By on June 22, 2011

The Japanese auto industry might come back to much normal faster that thought. But then there is shippiing. It takes a while to float a few thousand cars across the Pacific. Now add high gas prices and a high demand for fuel efficient cars and you have the reason why Edmunds reports that the U.S. national inventory of the Toyota Prius is down to four-day supply. Ed Larocque, Toyota’s national marketing manager for advanced technology vehicles, told Edmunds that “production in Japan likely will return to full capacity by the end of June.” Which means that that wave of Prii won’t was ashore before end of July.

Matters wouldn’t be as tight if the Prius would be built stateside. According to Larocque, Toyota would “like to have a plant up and active” to assemble the Prius in the U.S. – at some point. originally, the Blue Springs, Mississippi, plant had been slated for Prius production. But then the recession intervened, and Blue Spring is building Corollas.

 

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57 Comments on “Want A Prius? Take A Number...”


  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    Four day supply!? Some dealers have no Prius to sell at all and have been waiting for more than 60 days to get anything in.

    Ditto with Elantra and Sonata. The only thing in overabundance is GM trucks on distributor lots.

    • 0 avatar
      SVX pearlie

      A 4-day supply is clearly bigger than the zero-day supply of Volt & Leaf nationally.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        Unless they count the ones already on the ground

        http://www.cars.com/for-sale/searchresults.action?stkTyp=N&tracktype=newcc&mkId=20053&AmbMkId=20053&AmbMkNm=Chevrolet&make=Chevrolet&AmbMdNm=Volt&model=Volt&mdId=35025&AmbMdId=35025&rd=100000&zc=94102&enableSeo=1&searchSource=TRAIL_HEAD

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        OK, let’s see what Cars.com shows for new cars:

        1402 NEW Toyota Prius (4 days)
        593 NEW Chevy Volt
        173 NEW Nissan Leaf

        Pretending that ALL of the Volts are actually “for sale”, versus being “demonstrators”, if we take ratios, it looks like this:

        4 days Toyota Prius
        1.7 days Chevy Volt
        0.5 days Nissan Leaf

        However, in reality, 550 of those 593 Volts are test drive demonstrators, so those 43 Chevy Volts actually give a number like this:

        0.1 days Chevy Volt

        Still, thanks for proving my point.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Still, thanks for proving my point.

        I’m not sure what point that is, unless it was to prove that you don’t know how days-inventory figures are calculated.

        In addition, days of inventory is not a useful statistic for brand new models, since the calculation is based upon sales volumes for the individual models, which new models obviously can’t yet have.

        In other words, the Prius figure is meaningful to the extent that it reflects high demand, since the nameplate has been out for some time, while the figures for the Leaf and Volt (whatever they are) probably would not be — it will take some months before that is the case. Where the Prius figure may not be accurate is that it also reflects supply constraints caused by the earthquake/ tsunami/ nuclear crisis, which probably skews those numbers to something less than what they should otherwise be.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        @pch: are you dumb?

        Year to date, GM sold more Volt than Lexus sold HS.
        Nissan has also moved more Leaf than Lexus HS.

        If the Lexus HS can have an days of inventory, then the Volt & Leaf can be measured similarly.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Hey cool, it’s a new Pch101 comment.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        are you dumb?

        Probably so, since I’m wasting my time arguing with someone who doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

        You need to look up the formula for how days of inventory is calculated. You can apologize to me after that.

        Here’s a hint while you do that: It is a ratio that doesn’t just include the supply, but that also includes demand for that specific model. That demand component can’t be calculated when the car is new, since there haven’t been enough sales to be counted.

        As of the end of April, total US sales of the Volt had been about 1700 units. Chevy sold about the same number of Volts between January and April of 2011 that Honda sold of its unpopular Civic Hybrid. Production is well below norm and sales have been low.

        It’s too soon to tell how it’s doing. Using days of inventory for a new model such as this doesn’t work, for the reasons that I have explained. Without more data and a longer time series, it’s hard to know whether the car is selling in low numbers because of the limited ramp up in production, or whether there just aren’t that many takers.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        Given that those Volt & Leaf sales are all going to preordered Customers, the DoI is ZERO Days.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Given that those Volt & Leaf sales are all going to preordered Customers, the DoI is ZERO Days.

        I think that you’ve established that you lack both the data and the knowledge to provide any such statistics.

        And in any case, you’re missing the point. Based upon the January-April figures, Volt annual sales are a bit over 5,000 units per year. If you think that GM can turn a profit at a volume that low, then you are fooling yourself.

        There is currently no reliable days of inventory day for the Volt, for the reasons that I have stated. You’re not asking the right question, namely whether GM is going to be able to sell enough Volts to make it profitable. If it can’t sell enough cars to recoup the costs and generate some margin, then it had better get enough halo benefit from it to have made it worth the while. The same thing applies to the Leaf and Nissan.

        The Prius is a successful product. Some people need to learn to get over that.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        Hmmm… GM has built close to 4500 Volts and sold close to 2600. They sell about 440 per month. If we assume about 1/2 month’s worth is in transit, there’s 1600 lingering unsold. That’s a 3.5-month supply or thereabouts.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        SVX Pearlie: “However, in reality, 550 of those 593 Volts are test drive demonstrators,”

        A glance at the ads suggests otherwise. Some dealers have more than one Volt. Others have laced their ads with phrases like, “Available for Sale” (duh) and “Won’t Last Long” (remains to be seen).

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        If dealers are advertising 593 Volts as being in stock, doesn’t that mean they’re for sale? Are Chevy dealers really so contemptuous of their customers that they’d advertise cars that aren’t for sale? If they’re for sale, aren’t they part of supply? I see prices ranging from $42,280 to $59,995, plus quite a few listed with no price, but that I’ll assume aren’t outside that window. That’s a pretty big range, and it is one I’d travel to pay at the low end of, provided I wanted a Volt. I think it proves that there are plenty of unsold Volts, and it also proves pretty much any allegations of dealers profiting from assinine subsidiest that anyone wants to make. I also see ample evidence that SVX pearlie chooses a position and then doesn’t let reality guide him in supporting it. Kind of like he did in the Lincoln thread…

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        According to GM, they shipped 550 demonstrators to dealers in Q1.

        It seems to me, that any such demonstrators would be listed, because the point is to draw potential customers in for test drives. If they’re not listed, how can a customer know it’s there to be test driven?

        As for multiples, if there are 550 demonstrators, then obviously, some of the 43 other Volts would bee doubled-up, tripled-up, etc.

        Let’s look at an example. The first entry which comes up for “Chevy Volt demonstrators” is a red Volt at Bill Crispin Chevrolet, Ann Arbor Michigan:

        http://www.annarborchevrolet.org/20110607-chevy-volt-demonstrations-offered-now-at-chevrolet-dealer-serving-ann-arbor-mi/

        Now, let’s see what cars.com has near Ann Arbor, MI (48104):

        http://www.cars.com/for-sale/searchresults.action?sf1Dir=ASC&mkId=20053&mdId=35025&zc=48104&PMmt=1-1-0&stkTypId=28880&sf2Dir=DESC&sf1Nm=location&sf2Nm=price&rpp=50&feedSegId=28705&searchSource=GEO_SEARCH&crSrtFlds=stkTypId-feedSegId-mkId-mdId&pgId=2102&rd=10

        Holy smokes, there’s a brand new red Chevy Volt available within 10 miles of Ann Arbor, at Bill Crispin Chevrolet!

        http://www.cars.com/go/search/detail.jsp?tracktype=newcc&csDlId=&csDgId=&listingId=64682319&listingRecNum=0&criteria=sf1Dir%3DASC%26mkId%3D20053%26stkTyp%3DN%26mdId%3D35025%26rd%3D10%26crSrtFlds%3DstkTypId-feedSegId-mkId-mdId%26zc%3D48104%26rn%3D0%26PMmt%3D1-1-0%26stkTypId%3D28880%26sf2Dir%3DDESC%26sf1Nm%3Dlocation%26sf2Nm%3Dprice%26rpp%3D50%26feedSegId%3D28705&aff=national

        Imagine that!

        Well, maybe that’s too much coincidence.

        Let’s look at the second result from Google, at Elkins Chevrolet in Marlton, NJ:

        http://elkinschevrolet.com/VehicleSearchResults?model=Volt&search=new&make=Chevrolet

        They have 2 Volts, and the first (silver) Volt is labeled as their demonstrator with this exciting press line:

        “Attention!!! Our 2011 Chevrolet Volt Demonstrator has arrived! Come in and take a test”

        Wow, exciting, eh?

        Anyhow, let’s go back to cars.com again…

        http://www.cars.com/for-sale/searchresults.action?sf1Dir=ASC&mkId=20053&mdId=35025&crSrtFlds=stkTypId-feedSegId-mkId-mdId&rd=10&PMmt=1-1-0&stkTypId=28880&sf2Dir=DESC&sf1Nm=location&sf2Nm=price&rpp=50&feedSegId=28705&searchSource=GEO_SEARCH&pgId=2102&zc=08053

        Wow, 4 cars!

        And look, 2 of them are at Elkins.

        But wait, isn’t one of them silver?

        http://www.cars.com/go/search/detail.jsp?tracktype=newcc&csDlId=&csDgId=&listingId=64946216&listingRecNum=1&criteria=sf1Dir%3DASC%26mkId%3D20053%26stkTyp%3DN%26mdId%3D35025%26rd%3D10%26crSrtFlds%3DstkTypId-feedSegId-mkId-mdId%26zc%3D08053%26rn%3D0%26PMmt%3D1-1-0%26stkTypId%3D28880%26sf2Dir%3DDESC%26sf1Nm%3Dlocation%26sf2Nm%3Dprice%26rpp%3D50%26feedSegId%3D28705&aff=national

        Yes it is, and what does it say?

        “Attention!!! Our 2011 Chevrolet Volt Demonstrator has arrived! Come in and take a test drive…”

        Imagine, that.

        Anyhow, guys, been fun.

        Next time, engage brain and do a little homework.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        Next time, engage brain and do a little homework.

        That’s a good idea. You should really give it a shot next time.

        Step one — you need to figure out yet how to calculate days of inventory, which you still haven’t done.

        Step two — you need to realize that cars.com is not an industry standard for determining current inventory levels.

        Step three — you should learn how to use data appropriately. Even if you had calculated days of inventory accurately (which you didn’t), you still didn’t apply the result correctly or combine it with other data in order to draw more reasonable conclusions.

        Step four (and this is the clincher) — you need to comprehend that if sales levels for the Volt remain at current levels, then the car is going to be a huge loser with a capital “L.” Not that I would expect sales to remain at this level, but nothing that has happened thus far is pointing to a sure-fire winner here.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Ignoring the gratuitous GM attack on a Toyota article. I thought Prius sales had dropped recently and gas has retreated down to around $3.50 at which level Prius consideration will level out. If gas stays around the current level that gives time for Toyota to ship the Prius.

    • 0 avatar
      HoldenSSVSE

      Well the GM attack from the B&B didn’t take long did it.

      Lets see vehicles with a longer inventory turn than 3/4 ton Chevy Silverado:

      1) Mazda MX-5: 140 days
      2) Toyota Camry Hybrid: 123 days
      3) Subaru Legacy: 148 days
      4) VW Touareg: 123 days
      5) VW CC: 143 days
      6) Ford Mustang: 105 days (so about equal to Chevy trucks)

      But hey – lets not pass up a good opportunity to bash away.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        I’ve got brothers and their partners in the new car retail business who would give their left nuts to have more Prius, Sonata and Elantra cars in stock. If they had them, they’d be sold.

        Maybe location has a lot to do with it, i.e San Francisco, Los Angeles, Scottsdale, Houston, Dallas, Huntsville.

        If you have stock sitting on the lot that takes more than 30 days to turn, you’re losing money. See GM trucks as an example. Even with incentives up to $9500 off MSRP, they’re still not moving! That’s why GM is closing down the truck plants for an extended period.

        Prius? Is it illegal for a dealer to sell a Prius for more than $4000 over MSRP? No. But if you don’t have ANY to sell, even one will net you a nice profit and a happy camper for a customer.

      • 0 avatar
        geozinger

        @highdesertcat: You don’t think the softness in the market for big trucks is even slightly attenuated by $4.00/gallon gasoline? Now that gasoline is starting to trend downward we’ll see what happens with big truck sales.

        “Is it illegal for a dealer to sell a Prius for more than $4000 over MSRP? No. But if you don’t have ANY to sell, even one will net you a nice profit and a happy camper for a customer.”

        Seriously? Getting charged $4K over sticker will make a happy camper for a customer?

        Did you really mean to say that? Even with $4.00/gallon it will still take a while to see the return on investment (at least from gasoline savings).

        How would adding $4K to the price (of any car) make any customer a happy camper? If the idea was to save money, this idea is DOA.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I don’t know that it is an attack on GM. They’re in a difficult position. 140 day supply of Miatas is what, maybe 9,000 cars? A 100 day supply of GM pickups is what, about as many units as the second highest volume sedan moves in a year? 250,000 unsold trucks represent a big chunk of idle capital, no matter what arguments are used to distract from them. $3.50 gas with the no real pricing direction doesn’t encourage lifestyle sales of 14 mpg vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        geozinger, yes, I actually did mean what I posted. The saleslady who sold the last remaining Prius at my brother’s franchise in San Francisco had an older gentleman and his wife offer to buy it for $5K OVER MSRP, before tax, title and registration/license plates. There were four other couples looking at the same Prius, none who could match this offer. BTW, this is done all the time. I read somewhere that someone bid $10K over MSRP on a Volt when they first came out. That stretches MY imagination for an untried and untested brand new model.

        Most Americans do not care about the price of gas — I sure don’t. Gas costs what it costs. You can’t get around it if you want to drive. That doesn’t mean I’m rich. It means that I adjust my expenditures elsewhere so I can continue to buy the gas. Cutting back on just one latte buys you a gallon of gas.

        What people do care about is the uniqueness of their ride, and love’m or hate’m, the Prius has done very well for itself, it’s reputation over decades and TMC. In certain places, California for one, the Prius is still much in demand.

        And as for unsold GM trucks, the government can always send them overseas as foreign aid and/or Taliban target practice. I do not believe that the price of gas has an affect on truck sales. What I think affected truck sales was the general malaise that currently exists in American society and permeates throughout the American economy. The people who buy trucks will continue to buy trucks as long as they are confident that they will be better off tomorrow than they are today. And not many people think this today, nor will they for some time to come.

        Some of my ultra-left Democrat neighbors have even remarked to me that they aren’t doing as well today as they were during Bush. This means that their living standard came crashing down within just the last two and a half years. And these guys are way too old to find a new job to replace their savings. Imagine what the non-Democrat voters must be going through, unless they are independently wealthy. Imagine how those will vote in 2012.

        One of my neighbors remarked yesterday when we went to lunch together, “How in hell do you manage to buy a new Tundra?” (meaning during this time of recession and high living costs). I told him I initially financed through the local credit union then paid it off after 90 days, and I’m letting my social security repay my savings. I also reminded him that my wife sells real estate and although sales are very slow she manages to sell, due largely to the military population that constantly turns over, and the great number of people moving to South Central New Mexico from the East Coast states.

        So, a lot of factors come into play, in my area.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    My wife and I have narrowed her MINI replacement* down to the Lexus CT200h (her preference due to luxury and look), Prius v (my preference due to utility), and the regular ol’ Prius (least costly, most efficient, meet in the middle size-wise). I guess this just gives us a little more time to save. It might mean we hold off a bit later than late this year to let the demand cool off a hair.

    *Replacement as a daily driver. We’ll keep the MCS as a toy. She generally only sees 30mpg in her MCS, it is over 6 years old, and we’re going to start a family soon. We have to buy something, so may as well get something comfortable and efficient since we’ll still have the MINI for fun.

    • 0 avatar
      PintoFan

      Just out of curiosity, have you considered the Fusion hybrid as an alternative?

    • 0 avatar
      HoldenSSVSE

      How about a Ford Focus, bank the savings on the Prius to buy the extra bit of gas it will sip?

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        By the time I option the Focus the way I want, I’m into the 20s. Feature adjusted on True Delta (for what I’d want) is $1800 difference between the Prius and Focus. I’ve had better luck with Toyotas in the past, too. My first model year 4Runner is on zero defects after 20k miles and the Prius is well rated reliability wise. Either way, the Prius v is what I’m pushing for and it has more cargo space than the Equinox, Escape, etc while still doing 42mpg combined. It will easily swallow up my road and mountain bikes, baby strollers, luggage, etc. That is the sort of car I can see keeping in my fleet for a long time.

    • 0 avatar
      hurls

      “only sees 30mpg”

      That seems far from painful to me :)

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        Ha, well, I imagine it will be a lot more painful when we have to fit a little one in the back and we have my 23mpg 4Runner or the 32mpg (highway) MINI to choose from. We do so much traveling on the weekend that it makes sense to get something really efficient when we have to get a momma-mobile.

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      “My household has been exclusively hatches/wagons since 2006. They
      are far too practical to consider anything else.”

      The wife and I are like minded. Makes new car choices frustratingly simple as there are few to pick from.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        Yeah, I feel your pain. It makes for some interesting car shopping when you determine that there are only about 3 hatches that fit your needs. I had a Fit and Miata thrown into my group when I bought my GTI.

  • avatar
    VanillaDude

    Isn’t that special?
    So once your “car” is assembled on the other side of the Earth, sent to the docks and then shipped by diesel churning ships across 12,000 miles of the Pacific, then shipped by diesel churning trains across the country to your local dealer – you can pretend that you are being green all the while forgetting the global destruction that occurred between your house and the Toyota factory!

    Yeah! You’re saving the planet! Why buy local?

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      Plenty of non-hybrid cars are also shipped similarly. At least if you’ve bought the hybrid you’re saving fuel from that point on.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Vanilla,

      You forgot the cost of getting the battery in the car.

      Conversely, what car is made ‘locally’ for most people? If you mean NA, fine, but don’t forget, parts for many cars are sourced worldwide.

      We’re not talking watermelons and grapefruits here.

    • 0 avatar
      aristurtle

      Local? What the hell is “local”? Even cars assembled in the US invariably include parts that need to be shipped from long distances away. These are cars we’re talking about, not vegetables.

    • 0 avatar
      Sinistermisterman

      Actually the voyage from Japan to West Coast North America is anywhere from 4200 – 4800 nautical miles. Ships do not cross the middle of the Pacific, they arc northwards towards the Bearing Straights to shorten the voyage using the curvature of the earth – look up ‘Rhumb Line’.
      Also when one considers quite how many cars are loaded onto the car transporter vessels – anywhere from 3000-6000 vehicles at a time, transportation by ocean going vessel is actually the post fuel efficient method of transportation on the planet (even if most vessels do use gigantic 2 stroke diesel engines).
      As for the railroads? Again, hundreds, if not up to a thousand vehicles on one train. The engines used in modern diesel locomotives are much smaller than ships and are 4 stroke. After ships, trains are the next most fuel efficient mode of transport.

      On the other hand, I’m not saying we *should* ship large quantities of coal and iron ore across the ocean and then get it sent back to us as finished goods, all I’m saying is that compared to a car carrying one person to work in the morning, shipping and railroads are not the big problem.

    • 0 avatar
      PintoFan

      I think that you and many other people misunderstand why people buy Prii. It’s not necessarily to save the planet- it’s because it’s about the most fuel efficient new car you can buy. It’s more a question of dollars and cents than polar bears. Whether that is ultimately an economically rational choice is another matter entirely.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        They have also been proven to be very reliable (yes, the battery, too). As gas prices go up, you’ll see better residuals on used cars with high fuel economy, so you’re also improving your odds of your car being desirable when you sell it.

      • 0 avatar
        GarbageMotorsCo.

        Definitely. Helped a friend shop for a used one and I couldn’t believe the number of high mileage ones out there.

        http://www.cars.com/for-sale/used/toyota/prius/_/N-ma9Zfi0Zgs7Zm5d?mkId=20088&mdId=21751&rd=100000&zc=94102&PMmt=1-1-0&stkTypId=28881&rpp=50&feedSegId=28705&searchSource=SORT&crSrtFlds=stkTypId-feedSegId-mkId-mdId&pgId=2102&sf1Nm=miles&sf1Dir=DESC&sf2Nm=price&sf2Dir=DESC

      • 0 avatar
        Sinistermisterman

        @GarbageMotorsCo.
        Wow, interesting link. I always assumed when the Prius came out that due to the complexity of the vehicle that most would suffer from all sorts of problems past 150k. I was obviously wrong. Although why would anyone part with more than $5k for a vehicle with close to quarter of a million miles on the clock is beyond me. I don’t care how well made it is, unless it’s had the a complete overhaul and/or replacement of all the major mechanical components, you’d be better off using that $5k on a down payment on a much newer/low mileage vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        @Garbagemotors –

        Wow, check out these folks trying to sell a five year old Prius with 225,000 miles for seventeen grand…they’re on crack.

    • 0 avatar
      HoldenSSVSE

      Lets not forget the nickel strip mines, shipping via diesel burning trains and ships to build those batteries in the Prius, and the huge amounts of electricity needed to process.

      Prius owners don’t like to be reminded of the carbon footprint to build their product, and when you add it all up, there is nothing green about the Prius at all, nor does it get us off the teats of foreign oil (those damn Canadians) because the last time I checked, it still needs gas to go, still needs oil in the crank case, and still needs a paved tarmac street to drive down. Oh those details, details, details.

      • 0 avatar
        srogers

        Oil needs to be ‘mined’ and refined too. Sometimes it even requires foreign occupation and/or political manipulation.

        Speaking of damn Canadians, take a look at our lovely oilsands sites sometime. Or how our oil producing areas are entirely criss-crossed with seismic lines, service roads and well sites. You can’t walk a mile in Canadian bush in any direction without crossing a bulldozed cutline.

    • 0 avatar
      BigFire

      Some of us don’t subscribe to Al “The Divinity School Dropout” Gore’s new religion. I personally bought a Prius because I want the latest technology at the time. The fact that it’s still giving me good mileage is all I care about.

  • avatar
    HoldenSSVSE

    If you do the math on a Hyundai Elantra GLS with an automatic versus a Prius 2, the price delta (2011 Prius vs. 2012 Elantra) is $6,075. Do the math on 15,000 miles of annual driving at 50% highway 50% city and the Hyundai will burn about 140 more gallons of gas. At $5 a gallon break even is almost 10 years. At $9 a gallon break even is still over 5 years.

    Given the huge improvement in C-segment cars and the significant gains in MPG the economic math of a Prius purchase simply doesn’t add up. If you compare a Cruze Eco with an automatic versus the Prius the break even point at five years comes at about $7 a gallon, needing about 160 extra gallons of gas a year. The pricier Ford Focus SEL doesn’t add up as well against a Prius 2. Shoot even the math on a Hyundai Sonata GLS with automatic adds up better with a five year delta at $5 a gallon, which is more realistic. That shoots holes in the, “its bigger” arguement. The Cruze and Hyundai also come with better warranties.

    • 0 avatar
      srogers

      Here’s where we pull the old depreciation card. The Prius will be worth thousands more after 5 years than either a Focus, Cruze or Hyundai. Or at least in my local market.

      If you’re not dumping your car in 5 years, then the depreciation difference doesn’t matter so much, but then you can extend your fuel savings even longer, and assume that the price of gas will be higher than what you’ve chosen for your 5 year calculation.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        …and here’s where I pull the old “mental depreciation based on repeated humiliations at stoplights” card…Prius loses there big time… :)

      • 0 avatar
        srogers

        So you take a lot of pride in your drag racing wins over Prii? I’ll have to try that some time and see if it’s as thrilling as you make it sound!

        Actually, I’m not sure that I can beat a Prius. My Focus is slow and burns twice as much gas too.

      • 0 avatar
        SVX pearlie

        Not any more. CalTrans finally let the yellow HOV exemption stickers expire.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        @srogers:
        Every once in a while I need to let my inner teenager out and do a little racin’ in the street, even if it’s at a stoplight. Not all the time…but it’s nice to know your car CAN answer the call if need be. Unfortunately, that’s a call the Prius will never get. Not that there’s anything wrong with that…just makes a Prius the wrong car for me. I’ll sacrifice some MPG for some fun, as long as the car gets good mileage to begin with.

        Just one man’s (overly adolescent) opinion.

        And if your Focus can’t outrun a Prius, you need to get that baby to the shop! My ’05 ST was quite the little urban warrior. Prime victims: four door pickup trucks with the “No Fear” stickers. All day long, baby…

  • avatar
    kingofgix

    People go out of their way to bash the Prius, but nobody seems to want to bash the Mazda 3, or Nissan Altima, or Ford Fusion, or….
    The Prius is a car. It is exceptionally fuel efficient and has been shown to be extremely reliable. It is quiet and in many ways a very nice car. It has lots of backseat legroom and a convenient hatchback. It is a very reasonable car for someone to buy – reliable and efficient and priced competively given those attributes.

    Give it a rest, and since you hate them so much don’t buy one.

  • avatar
    hurls

    I happened to be down on the harborfront in San Diego monday and within the span of an hour 2 car carriers were headed back out, one Honda-”badged”.

    So something’s coming into the ports already. I suspect the second one was Korean, but I’m too lazy to find the picture I took and look up the ship’s registry info ;)

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    One thing is for certain, Prius actually had sizable rebates maybe four or five months ago. If you wanted a Prius that was the time to buy it.

  • avatar

    Only thing I want a Prius for is so I could pilot an RAH-66 Comanche, perform a “snap turn” and sideways slip so I could shoot at it with Hydras until it bursts into flames. The only problem is finding someone to drive it at top speed.


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  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Faisal Ali Khan, India