Toyota Unveiled the 2024 Camry as a Hybrid-Only Affair

We’re not even out of 2023 yet, but we’re already talking about 2025 model-year vehicles. Toyota recently revealed a new version of the iconic Camry sedan for 2025, which will let go of the car’s powerful V6 option in favor of hybrid power, more tech, and top-notch safety equipment. The car goes on sale in spring 2024.

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Is This the Revised 2025 Toyota Camry?

“A new dawn is coming,” or, at least, a new Camry from Toyota. Probably. The automaker issued a cryptic teaser for a car with the question, “Can you guess what’s on the horizon?” And, while there’s no official confirmation that it’s a Camry, the car is the most likely candidate for an overhaul.

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Some California Buyers Could Get a Tesla Model 3 for Less Than a New Toyota Camry

Should you buy a Camry, or should you buy a car from Elon Musk? If you’re shopping on price alone and live in California, the choice might become a lot simpler after this news. Reuters recently reported that the Model 3 can become less expensive than a new Camry if buyers can capitalize on federal and California state incentives.

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Junkyard Find: 1996 Toyota Camry Wagon

Toyota sold new Camry station wagons in North America from the 1987 through 1996 model years. I've found a couple of examples of the first-year longroof Camry during my junkyard travels, but the final-year cars remained elusive… until I spotted this one in a Silicon Valley car graveyard in April.

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Junkyard Find: 1988 Toyota Camry All-Trac

When American Motors introduced the Eagle for the 1980 model year, followed by Audi beginning Quattro sales here a year later, it was finally possible to buy cars—not trucks—that powered all four wheels with no confusing decisions demanded of drivers. Toyota's response to this was the All-Trac AWD system, which first appeared here in 1988 models. Here's one of those first-year cars: a Camry All-Trac found in a Denver self-service yard recently.

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Pour One Out for the JDM Toyota Camry

The Toyota Camry has been called many things over the years, but unpopular is not one of them. The car sold more than a half-million units globally last year, though the RAV4 outsold it. But while the suddenly-more-exciting sedan is a hot seller in most markets, its home country of Japan isn’t so in love with the car.

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Toyota Expected to Drop a New Camry and RAV4 in 2024

The Toyota Camry and RAV4 are beyond ubiquitous at this point, as they’re the go-to cars for people wanting dependable transportation that doesn’t take a lot of thought. Newer models are surprisingly sporty, though they’re still the unfailingly practical commuters Toyota has always offered. The current generation vehicles are now several years old, however, and the automaker is expected to issue brand-new versions in 2024.

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The New Honda Accord Hits Dealers This Month

The Honda Accord and Toyota Camry are old rivals, but the Honda recently got an overhaul for 2023, giving it an edge over its aging competitor. Honda debuted the car late in 2022 and now says the new Accord is hitting dealers’ lots. 

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Junkyard Find: 2006 Toyota Camry With Manual Transmission

When I walk the rows of a big Ewe Pullet-style self-service car graveyard, I always take a look inside every 2000s Toyota Camry I see. I do this because I wish to document one of the most elusive of all junkyard inmates: One of the final Camrys sold in the United States with a factory-installed manual transmission. Prior to today's Junkyard Find, the newest discarded three-pedal Camry I'd found was a 2001 model in California. We're pushing the record another five years forward today because I've found this five-on-the-floor-equipped 2006 Camry in the very same yard.

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Rare Rides Icons: The V20 Toyota Camry

The Toyota Camry made leaps and bounds after the model debuted as a sedan sub-variant of the Celica in 1980. The first Camry to stand on its own was the V10, a very boxy four-door on sale for just four years, from 1983 to 1986. In the North American market, the front-drive V10 Camry replaced the rear-drive Corona as Toyota’s compact offering. And though the V10 was designed in part with export markets like North America in mind, its successor the V20 used the North American customer as its starting place.

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Buy/Drive/Burn: V6 Midsize Japanese Sedans of 1997

Last week we challenged you to pick a Buy from V6 versions of the 2007 Toyota Camry, Nissan Maxima, and Honda Accord. The overwhelming feeling in the comments was in favor of an Accord purchase (and I agree with you). Today though, we step back a decade to the 1997 model year.

Does the Accord still win your vote in the Nineties?

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Buy/Drive/Burn: V6 Midsize Japanese Sedans of 2007

In contrast to the Try Very Hard Japanese sedans of the Nineties, the early and mid-2000s period was a time for Japanese manufacturers to rest upon their laurels. It was a time to save some cash, and put in a bit less effort than in the tiring decade prior.

And lucky you, today you get to pick one to buy.

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Junkyard Find: 2000 Toyota Camry CE With 5-Speed Manual Transmission

Toyota offered North American car buyers the opportunity to buy a new Camry with a manual transmission from the time of the car’s introduction here in 1983 all the way through the 2012 model year. As I’ve found during my junkyard explorations, many Camrys sold here during the 1980s had five-on-the-floor rigs, and this setup remained reasonably popular into the early 1990s. After about 1993, however, automatics rule the American Camry universe, and I’ve been on a years-long quest to find the newest possible manual-equipped junkyard Camry. After peering into thousands of discarded cars, I managed to find a 1997 Camry CE with three pedals, and now I have surpassed that discovery with this 2000 Camry CE in Colorado.

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2020 Toyota Camry TRD Review - Spicing It Up

I once wrote that the Toyota Camry is a jack-of-all-trades kind of car – a balanced machine that does lots of things well but not one thing in any spectacular way. I’ve also long told anyone shopping for a mid-size sedan that while the Camry is great, if they want something sporty, they need to give their attention to Honda and Mazda.

Toyota has decided to do something about that.

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Rare Rides: The 1986 Toyota Camry Five-door Liftback, Brown Plus Brown

Rare Rides has never featured a Camry previously, and that’s mostly down to the model’s general abundance in salt-free locations. However, a fine liftback like today’s example in brown, brown, and tan is well worth some coverage!

Come along as we check out the Camry body style which passed away long before any of the others.

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  • VoGhost Fantastic work by Honda design. When I first saw the pictures, I thought "Is that a second gen Acura NSX?"
  • V16 2025 VW GLI...or 2025 Honda Civic SI? Same target audience, similar price points. Both are rays of sun in the gray world of SUV'S.
  • FreedMike Said this before and I'll say it again: I'm not that exercised about this whole "pay for a subscription" thing, as long as the deal's reasonable. And here's how you make it reasonable: offer it a monthly charge. Let's say that adaptive headlights are a $500 option on this vehicle, and the subscription is $15 a month, or $540 over a three year lease. So you try the feature for a month, and if you like it, you keep it; if you don't, then you discontinue it, like a Netflix subscription. In any case, you didn't get charged $500 up front the feature. That's not a bad deal.In my case, let's say VW offers an over the air chip reflash that gives me another 25 hp. The total price of the upgrade is $1,000 (which is what a reflash would cost you in the aftermarket). If they offered me a one time monthly subscription for $50 to try it out, I'd take it. In other words, maybe the news isn't all bad.
  • 2ACL A good car, but - at least in this configuration -not one that should command a premium. Its qualities just aren't as enduring as those of Honda's contemporary sports cars. For better or worse, this is a formula they remain able to replicate.
  • Jalop1991 I just read that Tesla's profits are WAY down "as the electric vehicle company has faced both more EV competition from established automakers and a slowing of overall EV sales growth." This Cadillac wouldn't help Tesla at all, but the slowing market of EV sales overall means this should be a halo/boutique car. Regardless, yes, they should make it.