By on April 8, 2010

Underpinning further indications that the luxury segment is climbing off its death bed, Audi just announced amazing numbers for the first quarter of 2010. Audi just had the best quarter in recorded Audi history. Audi’s worldwide sales climbed by 26 percent in the first three months of 2010, writes Das Autohaus [sub]. In March, the four-ringed  daughter of Volkswagen sold 110.400 – never had Audi sold so many cars in a single month. And who’s buying all those Audis?

You guessed it. “Drivers on the growth in March and the first quarter again were China and the complete Asia-Pacific region,” reports Das Autohaus.

Audi’s Q1 sales by region:

Europe up 12 percent
U.S.A. up 34.8 percent
Argentina, Brazil up 70.5 percent
China up 77.3 percent
Africa, Mid-East up 40.2 percent

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10 Comments on “Audi Amazes With Record Sales...”


  • avatar
    Audi-Inni

    “Build a better mousetrap and the world will beat a path to your door.” It’s about product and service. I suspect many German car seekers are also sick of being abused by MB with inflated prices and poor quality/reliability. Unfortunately for those of us who have been loyal to the brand, their success means the secret’s out and their prices are escalating along with their sales.

  • avatar

    The US sales increase is remarkable but feels right: we’ve been thinking almost exclusively about an Audi for the past few months (to the exclusion of BMW and Mercedes). I can’t quite explain why but it seems that they’ve really captured the zeitgeist.

    On the other hand, customer service in the showroom has been terrible both times I’ve been in the last month. I hope Audi isn’t already starting to rest on its laurels.

  • avatar
    hakata

    In the US, anyway, I’d say it’s half design and half branding. While BMW (and to a lesser extent Mercedes) chased home runs with “revolutionary” Bangle style experiments, Audi just kept slugging with classic, restrained designs that appeal to those with the desire and means for a little luxury, but not the desire to flaunt it.

    At the same time, BMW’s prices rose and it became more and more identified with yuppie A-holedom, while buying a Mercedes marked you as a true social climber – especially if you bought a “C-heap” class. If you bought an Audi, particularly in the snow-belt, you could tell yourself you were buying a practical, sporty, rally-derived AWD vehicle that had worked its way upmarket – sort of a Subaru for the professional class.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyle Schellenberg

      +1

      There’s photo-shoot model beauty which is initially very appealing until the makeup comes off, and then there’s the natural hot girl who sells coffee at the corner shop. Somehow over time, she’s the one you can’t get out of your mind.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    New Mercedes designs are blocky and ugly. New BMW designs are bland and instantly forgettable. New Audi designs are sexy. Sex sells.

  • avatar
    drivelikejehu

    I like Audis well enough- my first car was an A4 and it lasted a good while- but I think they are starting to push it with pricing. It wasn’t long ago they offered a compelling product for significantly less than BMW and M-B. The A6 is now similarly priced to the 5 series, and that is a slam dunk for BMW. The A4′s 2.0T is a lot better than it used to be but for only a couple grand less than a 328i? And of course there’s the FWD issue, for those not interested in Quattro.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      Only $2000 less is true. But then I think you have to spend another $2500 in options if you want power seats, sunroof and remote locking (which are standard on the base A4). In the US, Audi’s chosen to have a little bit better base equipment than BMW while still keeping the entry price a little lower.

      Of course, for some people the RWD will be worth the $4500.

  • avatar
    mrcrispy

    Good for Audi – they deserve the success. I’d own an Audi over BMW any day, and did – my S4 was simply awesome. You just can’t beat Audio build quality, interiors, design and Quattro. They still have an image problem in the US, i.e. people who want ‘expensive’ and flashy buy BMW, which hurts them.


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