By on May 7, 2021

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Fast Facts

6.2-liter V8 (495 horsepower @ 6,450 rpm; 470 lb-ft @ 5,150 rpm)

Eight-speed, dual-clutch automatic; rear-wheel drive

15 city / 27 highway / 19 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

15.4 city, 8.7 highway, 12.4 combined. (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $58,900 (U.S) / $67,898 (Canada)

As Tested: $79,315 (U.S.) / $92,953 (Canada)

Prices include $1,095 destination charge in the United States and $2,200 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

I was cruising along Interstate 55 somewhere southwest of Chicago when I came upon a Mercedes SUV that was continually adjusting speed. Annoyed by someone who couldn’t maintain a constant speed in the passing lane, I dipped the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette I was driving into the right lane and tried to carefully weave my way through scattered traffic and work my way past the schlub.

It was only as I leisurely passed by that I saw the raised smartphone camera. Even in the dark of night, the C8 Corvette stands out, and I was now a temporary celebrity, about to be put into someone’s camera roll – or posted to their social-media accounts – whether I liked it or not.

That’s not unusual when one drives a supercar. I got that kind of attention when piloting an Acura NSX some time back – I was even asked if I was an actor, thanks to that tester’s California plates, despite the fact that my looks are more Buscemi than Clooney.

But I didn’t expect that in the ‘Vette. Because I forgot, at least at first, to take into account how different this one is from its predecessors. I was still in the “Corvettes are a dime a dozen!” mindset.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

I should’ve known the wedge-shaped, mid-engined Corvette would turn all eyes on me. Not just because it’s so different from the C7. But because the styling all but screams “supercar”.

So does the performance, as you’ll see shortly. But the price says something different. It says “relatively affordable, if you’re relatively well off.” Indeed, the C8 shown here actually cost just a bit less than either the Dodge Charger Hellcat or Ford Mustang Shelby GT500 I wrote about recently.

Honestly, it’s a bargain.

You will likely not be shocked when I tell you that the car offers acceleration that seems to warp space and time, thanks to the 6.2-liter V8 (495 hp/470 lb-ft) that sits just inches behind your head. The lack of an available manual transmission – your only choice is an eight-speed, dual-clutch automatic – does suck some of the fun out of the proceedings (paddles just aren’t the same), but only a little bit.

Indeed, it’s a miracle I got through my loan without talking to an officer of the law. The temptation to drop the hammer is always there, and rarely resisted.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

Corvettes have always been about more than just straight-line speed, though. They’re also supposed to be prolific handlers. Yes, previous-generation cars – especially before the C7 – had a reputation for sending drivers into the weeds after ham-fisted maneuvers, but there was also high reward for the risk.

Not so with this car – it’s a sharp, focused cornering tool that nonetheless feels somewhat more forgiving. Yes, I could still sense, at times, that pushing too hard would lead to expensive consequences. But I felt like the leash was a bit longer than with past Corvettes I’ve wheeled, and more importantly, the car was better at letting me know that doom was, if not impending, at least visible.

The car’s reflexes don’t just come in handy when attacking some curvy country road. During a gentle cruise down a suburban two-lane, I came upon the remains of an unfortunate raccoon that had met its maker via vehicular impact. If I’d been driving almost anything else, I’d have cleared the corpse with ease. But at the last second I remember that the Corvette’s ground clearance is so low that Chevy has made available a system that can temporarily raise the car when the driver encounters driveways or speedbumps.

I had space on either side, so a couple of quick flicks of the wheel later, I was back on the straight and narrow and the mortal remains of this particular Procyon lotor remained free from desecration, at least for the moment.

Perhaps more importantly, the Corvettes Eightus remained unblemished. Which, save for a small scratch on the removable roof due to clumsiness on the part of yours truly (see below), is how it was returned to its rightful owners.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

A lot of credit for the car’s dynamics go to the optional Z51 Package ($5,000), which is pretty much required if you plan on track driving and gives the short/long arm double-wishbone (front and rear) suspension even more of a performance tune and also adds Brembo brakes with larger rotors, Michelin Pilot Sport 4S tires (19s in front, 20s in the rear) instead of all-seasons, performance exhaust, better cooling, front-brake cooling inlets, electronic limited-slip differential, different axle ratio that makes the final-drive ration 5.2:1, and a rear spoiler.

You can get a magnetic ride-control system with the Z51 Package, but my test vehicle did not have it. Based on what I’ve read elsewhere, I’d opt for it. I would definitely opt for the Z51 Package even if I never tracked this car.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

So, the Corvette is fast and handles well. Big whoop, you say. It’s supposed to do that.

Well, yes. But the genius of this car is how well-behaved it is when you aren’t pushing it. While the C7 was mostly smooth during freeway jaunts, the C8 is so relaxed you almost forget what it can do. It reminded me of the NSX, when that car was put into Quiet mode.

Speaking of modes, the Corvette carries over the Weather, Tour, Sport, and Track drive modes from before and adds a configurable MyMode (which the car will remember) and a Z Mode, which adds engine and transmission adjustments to MyMode. As you might expect, the car’s responses improve in Sport and Track mode, and whoever set up the Z Mode in my car got it so right that I left it alone.

Get a wild hair, and it’s easy to adjust all the modes, but the Z Mode can be activated with just the press of a steering-wheel button.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

No car is perfect, and while this car is a delight to drive, it also has its flaws. For example, while the ride isn’t as stiff as you might expect from a low-slung sports car, it’s not soft, either. You will occasionally get punished by a pock-marked road.

Entry and exit aren’t great if you’re like me – tall, overweight, and past the party years of adulthood. At least the seats – once the bane of any Corvette driver’s existence – are acceptable in terms of comfort, though perhaps not for hauls longer than an hour. This car was fitted with the optional GT2 buckets.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

Aside from the exterior styling – which grew on me and looks better in person than in pictures – and the placement of the engine and the lack of a clutch pedal, the most controversial aspect of the newest ‘Vette is in the interior layout. Specifically, the line of buttons that lays atop the divider between driver and passenger. It seems like GM designers came up with a sleek, sexy cockpit and then forgot they needed to put in buttons for basic functions.

And yes, it looks awkward. Just as awkward in person as in pictures. But it’s not that hard to get used to, in terms of actually operating the various functions.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

Then there’s the operation of the removable roof panel. You can do it by yourself, but it would be easier with two people, and somehow I managed to cause a small scratch along the edge in the process of removing it for photos.

Storage is limited, especially with the top stowed.

Other key standard or available features on a 2LT trim ($7,300) Corvette like this test unit include run-flat tires, dual-zone climate control, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Bluetooth, satellite radio, Bose audio, remote start, keyless entry and starting, navigation, head-up display, curb-view camera, rear-camera mirror, heated and cooled seats, performance data recorder, heated steering wheel, wireless charger, and front-lift adjustable height.

A car that two of us named “best of” last year. All for a hair under $80K.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

There are other cars that are this fast, handle this well, and draw as much attention. But almost all of them cost significantly more – the NSX bases at nearly twice the price for a similar experience, though its complex hybrid system likely costs more to engineer and build, to be fair.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray

Yes, you could have a hoot of a performance car that has four doors and can haul four humans in comfort if you buy a Charger Hellcat. You could have a rear seat, in theory, and a regular-sized trunk in a Shelby Mustang. And those cars are also fast and fun to drive and similarly priced. But they aren’t super.

Yet the C8, especially with the Z51 Package, handles better than either. It’s faster – or at least has a slightly better 0-60 time – than either. Driving it is an event.

If you don’t need rear seats or much luggage/cargo space, and if you can stand the attention, the Corvette C8 is an excellent supercar at a bargain price.

Ed. note: We are trying a tweak to our review format, starting with this one. See below. We welcome any feedback you may have.

What’s New for 2020

The Corvette is completely redesigned and is now mid-engined. A manual transmission is no longer available.

Who Should Buy This Car

Those who can accept that changing an icon is sometimes for the better.

[Images © 2021 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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71 Comments on “2020 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Review – Affordable Supercar...”


  • avatar
    jmo

    A very well written review!

    This seems like the perfect fun car to buy after your youngest graduates from college. Your investments are doing well, the nest is empty, why not?

  • avatar
    ajla

    Maybe I’m getting to be in the minority here, but even after seeing a few on the road the mid-engine proportions are not growing on me.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I kinda like it but its not “Corvette” to me.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I was at a Cars and Coffee last weekend, and even parked next to a Ferrari, it was a rockstar.

      This speaks to what Tim was saying – this car looks great in person. There are a lot of styling elements, but they all make sense when you’re looking at “in the flesh,” so to speak.

      But I was also struck by how BIG this car is when parked next to that Ferrari.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Like I said I might be in the minority, and the car certainly won’t fail for lacking my approval, but I’ve seen a few on the road now and EPCOT has one you can examine up close and I still really don’t care for the C8’s design.

        I think GM built the car they wanted I just wish they wanted to build the poor man’s Portofino instead of the poor man’s 488.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Funny you mention the 488 – that was the Ferrari the C8 was parked next to. The 488 might as well have been a Miata – EVERYONE was looky-looking the ‘Vette.

          If the C8 were a female, it’d be a porn star – lots of…ahem…enhancements. And it might not age all that well. Wouldn’t turn it down, though.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        It is a bigger car, and it drives like a bigger car.

    • 0 avatar
      Lynchenstein

      The proportions are fine with me, it’s the details. In fact, it’s mostly just the air intakes on the side (what’s with that extra huge lip?) and those vent/grills on the back end.

      It has all the ingredients to be a real looker, but in typical Chevy fashion, the details make it kinda tacky looking.

      Even still, in black it looks gorgeous.

  • avatar
    NigelShiftright

    “But because the styling all but screams “supercar”.”

    Pretty much every supercar nowadays looks to me like someone asked a nine-year old to “draw a kewl anime warrior helmet, and stick four wheels underneath”.

    I’ll take a Miura or a GTB4 any day, and I wasn’t even born when those cars were being built.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The nice thing about the Corvette at least C4-C7, is for the most part it can be owned out of warranty, wrenched by anyone competent outside of some systems, and has a rich aftermarket. This one is so exotic I think you’ll end up with some supercar level repair bills down the line.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      I expect that to be true of the flat crank Z06 and maybe some of the goofy hybrid ones that are coming.

      But nothing in this engine should be any more advanced than what’s found in a Silverado. And since they’ll still sell tens of thousands per year economies of scale will keep even the unique parts out of McLaren/Ferrari/Lamborghini cost land.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Ah but what of the transmission? Suspension? Unique bits to the mid engine layout?

        “And since they’ll still sell tens of thousands per year economies of scale will keep even the unique parts out of McLaren/Ferrari/Lamborghini cost land.”

        I said before and will repeat these are going to be very collectable because I don’t think many of them will be built. GM profited well on Corvette but it was in part because the Y-body bones dated to the early 1980s. This is a whole new radical platform which has not been amortized yet and debuted during one of the top five crisis of the past century, now add the chip shortage which will go on for years. Does GM even profit on it now? As of April GM said it had 11,000 orders for the MY21, in contrast the C7 sold 34K units in its first model year.

        I’ll go out on a limb to say there will only be 50-70K units total sold for C8 even over the next several years and a revised C9 (with EV capabilities) will replace it and sell even fewer copies. Hopefully in a few years the EVs will be viewed as popular (they never actually will be IMO) and depreciation will hit C6 and C7 hard so I can scoop one up.

        https://www.corvetteblogger.com/2021/04/08/april-constraints-and-production-updates-for-2021-corvette/

        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chevrolet_Corvette_(C7)

        • 0 avatar
          jack4x

          “I’ll go out on a limb to say there will only be 50-70K units total sold for C8”

          I think that’s plenty to keep part prices down. By way of comparison there were something like 30K Vipers sold in 25 years. McLaren has sold 20 something thousand of all models combined in their history. The other issue is Joe Retiree will think twice about buying a C9 if he has to spend $5K every year on his C8.

          “Does GM even profit on it now?”

          I think this is a real open question.

          “Depreciation will hit C6 and C7 hard so I can scoop one up.”

          I hope this as well.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            GM sold 40K Rivieras in 1995 but then sales dropped to 10K units a year and by the end I think was a few thousand, about 80K total ball park. In the mid 00s anything Riviera specific was already becoming unobtanium, fortunately though drive train, suspension, and some of the other bits were parts bin GM. I’m not sure what’s parts bin GM on the C8, but my guess is not as much as you may think.

            Another thought, what are the insurance rates on the C8 vs C7? I can’t imagine collision work on the C8 is going to be cheap.

            My guess is it does not, but it also likely did not profit on C4 for the first several model years either but by the 90s is was a profit center. I imagine since then, its been a refinement of we need X units to break even for R&D and each unit itself was profitable until now. Per unit I hope the C8 is profitable but my guess is its very thin or even a loss leader at the moment. I feel a C9 is in the works now with EV capabilities but if GM never amortizes the R&D and machinery for C8 (and presumably C9), the model may face an uncertain future.

            Corvette works as the working man’s super car because of its volume and many shared parts, lose some of those and well…

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            The difference between something like a Riviera and something like a C8 is the dedication/financial resources their owners have to keep them on the road.

            $2500 for a C8 part that might have cost $1500 on a C7 might sting a bit, but isn’t going to send the car to the scrap yard like it would with a Riviera. But it’s also not something so far out of the real world it’s inconceivable, like the 4 figure oil changes at Ferrari dealers. I think people with the resources to afford a $60-90K car aren’t going to have trouble keeping it alive as long as they want to. If not, well then I’d be happy to buy a C8 that depreciates like an S-class in a few years.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            The C6 is already there. Or you can get low mileage driven on weekend then rubbed with a diaper C5’s for less and you get pop up headlights.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Art, my used grocery getter Toyota *increased* in value from late 2018 to now (which should be impossible). I can’t see C6s being a bargain atm, let’s go to the tape:

            MY09 Chevrolet Corvette 2LT Coupe

            12/16/20 $26,750* 19,848 4.1 8G/A Gray Regular Southwest Dallas
            4/21/21 $31,500* 20,512 4.2 8G/6 Yellow Regular Southwest Dallas
            12/18/20 $26,000* 26,542 4.4 8G/A Red Regular West Coast Nevada
            11/24/20 $25,500* 45,765 – – 8G/M Red Regular Northeast New Jersey
            3/8/21 $20,988* 69,249 3.6 8G/A Gray Regular Southwest El Paso
            3/25/21 $18,250* 162,489 4.3 8G/A Yellow Regular Southwest Texas Hobby

            Yeah mid to upper 20s on an MY09 2LT coupe is no bargain to me (I think C6s were around here 2 years ago too, maybe a bit closer to 30).

            One with 162K miles pulled 18, and this is wholesale. I can’t even imagine that, spending nearly 19 after fees and having to pay for the recon on a Vette north of 150K… you’ll be sitting 21 or 22 in it by the time its up to spec (tires/brakes/rotors/fluids/plugs/water pump) when you can spend $5K more and get one much less used. Madness.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            The value Corvette currently is the C5. I was at 18 all in for a 38k mile 2003. That included new tires, all fluids and brake pads.

            I did the clutch and some other things in anticipation of a little power bump it is getting.

            If I had to have an automatic though and was doing anything other than drag racing I’d grab the C6. The C5 autos have the old 4L60e 4 speed…the C6 got a 6 speed.

            They aren’t Miata cheap, but in the horsepower per dollar world they are pretty good deals and the C5 on handles.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d have to think there’s plenty of exotic stuff in a C7 that you can’t wrench on too.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I’m not really sure, I know it offered the magnetic ride suspension pioneered in Cadillac but being a Y-body and can be had in standard LS/manual drive train I feel the basic models are still relatively serviceable depending on trim.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          What is tough on the C7 is the whole torque tube situation with the clutch in front but the transmission in the back. For the C8 the engine is connected directly to a complete transaxle so in some regards it might be easier to work on. The whole thing comes out in one piece I bet.

          The mag-ride shocks are expensive but replacing them is no different than traditional shocks just with an added wiring connector.

          For sure GM needs to make a lot more C8s to start turning a profit. However many have speculated the platform will support an EV drivetrain so the C8 can likely morph into the C9 without much rework thus the payoff on this platform is amortized over two generations instead of just one.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I’ve had my C5 apart which is similar. It wasn’t bad. The C7 would be similar. Clutch is like 2 grand if you don’t do it yourself. C8 may very well be easier though.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I suspect that is the plan for C9, but I don’t think the EV Vette is going to sell as well as they think. Only 11K orders for MY21s by April? So the year might be 15-20K tops orders if they are lucky (and can even build that many with the Biden shortages)? The C7 -which the traditional Corvette people criticized- sold 34K units in its first year. The EV Corvette I would think would be even more expensive, if the gas LS V8 struggles to move units I can’t see the magic of battery power suddenly invigorating sales.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    It’s amazing how bipolar GM is when it comes to car design. They can produce such duds but they also show they are capable of designing and building vehicles that raise the bar for the class. The Escalade and the rest of the new, large SUVs and this Corvette are perfect examples of that.

    The comments about the styling are 100 percent spot on. Every time I see one of these I briefly think I’m seeing some Italian exotic and then as it draws near and the fact it’s a corvette is revealed I’m even more impressed. Bravo Chevy. Thank you for designing a car that raises the bar and not a blob of an SUV that relies on the history of the Corvette name to mask its massive shortcomings.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Agreed. I’m not a GM or Chevy fan, but I do like this car and what they’ve done with this generation.

      I’m also not in $60-80k car territory, but no doubt this is a decent value.

  • avatar
    Rick Astley

    FYI: The “Fast Facts” list it as a “6.2-liter four-cylinder”.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    things like this make the 1963 Stingray so valuable

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    “But at the last second I remember that the Corvette’s ground clearance is so low that Chevy has made available a system that can temporarily raise the car when the driver encounters driveways or speedbumps.”

    I was SO hoping that the next sentence would describe you pressing a button (letter “A”, I think) on the steering wheel, with the car nimbly tiptoeing over the unfortunate departed raccoon. :)

    Still, this review was pleasant to read.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I too was expecting a mention of the front axle lift system. The button is just forward of the drive mode selector, logically right next to the button that activates the curb camera.

  • avatar
    JMII

    As a current C7 Z51 owner this is my take on the C8…

    My wife loves the look, but I find the back end way too busy. The front is sharp and eye catching, the side says mid-engine and could be mistaken for a Lambo. To improve things GM should offer a spoiler delete. And yes it’s a BIG car with a small cockpit which can be unnerving, you’ll be looking UP at Camrys and under pickups. Honestly you should just forget the coupe with its targa top (light but awkward) and just get the convertible since the folding hardtop results in zero loss of trunk space.

    The lack of a manual transmission is a major disappointment, sadly its just step 1 of a slow death of vehicles with actual linkage between mechanic bits, everything is drive-by-wire, heck the C8 even has brake-by-wire. This might be the last big NA V8 so enjoy it while you can. The engine has so much torque I’ve left from stoplights in 3rd gear in my C7. The car pulls from 40 to 100 like most cars go from 10 to 30. While its not a screamer with a high redline, the mid-range power (and sound) flows like wave pushing you into triple digits so fast other traffic seems to be stopped in comparison. Even more amazing is you can get 30 MPG on the highway while cruising since that V8 just lumps along as if its idling.

    If visibility is improved in the C8 that is great news because my C7 with its long hood and big fenders plus electronic steering results in a “where’s Waldo?” in relation to the front tires location. While the Z51 bits aren’t necessary unless you see track time you must get the mag-ride. Let me repeat for clarity: get the mag-ride! Its literally the most amazing thing about my C7… those magnetic shocks have spoiled me for life. With a twist of the drive mode dial the car goes from smooth cruiser to on-rails track surgeon instantly. The way it can soak up bumps one minute then pull 1G in a turn the next is nothing short of magical. The PTM (performance traction management) system makes the car fantastic on the track by allowing just enough slip-n-slide to reach the apex then rocket out without requiring the twitch reactions of pro gamer drunk on Red Bull.

    The flaws on my C7 are the typical GM short cuts around fit and finish. It has a few squeaks and rattles plus some body panels gaps that are questionable compared to my wife’s Infiniti. However the interior is massively improved with excellent modern materials (carbon fiber, suede, leather, aluminum in my 3LT) putting it on par with Porsche. I say that because my brother owns a Cayman and he approves.

    In terms of working on the car (at least from the photos) its appears the C8 will not too bad. One look at my brother’s Cayman and I got spooked, that is not a vehicle you want outside of warranty for sure. The nice thing about a Corvette is due to GM parts sharing there is nothing exotic going on aside from all the computers. In 2.5 years of driving and tracking my C7 nothing has required a trip to the dealer, all fixes were minor enough to do in my driveway.

    In a few years my C7 will likely be traded for a used C8, because in terms of dollars-per-smile this car might be the best bargain on the planet.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      That all just makes me wish even more that the CT5-V (which comes with the magnetic shocks and PTM) used the V8.

    • 0 avatar
      ktm

      Last I saw, most exotics do not have a manual either.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        The manual was left behind for two main reasons: 1) you can’t shift fast enough to take full advantage of the engine and chassis combo, at this level of performance the stick just slows you down… and 2) the pedal box doesn’t fit since the ME configuration moves the driver so much closer to the front wheels.

        • 0 avatar
          tomLU86

          Also, the manual was left behind because the linkage would have been challenging and costly. Since it won’t help on the track, and most Corvettes were automatics anyway, why bother?

          IDK, did the Audi V10 offer a manual? I think so?

          But Ferrari doesn’t. “Why should we?”

          Still, the car has gotten impressive reviews. Other than the disconnect between “how well behaved it is” and the “ride can be harder than you would expect”–it is a sports car with superlative handling, what exactly would one expect?–Tim H likes the car, as do most.

          • 0 avatar
            Tele Vision

            Linkage?! It’s not a 1960’s F1 car. The C7 has a hydraulic clutch like my ’07 V does.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          But the transmission has been back there for 3 generations. I feel like they could have figured the linkage out. I’d prefer a stick, but the lack of one wouldn’t keep me from buying…this thing is the bargain of the century at MSRP.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            They *could* have but chose not to. The argument that the hole in the center backbone would have weakened the frame could certainly have been engineered out, though it might have added some weight. That is what is often cited by GM – but heck, you could forgo a mechanical linkage and made the stick electronic.

            Interesting to note that for the C7’s first year, most of the cars were ordered and the take rate on the manual was about 40%. I ordered and spec’d the manual. As the model years rolled on, more were ordered for dealer stock and the percentage of manuals dropped significantly. I take that to mean manuals would sell, if only they could be had without a 4 month wait. Porsche brought back manuals on some models so I think it is a shame that that it is no longer an option.

        • 0 avatar
          dantes_inferno

          >The manual was left behind for two main reasons: 1) you can’t shift

          You could have stopped there.

          I get it – most drivers shy away from the challenge and driving satisfaction of a manual transmission (among most other challenges during the current instant gratification era). Besides, shifting would cut in on valuable texting time. We can’t have that now, can we?

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      …The flaws on my C7 are the typical GM short cuts around fit and finish…

      Two things about my Vette that annoy me would be so easy to address – one, the A/C condensate drips on the hot exhaust when you park the car. Two, the gas door release latch often toggles several times when I open the driver’s door. How that stuff got by is inexcusable.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I’ve universal read that the climate control row is WTF visually but logical to use in practice.

    The way things should be given it could have gone the other way and how many vehicles have form over function interiors.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The cockpit was designed to wrap around you, so the climate row is actually a great use of space. However it is a new and somewhat odd layout so the hate is strong against it. I’ve heard equal complaints about the infotainment screen being angled towards the driver so much that the passenger can’t even see it much less control it… well too bad that is the downside of being a passenger :)

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I kind of wished GM would have kept an updated C7 version around for traditionalists who still like the front engine design while marketing the C8 as a halo (Zora?) After all Ferrari offers both front and mid engine cars.
    Nonetheless it’s quite a supercar bargain for a fraction of the cost of a McClaren or a Ferrari and $60k less than a Acura NSX.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Five solid decades of completely unhinged kleptocratic financialization, have rendered traditionalists; meaning people who prefer usable cars to amusement par rides; rather irrelevant as far as costlier-than-Civic vehicles go.

      Te market is now split between penalty boxes and silly single-use items. With the former increasingly being replaced by the bus.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Cars like the Corvette make me wish that I live below the snow belt. It is easier to justify the cost if I can drive it all year as opposed to a summer toy.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Cars like the Corvette make me wish that I live below the snow belt. It is easier to justify the cost if I can drive it all year as opposed to a summer toy.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      You know, its not that bad to put the car into hibernation – every spring its almost like getting a new car. Truthfully I’m not sure I’d want to use a car like this as a year-round daily driver…it is kind of snug for two people. The coupe would be better in this regard – the convertible has a lot less interior space.

      • 0 avatar
        Michael S6

        Thank you for the different perspective. Never thought of getting a new car every spring, and it will be something to look forward to after a long winter.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “Other key standard or available features on a 2LT trim ($7,300) Corvette like this test unit include run-flat tires, dual-zone climate control, Apple CarPlay, Android Auto, Bluetooth, satellite radio, Bose audio, remote start, keyless entry and starting, navigation, head-up display, curb-view camera, rear-camera mirror, heated and cooled seats, performance data recorder, heated steering wheel, wireless charger, and front-lift adjustable height.”

    I’ve never tried to shop for one of these so maybe its one of those, well the base 1LT technically exists but we only have one because it really doesn’t exist we just want to advertise a certain price point then get you into the 2LT for more, but all of those features save the special tires and heated steering wheel need to just be standard on every trim. Everything on Earth has keyless entry now, anything serious with leather heated/cooled seats, and remote start… in a $60K (before ADM and real options) car? Come on man! The 1995 Buick Riviera had standard dual zone climate control for frack’s sake, but its in an 2LT options package on a Corvette? Really?

    Proof:

    youtu.be/M0rSCGAA1Fc?t=1611

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      It’s a sports car – not a luxury car – if you’re buying this as a track toy you’re not going anything past 1LT and you’re not going to want the added ounces and pounds.

      $58K base price is stupid cheap for what you get – single-zone climate control (for two people total) or not.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    I was behind a red one last week. I just don’t like the looks of it. Like most “modern” designed cars, there’s too much going on, and if I was in the market for a car like this, I would look at the C7 that is at a dealership I pass almost daily. It’s red, and looks to be in great shape.

    • 0 avatar
      statikboy

      I have to agree about most modern cars, including this one, having too much going on. I personally think it has to do with hiding the vast swaths of paint resulting from too-tall vehicles that comes from pedestrian crash standards and unnecessarily giant wheels. This has also begotten the always-ugly plastic wheel arches present on “SUV”s.

      I also think the C8 Corvette looks very plastic fantastic. It might BE an amazing car for $90K but the body LOOKS more Kit Car than Supercar. The interior appears quite nice.

      Full disclosure: When I think about what is required for me to earn it, I don’t believe ANY car is worth $90K or even $25K.

  • avatar
    AnalogMan

    I’m in the minority, but the lack of a manual transmission will absolutely keep me from buying one – and I’m exactly the demographic GM is targeting with this car.

    I don’t care how much faster a computer-controlled transmission is than my own ability to shift. I don’t care if video-game paddle shifters result in a 0.3 seconds faster 0-60 run or 1.7 seconds around the Nurburgring. I don’t tear off 0-60 runs on the street, and don’t expect to be rounding the Nurburgring anytime soon.

    I don’t care that Ferrari or any other super-car manufacturers also don’t offer manuals. Just because multiple people (or companies) do something doesn’t make it right, or smart.

    I also don’t care about ‘numbers’ and throwing them around to impress people I don’t care about down at the local bar (when it’s safe to go to bars again).

    What I do care about is how a car *feels* to drive for *me*, how much fun it is. I’m admittedly old-school, but for me (and for my money), there’s just no substitute for the fun of rowing my own gears and feeling more of a connection with the car. How it feels in the seat of my pants, and the grin it puts on my face, is far more important to me than the ‘numbers’.

    No manual = no chance I would buy this car (or any car without a manual). I’ll keep driving manuals until my cold dead fingers are pried off the shifter.

  • avatar
    NeilM

    “ Corvettes have always been about more than just straight-line speed, though. They’re also supposed to be prolific handlers.”

    Perhaps the author meant “proficient”?

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      I think he does but (like most car reviews) this review follows the Brock Yates tradition of using too many adjectives/superlatives/analogies in a car review. Not picking on this author – it’s a good review – but this has plagued auto journalism for decades.

  • avatar
    dantes_inferno

    There’s only two words that will stop that Vette (and other vehicles – ICE, hybrid and EV’s alike) dead in it’s tracks: Chip Shortage.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    A truly brilliant car with standout performance and value, now just clean up that rear facia. In fact, just use Chip Foose’ interpretation when you refresh it in a couple years.

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