By on February 8, 2012

Having won a somewhat controversial victory in New York’s “Taxi Of Tomorrow” competition, the Nissan NV200 has now arrived for civilian use.

Highlights of the NV 200 include the ability to fit a standard pallet (40×48) in the back, integrated mounting points (no more drilling!), more cargo room than a Ford Transit Connect, and hanging file folder storage. The sole powerplant available at launch will be a 2 liter, 4-cylinder engine. An electic version using “Leaf technology” will be coming out as a concept soon. No pricing announced, but it will be for sale later in 2012.

Taken together with the Titan-based NV, Nissan now joins Ford in offering two tiers of commercial vans in the United States.

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25 Comments on “Nissan NV200: 2012 Chicago Auto Show...”


  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    Where were these when I was young, working, and needed them. Maybe as a camper I could make an excuse.

  • avatar
    Speed Spaniel

    Uncle Hershel, your ride is here.

  • avatar
    Marko

    Reminds me of the Isuzu Axiom.

  • avatar
    Banger

    I kinda dig it, in the “This Van is Destined to Become the New Panther” kind of way. In that I mean, it’s going to have a plentiful spare parts supply due to its use as a government-endorsed Taxi in the nation’s largest city.

    I could see myself buying one of these rather than the Transit Connect, which forces too many compromises on a private user IMHO.

  • avatar
    Rental Man

    Ford Transit Connect NV’s this van. The Connect is still so Euro looking on our streets I still have 2nd take when I see them. The Connect is old overseas and near replacing. With correct powertrains (Diesel) & price there is a future here for city cargo deliveries ans outdoor lifestyle versions like overseas.

    http://www.citroen.co.uk/new-cars/car-range/citroen-berlingo-multispace/#/new-cars/car-range/citroen-berlingo-multispace/

  • avatar
    Tifighter

    Cargo only for the 200? Or will there be a passenger version?

    That 3500 SL passenger looks a lot nicer than the last E350 shuttle I was in…

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    That is simply horrible to look at. And the B-pillar looks simply horrible to look past. How many bike couriers will those B-pillars hide?

    • 0 avatar
      Xeranar

      It’s a delivery truck….If it qualifies as having a B-pillar it will swallow up all light like a black hole. If you mean for somebody inside the van, well screw the bike courier, they have no reason to be that close and the van is moving.

  • avatar
    MrWhopee

    You lucky Americans got a nice, big 2 liter engine. This van will be sold here in Indonesia (the passenger version) later this year with a whopping 1.5l engine. I guess it’ll reach 60 mph, eventually.

    • 0 avatar
      Acubra

      Yep, with this powerhouse of an (gas?) engine, together with a puke-inducing snout, will not make too many friends out here, methinks. A good sturdy diesel would help, though…

      • 0 avatar
        Patrickj

        In NYC taxi service, gas and brake pedals could be replaced by a single switch. Up floors the gas, down slams on the brakes.

        I’ve never heard of 4 cylinder reliability being a strong point of Nissans. In 40,000 miles, it will take a quart of oil to get the 2 liter engine through 24 hours driving something this big.

        A single model of taxi? It wasn’t all that smart when it happened naturally with the Crown Vic. Mandating it is complete stupidity that will last about 15 minutes after Bloomberg leaves office.

      • 0 avatar
        MrWhopee

        Indeed that would suit the way NYC taxi cab drivers drive. They seem to treat the gas/brake pedal as strictly on/off device.

      • 0 avatar
        KalapanaBlack

        “I’ve never heard of 4 cylinder reliability being a strong point of Nissans. In 40,000 miles, it will take a quart of oil to get the 2 liter engine through 24 hours driving something this big.”

        Not sure about the size/weight factor or their newer 4-cylinders, but you’ve obviously never acquainted yourself with the Nissan SR engine. Said engine is legendary the world over for durability, with many B13 Sentra-based taxis still in use without maintenance (minimal is an understatement) in Central and South America well into the 400,000 mile range on original internals. I often muse about my old ’95 G20 being the last ’70s Japanese car. The engine was nowhere near used up. It felt (at 208,000 mi) like it was at 30,000, tops. Automatic transmission scared me off (though I never actually had trouble). But the big think was that the car – a Pittsburgh region vehicle for most of its life – rusted away around that awesome engine. Nissan has made some truly long-lasting engines in the past.

        Hopefully they can keep that reputation with the NV series. In scanning the Wikipedia article about the MR20DE used in this car, it has a very peculiar block pre-stressing that should make it pretty durable in the long run. A snippet:

        “The MR engine family features ‘under stress’ manufacture, meaning while the block is being bored, a torque plate puts the block under stress. The block becomes temporarily distorted until the head is torqued onto it, at which point the block is pulled into the correct shape. This method is unlike traditional engine assembly, in which the head being bolted to the block can twist it out of shape, decreasing engine efficiency and in the worst case scenario, increasing oil consumption.”

  • avatar
    Toad

    I like the concept but the execution…not so much. It looks like a vehicular platypus…or a Cube with a genetic problem. The current Nissan full size vans seems to be getting lot rot, and I’m afraid these my join them.

    By comparison, the Ford E vans look tasteful.

  • avatar
    TokyoPlumber

    I’m picturing the NAPA logo on the side of this NV200. Priced correctly, this little van could fill some of the void left by the Ford Ranger. Raking moo poo or sheep sh*t in and out of the NV200 won’t be happening. However, for light duty delivery work (auto parts distributors, pharmacies, etc…) this could be just the ticket. Just the ticket, that is, if it costs a bit more than the Ranger and a lot less than the Transit Connect.

    • 0 avatar
      Ian Anderson

      I wouldn’t be so sure, around my area the parts stores are the only ones that use pickup trucks. The parts warehouses have fleets upon fleets of Hyundai Accents. I know what they are since they’re the only yellow/green striped Accents.

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    The interior looks much better than the Transit Connect.

  • avatar

    Doesn’t Chrysler sell Ram van and a panel minivan? Last I checked, they had the same 2-tier system de-facto. As for GM, their lower tier is HHR panel van (should’ve kept Savanna, but oh well).

  • avatar
    Bryce

    It looks like a gutted Nissan El Grand youll wanna hope it goes better than normal nissan

  • avatar
    Bimmer

    That’s one FUGLY front that only mother could love! Thank God I don’t live in New Your to see that vomit inducing abomination in such quantities!

  • avatar
    MusicMachine

    Nice to have another option–as far as utility vans go.

  • avatar
    obbop

    Hopefully, as new “modern” van-type critters scurry about, the traditional GMC and Ford cargo vans will drop in price.

    Especially the long-wheel-base models that allow more living room for those that end up as stealth van dwellers.

    Say hello to the growing 3rd-world-level class within the USA, folks.

  • avatar
    hriehl1

    In passenger-configuration, is there anything here not already available in a Mazda5? At well under $20K?

  • avatar
    87CE 95PV Type Я

    That front bumper is too big and is going to get messed up in my opinion. Wonder if it could be made out of metal?


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