By on February 8, 2022

Much like the V20 Toyota Camry covered by Rare Rides recently, Honda’s CA generation Accord was a big, important step forward for Honda’s mainstream sedan. Designed for a global market and manufactured in many different countries, the CA Accord put the nameplate on the minds of many a middle-market American consumer. Let’s take a trip back in time, to when cars were still square.

The Accord name was an established one at Honda by the mid-Eighties, as it entered production in 1976 for the ’77 model year. The Accord started out as a larger compact in its first generation (SJ), and was initially only available as a three-door hatchback. Accord was Honda’s largest car ever, as the company had concentrated mostly on Kei and subcompact cars in the past. Before Accord, Honda’s largest car was the compact 1300 sedan of 1969 to 1972. The Accord line saw a sedan added a year after introduction, and the four-door made its first North American appearance in 1979.

The second-generation Accord (SY) appeared in 1982 and looked more like a Honda with its quad square headlamps. Most dimensions increased except exterior length, which remained about the same as before. Again a three-door hatchback and four-door sedan were offered, and North American market Accords were now manufactured in Marysville, Ohio. Honda opened its Marysville Auto Plant in 1982, and it still builds Accords today. With its second-generation Honda established a cadence of Accord replacement every four years, which was adhered to through the model’s fifth generation in 1997.

That meant a new Accord was due for the 1986 model year, as Honda planned to expand the model’s reach considerably with its third generation. They called it CA, or Continental Accord. It would be the largest Accord to date and needed to appeal to audiences in almost all world markets. Honda used in-house designer Toshi Oshika for the Accord, who also applied his skills to edit the accord into the upscale Honda Vigor for the Japanese market.

The Accord’s clean-sheet redesign was finalized in 1983 and was much sleeker than its predecessor. The SY had a boxy late Seventies look: Chunky bumpers and trim looked as though they were applied as an afterthought. The CA’s design was a much more cohesive whole and looked integrated and modern. Flip-up headlamps were used for the first time, a feature blessed to the Accord because of its luxurious Vigor sibling. The headlamps were a distinguishing feature, particularly in Japan. There, Accords did not receive them as the model was positioned below the flip-up visage of the Vigor. The Vigor was even sold at a separate dealership chain. All Accords in Japan were labeled Accord CA and had fixed headlamps, to signal to onlookers that they were not luxurious.

The Accord’s new shape was part of a complete restyling at Honda that sought to unify the company’s product offerings in a singular design language. The company launched its premium Acura brand in North America for 1986, which coincided with a new upscale dealership chain in Japan called Honda ClioClio locations sold Honda’s new premium products like Legend, Integra, and Vigor. Non-luxury products like the Prelude and CR-X were redesigned shortly after the Accord debuted the new styling direction. With its 1986 appearance, the new Accord beat the V20 Camry to market by a whole year. It was a crucial lead at a time when the Japanese sedan market was experiencing such rapid advancements.

The new styling was applied to more Accord body styles than ever before, which varied by market. There was an Accord coupe for the first time (1988+), and the three-door hatchback returned as an Accord mainstay. The expected four-door sedan was present too, but there was a fourth option: AeroDeck. Off-limits to many markets, the AeroDeck was a three-door shooting brake. It was much cooler than the other Accords but would’ve undoubtedly been a slow seller in the US. Worth a mention: All Accord coupes of this generation were built in Ohio and then exported with right-hand drive to Japan.

The CA was built in seven different locations around the world, one more than the second-generation car. Home production at Honda’s Saitama factory was supplemented by Marysville in Ohio, Canadian production in Ontario, Pentone in New Zealand, as well as factories in Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia.

With its new international focus, the CA Accord arrived with a new double-wishbone suspension for which Honda became known. Accord was the first Honda product to employ wishbones front and rear. The more costly suspension setup delivered returns in better handling, and better stability at speed. All CA Accords used front sway bars, and high-level trims added bars at the rear. The Accord offered front brake discs and rear drums at low trims, or four-wheel discs if a customer was feeling flush. ABS was available for the first time on an Accord, but only on models with four-wheel discs.

Unlike the V20 Camry that offered a V6 to appeal specifically to Americans, Honda was not too interested in cylinder counts higher than four outside its luxury cars. All CA Accords used an inline-four engine, in five different varieties depending upon the market. At the lower end was a 1.6-liter, alongside two 1.8s and two 2.0s. Transmissions were two and included a rewarding five-speed manual, and a four-speed automatic. All North American cars used the 2.0-liter engines; the lower-spec A20A was good for 98 horsepower and the B20A made 120.

Accord grew considerably larger in its third generation, as it edged toward becoming the midsize car it is today. Wheelbase increased from 96.5 inches to 102.4″. Overall length on the sedan grew from 173.6 inches to 179.1″, and the hatchback was slightly shorter at 174.8 inches. Width, a key part of selling cars in the North American market, increased on the sedan from 65 inches in 1985 to a WideTrac-like 67.4 inches in 1986. Though much larger, the CA is still dwarfed by modern car heft: The current Accord is 196 inches long, and 73 inches wide.

Much of the high-level equipment on Accords sold in other markets (especially Japan) was not available in the North American and Australian markets. Home market Accords had optional niceties like heated mirrors, a full digital dash, climate control, and a power equipment package. Though not entirely spartan, North American Accords were limited in luxury scope by two things: The new Acura lineup (Legend, Integra) needed protection from any well-equipped Honda that may steal a sale, and North American consumers’ views that Honda was a builder of affordable economy cars.

At the debut, the American accord was available in three basic trim levels in the hatchback and sedan body styles. At base was the $9,587 DX ($24,036 adj.), where a hatchback was slightly more affordable than the $10,436 ($26,165 adj.) sedan. Mid-level was the LX, where the hatchback’s ask of $12,583 ($31,548 adj.) was slightly more dear than the sedan at $12,536 ($31,430 adj.). Top tier was the LXi, available only as a sedan. With its air conditioning, optional ruched leather, power door locks, alloy wheels, and power moonroof it asked $14,196 ($35,592 adj.).

There were not a lot of changes over the CA Accord’s four-year run, apart from the addition of the conservative coupe for the non-Prelude buyer of 1988. For its final year in 1989, the U.S. market received a new sporty Accord, the SE-i. The hatchback was excluded from SE-i, but sedan and coupe buyers received standard alloy wheels, the best four-wheel disc brakes, leather as standard, factory window tint, and full power equipment. The ultimate luxury Accord of the Eighties was limited to two conservatively chosen colors for sedan and coupe. Sedan customers chose from charcoal with gray interior or taupe with beige. Coupes were more exciting with their gray over gray, and teal over beige options. The SE-i asked $18,215 ($41,935 adj.) for the well-heeled Honda buyer in 1989. The most Honda will charge you for an Accord today is $38,050 for the 2.0T Touring.

The CA Accord expanded the model’s prominence around the globe and was particularly important to Honda’s North American operations. In its final third-gen year in 1989, the Accord became the first imported car crowned the best-selling automobile in the United States. By then Honda was ready to debut an even better Accord for the Nineties – the CB7 – which again beat the new Camry to market by a year. But that’s a story for another day.

[Images: Honda]

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46 Comments on “Rare Rides Icons: The CA Honda Accord, it’s Continental...”


  • avatar
    A Scientist

    A girlfriend of mine in high school had an ’89 model (this was in the mid 90s). White sedan with IIRC a dark burgundy interior. 5-speed. It was a legitimately fantastic little car from end-to-end. Nice ride, fun to drive, and as reliable as a Florida sunrise on the beach.

    • 0 avatar
      Moparmann

      I bought a used ’89 Accord LXi coupe/5 spd in the same color scheme. It was my first purchase of a car that was in excess of 100k miles! After 10 years, I did have to replace the transmission, but it was a GREAT car!! (And I still own it today!) :-)

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Great series again thank you Corey for following up on a suggestion to do the Accord. My wife bought new one of the first 77 Accord hatchbacks with a 5 speed manual which we had for over 17 years and finally died of the tin worm (she had to get on a waiting list which took 6 months to get the Accord). Great car getting around 40 mpgs and was far ahead of the American cars. My wife now has a 2013 CRV AWD which has been a great car as well but to this day I still miss that 77 Accord. You could fit a washing machine in the back of that Accord with the rear seat down.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      i fit a dishwasher inside a scion xa. interesting to see how theyd compare size-wise- 77 vs 06.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Can fit a washing machine in the 77 Accord hatch with the 2nd seat down. Once fit 3 decent size pine trees with a bungee cord hold the hatch up which I grew from seedlings and gave to some friends at work. The trees were 4 to 5 feet tall and I balled and burlapped them.

  • avatar
    Danddd

    Wow, look at the rear opening on that two door wagon. As a station wagon fan, I love it. Did Honda make a four door wagon in that series?

  • avatar
    MitchConner

    As a sales and marketing guy, I’m asked about the best way to go about building a brand a few times a year. A lot of executives think a brand can be changed with a new ad campaign, trademark, or corporate tagline — but that’s the equivalent of building a movie set. Nice facade. Nothing behind it.

    Since my definition of a brand is “a brand is what people think of you and you’re only good as your weakest link” you’ve got to start with product. No amount of supporting corporate identity guidelines, messaging, training materials, or advertising is going to overcome a crappy product.

    Late 80’s Honda was pretty amazing. Honda’s Civic and Accords were great. Great design that still looks pretty good today. Simple, clearly defined product and equipment levels. Honda’s cars might not have had the most horsepower or had best in class handling or braking — but they were in the ballpark across the board with rock solid, German-like build quality. Acura was dialed in as well with a clearly defined premium positioning without the punishing maintenance requirements of the German brands.

    Their only weakness was the buying experience — as some of their dealers were nothing short of a Moroccan bazaar with ADMs and shady negotiation techniques — but if you were smart you’d know every one of their products was in short supply and could negotiate accordingly. People didn’t mind, though, as the products were so good you could pretty much forget about the dealers once you closed a deal — as you didn’t have to go back to them for warranty issues or ongoing service.

    As time went on Honda lost its focus a bit. A lot of buyers looked at Lexus and felt the higher prices were worth it versus an Acura. Their legendary reliability tailed off. Some of their designs, especially at Acura, really missed the mark — although its latest positioning and vehicles are showing signs that the ship is beginning to turn.

    If somebody was charged with turning a car company or brand around — a good place to start would be to study this era at Honda. It was really something.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Agree about your present and past assessment of Honda but Honda does still make a good solid product but they have slipped–at least they are not GM. Still put Honda, Toyota, and Mazda as some of the best manufacturers in overall quality for the price. Honda has let the Acura brand slip and could learn from Lexus and from the Hyundai Genesis.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    Great work about a very important vehicle. I purchased a brand new 1986 LX with a 5 speed. Still my wife’s favourite of all the vehicles we have had. As an aside, A/C was not available as a factory option ( at least in that model and quite likely not at all in Canada) and had to be dealer installed. There was a fault with these and most required replacement within a few years. My peers in that era were still prone to purchasing Celebrities, Pontiac 6000s, and Tauri. Yet our Accord became their ‘go to’ as it was just more ‘refined’. Eventually nearly all switched to Japanese marques and now most would never even consider a domestic vehicle.

    And yes, hideway/pop-up headlights certainly signified ‘luxury’/cool.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @Arthur–Originally Honda did not offer factory air conditioning up until the late 80s and most air conditioned Hondas before were dealer installed. My wife had air installed in her 77 Accord after moving from San Francisco to LA because she was driving more on the interstate. I had never driven a Honda until I started dating my wife and once I did there was no comparison between the Big 3 and Honda, the Honda was so much better.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        @Jeff, Yes that is my belief but in the article Corey mentions the LXi being available with A/C and I did not want to re-open that can of worms. At the time Honda Canada was a client. When the dealer installed A/C went in mid July three different dealers told me that the part required was out of stock in Canada and that it would not be available for approximately 2 months. Since I used the car for business that would be unacceptable. So I went to Honda Canada’s HQ and spoke with one my contacts. A couple of days later the required part arrived, air delivery from Japan. I took it to the local dealer and said ‘here fix the A/C’. They were so shocked to see the part that I was treated with ‘kid gloves’ thereafter, as they were unsure just how ‘high up’ my contacts were.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          @Arthur–It very well could be that the LXi was the first Accord with factory air with that model debuting in 1986. Soichiro Honda did not want air conditioning in any Hondas and that was the main reason Hondas for many years did not come with factory air. In the South particularly Houston you do not want a vehicle without air with Houston’s heat and humidity you would swelter. When my parents moved to Houston, TX from Dayton, OH in the Summer of 1958 we had no air in our 57 Chrysler Windsor and that fall my father traded that Chrysler in for a 1959 9 passenger Plymouth Sport Suburban wagon with factory air. It use to be a big business to install aftermarket air below the dash for cars and in Houston air was a necessity and used cars without it were practically worthless.

    • 0 avatar
      B-BodyBuick84

      Speaking about vehicles, how goes the search for a new ride? Test drive any potential candidates so far?

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        The B&B are going to hold these against me but: a) Subaru Crosstrek. CVT and concerns regarding ongoing Subaru costs. But then Subies are always easy to sell used. b) Mazda CX-30. Access/egresss into the back seat is somewhat questionable. Do not like the instrument panel. Great Mazda warranty and a ‘real’ automatic transmission. c) Toyota Corolla Crosssport. Another CVT. But Toyota reputation and resale. The back seat/headroom seem much more comfortable than the previous two.

        Based on current availability and dealer ‘asks’, we just put $800+ and a set of tires/rims from my old (since departed car) into/on our existing older (2nd) car and may hold off replacing it until the summer. The tires are ‘larger’ but fit into the acceptable parameters and noticeably improved the ‘ride’.

        • 0 avatar
          redapple

          Arthur..
          All 3 are fine but which has the best;
          -Resale and safety?
          – Real knobs- i hate using the TVscreen and digging down 3 menus.

          Maint cost ( for those 3 ) and CVT do not worry me.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Nice car.

    Dumb horn switches.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “Though much larger, the CA is still dwarfed by modern car heft: The current Accord is 196 inches long, and 73 inches wide.”

    There’s an Accord hatchback coupe in my complex, and I’m struck how tiny it looks. But it looked huge back in the day.

    How things have changed…

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    I never owned one of these, but I drove a buddy’s quite a bit back in the day. This car was a revelation, such smooth steering and shifting. The clutch was like butter compared to what I was used to. Marvelous quality of materials on the interior. And sedans were not supposed to handle this good.
    I’d forgotten how good this car was, and how many there were back then.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I owned an ’88 LX (previously my mom’s). The carbureted engine was a regrettable cost-cutting choice but absolutely everything else about the car simply blew the competition away. Next to what any other maker was selling in 1986, the car felt like an ambassador from a wonderful future. Build quality was impeccable—the only cars I’ve ever owned with better interior quality than that ’88 are flagship Lexuses. Ride/handling balance was superb for an inexpensive car. The car was full-featured and thoughtfully engineered even at the level of small details.

    If it had been a fuel-injected 5-speed, I probably wouldn’t have sent it to New Hampshire with my then-girlfriend when she moved there, dooming it to a rusty death.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      You gave her your car? Dang.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        At the time I knew I was going to be moving across the country reasonably soon myself and would in all likelihood have to go from 2 cars to 0. So I sent the old Accord with her and kept my almost-new ’04 TSX for the time being, selling it a year later when I made the move. By then the Accord was worth a couple thousand bucks at most. It had some body damage from both vandalism and a minor crash (also by the girlfriend), although it was in good shape mechanically.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    BTW, Corey: there were certainly LHD Aerodecks in continental Europe. I saw quite a lot of them in my Swiss summers in the late ’80s and early ’90s.

  • avatar
    B-BodyBuick84

    Sister once owned an 89′ as her first vehicle. Absolutely fell in love with it, loved everything about it from the driving to the fuel economy to the pop up headlights, and this is a girl that still today has 0.1% interest in vehicles. Honda did an excellent job on these vehicles. My only complaint would be that in order to fix an alternating lean/ rich condition, I must have replaced about 20 feet of vacuum line… 89′ was the last year of Honda’s 2-barrel carbs on the lower trims. Funny enough, I remember although it ran far smoother with the new lines, it took a replacement 02 sensor to solve the issue.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    I owned one of those. 88 DX 4-door sedan with a 5-speed and dealer installed A/C. $12,669.50 out the door all in. No radio (but prewired at least and came with an antenna) and no right hand door mirror, but it did come with factory cruise control. Last of the carbureted Hondas. Front brake pads wore out quickly but easy to change. Otherwise pretty indestructible. Drove it 200k and gave it to my niece as her first car.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      sounds like the civic cx i had in 1998, including the price 10 yrs later

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      That was one cool thing (of many) about Hondas of that timeframe: they were pre-provisioned for any and all accessories from the factory! Want rear speakers? If you were reasonably handy with a utility knife and could follow directions, all you had to do was cut the holes in the package shelf using the template in the box with the speaker — the speaker wiring was included, and plugged-into the back of the radio if the dealer installed it, and you simply screwed the speakers into place and plugged in the cable after removing the tape which held the cable in place on the ceiling of the trunk under the package shelf. I think other things like foglights could be added by popping a switch into a dash blank, mounting the lights outside and plugging the factory-supplied cable in, then maybe hooking an included cable behind the dash into the back of the switch and into the fuse box! Voilà!

      Up until the 8th-Gen Accords which debuted in 2008, you could even add a HomeLink module to an Accord not so-equipped! Yep, the cable for that was included in every Accord, or maybe at least on all Accords above the base DX/VP model. Pop out the blank in the overhead console, and reach in under the headliner and plug the cable into the back of the module. Done! Unfortunately, Honda stopped doing this around the end of the noughts. A couple Honda dealers with large Web accessory presences sold HomeLink modules jerry-rigged with a battery tucked in back, but that was it.

      And nowadays, you or the dealer has to practically rip the entire dash of a brand new vehicle apart to do something as simple as installing a wireless phone charger, foglights, or a heated steering wheel! Much better to spring for the model that has all that stuff factree-installed, rather than pay the dealer to ham-handedly install that stuff, with the visible scratches and obnoxious rattles which would invariably result!

  • avatar
    IanGTCS

    My dad had an 87 hatch for 9 years and 312,000km. Probably the favourite car he ever owned, he spoke fondly of it until the end. It was also the first car I ever drove. He traded it in on a year old 1995 Accord, it was getting older and rustier and between me now driving and my step-sister following closely behind something more modern with ABS and airbags was likely a good idea.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    My second car was an 83 Accord Hatch 5-speed, solid little car. Wasn’t fast, but I drove it from LA to Salt Lake once, doing 80 the whole way, and it did fine. I really like the 3rd-gens, esp. the hatch with hidden headlamps.

  • avatar
    islander800

    We bought a new 1986 Accord, the top line model LXi (in Canada referred to as the “EXi”). Great car, wonderful view over the low cowl and virtually trouble-free. The one issue we had was that its 4-speed automatic had a problem that was recognized by Honda as a design flaw: after about 100K miles, shifts got rough. Even though it was out of warranty, Honda sprang for the cost of a transmission rebuild and we only paid for the removal/installation labour, about one-quarter the total cost. I thought that was more than fair. (Compare that to your expectations/experiences with GM. That’s why we still own Hondas today.) It always handled great but when I replaced worn-out tires with a new set of Pirelli P6s, it was transformed – it handled like it was on rails with instantaneous response. That’s when I realized what a difference your tire choice makes to overall performance. Only problem was, since the P6 tire compound was quite soft, they wore out pretty quickly. Reasonable trade-off for much better handling!

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I want to say that beginning with the 4th-Gens in 1990, the U.S. LX trim was the “EX-V” in Canada?

      You folks also got heated mirrors years before U.S. Hondas did, and now you folks get heated steering wheels factory-installed, versus having the dealer practically gut the dashboard to install the feature in the land of Biden.

  • avatar
    KOKing

    Although my favorite ‘early’ Accord is the CB, the CA is distinctive (I mean, who else was doing pop-up headlights on a mainstream sedan??), and probably did a lot to really cement Honda’s reputation beyond ‘basic transportation.’ A college roommate of mine in ~92 drove a LXi w very nice leather inside, though I seem to remember it already smoked a bit.

  • avatar
    Mike-NB2

    Excellent series. I always look forward to these.

    I had two of the first generation Accords – a ’78 hatchback and an ’82 sedan. I bought the ’78 in 1982 and it was pretty beat up but you could tell how much more advanced it was than the Big 3 stuff of the same era. I bought the ’82 in 1985 or 1986 and it was in almost-new condition. Amazing car and so far ahead of the Big 3.

    Then, in 1990 or 1991 a friend bought a 1989 EXi (as they were in Canada). The equipment level and quality of this vehicle made it exponentially better than just about everything else on the road. He kept it until it died of old age, and that was a looong time. Excellent car.

    I think I’ll send him the link to the story.

  • avatar
    GregLocock

    Interesting article.

    “Non-luxury products like the Prelude and CR-X” not luxury, but high end in each’s own market segment.

    That wagon looks great.

  • avatar
    Tele Vision

    I’m sure that I’ve told this story here before but in the Nineties my friend’s Dad had an Eighties Accord that no one – But No One – was allowed to drive. It was his baby. His wife got ever-better Accords but he treasured his old one that he’d had shipped from Montreal to Calgary when they moved here.

    I think that it was an ’84 four-door. It was brown and browner. Five-speed. Impeccable shape.

    His wife’s ’90 Accord was getting thrashed by The Herself and their kids, as the kids would happily take her car whenever possible, so he went to a local Honda dealer to secure a new one.

    He instead arrived home with a piece of paper stating that he was the new owner of something called an ‘NSX’. The first one sold in Western Canada.

    He treated the NSX in the same way he treated his old Accord: NO One Drives It But Me! The old Accord wasn’t worth beans at that time but it was ‘accorded’ the same respect the the NSX was.

    He sold the NSX long before he sold the ’84.

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    This is the car in which my Dad was introduced to Honda when an engineer at my parents’ boat club let him take his 1986 LX Sedan for a spin after he was bitching to him about the latest parts-cannon attempt by the Buick dealer to correct the dangerous cold stumble from the carburetor on his 1986 Century Limited’s 2.8 V6. He traded that Century in on a 1990 Civic EX Sedan (basically the CR-X Si chassis and drivetrain — albeit with the 4-speed automatic overdrive — with a sedan body dropped on top) which was sitting on the showroom floor for Mom, then leased a 1991 Accord EX Sedan automatic in the brochure Hampshire Green Pearl! That car was every bit as good as a BMW at a fraction of the price, and is still considered the benchmark Accord generation not only by myself, but also according to the B&B here in a survey some years ago! My Dad has had one of every Accord generation from the 4th-8th for a total of five, and I’ve had a 1994 Civic and Accords from the 5th, 7th, 9th and 10th-Generations. But that 1991 is still the best, especially in terms of interior quality and workmanship. My family also counts an Acura Integra, another Civic and two Odysseys among the other Hondas to grace our garages.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “All Accord coupes of this generation were built in Ohio and then exported with right-hand drive to Japan.”

    There is this interesting critter:
    https://www.duncanimports.com/used/Honda/1989-Honda-Accord-866d175d0a0e0ae85f1750cfe9c3aaa9.htm

    It seems to be one of the coupes built for the Japanese market, but it’s LHD and the speedo is marked in both kilometers and miles.

  • avatar
    randy in rocklin

    Corey, Look what you started. Now do the Toyotas and Mazdas.

  • avatar
    seanself117

    I have the 89 SE-I teal with Beige. It is in great shape and only has 26k mile on it. It’s in great shape and I love driving that car. Thanks for posting this article I never knew how rare this car is. I’m glad to have in my garage. I’m going to take it to car shows and see if other like as much as I do. I may even throw my 1969 Ct70 silver tag in the trunk and bring it too.

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