By on August 22, 2011

Portland’s 82nd Avenue is one of those streets that exists in nearly every American city. Unofficially demarcating Portland proper (“the right side of the tracks”) from the extensive working-class suburbs that bleed into Gresham (“the wrong side of the tracks”), “Shady-Second” is home to a vast strip of wall-to-wall buy-here-pay-here lots, used-car hustlers, and small repair shops that line both sides of the road from Sandy Boulevard all the way down to Division. Like every other used-car strip in every other town in America, it’s where folks go when they need a car and don’t have much money to spend. Unlike most other low-cost car Meccas, however, 82nd Avenue is also home to Oregon’s last remaining Saab dealership. And it’s something of a symbol of the hell that Saab dealers are going through right now.

Though I drive past it with some regularity (I live closer to “the tracks” than it’s fashionable to admit), today marked the first time I ever visited Garry Small Saab. Not because I haven’t been intrigued by the struggles of the few remaining Saab dealers, mind you, but because it’s hard to get any blogger out from behind his computer to chase a story. But when Automotive News [sub] quoted Mr Small in a piece today entitled Steady drip of bad news wears on Saab dealers, I knew I had to stop by. Though I’m extremely pessimistic about Saab’s chances of survival, and I’ve been highly critical of Victor Muller’s leadership, I feel nothing but sympathy for the dealers who are left to carry on the ground war. Anyone left in the Saab game after two years of a living PR nightmare has my complete sympathy and respect.

It’s certainly not hard to feel for Mr Small’s dilemma. Having bit his tongue around the media (to the best of my knowledge) for the last several years, Mr Small’s quote to AN [sub] betrays no sign of bitterness or anger; the facts simply speak for themselves.

Garry Small, owner of Garry Small Saab in Portland, Ore., has sold 15 new Saabs this year — but none since June. He has 14 in stock at his Saab-exclusive store.

“Sales have been absolutely flat,” he said. “At this rate of sales, we’ve got a two-year supply, you might say.”

Like other Saab dealers, Small has boosted used-car volume and relies more heavily on service operations.

“There’s no problem with parts and service,” he said. “That’s what’s keeping the doors open.”

By the beginning of June of this year, AN [sub] calculated Saab’s average inventory at a 248 days (prompting us to wonder why Saab was so concerned about restarting production). Based on his current selling rate, however, that number appears to have nearly tripled for Mr Small, whose 14 in-stock new Saabs account for something like a 700-day supply. Small doesn’t appear to be angry or bitter about the experience: after all, he hasn’t had problems with service the way some other Saab dealers have, with one telling AN [sub] that he had to wait 187 days for a 9-7x replacement hood. And because Portland is the kind of city that bought quite a few Saabs before “the troubles” (but wasn’t far enough in love with the brand to inspire hordes of specialty shops ala Volvo, Mercedes and Subaru), there’s plenty of service business to keep things afloat. But when 14 cars makes up a two-year supply, that service business just won’t last forever.

When I showed up at Small Saab this morning, finding it nestled between a buy-here-pay-here lot featuring English and Spanish signage and a used RV business, I didn’t see 14 new Saabs. In fact my first impression was of the used cars out front, which included a few 9-3s, a 9-5 and a 9-7x, as well as a New Beetle, Acura RDX and other entry-premium used vehicles. But on the North side of the building, lined up in a row, were six brand-new Saabs, mostly 9-5s, waiting for buyers. Evidently Mr Small wants to keep his visible stock to a roughly one-year supply. Opposite the new Saabs, though, was a seemingly endless row of 9-3s of every variety, reflecting the morning sun. With several hundred-thousand dollars of used Saab stock on hand, I was suddenly very curious about the level of demand for the brand’s used models. And though Small mentioned that service was his major earner, the service drop-off point held only a 9-5 wagon and, curiously, a TR6 and MGB (which are apparently part of the dealership’s used-car inventory). If anything can keep a service bay open, it’s a pair of British sportscars… but was that really keeping Oregon’s last Saab dealer above water? [Ed: please note that this is what we in the business call a "rhetorical question"]

Sadly, Mr Small was not in to answer my questions. After handing the friendly desk attendant my card, I was treated to a long, quizzical look. “We’re actually a fairly good-sized blog,” I explain, “and I saw Mr Small quoted in Automotive News… is there any chance I could ask a few questions?” An eyebrow moved, barely perceptibly. “Oh I know who you are,” I was told. “We’ve read TTAC. Unfortunately, Mr Small won’t be in until tomorrow.”

I left a card, and encouraged my somewhat stand-offish liason to pass it along to Mr Small, explaining that I sympathized with his plight and simply wanted to give him a chance to tell the world the truth about what it’s been like to be a Saab dealer over the last several years. As I drove away, I knew there was a good chance he wouldn’t call back. After all, if you’ve hung onto a Saab franchise for this long, why give up now?

The answer to that question, it seems, can be found in Sweden. Last week, we heard one of Sweden’s largest Saab dealers lambast the company, telling the press

For me, it is important to be proud of the brands that we have in our halls. Saab does not deliver cars they promised, they do not pay wages to their employees, nor debts to their suppliers while the owners pick out big money. It does not feel right for a [my] car dealers.

And now SvD.se reports that another major Swedish dealer has removed the Saabs from his ten showrooms, explaining

We have taken a time out and removed the show cars. It is sad, but there is no reason to work with selling cars that no one knows if or when they can be delivered

And it’s not just Sweden anymore: the AN [sub] story that quoted Small noted that eight of Saab’s 204 US dealers have closed their new car franchises, and quotes another dealer as saying he wishes he could drop out of the Saab game:

“I’d like to sell my Saab franchise, but it has almost no value right now,” said the dealer, who asked not to be identified. “To go from a top 10 dealer to crickets in the showroom — it’s a sign.”

Finally, the alternative to switching to used cars or trying to pick up a new franchise is also clear: the Albany Times-Union reports that

Fred Carl’s New Salem Garage Inc. has filed for Chapter 7 liquidation in Albany bankruptcy court, listing $1.63 million in liabilities and $254,000 in assets.

The Colonie Saab dealership closed Aug. 12 after more than a half-century in business… The decline in sales is reflected in New Salem Garage’s own financial performance. Its sales fell from $6.2 million in 2009 to $2.7 million last year and just $1 million through early August of this year.

With debt collectors closing in on Saab and freezing at least one of its accounts, workers complaining that they’ve received no guarantee that their next paycheck will arrive on time, and dealers dropping like flies, there’s nothing to gloat about here. The long, messy, highly public collapse of Saab is nothing short of a tragedy. But for precisely this reason it can’t be ignored or whitewashed. Anyone interested in the car business needs to look closely at Saab’s example as a warning sign that this business is merciless, and no place for unfounded optimism. And I really do hope Mr Small decides to give me a call and share his perspective… after all, there’s no better way to learn from history than to hear from the guys manning the front lines.

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46 Comments on “This Is What A Year’s Supply Of Saabs Looks Like...”


  • avatar
    threeer

    It speaks volumes, unfortunately, when the dealer is able to virtually brag about parts/service. What does that say about the cars?
    And I wouldn’t wait for a call back…unless you slipped an offer note in with that card for one of the few remaining new models he had on the lot.

  • avatar

    The dealer in Southfield, MI, has at least a year’s supply. Maybe 2-3. At some point they’ll simply liquidate them all. The 9-5 will end up an incredibly good car for the final selling price, but repairs down the road could prove difficult.

    I’ve seen one 9-4X in someone’s driveway. I almost stopped to ask if he’d bought it, or if it was a manufacturer car. Those will be quite rare.

    • 0 avatar
      vvk

      SAABs have always been “incredibly good.. for the final selling price.” However, new 9-5 is so bad it might have trouble becoming “incredibly good” at any price.

      Given that it’s basically an Insignia/Regal/Lacrosse — why would repairs prove difficult in the future? I don’t buy this.

      • 0 avatar

        What? Where did you get the idea that the 9-5 is “so bad”? It isn’t bad at all, its just large and expensive, and since there is a lot of large and expensive cars (with company’s that we know will survive) it isn’t selling well.

        As far as I have heard, the new 9-5 has a nice interior, is deceptively fast, looks great, and has a nice balance between ride and handling, especially for the size of the vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        vvk

        > new 9-5 has a nice interior, is deceptively fast, looks great,
        > and has a nice balance between ride and handling, especially
        > for the size of the vehicle.

        Deceptively fast?! You jest. You try it before you voice your opinion.

        Nice balance between ride and handling? Old 9-5 had it. New one is a pig. It has poor ride and very, very poor handling.

        Being the biggest SAAB fan you will find, I will defend C900, NG900, OG9-3, 9-3SS and OG9-5 as the best possible cars in their class. You just can’t get anything better for the money, ever. The new 9-5 does not feel like a SAAB at all. It feels synthetic, like a Lexus. It is that special feel that makes a SAAB worth the money. With it gone, it’s just a generic car.

      • 0 avatar
        Omnifan

        Repairs to the powertrain would not necessarily be difficult, however, any non-powertrain parts (i.e. body and interior) would be next to impossible to find.

        Given the high degree of commonality of the powertrain components, I’d take a chance on a SAAB at bargain basement prices. Just expect to keep it a long time, as resale values won’t be worth much. Also expect other GM dealers to treat you like you had the plague when you try to get warranty service.

    • 0 avatar
      Type57SC

      If you think Glassman’s in bad shape, check out the 9-5 glut in Troy. I think it’s about 50. Oddly they sell the 9-4x’s off the truck. So much for DeLorenzo’s fawning over the SRX design when he was sucking up to/showing off for Welburn.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    No new 9-3s or 9-4Xs on the lots? Just 9-5s?

    • 0 avatar

      There’s one 9-3 at the end. Not a single 9-4X in sight… and you’d imagine that if one were in stock, it would be right out front.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        http://www.saabofsandiego.com/VehicleDetails/new-2011-Saab-9_4X-FWD_4dr_3.0i_Premium-San_Diego-CA/1236799723

        Definition of optimism: Saab dealer saying ‘contact us’ instead of posting the 9-4x’s price.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        What’s even more telling is that Saab doesn’t even clearly advertise the price of their cars on their own websites. To find that out you have to go to the Features & Specs page, and in the case of the 9-4x (which doesn’t have a Features & Specs page, you have to build it). They are too ashamed to even admit the price that their cars start at.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Earlier in Saab’s death-watch, the same dealers were listing prices that reflected 10 grand off. They had 9-3s starting under $22,000 and 9-5s in the mid 30s. It seems like one of the biggest Saab dealers, and discounters, is gone. There was a Saab dealer in Orange County, CA that had the biggest inventories and promotions, but I can’t find them on google or on the Saab USA dealer locator now. Now the only Orange County Saab dealer I can find is in NY.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Hopefully you’re able to talk to Mr. Small. It would be interesting to get his perspective.

    Here on the other side of the U.S., the Portland Saab dealer has moved recently. The former Portland Saab building has been face-lifted and now contains an Ace hardware store and a bank. It was a pretty decent size dealership years ago.

    Portland Saab still exists though. Although they’re now contained in the same building as the Volvo dealership in Scarborough, ME. It’s kind of weird to drive by and see 2 dead-ish brands under the same roof. But at least they’re still building Volvos. Portland Saab has 20 new cars in stock. I guess that’ll last them about 2-3 years.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Portland Saab has been owned by same folks as Portland Volvo for quite a few years now. Only made sense to consolidate the two businesses.

      How is Volvo “dead-ish”? They are selling all kinds of cars and making profits!

  • avatar
    Secret Hi5

    Anecdotes:
    My cousin graduated from college in 2010 and only had eyes for Saab. She ended up buying a late-2000s 9-3. No idea why she was fixated on Saab . . .

    I was surprised to see a couple of new rental 9-5s at the National/Enterprise lot in San Antonio. I’d think that Saabs are not cost-effective rental vehicles due to their questionable resale value.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Depends on what you pay for them in the first place. I was plenty happy with the resale value of my ’08 9-3 SportCombi. Bought for $24K, sold for $18K 25 months later.

      I am quite certain that National got a REALLY good deal on thier 9-5s. For that matter, it would not suprise me if Saab essentially GAVE them to National to get people to drive and talk about them a bit.

      Aside from wanting one of the (theoretically) last BMW station wagons to be imported, I wanted to get rid of the Saab while the getting was still relatively good.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    My local megadealer has 34 new Saabs in stock, ranging in price from $31k to $59k, so they may have $1.5 million in new Saab inventory. I suppose this will last them a long time.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    I drove by Saab of Lakeside in Macomb yesterday(my brother lives around the corner). I bet they have 100+ cars on their lot. I didn’t count. I can’t imagine them selling…any of them.

  • avatar
    PDXTSX

    Great story Edward! I too hope that Mr. Small gets into contact with you. It would be very insightful to hear from another viewpoint of the tragedy with Saab.
    I recently saw for the first time the new 9-5, and was quite impressed with it’s looks, and shocked to find that it had been on sale for over a year without me seeing a single one before then. I wanted to ask the driver if the car was a dealer demo or some type of promotional vehicle, as it did seem very rare and unusual. I view the current 9-3 as well as being a very good looking car… shame that the engineering and quality seem to be less than cutting edge these days.

    Also I am happy to have learned that one of my favorite websites has a connection to my fair city of Portland! Keep up the good work!

  • avatar

    I have actually been dealing on new Saabs the past two months after realizing that incentives and dealer discounting is making them among the best new deals on the market.

    There are excellent deals to be had on new 9-3s and 9-5s right now – up to 10k off, even more if you can live with a low mileage dealer demo or are okay with an unsold 2009/2010 model.

    There is a good inventory nationwide of all their new vehicles unless you are picky about options and features, which are somewhat strange on new Saabs. For instance many 9-3s do not have XM radio, which is standard on most cars. All 2011 9-5 Aeros have glass roofs as well, no 2010s have it. I do not want it personally so it’s narrowing down my choices.

    Many dealers have recieved stock of the new 9-4X SUV as well. All Aero models have the glass roof too. But there are plenty of 3.0 models that don’t and those come fairly loaded at the base price. The Aero basically has everything standard, or at least that’s how dealers all ordered them.

    As for the 9-5, before you knock it or say it’s a Buick LaCrosse, go drive one. It is built, styled and trimmed nothing like a Buick LaCrosse, it is vastly nicer car, especially the leather and the solidity in which all the doors, trunk, hood and other parts operate. It also drives much better. Even the four cylinder is impressive. It is fast, comfortable, has low fuel consumption and handles very well.

    Transaction prices for the 9-5 Aero, especially a new 2010, are donw in the mid to high 30s now. I can’t think of any better cars for the money. All new Saabs use GM parts too, so aside from cosmetic or interior parts they shouldn’t be too troublesome to maintain or expensive to repair – no different than the Holden rebadged Pontiacs.

    I just wish I could also use my GM blue card earnings on a new Saab too since I have almost 4k accrued on it.

    • 0 avatar
      bill h.

      Trishield: I remember a couple of years ago when you used to knock Saabs a lot….what with the change in outlook?

      Is it possible you have actually driven the cars, which I suspect is not the case with most of the Armchair Commentariat here?

  • avatar
    tallnikita

    But what exactly are the historians to look at here? What I see is that Saab had something half-decent going with their 9-3 and 9-5, then GM picked them up and turned their product development a beggar at Opel’s banquet. So Saab ended up with GM’s overweight products that had the key fob between the seats. Wow. Then GM cut their losses and dumped Saab. Isn’t GM somewhat at fault here for completely destroying whatever loyalty Saab has had? I mean, can you offer blinged out Subaru and a Chevy SUV as Saab, and then with a straight face claim “born from jets”?

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      GM actually saved Saab. Saab didn’t have a half-decent thing going with their 9-3 and 9-5 picked them up, which were both developed under GM’s leadership. Instead they had an aging, uncompetitive line up and were going bankrupt. If GM hadn’t stepped in Saab would have died 20 years ago.

      Loyalty is nice and all, but is completely useless if the company is making no money. Which happened before GM stepped in (I guess people weren’t THAT loyal), during GM’s rein (despite Saab having their best sales after), and ironically, is still occurring even though Saab is now independent and (mostly) free from the big bad GM. Saab’s “loyal” customers have done diddly-squat for the brand.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Absolutely. GM didn’t do a hostile takeover of Saab. Saab had already failed as an independent. Also, the 9-3 and 9-5 were GM cars that replaced the Saab 900 and Fiat-based 9000. I worked at a dealer that sold Saabs in 1989, near the end of the line for independent Saab. The cars were awful from a reliability standpoint, even compared to contemporary Oldsmobiles and Chryslers. We sold no more than 90 Saabs a year, in a college town where one might have been forgiven for thinking that the best selling cars in the nation were Volvos, BMWs, and Hondas; in that order.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Well said. The trouble is “Saab loyalists” mostly buy USED Saabs….

        I’ve been on a pretty active (and pretty rabid) Saab e-mail list for many years. Probably 100+ really active members, and a similar number of lurkers. Myself included, I doubt 10 people on that list have bought new Saabs in the last 5-10 years. And I only bought one when they were 1/3 off in early ’09.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        Exactly. Everyone is always touting how much money they got off their new Saab, with many trying to spin it as being a positive thing. Yes, you can find excellent deals on new Saabs, but that is because they are a failing brand, not because they are amazing. (Of course Saab is amazing in its ability to overprice the MSRP of their cars by about $10,000 across the board)

    • 0 avatar

      Hyundai supporters and owners brag about how amazing their cars are for what they get them for (which is cheap). How is that any different with Saabs or any other new vehicle you get a knockout deal on? At 35-40k a new 9-5 Aero is a damn impressive and good car for that money, you’d have trouble finding something like it and as good as it for the transaction price. It’s also a beautiful car inside and out, something I can’t say for too many new vehicles on the market.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Hyundais are sold at a profit. Saab has been losing money for decades. If you can build cars that represent a lot of value for a price that pays your bills, you will succeed. If you build cars that have to be discounted to a point where you’re bleeding money in order for anyone to buy them, you will go out of business. Saab is going to go out of business.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        I was talking from a business point of view. Hyundai builds their cars purposely to be cheap (relative to their competitors) and full of value, and tout that as a reason to buy them. Saab wants to be a premium automaker. Having to sell their cars with such deep discounts doesn’t help their cause. And even with those discounts they are struggling to move cars.

        From the customer’s POV I agree with you. The 9-5 is fantastic, and can be gotten for a steal, assuming you have no issues with future warranty claims and resale values. But again, that is not good business for Saab.

      • 0 avatar
        Type57SC

        What? at 35-40 I can get a fairly low spec, but nice ES, Genesis or TL, or if I want to roll the reliabilty dice like the 9-5, I can get a 300

  • avatar
    threeer

    Too bad though that in the end SAAB will slowly fade away…my wife had her eye on a used wagon to haul our two pups around last year, and though I completely dug the look, I just couldn’t get past the lack of future support and longevity/reliability concerns. The automotive landscape will certainly be duller without (true) SAABs on the road.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Well, this is a sad story. To my knowledge, there are two Saab stores in metro DC. One, International Motors, is where I bought my ’02 9-5 wagon, new. AFAIK, it’s not tied in with any other dealer, or brand. The other, VOB, is co-branded with other BMW and Nissan stores, at different locations.

    One serious question I would have in buying any new or CPO Saab (and I do agree that the prices on both seem attractive right now) is who is behind the warranty. If Saab Cars goes out of business in Sweden, are those warranties worthless? My guess is that they would be worthless. So, people buying those cars should take that into account when pricing them.

    The story about getting parts is a little upsetting, too. Certainly the body panels and interior bits are, for the most part, going to be unique to Saab. Of the engines, the old 2.3 liter 4 in the 9-5 is a Saab, not GM engine. The 2.0 liter 4 in newer 9-3s and the 2.8 liter V-6 in some 9-5s and 9-3s is, I believe, a GM engine. But who knows how many unique parts were included with those engines and drivetrains?

    I think my 9-5 (which has been pretty good lately) will serve my daughter for her final two years of college, garaged in Madison, WI. After that, I’ll take whatever I can get for it and be satisfied.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    Saab – The HP Touchpad of the automotive world.

    • 0 avatar
      cfclark

      Took the words right out of my mouth. I think I’ll go to Best Buy and see if they have any $99 TouchPads left, then drop by the Saab dealer (I’m in Portland for the week, so I should go visit Mr. Small) to pick up a car to carry it around in.

      I was musing the other day that I could probably pick up a decent 9-2x used, but I’m not sure my Subie mechanic would work on it.

      • 0 avatar
        Hobie-wan

        They should. The cars were built in Japan by Subaru. Aside from the nose, tail, some sound deadening, and a few minor things (like a plastic guard next to the gas pedal) they’re all Impreza parts. I just got my Saabaru a few months ago and haven’t had to do anything beyond replace some trim bits, but the Subaru dealer parts guy near me didn’t bat an eye when I said I had an 05 Saabaru. Even if they don’t know from the name, they should know it is Impreza wagon and a few WRX steering bits once they look at it.

  • avatar
    Dynamic88

    I didn’t realize there were any stand alone Saab dealers. Where I live they are sold by the local Dodge dealer.

  • avatar
    spyked

    I too am hoping for the best. Especially for the guys at International Motors in DC area. Good people, been there forever. As a result, VA, inside the beltway, is very much SAAB country and we have quite a few SAAB specialty repair places in VA as well.

    The new 9-5 is NOT a Buick (not that a Regal or LaCrosse are terrible cars). All companies share components. Hell, VW platforms can probably be counted on one hand, all shared by VW, Audi, Seat, Skoda, and some Porsche and Lambo and Bentley (with more on the way).

    My concern for SAAB has nothing to do with their product and everything to do with their leadership.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    When I left Grand Rapids, Michigan, in 2007 the standalone SAAB dealer was also amongst the BHPH lots down on South Division St.

    They got bought out by the guy who owns a Ford Dealership, and he built a SAAB building out behind the Ford Store.

    I live in Las Vegas now. The SAAB store is mixed in with a Cadillac store.

  • avatar
    mazder3

    Poor Tracy Banks. She has 63 Saabs in stock, and many have *Ltd Avail* in their description.

    • 0 avatar
      salhany

      I see she’s got a fair number of 9-3s with XWD, which is very tempting if the prices got low enough. I’d worry that on the new 9-5s the parts availability going forward would not be very good, but on the 9-3s I’ll bet they’ve sold enough of them for long enough that parts wouldn’t be so hard to come by.

      If I needed a car I’d really be tempted to jump on one of those deals, the dealer demos in particular.

      • 0 avatar
        roughbearingatsea

        Don’t be so sure on parts availability. I actually am at a Saab dealership. No availability on a late model 9-3 ignition switch. No ETA from Saab and dealer locate came up with a big goose egg. Good luck getting a key for one too, global backorder. The situation will get worse before it gets better. BTW it’s p/n 12801010. Someone on Ebay has some new keys for sale at $250 each which is 110% above MSRP.

  • avatar
    Robert Schwartz

    Why don’t the dealers cut the prices on their stock. The cars are not getting anymore valuable sitting there.

    • 0 avatar
      bill h.

      Many of them have, and the transaction prices are lower than MSRP by significant amounts (see Trishield’s posting above). But the word doesn’t get out very well. I see this as another result of Saab’s idiotic retailing scheme, trying to price the cars in the same league as the Germans when (even if they were comparable) they don’t have the street cred to command those prices. But most of the coverage in the press doesn’t take the time to investigate the real selling prices vs. the sticker, and so they get constantly tagged as being overpriced.

      I have contended for years that Saab needed to more realistically price their cars on the sticker–at this point, getting them in people’s hands and out on the street would have at least upped their visibility, whatever the financial impact. They don’t do anybody any good sitting on the lots.

    • 0 avatar
      gslippy

      Maybe they’re hoping for a miracle at the mothership. In any case, when I see the average MSRP for the Saabs near me is $45k, it’s clear they have a lot of money tied up in them and don’t want to take a bath.

      Speaking of this local megadealer – they also used to sell Pontiac, Hummer, and Saturn, and had new Hummers on the lot for quite a while after that brand’s demise. FWIW, they still have a NEW 2006 Cadillac DTS on their lot, and 2 new 2008 GMC vans.

      Now I see they’re about to open a Fiat dealership – one of the few in western PA. But don’t cry for them; they handle a ton of hot brands, too.

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Schwartz

        “it’s clear they have a lot of money tied up in them and don’t want to take a bath.”

        They are in the tub. A miracle might bail them out, but prudence says take cash before it goes away.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    In Queens NYC there is a Saab franchise part a of Cadillac, GMC and Chevy dealer. It became common post 90 GM sale to add the brand. They used to carry Pontiac/Olds as well. I see Saab’s on sale starting mid-20’s for a 9-3 which is a good deal compared to a Subaru, Kia etc.

    In the recent Consumer Reports auto issue they rate the newest 9-3 below-par basically since it’s competitors have vastly improved their products. They used to rank them better than average. This could be another reason why people are shying away from them.


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