sedan version of the Camaro (which shares its Zeta platform and Aussie enginerring), and the Camaro starts at $24K with the 323HP V6 (with an even lower transaction cost since they stack the V6 high and sell it low) or $33K with the 426HP V8. Usually when a sedan and coupe version of the same car are available the coupe sells for more money. But my understanding is that Chevy will want ~$50K for this sedan version. ~$20K more than the V8 coupe version. Also about ~$20K more than a V8 Charger or 300C. If the ~$50K pricing is correct you will really have to hate the Charger, 300C and Camaro to get this thing. Which is my understanding of what Chevy dealer’s strategy will be – if you really want an SS the dealer will order one for you, but they won’t stock it.

      “The one misstep is that Chevrolet didn’t offer a 6-speed manual with the 415 horsepower LS3.” – Don’t forget to mention that the SS will not be offered with diesel, will not be offered in brown and will not be offered as a wagon or ute. Ok, actually you might have a point here. Given the price advantage that the Charger/300C has offering stick could have been one area where the SS had an advantage. Otherwise it seems that even in the SS’s home country people prefer the Chrysler/Dodge platform: http://www.carsguide.com.au/news-and-reviews/car-reviews-road-tests/holden_commodore_sv6_z_series_vs_chrysler_300_limited_v6

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        “Also about ~$20K more than a V8 Charger or 300C. If the ~$50K pricing is correct you will really have to hate the Charger, 300C and Camaro to get this thing.”

        Right. This is a car by the fanboys for the fanboys. Chevy asks the question: How many halo cars does one mainstream manufacturer need?

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I’ve posted below that $50K will be too high in price, but, you really over simplify comparing the sticker price of a rental grade Charger with a V8 and the spiritual successor of a loaded G8 GXP.

        The SS is closer to the SRT in check boxes, admittedly at a 55 HP disadvantage. The SS had as extra cog, more aggressive gear ratio, heads up display, self-parking, all the anti-collision technology (just channeling Karesh).

        The Charger SRT is $47K sticker. Add a sunroof $48K, add some of the anti-collision technology, $49K.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        APaGttH: Yes but you and I both know that if Chevy would build a 3.6V6 version and a 350hp V8 version with a rental car interior they would easily sell in Charger numbers. The problem is then then that the new Impala would have no reason to exist. I would postulate that Chevy would be better off with a RWD family sedan as their top of the heap sedan instead of the Impala. If I want a big soft FWD sedan there is lots more competition out there.

        If I want a RWD family sedan for a reasonable price the competition pool is much smaller.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        Re: APaGttH

        I’m not comparing it to a V6 Charger, although a V6 charger is no joke with the Pentastar.

        A Hemi Charger starts at $29,995, and the fully loaded R/T Max at $36,495. Before any rebates or discounts.

        The Corvette is one thing, but what is the point of Buick and Cadillac with Chevy selling $50K cars?

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        @racer-esq. and just as the G8 GT ate the 5.7 liter Charger alive in every review back to 2008, and it still has the sae 5.7 and sae 5-speed and the same gear ratio you’re comparing apples to pears (not quite to oranges).

        The R/T Max lacks 45 HP for starters, a cog in the transmission, Brembo brakes, 1/2 a liter displacement, the equivalent to U-Connect (the Max comes with the cheaper Garmin option), remote start, heads up display, etc.

        I wish Karesh still wrote for TTaC, the closer comparison, just as it was in late 2009 is the 6.4 SRT.

        That was the G8 GXP competitor and that’s where the performance line is. The 5.7 Hemi in the Dodge can’t keep up with the G8 GT, let alone the GXP with 60 extra HP.

        A SRT with leather seats, paddle shifters, Brembos and Nav will set you back $46K. So sayeth the Dodge site.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        “The 5.7 Hemi in the Dodge can’t keep up with the G8 GT, let alone the GXP with 60 extra HP.”

        I’d venture to say the current car can.

        You’re also forgetting the SRT cars will be equipped with the 8 speed very shortly. First one out the door is the Grand Cherokee for 2014.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        They want $50G for Chevy? – funny guys… I mean, those who is going to buy it.

    • 0 avatar
      chas404

      Why is this not a monte carlo coupe?

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    The black bar in the middle of the bumper looks stupid. Needs to be body color. Otherwise, generic sedan, which with the speed potential on tap is not a bad thing AT ALL.

    At least the wheels look like they might be light in wieght.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      I’m going to guess compliance issue for US bumper regulations.

      The G8 had different bits under the front clip from its Holden cousin for this very reason – the bumpers on the Aussie VE Commodore front and rear did not meet US standards. It’s also why the G8 didn’t get a nav system as an option or standard – the screen was too low by DOT standards in the center stack and it would have required significant engineering and cost to accommodate US regs.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      My thoughts exactly, with that black bar the car looks like its giving off a “duuahhh” face, like too many other cars today.

      I’ve seen a few of the newer “Chevy Caprice” police cars in person and they actually looked alright, so if you want a decent looking one you’ll have to pick up a battered fleet model.

      This being a possibly unpopular V8 sedan I can see GM tacking it up to high heaven hoping to snatch up buyers, expect Camaro tailights and a few sporty models with huge spoilers.

      All this and frankly I’d like a better name than “SS”, otherwise we’ll be seeing an “SS SS” model.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        The police sedan Caprice is based on the Statesman and is about ten inches longer with a 355 HP L76 V8 6.0 with AFM under the hood.

        The SS is based on the Commodore with a 415 HP LS3 V8 6.2 without AFM.

        They are pretty different cars.

    • 0 avatar

      Yup the black bar is what my eyes saw first. Where’s the rear end view?

    • 0 avatar
      Maxseven

      Well, at least the bar is black and not color-keyed to the body. I’m thinking the body-colored section between the grill and the lower fascia should be removed or darkened.

      The major irritation I have is with the MASSIVE Chevy logo. I suppose that could be removed by the owner though.

      Otherwise – very attractive. I’m betting the interior is going to be tacky looking though.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The massive Chevy logo is just following the pattern set by Volkswagen and Mercedes. the holes might look unsightly if you remove the logo, unless you replace it with something else, but what?

      • 0 avatar
        Maxseven

        At least the VW and Benz badges are tasteful. The Chevy logo needs a major facelift.

        A small “SS” down in the corner of the grill would be fine.

    • 0 avatar
      Michael500

      Suddenly it’s 2006! Right you are, this thing is generic looking, just like the 02 GTO Holden. That GTO failed, the G8 was pretty cool but it failed. This will be their third strike (out). They can sell 5000 to the Chevy Kool-aid drinkers, but that’s it. The G8 got a Pontiac fascia and a cool scoop-hood, this one just got an emblem?

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    The Cheverolet SS serves as a very good promotional vehicle for NASCAR, being a production RWD performance sedan.
    The Car will be seen at the Texas V8Supercar event initially.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    Since this is going to be a higher priced vehicle anyway, I wonder what it would have taken to give it Cadillac influenced styling, Cadified the interior and sold it as the XTS instead of the ugly FWD they ended up with?

    • 0 avatar
      pacificpom2

      Because you cannot have a bunch of south sea islanders outshining your local home grown designers. The Cadillac is a product of outstanding American design talent, and woe betide anybody who denigrates the locals against the outsiders. Or, just import the Buick Park Avenues from China!

  • avatar
    Compaq Deskpro

    Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like a hot rod cop car like the last Impala SS did, even though that is what it is.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      The Caprice PPV is based on the Statesman and has a different engine and is close to ten inches longer with a different wheel base. Also the Caprice PPV is based on the VE platform, this is based on the VF platform. It is not a tarted up Caprice PPV.

      • 0 avatar
        delux

        VE platform = VF Platform

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        VE Platform VF Platform

        The VE Platform = the VF Platform in the same way that a fifth generation Hyundai Sonata = Sixth Generation Hyundai Sonata.

        Good luck swapping that VF hood on to a VE, or the tail lights, or the doors, or the dashboard, or the driver seat, or the master cylinder, or the rear brakes discs, or the headlamp assembly, or the DRLs, or the core support, or the drive shaft, or the…

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “Good luck swapping that VF hood on to a VE, or the tail lights, or the doors, or the dashboard, or the driver seat, or the master cylinder, or the rear brakes discs, or the headlamp assembly, or the DRLs, or the core support, or the drive shaft, or the…”

        None of those things have much to do with a platform.

        Very few of the parts you mentioned are a direct interchange between my ’88 Grand AM and my ’92 Grand Am even though they share the same platform. OTOH, a Trans Sport van and my ’92 Bonneville have several interchangeable parts even though they are on very different platforms.

        This is an update, but it’s still a Zeta car (which isn’t a bad thing)

      • 0 avatar
        Compaq Deskpro

        To hell with this car then. The Caprice connection was the only thing that held my interest.

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      Either way it will be hard to have their cake and eat it too. This doesn’t seem as flexible a platform as the Chrysler LX.

  • avatar
    pacificpom2

    Back in the dim dark past, GM set up “centres of excellence”. Europe was delegated responsibility to design small/medium FWD, Australia was handed large RWD and North America was handed trucks and large FWD vehicles. The designs themselves are not in question, its the fact that GM, and to an equal extent Ford, wouldn’t allow outside influences to progress beyond the basic chassis engineering for the local markets. If GM was truly into global design ideas, they might has “tendered out” the design of their vehicles, to see who could come up with the best exterior, interior etc.. We don’t care who designed the interior/exterior/power train as long as it meets the requirements of the particular customer. I realise that no australian would have the mind set to presume what the american customer wants from Cadillac, but even Cadillac themselves dont seen to have a grasp on that either.

    • 0 avatar
      doug-g

      It’s easy to be an armchair quarterback. I don’t know chassis dynamics, technology adaptability, exchange rates and MANY more things that go into the decision making process of a major automobile company. All I can do is look at the product and decide whether I like it or not.

      With that in mind, they can fill the current XTS to the roof with high-tech gizmos and high-end interior fittings and they’re not going to turn that FWD anteater into any kind of a luxury car that fulfills the major function of a luxury product – to make people aspire to it. The current XTS, IMHO, lacks any kind of curb or street presence. GM would have done themselves a favor by updating the long-in-tooth DTS. At least the DTS had a hood, a trunk and proper proportions. Yeah, three box, but at least it looked like something other than a melted blob with a giant chrome grill. Personally, I could see this Holden turned into a Cadillac, at least style-wise with a front clip and redesigned rear end. The interior? I don’t know. Would CUE, for example, be useable? If it weren’t, wouldn’t a damned nice looking car that could kick some butt on the street make more sense considering the direction Cadillac claims it wants to go than a “user experience” directed more towards people who won’t give the current XTS a first look?

      That’s the view from this section of the peanut gallery.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Well, color me a bit disappointed. The G8 GXP also had the LS3 and 415 HP / 415 torque out of the box. Performance numbers were faster, about 4.7 seconds 0 to 60 than the “around five” they are projecting for the SS. There was A LOT of chatter this was going to get the new Corvette engine.

    The interior is going to be much nicer looking at the pics and what little I’ve read. The G8 didn’t have a bad interior compared to say the Bonneville and Grand Prix it replaced, but if there was a weakness – that would be it. Anything over $47K and this feels over priced – going up 3% a year a G8 GT today would come in at about the same price. Even at $47K – it feels over priced. I sure hope the sticker isn’t going to be $50K.

    Four piston Brembos front, single piston rear, 6-speed, LS3, all right out of the G8 GXP spec sheet. My understanding is the lack of a manual is because of US certification requirements which cost several million – the math doesn’t add up – but the absence of a manual is a crying shame. The 3.27 rear end is more aggressive than the 2.92 in the G8.

    The rear rims are wider than the front and get wider rubber on a lower profile. This is a popular tweak on the G8 GT with after market rubber. It’s more for keep the copious amounts of power getting to the ground than handling. I hope one thing that hasn’t changed is that Stabilitrak can be completely disabled and when enabled, doesn’t engage until the fun is truly no longer fun.

    Other things on the tick sheet that at least on paper are added to the defunct G8 GXP:

    • Bose® Nine-speaker premium sound system
    • Color heads-up display
    • Push-button start
    • Forward Collision Alert
    • Lane Departure Warning
    • Side Blind Zone Alert
    • Rear-vision camera Rear Cross Traffic Alert
    • Automatic Parking Assist

    Premium fuel is not required. If the word on 10% improvement on fuel economy is true – than look for MPG around 15/24 and no gas guzzler tax like the G8 GXP had.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      I suspect that the 0-60 times were adjusted so that the SS doesn’t upstage the automatic V8 Camaro.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Ryoku75,
        There would not be much of a difference as the Camaro was engineered by Holden in Melbourne based on the Commodores Zeta “Architecture”

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Bah – disagree. GM seems to have finally walked away from thou shalt not build Product X to be faster than Product Y. When the second gen CTS-V came out it was faster than the best Corvette could offer.

        I agree with other poster, this is a practical family sedan that can seat five with a real trunk on steroids. The Camaro is about 7/8th the size based on the VE platform with a cave of an interior, a torture chamber for a backseat and a useless trunk.

    • 0 avatar
      86SN2001

      Regarding the performance figures:

      I’m guessing GM is sandbagging the a bit. That seems a bit slow for those performance figures.

      And I really don’t see this car impacting Camaro sales even if it was faster than the Camaro. This is a practical family sedan…the Camaro is a pony car. Two different markets.

    • 0 avatar
      outback_ute

      This seems more like the G8 GT level rather than a GXP replacement to me. Other than the power output it seems to be basically a Commodore SS.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      “Well, color me a bit disappointed. The G8 GXP also had the LS3 and 415 HP / 415 torque out of the box. Performance numbers were faster, about 4.7 seconds 0 to 60 than the “around five” they are projecting for the SS. There was A LOT of chatter this was going to get the new Corvette engine”.

      I agree, sometimes I think GM purposely keep new models a step or so away from being just right. Many ’04 GTO owners wish they had waited a year for the LS2 and ’94-’95 Impala SS owners for the ’96 with console shifter and analog gauges/speedometer.

      Glad the Bose is in and Blaupunkt crap is out, I hate the Blaupunkt in my GTO.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        I fear too many customers will simply see a gray sedan with a slush box and nothing more.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        I’ve owned too many cars with Bose to have any respect for them whatsoever. They sound awful. Worse, they’re not easily fixable because of their love of using active EQ to compensate for the bargain-basement crap they use for drivers.

        Back in the old days, I could replace cheap drivers with nice stuff from Scandinavia. Now I’m resigned to not having decent sound in the cars I want to drive.

      • 0 avatar

        I’m a bit skeptical about some of the branding of audio equipment in cars. After all, Volkswagen has a deal where their audio gear is branded with Fender, a company not really in the business of making high fidelity audio gear, a company whose electronic equipment is noted for its distinctive distortion. Fender, though, is a brand name that consumers recognize. Just as there are low information voters, there are low information consumers.

        About 35 years ago, there was a botulism problem with some home canned peppers at a Mexican restaurant in Pontiac, Michigan called Trini & Carmen’s. About 50 people got sick. At the time it was the largest outbreak of botulism poisoning in US history. Somehow the restaurant survived. After a few years I noticed that people would say, “Trini & Carmen’s? I’ve heard of them,” not remembering why they recognized the name. They’re still in business.

        The Infinity branded stuff that I’ve listened to in Acuras sounds pretty good and I’ve been impressed with the B&W branded gear in the Jaguars I’ve tested, though the most recent Jaguar didn’t have, apparently, a branded audio system and it sounded just fine.

        As for Bose, I don’t want to be an audiophile snob, but there is a reason for the old doggerel, “there are no highs, there are no lows, it must be Bose”. Bose is a very successful marketing company but my audio tastes run more towards conrad-johnson and Martin Logan (if I could afford them).

      • 0 avatar
        Loser

        @ bunkie, in my limited experience the Bose sounds better than the Blaupunkt. The one I have has a very muddy sound. I drove a Pontiac G5 with a Bose system and it sounded better than my GTO. The stock system in my wife’s 4Runner and brothers ’09 Fusion blows mine away.

  • avatar
    zeus01

    Hmmm. It seems the difference between “home run” and “boring” depends on whether the badge sez “Chevrolet” or “Toyota”. No bias here…

  • avatar
    86SN2001

    Nice to see that two American manufactures know how to build exciting and desirable family sedans (V8 and RWD).

    Ford becomes even less relevant now.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @86SN2001 Not exactly American, US owned would be more correct.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Both RWD and the V8 are obsolete as far as practical family cars go.

      RWD is more fun for honing, and the V8 in my F-150 sounds and feels badass. That makes V8 RWD less practical, but more fun, and I respect more fun.

      TCS solves all of the gotchas that FWD had 20 years ago. My family truckster (Toyota Sienna) is pleasantly overpowered with a 3L V6. It’d be fine with a much smaller engine, but I can get 29MPG out of it on the highway, which is really very good for a living room. And it handles well in snow and on the highway, too.

      P.S. My F-150 is for sale! It’s a great truck and well maintained, but I don’t have the space or the need for it.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “Both RWD and the V8 are obsolete as far as practical family cars go.”

        Disagree! The Charger is V8, RWD and practical. You don’t have to sell out to bland to get a reasonable family sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        And you also don’t need RWD and a V8 to have fun driving.

        P.S. The previous-gen daily-rental Chargers were no pleasure to drive in my book. I’d rather even choose a Focus or a Jetta on the rental car lot, sorry …

      • 0 avatar
        nrd515

        I don’t want FWD in anything, period. I’ve driven a lot of modern FWD cars, from the current Taurus, Edge, Malibu, and a bunch of minivans, and to be honest, I would take any RWD vehicle over any of them. Personally, I owned one lone FWD, a Dodge Caravan. It’s serious lack of power was my main complaint with it, but the FWD was the reason I was happy to see it go. Other than a desire for a flat floor, I see no reason for FWD in anything. The V8 is just a matter of how much torque do you want/need, and if can you afford it. I would rather have a semi-gutless RWD car than a decently powered FWD one. I would have to wonder what you consider “Overpowered”, as I’ve driven a top of the line 2012 Sienna and it’s well, one thing it’s not, is overpowered. Adequate is the best word I would use for it. About 100lb/ft short is my honest opinion of it. It’s warp drive compared to my Caravan though.

    • 0 avatar
      Loser

      Even if Ford did sell one here you’d bitch saying it was a “bland, hideous appliance”, followed by “bold moves indeed”.

      • 0 avatar
        86SN2001

        As usual, you couldn’t be more wrong. Thanks for playing though!

      • 0 avatar
        Loser

        So what V-8 Ford engine could they use in a rear drive 4 door that you have not already called a boat anchor or marginally better than a boat anchor?

      • 0 avatar
        Hoser

        GM has created a car as at home on the track performance-wise as it is the rental lot appearance-wise.

        Other than what is under the hood, this is truly a bland, hideous appliance that should have been aborted.

        Every time Matt says “you couldn’t be more wrong”, means you just hit the nail on the head. “Deny Deny Deny” is his only defense.

        What happened to voting the troll off the island?

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      I feel your sentiments, but there is no business case for this market as the 300 thoroughly covers it (and people like us are the minority). With that said, I really hope this niche market grows.

      My next daily driver will be a heavily modified panther.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      Exactly, who is going to get an Aston Martin looking (much better than the new Malibu) Fusion for $20K now that you can get a Pontiac G8 with slightly updated front and rear clips for $50K.

      I like RWD performance cars. Guess what, Ford will sell you a Mustang with RWD AND stick (which the SS does not offer) for $20K. That makes the SS irrelevant to even its core market. Hell, Chevy’s own Camaro (which does not get as good of reviews as the Mustang) makes the SS irrelevant.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        I don’t think the Mustang, a 2+2 coupe/sports car, makes the SS irrelevant at all. The Charger on the other hand…

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        You are right that the Charger/300 is the direct competitor, and still blows the SS out of the water on expected price.

        But as a person that has owned multiple RWD cars with both 2 and 4 doors I will say that, at least for me, 2 doors was never a deal breaker. RWD (and stick, but I will admit I am in the minority there) are generally my requirements, after that it comes down to price, reliability, etc. 4 doors is generally a plus, but not a requirement.

    • 0 avatar
      thelaine

      Agreed 86S. I love the wolf in sheep’s clothing RWD American family sedan. If I was in the market now, I would love to have one of these. I hope the type never dies out. This seems like a fine example. It doesn’t have to be the absolute fastest or the best, it just has to make you smile after you drop off the kids, get on some open road, and hammer it.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      As if there is a huge market for RWD performance sedans. As much as I would like to see Ford jump into this, it would make about as much sense as Ford investing billions in a new sports car just to get a sliver of pie that’s already been sliced up by Corvette and Viper.

      Maybe if the segment had exploded and Ford could be able to make a business case for it but that GM only expects to sell 5000 examples of the SS doesn’t indicate any confidence.

  • avatar

    So is this an official for-the-people model, or for fleets and cops only (still)?

    • 0 avatar
      86SN2001

      For the people. This has a completely different look from the Caprice (of course, GM may be changing the Caprice for 2014, but nothing as of yet)

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      The Caprice PPV and the SS are very different cars.

      The Caprice PPV is based on the VE Statesman, is about 10 inches longer with a longer wheelbase, comes with an optional 355 HP L76 AFM 6.0 V8 (LS2 aluminum block, L92 heads, LS3 intakes and throttle body) that produces 355 HP. This is closer to the Charger R/T. It is worth noting the L76 in the defunct G8 GT and current Caprice PPV has almost nothing in common with the VVT L76 6.0 with 413 HP in the GMC Yukon Denali and Cadillac Escalade. Although both LS2 blocks, the L76 truck motor is iron, the Australian L76 for the Commodore is aluminum.

      The SS is based on the VF Commodore SS V-Series Z-Performance with an LS3 slightly detuned to 415 HP versus the 430 HP in the Corvette and the 6.0 L76 with 355 HP used in Australia.

      If you look at the greenhouse and doors on the SS and you’re going wait a minute, that looks like the G8 you are 100% correct. The greenhouse, and door skins and door pulls look are all the same (the pulls aren’t interchangeable but they are the same shape, size, etc).

      The Camaro is also a Zeta car, based on the VE Commodore and shrunk down to about 7/8th size. The high belt line on the Camaro is in part to accommodate the VE suspension bits, a broke GM couldn’t invest more to make it smaller so they went off the shelf. Find an old G8 GT and open the hood next to a V8 Camaro – the location and parts for the ABS module, master cylinder, radiator, jumper connections for the battery, relay box, etc. all the same. Open the trunk of the Camaro and the battery is mounted on the driver side US, because the Aussie designed Zeta put it on the passenger side in Australia.

      What is not clear to me is if the PPV goes to the VF platform or not. Word is, as you probably know, the Camaro is going to go to the Alpha platform when it gets redesigned. This will make it much smaller, but because of chassis differences the interior will probably grow larger, with the trunk about the same. The VE Commodore was almost to the millimeter the identical dimensions to the previous generation BMW 5-series. The only thing that keeps the Camaro from looking ridiculously super sized for a pony car is the Challenger – which is proportionally GORGEOUS, albeit huge.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Just a note: the current Holden Statesman/Caprice has ‘WM’ for the platform code. VE and VF are the short-wheelbase versions.

      • 0 avatar
        outback_ute

        VE VF & WM are model codes not platform codes, they are the equivalent of model year designations.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @RobertRyan- As I wrote, regardless of the word on the street or in the blogosphere, GM internal data on the cars we build, sell, warranty and recall supports my contention. GM and Ford in America are runing neck and neck with the very best carmakers in the world as independent quality surveys show.

        @APaGttH- Caprice (Holden and Chevy PPV) share the same 3,009 mm wheelbase of the Commodore, Chevy SS versions. The underpinings are identical, though the Caprice is longer and has a different rear roofline. G8 enthusiasts here benefit from the beefier powertrain pieces made available from GM or the aftermarket for the Camaro.

        Gen III and Gen IV small blocks are actually very littly different whether the block is aluminum or iron. They share common design valve train, pistons, rods, crankshafts and cylinder heads and blocks and more. They all have the same base engine dimensions, though trucks have different intake manifolds that make use of the additional underhood space of trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @doctor olds.
        “The independent surveys” are not that terribly accurate(biased towards US suppliers?) as US consumers are buying increasingly enormous numbers of Korean/ Japanese and it seems now European vehicles. I think the buyers have a much better idea of quality as they have to pay the money and in a down economy you try and make the right choice.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @RobertRyan- By your measure GM is very successful, continuing to sell more cars than any other car company in the US, China and the world, outside Toyota’s 2,000,000 to a few thousand advantage in their home market where all imports combined amount to only single digit market share.
        Independent surveys are only as accurate as the consumers responding to them, but they all try very hard to eliminate any bias one way or the other. Vehicle makers make multi-million dollar decisions, in part, based on such surveys. I did spend a number of years working to understand such data for GM.

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        @doctor olds

        Caprice and Ute sit on a longer wheelbase -3,009 mm (118.5 in) than Commodore and Tourer -2,915 mm (114.8 in), as per wikipedia and my own observations.

        The Toadster who seems to know the car better than Holden engineers, has posted a lot of confusing nonsense about the car in this thread. But I like his level of fanboyism.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @Athos Nobile- You are right! I stand corrected. Trusted a bad memory and must have been in error when looking up the numbers today. Thanks!

  • avatar
    Buckshot

    It looks 10 yo.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      Generic. Bland. Fast.

      In an America with aggressive militarized police forces who treat every traffic stop like a combat situation, looking bland is an good thing.

      Doesn’t attract attention, but goes fast. I get that! I probably won’t buy it, but I get the appeal! :-)

  • avatar
    Summicron

    “In an America with aggressive militarized police forces who treat every traffic stop like a combat situation…”

    OK… *you* walk up to a car full of “youths” you just pulled over with nothing but a flashlight and a kindly face.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      And when you threaten those kids, they learn to fear the police, as I learned in my 20s when the wave of militarization hit the place where I was living. Do you want the people on your side or not?

      After that I saw a guy breaking into a car and made the calculation that I’d rather watch an unarmed man steal a car than talk to the armed men with attitude problems who were bound to show up if I made the call.

      I GTFO’d to a saner place, but you guys really aren’t doing yourselves any favors by being aggressive with the law-abiding populace. Nobody ever said being a cop was supposed to be easy.

      Seriously, the only people who have eve deliberately threatened me with a gun (by reaching toward their holster – that’s a threat in real life) have been cops, and I was trying to puzzle out why they had come over to talk to me while i was sitting on the tailgate of my truck, unarmed, with my hand in plain sight. I thought we both had manners before that incident, but “don’t make me pull my gun on you” in that situation just means that the cops are put of touch with my reality, and the most dangerous people for miles around! And, yes, that’s what they wanted me to think, bit they didn’t think about the implications of using fear this way over the long term. None of my subsequent conversations with the police over the last decade or so have gone much better, so my former respect for police has been replaced by fear.

      That’s just what’s happened to me. My friends, who are mostly highly educated engineers and sciency types, have had much worse threats – including one friend who was on the wrong end of a false alarm call that ended with the cops shooting his brother’s dog in the face. When the cops show up for no reason and gun down the dog, they’re doing something wrong. And before anyone talks about selection bias, I’d like to point out that these are the majority of our interactions with police.

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        Police are a necessary part of a civilized country, so what’s the solution? Become part of the community, and act like it whenever possible.

        Going into combat mode when you pull over normal just means people means that normal people find themselves in a combat situation whenever the cops show up. That’s really bad in terms of long term relationships.

        My solution is to avoid talking to law enforcement until y’all wise up. Some of the time, that will make things easier, sometimes harder. But, given the number of times I’ve been screamed at or threatened over nothing, its not really my problem anymore.

      • 0 avatar
        Summicron

        You were never one of “those kids” and neither were your friends.
        You know perfectly well the societal component I’m referring to…. 4th generation brutalized, ignorant, drug-saturated, fatherless, illiterate and utterly hopeless products of the Great Society; baked in a popular culture that glorifies every destructive element of their fast track to prison, a morgue or both. Your cohort was not this but the polar opposite.

        You’ve led a nice sheltered life, comparatively speaking. Be duly thankful and please attempt to understand the precautions taken by those who daily have to face all the horrors blind luck has allowed you to escape.

        RE: Off Topic Posts…
        Here’s my fine of 1500 Internet Drachmas XXXXXX

      • 0 avatar
        Luke42

        @summicron:

        We can talk about what went wrong with my childhood over a beer; it’s not what you imagine, despite then fact that I find myself in an excellent situation now. But, for the sake of argument, let’s accept your premise.

        I learned to fear the cops the same way “those kids” do. In my 20s, around the time I became a respectable homeowner.

        What gives?

      • 0 avatar
        Summicron

        @Luke42

        I shouldn’ta sploded.

        Just got back from seeing Lincoln (finally).

        War’s over…. no hangings

  • avatar
    WEGIV

    As a current “Pontiac” GTO owner who at least considered trading up to a G8 and is now in the market for a new car (aka, their target market), I’m really disappointed that this is leaving me so m-e-h meh.
    I like a sleeper as much as the next guy, but this goes a little too far into the nondescript. The SS looks positively dumpy next to the Camaro and Corvette, like “oh hey, someone took a picture of a Camaro and a C7 and accidentally forgot to crop their rental car out of the picture.”
    I can’t understand why they chose that nondescript silver as the debut color for its first press images – the subtle character lines almost completely disappear (I thought it didn’t have any until I saw the darker pic with the headlights on). Maybe in a different color and with some more aggressive wheels it’ll be better – they had to tweak the GTO’s styling and upgrade to the current-gen engine/brakes between 04 and 05 too…but I’d bet that the exterior styling isn’t the only concern.
    As a current GTO owner, I can make an educated guess at what the Holden-flavored driving experience will be like:
    * V8 is fun, suitably motivates the car and makes good noises, but gets really crap mileage (mid-teens or less) anywhere other than the highway no matter how carefully you drive it
    * Weight will mean that it’ll handle decently in the twisties, but won’t really compare to a proper sport sedan in terms of making you forget how heavy it is (I’d guess just north of 2 tons given the Camaro’s weight)
    * not enough tire for the weight and power of the car, and limited room to add without rolling the fenders
    * any part that isn’t common across all LS3 drivetrain cars will be “German car” expensive and not well-stocked by dealers because it’ll have to be imported from Australia, and there will be a very limited secondhand/reman market because it’s so low-volume
    * no choice of interior/exterior options except color and dealer-installed things like wheels to keep ordering/stocking easy on a low-volume car
    * reasonably nice interior, but doesn’t age well (my 05 interior is self-destructing)
    * questionable paint quality compared to the US-made GM stuff (lots of orange peel, thin clearcoat that is prone to damage)

    So I’d be replacing one car with at least some of those defects with another, settling for styling I don’t exactly love, and I can’t get a manual. No sale. For $47K-ish plus the continued cost of v8-thirsty MPG it’s more likely to be a used LSA-powered CTS-V or a used Audi RS4.

    • 0 avatar
      Stumpaster

      Self destruct interior isn’t it standard on all Chevys?

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Let me guess; You have the Torrid red GT0? Silver is the perfect color for the SS unless you’re trying to stand out. What I liked about the GTO is it blended in, unless you got the Yellow Jacket or Horred. Otherwise, I thought I was looking at a throw it away Grand Am until I got right up on it.

      I’m also glad they didn’t go with the vatozone spoilers and such on the SS. Time is ticking away for Ford though and the F-150 is the only thing they can throw at it.

      • 0 avatar
        WEGIV

        no, mine is black. There’s a difference between wanting to stand out (choosing a “hello officer” color) and expecting that the car will have styling that is visually interesting even in a relatively sedate color. There are plenty of cars that blend in with the surrounding traffic but still look good on their own.

    • 0 avatar
      Alexdi

      Nicely said. Your thoughts mirror mine, particularly about the rental-car exterior. I would look very hard at a CPO CTS-V before this.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I prefer the Caprice.

  • avatar
    OAlx

    It is somewhere between ugly, nondescript and average. Why bother?

  • avatar
    jdmcomp

    As for me, I would rather Chevy make a version of the ATS as the SS and get rid of the Caddy weight and bling.

  • avatar
    Thomas Kreutzer

    I’m sorry but I thought the styling was bland and the rear end oddly proportioned when Pontiac sold this car 5 years ago and now I think it is bland, odd looking AND dated. There is something about this car, the back quarters and windows maybe, that reminds me of an old series 3 BMW and, frankly, I don’t think it fits on a car this size.

    The new Impala looks modern and sharp compared to this. Other than the sound out the back I can’t imagine this car offers a better experience out on the road.

    Whatever, I guess, “different strokes for different folks” and the General has at least a couple of cars I would seriously shop and it isn’t going to kill me if this brings other guys into the showroom, too.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Thomas Kreutzer
      It screams Holden Epica to me. The discontinued Korean import we had.
      Chevrolet Impala.
      http://www.chevrolet.com/impala-sports-sedan.html

      Holden Epica.
      http://www.classycars.org/Holden/Holden.2007.Epica.jpg

  • avatar
    Loser

    I wanted to get a G8 GXP but had other priorities at the time. Looks like I’ll be selling my GTO soon. I think the bow tie on the grill is a bit too big, would look better with an “SS” badge in it’s place. Just wonder how much markup the dealers will add to this car.

  • avatar
    carguy

    While this will always be a niche product for Chevy, it’s success will entirely depend on the price tag. If a decently equipped model will sell in the low to mid 30s then they have a chance. If the high Aussie dollar pushes this into $40K territory then it will just be an expensive NASCAR marketing exercise.

    I don’t quite understand the car forum hate for this car – I kind of dig the sleeper looks and I’m sure it will look sufficiently aggressive in black.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      The “blogosphere” and the car mags have been saying near $50K. Go price a Hemi Charger and then come back and tell me why Chevy’s price tag is a massive fail.

      Oh wait, GM DOESN’T want to sell more than 5,000 of these cause then they might owe CAFE fines.

      • 0 avatar
        racer-esq.

        I don’t think CAFE explains this, it’s the AUD and shipping. GM is selling as many SS Camaros as it can.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Ummm, I just did, an SRT Charger with a 6.4, starts at $47K.

        You can’t compare a rental grade base Charger with a 5.7 and 5-speed under the hood to a self parking leather interior navigation system etc etc etc etc car. The closest in equipment is the top line Charger.

        It would be like pointing at a completely loaded every option Toyota Sienna and going, pffffft, I can buy a Caravan for $25K less. Yes you can, but a throw up interior Caravan isn’t in the same league as a loaded Sienna.

        The key difference, I can buy a stripped Sienna (not that even a stripped one s I’ll-equipped) and now compare.

        Yes, you can buy a $26k Charger…not even close to the same car as the SS, or the top trim $20K more expensive SRT.

        Just like I can buy a Camry L – which doesn’t even come close to the $13K more expensive loaded out Camry SE.

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        Which car mags? MT yesterday posted it was going to be around $38K.

        The 50 grand number is something you guys placed and repeated ad nauseaum here.

  • avatar
    ajla

    From what I’ve read about how GM is marketing the car, I’m predicting high $40Ks, with dealer markups pushing it into the mid $50Ks.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    I’m not sure who the target market for this car is. It’s almost like they are trying to compete with Lexus on who can make the blandest, most overpriced RWD sedan.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    The black bumper bar is reminiscent of the late, unlamented Mazda smiley-face styling device. It didn’t make car buyers’ hearts sing or open their wallets.

    At $50Gs a copy I doubt there will be a stampede on Chevrolet showrooms, especially with the Chrysler 300C and Dodge Charger available for much less.

  • avatar
    Autopassion

    I wish the result would have looked more like this:
    http://www.seriouswheels.com/2000-2003/2003-Chevrolet-SS-Concept-Exhibition.htm

  • avatar
    danio3834

    I really like the powertrain, and I’m really glad Chevy is making this car available.

    That being said, it’s not distinctive enough, not enough character to create the “want” that I feel for cars like the SRT8s, BOSS, GT500, Camaro SS, Corvette.

    I’m sure it’ll be a fine sedan, and I’d take one over an Impala any day, but not over a Charger or 300.

  • avatar
    jbltg

    zzzzzzzzzzzzz……and 50K, for that?….

  • avatar
    otter

    Despite the “new” appellation, it appears to be the same BIW as the previous Commodore – same apertures, glass, roof, cowl, and so on. Isn’t the Commodore a bit narrow compared to other E-segment sedans? A sort of global homogeniety of some of the design language strikes me, too – the surfacing around the taillamps and decklid, and the front end, in particular (ref. Malibu, for sintance); ‘Chevy’ in the US, ‘Holden’ in Australia, it’s all just a grille insert change away. Success in the US will depend on careful market positioning and pricing, I bet.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      The greenhouse and doors are the same, the cowl is not. The VE Commodore was dimensionally almost to the millimeter identical to the last gen 5-series. (EG 2009 Commodore vs a 2009 5-series sedan).

      Does that help you gauge if it is more narrow than other E-Segment cars?

      • 0 avatar
        otter

        APaGttH,

        I remember reading that the Pontiac G8 (VE Commodore) was a bit narrow, but I’ve never been in one. I’ve driven a Caprice (VE Statesman) and that is narrower inside than comparable US police cars (Taurus, Charger) so that was probably the basis of my impression. That said, I could easily be wrong.How can the cowl be different when the rest of the BIW is the same?

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      It is the same BIW and the cowls are exactly the same between the Caprice and Commodore. Cowl details are BIW “hard points” that seldom, if ever vary between model variations. An example: the Cadillac STS was saddled with a too high cowl that was shared with the old SRX, though the cars looked quite different, much of the “black metal”, the internal structure of the car body, was the same.

      The Commodore/G8/SS interior is larger than the Dodge Charger, 107 cu ft vs. 104.7 cu ft, and bigger in every dimension except two: Charger has .7″ more rear knee room and 0.2″ more front shoulder room. The G8 has .5″ more front hip room, which should make it feel slightly larger than Charger, if the difference is noticable.
      The 2009 BMW 5 series had 99.1 cu ft of interior volume and had interior smaller than the 2009 G8 in every dimension but head room. The current Taurus with 102.2 cu ft of interior volume is also smaller in every dimension but front head room.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    It’s way better looking than the Camaro or Corvette.

    I guess GM pays to Federalize this thing by charging snooty $50k prices. It’ll be just another short-run car, so get it while you can!

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    $50,000 for THIS? Ridiculous. I wouldn’t pay over $35,000. If I wanted to spend 50k on a sedan, I would get an A6. Maybe not quite as fast in a straight line, but infinitely better in every other regard.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      $23,000 for a Chevy Cruze? Ridiculous! No one will buy one!

      $20,000 for a Ford Fiesta? Ridiculous! No one will buy one!

      $29,000 for a Buick Verano? Ridiculous! No one will buy one!

      $25,000 for a FR-S? I can buy a MX-5 for less! No one will buy one!

      Lexus wants how much for a LF-A? No one will buy one!

      One thing I’ve learned from the B&B is when it comes to guessing car price and demand, collectively, as a group, yours truly included – we aren’t so bright. All 5,000 will easily sell, and they won’t need cash on the hood to move them.

      Finally, if the NASCAR watching dude goes into a Chevy dealer looking at a SS, and leaves in an Impala – win General Motors.

      And before you make the jump that no one will cross shop a FWD sedan vs a RWD performance sedan do you really think Toyota would spend the millions upon millions upon millions they do in NASCAR if some bean counter could not have it proven to them that Toyota + NASCAR = more FWD Camry sedans sold. If anything the ability to buy an SS just like I saw on NASCAR will appeal to at least 5,000 buyers, easily.

    • 0 avatar
      86SN2001

      Mandalorian:

      Price has not been announced. Quit whining.

  • avatar
    david42

    If it had a little more style, they could’ve called it a Cadillac and priced it at $60k.

  • avatar
    Dynasty

    Looks like a Chevy.

    Not sure if it will be worth 50K. But then again, what car that sells for 50K is REALLY worth 50K…

    The styling will age really well. Doesn’t scream look at me like the Challengers, Camaros, and Corvettes do.

    And I’d bet my house, my car, and the rest of my possessions that every single one of the 5000 copies of this car will find a loving home.

    • 0 avatar
      Lichtronamo

      Only problem is that it doesn’t look like a NEW Chevy. That front clip is a mishmash of Cruze headlights, W-Body Impala and some kind of Ford/Mazda lower opening. Given GM’s push to integrate Chevy/Holden styling, I’m surprised this isn’t more cohesive and also more up to date with what is supposed to be Chevy’s new look shown on the Impala and Traverse.

    • 0 avatar
      Hoser

      “And I’d bet my house, my car, and the rest of my possessions that every single one of the 5000 copies of this car will find a loving home.”

      I’d say you’re right. And a good number of those homes will be directly into storage only to see the light of day again in 25-30 years at auction when people with more money than sense wish to buy a low-production high-performance piece of history.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @doctor olds
    It is a GM owned company like Opel/Vauxhall that has been incorporated into a foreign country, therefore a subsidiary not a Division. The Zeta was started by a German not a US CEO. Design is now incorporated globally ,after the original US company was declared bankrupt and bailed out by the US government.. The Holden SS or Chevrolet SS is built in Australia. It is not just a nameplate

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      100% correct. Most of the Zeta platform engineers were poached from BMW. There is a reason why the VE Commodore was almost dimensionally identical to a BMW 5-series to the millimeter with equivalent performance numbers for acceleration, handling and braking and a suspension with similar design and characteristics (right up to eating LCAs up front on command).

      Back in the day I think they did a darn good job building what they did scrounging through the GM parts bin.

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      Holden is just a nameplate, meaning no disrespect, witness Holden Malibu and Captiva, as two examples of vehicles offered with other nameplates in other markets.

      At the same time, there is a GM engineering center in Australia that has done a lot of large RWD vehicle development, notably the Commodore and Camaro. Check to see who the leaders of the Australian business unit have been. I know two who came through that slot personally, Denny Mooney came up through Oldsmobile Division and Mark Reuss, current President of GMNA did a stint there. Don’t know if the current leader is an Aussie or from somewhere else.

      The Zeta was derived from a carline engineered at the GM engineering center in Europe. As a point of fact, there is not now and has never been a German CEO. General Motors Corporation and now GM Company has always had only one CEO and his office is in Detroit. The leadership is global and rotates among the regions frequently.
      My point is, whether the legal relationship is defined as a wholly owned subsidiary for legal reasons, both Holdens’ and Opel’s engineering centers are functionally integrated parts of GM’s global engineering structure.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @doctor olds
        Peter Hanneymeyer a German was the CEO of Holden, different company a subsidiary of GM US. Mark Reuss is the CEO of GM. Zeta was developed at Holden from the original Opel. That is how we ended up doing Global RWD cars for GM until Sigma was developed.
        Unlike other US GM “nameplates” Holden did not go into bankruptcy, but was a profitable unit at the time of the US Bankruptcy of GM US.
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/GM_Zeta_platform

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        Michael (Mike) Devereux is chairman and managing director of GM Holden Ltd., previously served as president and managing director of GM Middle East Operations, began his GM career in 1984 as a co-op engineering student at the GM of Canada St. Catharines Engine and Foundry Complex.

        My point, he is a North American who has served in a number of locations, just as Hannemeyer who, similarly, would have been Managing Director not CEO. If you would like to learn more about the global experiences and origins of Holden’s current management, hit this link: http://media.gm.com/media/au/en/holden/company.html

        Mark Reuss did a stint as Managing Director of Holden before returning to the United States. Denny Mooney preceded him. The job is much the same as the old Divisional General Managers in America.

        General Motors was careful to establish overseas business units as separate legal entities which shielded them from being forced into bankruptcy, but they are, non the less, just divisions for most intents and purposes.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Doctor Olds said ” but they are, non the less, just divisions for most intents and purposes.”

        They are NOT Divisions but Subsidiaries. Before GM US went into Bankruptcy Holden was making its own locally designed V8 engines(Unfortunately they were not allowed to upgrade it to Gen 111 capability, was not interchangeable as far as parts went with other GM V8′s, had Australian CEO’s(Who knows might end up with another one). If Opel was a Division GM US could shut it down now as it would be as easy as shutting down Oldsmobile and Pontiac, but it also a subsidiary and has the same as other country corporation problems as Holden.

      • 0 avatar
        Truckducken

        This topic is officially declared ‘beaten to death’.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        Kinda like GM is just a name plate for its Beijing masters.

  • avatar
    V6

    good lord, talk about negative nancy’s. the basic car has been around since 2006, when Ford was selling the Five Hundred and a year or so after the first 300 came out. This is just a thorough & final facelift of this generation car. If it had gunslit windows everyone would be crying and moaning about that too, and pricing hasn’t even been revealed yet in order to moan about its 50k price. And really, who would expect what is ultimately a gussied up family car to look like a Camaro of C7…

  • avatar

    My 6.1 SRT8 made 420 lb-feet when it was STOCK. The new 6.4 can gonna KILL this thing off the line on summer tires.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Drag radials maybe. Otherwise, the limits of friction say nuh-uh.

      It’s fairly obvious GM isn’t spending much money to produce this car. Carryover chassis, body configuration, and drivetrain all point to that. This is another low-volume halo ride like the SSR or the old Impala SS.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Agreed, even with summer rubber there is only so much you can get in the traction department. At 394 HP and 422 pound feet of torque on the drag strip with summer rubber there is no way to prevent them spinning on the 1-2 shift. If I turn traction/stability control back on it robs me of even more time than the wheel spin I get. At launch I have to roll into the throttle.

        Going down to 17″ rims rear (which then changes the gear ratio due to the smaller O.D.) and drag radials would product a good 1/2 second faster time (on paper). I have yet to test the theory, but have the 17″ rims sitting in the garage. Now if it would just stop feckin’ raining here for one God damn summer (for the last three years practically every track day for the average slob in this area for test and tune it has been – raining – this past summer when it finally dried out in August I was closing on a new house/moving and renting out house number one – no time to play – ARGH)

        Point of proof, according to the Dodge site, the SRT 6.4 Hemi powered Charger runs the 1/4 mile in the high 12′s – which isn’t a shock when you look at the spec sheet…

        http://www.dodge.com/en/2012/charger/srt8/

        A Pontiac G8 GXP, which at least is reported to be heavier than the SS (if the 10% weight reduction rumors are true, the G8 GXP weighed in at 3,995 pounds, that means the SS would be 3,600ish) ran the 1/4 mile in…the high 12′s.

        Here is another point, the SRT Dodge Charger is a porker at 4,400 pounds. If the SS comes in at say 600 or 700 pounds lighter (even if it comes in at GXP weight of 4,000 pounds) it has a massive weight advantage over the overweight Charger. The Charger is also nose heavy at 54/46 – where the SS is 50/50. Although shod with 20″ rims, the 245/45R20 is going to have a smaller actual “footprint” on the ground versus the SS wider rear tires. Final the rear end is less aggressive at 3.06. That helps improve fuel economy to 14/23 but is going to hurt in a 1/4 mile sprint compared to the more aggressive 3.27 rear end on the SS.

        So on weight alone:

        700 pounds lighter: equal to about 7/10 of a second in the 1/4 mile OR equal to having 70 extra HP.

        500 pounds lighter: equal to about 1/2 a second in the 1/4 mile OR equal to having 50 extra HP.

        400 pounds lighter: equal to about 2/5 of a second in the 1/4 mile OR equal to having 40 extra HP.

        So if the SS comes in at G8 GXP weight (heavy than estimated e.g. no weight reduction) it still is like getting a 40 HP boost over the 400 pound heavier Charger SRT.

        Heavier, less weight over the rear axle, less aggressive gearing, and a smaller contact patch a devil in a drag race does not make.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    This thing looks like a real screamer for those who want a Corvette sedan and easier ingress/egress. I hope one of these will be on display at our upcoming auto show, but my hopes aren’t real high.

    I’d love to examine this up close sometime. My dealer may just get one, too. They sure sell lots of Camaros, and offering these would be icing on the cake.

    I really like it, though I’d never buy one, but I still find it inviting!

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    The car is about the same as the G8 GXP, with a Chevy face and nicer tail lights.

    Chevrolet will have no trouble selling them, and it is, afterall, just a mid-cycle enhancement of the Commodore. It is a very good car.

    Surprisingly, a large number of Aussies re-badge their Commodores with the gold Chevy bowtie grilles! They know where the drivetrains come from!

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Previously the V8 Drive trains for the Commodore were these. Very much non-Bowtie more like Ford V8 than anyting else. Very strong engine. Holden had plans of getting capacity up to near 7 Litres. OHC etc.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Holden_V8_engine

      http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_c0luMfP4aGw/TC8OGWtuIdI/AAAAAAAAAAs/K3-wPV4AZqg/s1600/Holden+5L+V8.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      If they make V6s in China, what’s to stop them from making V8s?

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    Chrysler HEMI has only three words to say about this new Chevy; EIGHT SPEED TORQUEFLITE!

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I think using GMH as a supplier to GM in the US is good. What I’m looking at is a way to protect and secure our auto industry.

    What would be an even better idea is to have a HSV dealership across NA.

    GMH actually produces some of the finest quality vehicles for GM. These vehicles could be touted against the Euro prestige vehicles. GMH will have to improve quality a little, but nowheres as much a the NA manufactured GMs.

    The current Commodores are built as good as or better than the US manufactured BMWs. I hope GM doesn’t screw GMH up.

    The Commodore chassis is one of the best chassis GM has, it is flexible ie utes, wagons, sedans. It is also a solid platform to produce high performance vehicles on.

    GMH also has the technology and know how for competitive limited production runs.

    Australia also has a innovative and highly skilled vehicle design sector, it might be small, but some great work has been done by the manufacturers here.

    Even Ford Australia is in the same boat with FPV’s, HSV’s competition.

    The NA market would love to drive around in supercharged Falcons.

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      The engines you refer to were home grown, much as the US divisions once had their own V8s, and, as was the case earlier in America, they were phased out of production in 1999 in favor of the far superior GenIII V-8 designed right here in Pontiac Michigan.

      Holden and Opel Vauxhall are brands that can be discarded as easily as Oldsmobile or Pontiac, not that it would be a good business move. They are wholly owned subsidiaries, as you point out, perhaps more like Saab than the US nameplates of old, and Saab’s engineering center was also integrated into GM’s global product development system.

      Sadly, Big Al, Oz has not been the bright star in the quality arena compared to the products competing in North America. That was true a few years ago for sure, in the G8 days. Hope it has changed.
      I don’t mean to knock the Aussies, I love em! Got lots of friends there. I drove a 2010 Commodore SV6 from Sydney to Melbourne and back and it was a wonderful car. I like all the interations over there. I am delighted to see it back in the US and hope the next gen rwd platform continues to be built in Oz, as well as NA.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Doctor Olds
        What I’m talking about is developing a GM to compete against BMW, Audi, Mercs etc.

        I think GMH would be suited to do this, with its profitable limited run production and engineering.

        The quality is quite good, but it can improve. But the US is still behind, it has improved markedly in the past 15 years since I had my Cherokee Sport. That vehicle was a nightmare and poorly put together.

        It wouldn’t really compete against “bargain” GM products, it would compliment GM and have it as a global “niche” product.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        I hope GMH continues to do well, too!

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @doctor olds.
        GM was not going to allow Holden to do an update of the locally produced V8. Now in hindsight they should have, as they would have produced an engine that would have leapfrogged(looking at what they were going to do) the then to be introduced Gen 111 V8 and would have been compatible with other Chevrolet architecture. GM NA beancounters killed that project.
        “Sadly, Big Al, Oz has not been the bright star in the quality arena compared to the products competing in North America”
        The GM products selling in NA are not looked at as quality products when sold outside NA. Bit subpar actually.
        Interestingly the Chevrolet SS is very similar to the G8, sold by that now defunct brand Pontiac. NASCAR will make the SS popular and I would say all 5000 units will be snapped up.

      • 0 avatar
        Pig_Iron

        If the Aussies were allowed to work their magic on the new V8 like they did with old Buick V6, it might be something worth looking at.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @Robert Ryan- Irrespective of the word on the street, I can tell you the data did clearly indicate the NA vehicles, and engines, for that matter, at least from GM, were substantially higher quality than any of the vehicles and engines imported to NA whether from Oz, Korea or Germany. I hope and trust they all have improved in the 4 years I have been out of the business.

        A new unique Holden V8 makes no business sense, proud as you are of their capability. I recall the argument years ago. Olds had one engine plant, Chevrolet had 3. It made no sense to close one of the Chevy plants to keep the Olds plant going, even though the Olds V8 with fuel injection, as used in the Cadillac Seville, was of a little higher quality and capability than the Chevy of the time. GM’s center for expertise in V8s is in Pontiac, Michigan, and their capability rivals any engine group anywhere in the world. GM made the right business decision to focus on one V8. The new LT1 is one of the best engines in the world.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Here is an interesting article on the costs of the SS in comparison to what we pay for the equivalent.

    http://smh.drive.com.au/motor-news/americans-to-pay-10000-less-for-vf-commodore-20130216-2ejoa.html

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      Thanks for that. I saw it in The Age this morning. Couldn’t be bothered reading, it is Sunday, sunny and reading 107 wingers, er comments, is going to sour my day.

      Go to the Whirlpool forums, much more positive vibe. It was sitting at 22 pages last Friday.

      Then go to Holden’s YouTube channel for the virtual drive in Collins St, detailed down the the tram.

  • avatar
    86SN2001

    Funny, all this talk about price and yet there isn’t ONE DOLLAR SIGN in the entire article.

    Jesus people, you’re complaining just to complain.

    This car was federalized on the back of the G8…

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    …and for those of you who can’t afford a $40,000 car we have some crappy 4-cylinder penalty boxes to sell you. Enjoy global laming as we continue our fight against manbearpig.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I dont see what all the hoopla’s about. Especially after the G8 already failed.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @sportyaccordy
    The G8 isn’t a typical Australian muscle car. I personally didn’t like the G8 or as it is known here a Monaro. The only real 2 door muscle that was of any significance was a Valiant E49 Charger. It was the quickest 6 cyl in the world until Porche came out with their turbo 6.

    Australia is reknown for making muscle car sedans, like the GTHO Phase III Falcon from the early 70s. It was the quickest 4 door sedan in the world unitl the 80s. It was even compared to a Ferarri.

    Unlike the US, touring car racing is significant in Australia, so our muscle cars had to handle. For us it wasn’t just V8s and cubes.

    V8 SuperCars in Australia currently plays a big role in HSV and FPV.

    You guys are essentially getting an HSV Commodore.

    Vauxhall sell HSV’s in the UK and their direct competitors are M series BMW’s and AMG Mercs, hence my statement for GM to create a niche market to take on the Germans.

    From what I have read the appeal of our performance cars is the “US muscle car rawness” with handling.

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      @Big Al from Oz- The V8 Supercar Series is GREAT! Glad to see it coming to America. I had the chance to drive around the circuit at Mount Panorama the day after the 2010 Bathurst race. I was sorry our schedule didn’t allow us to see the race!

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @doctor olds,
        I have driven around there too at 40kmh. Pretty scary going through the “Esses” at even at that slow speed. 160kph or 100mphthe speeds they race there. NO WAY!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Ummmmmmm the G8 was NOT the Monaro, the GTO was. The G8 is a Comodore SS-V or SV6 depending on engine. No such thing as a two door G8

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Holden Chev SS wins first NASCAR race and dominates.

    Hmm. The NASCAR Holden/Chev SS is turned out to be more competitive than I thought.

    http://smh.drive.com.au/motor-news/holden-wins-in-nascar-debut-20130217-2el00.html

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Hah, the cynic in me just doesn’t believe this was coincidnece. New car dominates and wins the race. Yeah… as if this wasn’t pre-ordained probably along with M/T COTY at a coffee shop near GM headquarters where Akerson, Loh and France just happened to be enjoying some libation along with two big burlap sacks sitting underneath the table.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        Shouldn’t be a surprise. Chevy wins more races than any other maker.

        Other than appearance and engine differences, NASCAR racers are all very similar- most use the same chassis, Ford transmissions, and rear axles.

        When Toyota decided to compete in NASCAR, they had to design a completely new pushrod, carbureted V8 with no commonality with any Toyota product. I used to sit near the motorsports guys in GM Powertrain and remember them complaining of the unfairness when NASCAR rejected GM’s clean sheet race engine because it was too different from anything we produced.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I don’t know what race this guy watched, but the Chevrolets hardly “dominated”.

      Not to mention that Daytona is a restrictor plate track which hardly allows the true ability of new cars to be tested and the Sprint Unlimited is more like a preseason game than anything else (no points are awarded, only 20 cars raced, only 75 laps).

    • 0 avatar

      Ummm, guys, you do know that NASCAR racecars are still scratch built tube framed racers mounted with silhouette bodies that now actually look a bit like production cars but really have nothing at all to do with their retail namesakes, don’t you? Do Ford, Chevy, Dodge or Toyota offer any production cars with a 358 cubic inch pushrod V8? NASCAR Sprint Cup cars have more in common with those companies’ pickup trucks than they do with any of their passenger cars.

  • avatar
    JSF22

    It’s not going to change the world, like the day my parents brought home their new ’66 Impala SS, but the idea of a handsome, comfortable, sporty, RWD, V8-powered Chevy is still appealing, whether it’s a Holden or not. There’s a place for this car if the price is right and I hope they stick with it.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    $50,000? and 5,000 units? This has self-fulfilling prophecy written all over it. “We have to discontinue it because it’s too pricy and doesn’t sell in enough volume.” Umm, because you over-priced it and only built 5,000? GM is the absolute king of over-promise, under-deliver. If they had any brains at all they could, with this car, occupy a new niche. That’s the one BMW left vacant a long time ago. A simple, plain sports-oriented sedan. Those early 3-series had barely 130HP, with 300HP in a V6, or even 280HP in a turbo four, a single option package (nav, sunroof, leather) and a base price of $21K this could be a sleeper hit.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @doctor olds. Different websites say otherwise.You are getting basically the SAME Holden as you had before 4 yrs ago under a Pontiac guise. As far as US Vehicles and quality they have a very poor reputation here an in Europe.
    Holden stopped importing the Suburban. Ford the Taurus, Explorer and Brazilian F250 (Horrible vehicle, not USmade I know) because of excessive warranty issues. The Warranty issues with the Explorer outlasted the vehicle itself. I see in the US like here Japanese and Korean vehicles dominate the sales charts because of their general overall quality.Overall Japanese, then Koreans lead in overall quality than there is a toss up between US and European vehicles. US vehicles have improved dramatically in the last 5yrs so have the Europeans.
    That was my point the Holden Development of their V8 could not go ahead as GM wanted commonality with engines.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @ajla
    You must a supporter of brand x, y or z. I think leading 40 laps out of 75 is great, even better so for an unproven vehicle. The Chev team should be proud.

    I don’t even follow NASCAR, so whom ever wins I will not lose sleep over.

    @doctor olds
    So who collected and corelated the data? That Chev in the US builds the quality that you allude to.

    Sorry, but you are incorrect on that one. My mothers neighbour owns a new Chev pickup and the fit and finish is lower than what we get from Korea.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “I don’t even follow NASCAR.”

      That makes me wonder why you are bothering to comment on it then.

      NASCAR is not DTM, F1, or V8 Supercars, the current system is set up for maximum parity.

      Every NASCAR team is running a new style car this year, which was mandated by the NASCAR governing body. So it isn’t like only the GM teams had new stuff to deal with.

      Also, NASCAR vehicles have very little to do with their street counterparts in the first place. The race team (Hendricks, Penske, JGR, etc.) has tons more to do with how a car does than the manufacturer stickers.

      I actually watched the Sprint Unlimited (which again is not for points and only had 20 cars racing) last night, and the Chevrolets did not dominate. If you’ve got some free time go watch some clips on youtube.

      It is nearly impossible for ANY car to dominate at Daytona and Talladega due to the way the rules require the cars to be set up for those particular tracks.

      Chevrolet has been easily the strongest team in NASCAR over the last decade, and it was highly unlikely that using the Holden sheetmetal would somehow end their reign.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @ajla
        Then if the racing is a tight as you say then leading 40 laps is a great achievement.

        Our V8 Supercar formula makes for very close racing as well, but the better financed teams still do have an advantage.

        But the racing is very close.

        In May V8 Supercars will be racing in Austin Texas, I can’t remember the name of the new circuit, I think it’s called Race Track of the Americas or something similar.

        To the NA guys who follow racing it is great viewing. We have a new formula this year as well, it isn’t the Ford vs Holden show. Mercedes and Nissan have also entered vehicles. It will be interesting.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @doctor olds
    They also own a Malibu, and the same with the quality of it.

  • avatar
    jeffzekas

    The SS needs less bull & more bling: manual shift, mesh grill, race colors, working scoops, drop price $10K– GM needs to think “1965 Shelby GT350″.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Here is the Chev SS/Commodores main competitor in Australia, the Falcon GT. They are going to start production of it again for 2013.

    http://www.news.com.au/business/companies/ford-falcon-gt-back-at-broadmeadows-after-37-years/story-fnda1bsz-1226579835067

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @jeffzekas
    I see alot of comments regarding price. I do think the US price will be quite fair for the Chev SS.

    We have discussed quality etc of US manufactured vehicles. But to have better quality will cost money.

    I do understand the demand for cheap econo boxes, but this isn’t one.

    Our industry doesn’t over produce, recieve the same handouts, whether rebates, subsidisation, etc as the US industry. Our auto industry is unprotect compared to the US.

    Maybe the Big 3 wouldn’t of have so many financial problems recently if they didn’t over produce and relied on protectionist regulations. But the down side is you would have to pay a fair price for a vehicle.

    I think you guys will have to pay more in the future for your vehicles, and this is already occuring.

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      @Big Al- What would you call the couple hundred $million AU government investment to keep Holden going?

      Actually, I know very well what I am talking about, having retired from GM Powertrain Product Engineering in 2008. The word on the street is a real factor in consumer quality impressions, but that does not beat real, hard data upon which my comments are founded.

      As another matter of fact, US CAFE regulations uniquely harmed the US makers whild benefiting the Japanese and Koreans in particular.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @doctor olds” Sorry but “real hard data”??? The Real Hard Data is the product being sold, not some subjective analysis of quality.Every company has marketeers that tell management that their product will blow the opposition out of the water, till they have to actually sell it.
        The”$million AU government investment” is to keep manufacturers seeking other alternatives in a difficult environment(High Dollar). If the Car companies fail, unlike the US they will NOT bail them out like has happened with GM NA and Chrysler.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    @doctor olds
    I did say our industry does recieve some assistance. So look at the question you posed, then read my comment. It doesn’t quite marry up.

    I’m totally against it.

    But the US and Euro auto industry operate in a far more protected environment, with massive handouts compared to us, even per capita.

    And if you worked at GM like you claim you know I’m not telling a lie.

    As a matter of fact. Ford and GM requested the handout. Their ultimatum was no handout we fold shop. That’s why their Australian arms can compete with the Germans like I stated. It would be less work here to produce the quality required by GM or even Ford than their US and European operations.

    They wanted billions to remain open in Australia. Why? Because every other country is doing it. That doesn’t make it good business.

    As for CAFE I’m totally againt it. I think the Euro model is a better model to control emissions. Also using fuel tax as a “behavioural modifier” is the best tool. If you can afford to run it, buy it.

    I’m against any subsidy esp. for EV, hybrid, CNG etc. As for hybids, current diesel technology can produce very competitive results.

    Let’s maximise our current technologies, diesel still can be advanced much more than gasoline. These other technologies are “feel good” vote grabbers.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @doctor olds.
    It would not been around if not for the huge bailout by the US Government. “Socialist” or what ever you want to call it. Still GM will be roughly 3rd in overall standings by mid 2013. VW has actually passed it in China and as you have said Toyota is powering on.
    Japan does import cars but more of the European Luxury type, so no mass imports or building of mainstream overseas designed vehicles like the US. If you took the Wuling “Mini Van” component out in which GM has only a 10% holding of the company. It would be already third.

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    @Robert Ryan- Real hard data is as I wrote, warranty claims, customer complaints and recalls. Our staff was privy to that data for all GM products produced everywhere in the world.

    Your comments about GM in China seem to ignore the fact that every foreign maker there is a 50/50 joint venture with a Chinese company. You can’t quibble about the reality that post-bankruptcy GM, with half the brands still sold more vehicles in America than any other maker by a considerable margin last year. If I were a betting man, I would bet the many new entries being launched in 2013 will begin to widen GM’s advantage and market share. After all, not only have they been under the dark cloud of the Government Motors moniker, lost half their brands, and stopped the new product pipleline until now.

    We would have had some very nice Buicks,Cadillacs and Chevrolets on Zeta architecture, as well as the Pontiac G8 if the financial collapse of 2008 hadn’t pushed 2/3 of our industry into bankruptcy.Government policy played a huge role in the decline that leading up to it.

    • 0 avatar
      Athos Nobile

      “We would have had some very nice Buicks,Cadillacs and Chevrolets on Zeta architecture”

      Did you get to see any of that? GMinsidenews has some stuff but is very vague. The rest of the interwebZ is not very helpful either.

      I’ve heard here that there were big plans for the platform when it was initially conceived.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @Athos Nobile- They were in the future product plan at the time. I can’t recall the model years. The only one I saw was a Caprice with an Ultra V8 development car. The UV8 was to be the 32 Valve DOHC replacement for the Northstar V8. The engineering development was completed, but production was cancelled due to capital constraints as the US market slumped due to the first $4 gas price spike in early 2008. My early retirement offer also came as part of the restructuring GM undertook in response. Zeta Chevies are sold in the Middle East, and Buicks sold in China.

        @Mr. Ryan- You can’t get any “harder” data than what I cited!

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        I know about the ME, SA, Brazil, China and Korea stuff. The Chinese Park Avenue is AWESOME, it is even more luxurious than the Caprice sold here.

        I was expecting something like a CUV, a Caddy, a coupe (other than Camaro) or something of the sorts.

        I wonder if someday they will dust off and produce the Ultra V8 you mentioned.

      • 0 avatar
        doctor olds

        @Athos Nobile- I happened to bump into the small block Chief Engineer in the grocery store a few months ago and asked him that very question about the UV8. He said he doubted it would ever be resurrected, and “if” they do a DOHC V8, it will “probably” be based on the small block.

        We had an awesome DOHC small block mockup that was in development before I retired. We can only hope it sees production! There was talk of 750 turbocharged horsepower. That was before bankruptcy, and 50+ MPG CAFE, however.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @doctor olds.
    “Waranty claims , customer complaints and recalls” are really irrelevant. Yes it is important for the company but NOT the market, contrary to the media beat ups on recalls. Toyota has had MASSIVE recalls lately about their products worldwide ,but their sales globally are rising at an ever increasing rate.
    Yes every manufacturer needs to have a Chinese dance partner that is part of the deal. Still VW is very much powering ahead there as well.
    GM was was No1 in the US before the bankruptcy so no surprise it retained that position after the bailout.as it was an operating entity not an organisation that had been shuttered.

  • avatar
    alf42

    GM puts too much chrome on their cars for my tastes. From the wheels to the faux side scoops to the door handles down to the cupholders. Their cars look like they were designed for pimps. I guess they have research showing the majority of customers like this, but I certainly don’t. GM has come out with many competent designs lately but they’re all tackied up with the shiny stuff. GM won’t find me in a showroom as long as they keep doing this to their cars. Other makes are guilty of this too, but GM is the worst. At least make a no-chrome option. How expensive can that be?

    • 0 avatar
      Maxseven

      I’m in complete agreement with you – and well said. There must be a rather large portion of the population that thinks the chrome looks “cool.” Infiniti designers are fond of the dazzling chrome as well.

      The SS/Commodore at least has what appear to be subtly brushed finishes on most of the metallic trim parts in the cockpit. The gauge, cup holder and (maybe the) start button periphery get the pimp touch though.

      Ugh that Chevy bow-tie logo – every time I see it I think cheap, tacky, dusty plastic crap.

  • avatar
    cft925

    One question… When do we get the ute?

    • 0 avatar
      doctor olds

      @cft925- I’d like to see the station wagon, too, but don’t count on these versions making it to the US.

      CAFE is the reason these will likely be low volume, as the post’s title alludes.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    @RobertRyan – Fit & Finish and softer grain plastics mean absolute jack sh!t if your Volvo, Land Rover, Mini, VW, BMW, Mercedes, Audi, Porsche, Jag or whatever leaves you stranded at 11 PM or your wife and kids know more about tow trucks than anyone should…

    The rest of the world might be thrilled to get their hands on our domestic line-up of bean_counted_to_death specialty cars and pickup trucks for the sake of getting a fair price, “atrocious” panel gaps and all… And the two of you cannot speak for the rest of the world.

    Yourself and your partner may rather gouge your eyes out than drive American and prefer Korean over anything, but it goes much deeper;
    Both of you are extremely bitter towards the American auto industry and Americans in general and have to vent at every opportunity.

    Yes Australian car builders are amazing & self reliant and Australians are superior beings OK we get it.

    Is it too late to nominate you and your twin for TTAC Troll Pole???

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Denvermike thanks for breaking TTAC rules on Blog Behavior. I did not know this thread on the Australian Holden SS rebadged as a Chevrolet SS
      was annoying you so much?

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Who says I’m annoyed? I’m not sure where you’re getting that, but I’m an enthusiast 1st, and there’s not a car on the planet that annoys me, actually.
        And I’m not even annoyed by trolls such as yourself and the others. It’s more of a curiosity than anything…

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The theme of some of the comments posted alluded to the cost to the American public of this vehicle.

    I do think it is a fair price of hopefully around the $40k mark. Like I have stated in the UK this vehicle’s competitor is M series and AMG’s.

    This vehicle should and will probably out handle any GM other than the Corvette straight off the showroom floor.

    And it is a family car. We have them here and you will see housewives and kids at shopping centres in HSVs and for that matter FPVs.

    I think the American public will be very satisfied with the fit and finish of the vehicle also. I would think it will be very good.

    This is vehicle is quite unique by the fact it has “muscle car” tendencies, with very good handling and is a sedan.

    GMH and Chev will be the only seller of this vehicle. If you want one I would go and order one soon as only 5 000 are going to be manufactured.

  • avatar
    turbobrick

    GM sold over 24 thousand Chevy SSR’s. Ford sold over 11 thousand Mercury Marauders, with majority of them during the first year. So keeping that in mind, the 5000 unit sales goal and 50K price tag seem reasonable.

    Selling a cheaper V6 version would make zero sense as no one would have an emotional reason to buy one, and all the rational arguments would point towards a Charger or Impala.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It just looks too much like a Malibu, circa 06. A 50 grand Chevy needs to be special!

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Pig Iron Agreed Yes if that development of the Holden V8 HAD gone ahead prior it could have been the “Gen 111″ rather than what was produced.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @doctor olds Mark Reuss in an interview said he is leaving the door open as regards the Sportswagon coming to the US.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Here is a great piece on the Australian auto industry, in particular what could be percieved as Austrlians subsidising the Chev SS.

    It is an opinion piece, but there is some logic behind the story. This is what is wrong with any form of protectionism/subsidisation.

    http://www.smh.com.au/business/quietly-dumping-holdens-20130219-2eonq.html

  • avatar
    doctor olds

    @robertryan- i saw that. they are great looking cars! coming to oz was like going to fantasyland with all the commodores of all shapes, of course, i thought of them like pontiac g8s! reminded me of growing up in lansing where oldsmobile held 25% of the market.

    @big al- it is an interesting piece, though the author’s conclusion is flawed by the fact that the higher price in AU is primarily, if not entirely due to taxation. i can’t tell you what the build cost is, but it is not a valid assumption that a price $10,000 less in America means it is being sold at a loss. In all likelyhood, it is at least breakeven and adds volume at the holden plant, reducing the manufacturing costs for all commodores. Seems like a win-win for AU economy and US buyers.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Should read: Here’s our first look at the Chevrolet SS. Silly moniker aside, it looks just like a Holden Caprice.


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