By on August 31, 2009

If it sounds too good to be true, someone somewhere is scamming someone somewhere. This morning’s story in Automotive News [AN, sub] would almost have us believe that former Brilliance automotive CEO Yang Rong is “leading a venture to build a $6.5 billion auto plant in northern Mississippi, where he would hire 25,000 workers to eventually produce 1 million cars a year.” ‘Cause, you know, the U.S. market has room for another mainstream automotive brand. To its credit, AN sees a few problems with the concept: “It would be easy to dismiss his proposal out of hand. The plan has no brand, products or retail network. But Yang oversaw a rise from nowhere in Brilliance’s fortunes in the 1990s, and he has been attracting money from some of China’s wealthy residents.” The last part of that statement is the most credible; and it doesn’t bode well for anyone gullible enough to invest in Rong’s visionary vehicles. Oh, and Uncle Sam’s part of the scam . . .

Vincent Wang, Yang’s associate and one of three key project players with the name Wang, spoke with Automotive News on behalf of Yang because of the industrialist’s limited English. Wang said the project will attract auto investors through a special U.S. visa program called EB-5. That program, created in 1990, encourages wealthy foreigners to invest in the United States.

A commercial investment of $1 million, or $500,000 if made in an economically distressed area such as northern Mississippi, qualifies a foreign family for a permanent-resident green card. “A lot of people in China want to move some of their money out of China,” Wang said.

There’s a lot of history behind Mr. Rong; none of it would lead you to believe that your money would be safe in his hands. In short, if loving Rong is right, I don’t want to right.

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14 Comments on “China’s Brilliance Ex-CEO Bilking Billions for U.S. Auto Factory Scam?...”


  • avatar
    WildBill

    Ten points if you know what make and model tractor that is in the picture (hint: it is auto related).

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    lamborghini?

    explain the significance of the picture?

    sometimes i like visit TTAC just to see kind of picture tied to the article and to see the tenuous link

    oh and chinese businessmen? usually should be approached with caution

  • avatar
    Paul Niedermeyer

    This is so Rong on many levels.

    Ford 8N or 9N.

  • avatar
    RetardedSparks

    “The plan has no brand, products or retail network. But ____ oversaw a rise from nowhere in _____’s fortunes in the 1990s, and he has been attracting money from wealthy ______.”

    This is a “Mad Lib” for the ages. You could fill in those blanks with a lot of names from the last 10 years.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @ wild bill Its around a 49 Ford 9n.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    There’s a “Whose on First?” joke somewhere in the Rongs, Yangs and Wangs.

  • avatar
    WildBill

    Based on the paint job, one small detail I can make out and the wheels, the tractor is a Ford 8n.

    9N – 1939 to 1941 (I have a ’41)
    2N – 1942 to 1947
    8N – 1947 to 1952 (I have a ’47)

    Officially the 8N designation is for 1948 but production started in ’47 and that’s when the red and light grey paint started in use.

    Still not sure what the pic has to do with the article???

  • avatar
    krazykarguy

    You’re all wrong – it’s a Ferguson TO20.

    The emblem on the side of the hood gives it away. Essentially a 8N clone. My dad has a 1950 one.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @krazykarguy…Was there not something,called a Ford Ferguson from that era?

  • avatar
    krazykarguy

    @mikey

    The TO20 was essentially a Ford 8N, manufactured under a “gentleman’s agreement between Henry Ford and Harry Ferguson. These were colloquially referred to as “Ferguson-Fords”, and produced from 1946-47. This tractor design was called the TE20 (Tractor England) for all markets except North America, where it was called the TO20 (Tractor Overseas). The TO’s were built in Detroit from 1948-51. TE’s were built in Coventry, England from 1946-56.

    Info was cliff noted from: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferguson_TE20

    A true TE/TO Ferguson color scheme is ALL light grey, as pictured on the tractor above (despite the rust). Fords had a light grey body and a red engine/drivetrain.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @ krazykarguy thanks for the info. Sorry RF for getting so far off topic..

  • avatar

    I don’t think it’s a scam, hell, it makes perfect sense; opening up the domestic market to China due to the debt they hold. The follow-up will revolve around this new plant’s plan to build US vehicles of some sort.

  • avatar
    YZS

    They only became a car company in 1992, and they’ve done pretty well for themselves so far.

  • avatar
    JAG64

    Guys, Please keep the comments clean of racist remarks.


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