By on July 19, 2019

2020 Chevrolet Corvette

ORANGE COUNTY, CA. — After months, if not years, of hype, plus another 30 minutes or so of introduction, the 2020 Chevrolet Corvette is finally here.

Dubbed C8, for eighth generation, the Corvette is now mid-engined for the first time ever.

It’s also sans stick, at least for the foreseeable future.

Chevy introduced just one version of the car in Southern California Thursday — the Stingray. A Z51 performance package is available, and Stingrays so equipped will be able to hit 60 mph from a standing start in under 3 seconds.

Oh, and the price tag? Under $60,000 to start.

(Full disclosure: Chevrolet flew me out to California, put me in a hotel, and fed me all so that I could see the new Corvette up close. They also handed out a commemorative coin that I took thinking it was the press kit.)

Yeah, that’s not an exact number, and the cynic in me thinks that the Chevy will just mark it at $59,995 before destination. Cynical semantic games aside, that price tag is still lower than many expected for the first mid-engine Corvette ever.

Speaking of relevant numbers, the 6.2-liter naturally-aspirated V8 will put out 495 horsepower and 470 pound-feet of torque when equipped with the performance exhaust. An eight-speed dual-clutch automatic transmission gets that power to the ground.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette

Chevy claims that the switch to a mid-engine layout was made because the company felt it had reached the limits of performance with a front-engine setup, and the new layout will provide for better weight distribution and responsiveness.

Another first: The car will be available in right-hand drive.

Buyers will have three seat types to choose from, and two of those come with heating and cooling.

Launch control is available, and the Z51 package adds larger brake rotors, performance suspension with manually adjustable spring seats, better cooling (including front brake cooling inlets), the aforementioned performance exhaust, and a different axle ratio.

Other standard or available performance items include an electronic limited-slip differential, magnetic ride control, performance traction management, front splitter, and rear spoiler.

Drivers can mess around with the same four drive modes previously available — weather, tour, sport, and track — while also messing around with two customizable modes, including a so-called “Z mode.” Z mode essentially allows drivers to customize power settings (engine/transmission) while MyMode adjusts steering input and suspension.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette

A heated steering wheel is now available, along with near-field communication for Bluetooth, and wireless cell-phone charging. The performance data recorder has new features.

The move to a mid-engine means the car now gets a “frunk” (front trunk), which Chevy says is big enough for a rollerboard and a laptop bag. There’s still cargo space in the rear — Chevy claims two golf bags will fit back there. One can forego the golf bags and put the removable roof panel back there, instead. The front and rear cargo areas are made from fiberglass, as is the dashboard, and a carbon-fiber rear bumper beam is aimed at reducing weight.

One cool trick up the new Vette’s sleeve is the ability to raise the front bumper to avoid scraping the fascia when approaching driveways or speed bumps. This system uses GPS to memorize up to 1,000 places where the car could encounter such obstacles, remembering each for the next time, and functions at speeds up to 24 mph.

2020 Chevrolet Corvette

I had to admit I was apprehensive about seeing the car — I am still wrapping my mind around the ‘Vette switching to a mid-engine layout. It doesn’t matter that Chevy has wanted to do it for a long time, or that it likely will lead to better performance as the automaker claims. It still feels weird.

Perhaps I’d have an easier time wrapping my head around it if the car hadn’t gone automatic-only. Yes, I get it — stickshifts aren’t selling well (even among Corvette buyers) and the automatic can probably shift better than any human. And yeah, I know, the first Corvette didn’t have a stick, either. Logically, it makes sense, and there’s precedent. But it just feels wrong.

Another outlet blew the embargo as I was on my way to the event, and I have to admit, I was uncertain about the car’s looks based on the press photos. Same goes for the shot detailing the interior.

I felt better seeing the car in the flesh, as it were. The exterior styling gels together well — it’s a sharp-looking car. I did see some elements that reminded me of other two-seat halo cars. From one angle, I saw Audi R8. From another, Ford GT. The wedge shape made me think a little about the Acura NSX. And the taillights, of course, borrow from the Camaro.

Inside, I liked that the infotainment system was angled towards the driver, and the two-spoke steering wheel looks much less awkward than in photos. The digital instrument cluster wasn’t turned on, so no chance to take a peek. There was an overall cohesiveness to the shape of the dash and center stack, although the push-button shifter looked wonky to my eye.

Speaking of buttons — the vertical line of buttons laid out on top of a handle that separates passenger from driver looks awful. It’s a big stain on an otherwise nice interior. It comes across as if designers had gotten too far along in the process before remembering that all cars need these controls. I suspect it will also be an awkward reach for the driver — I had no chance to sit in the car to see for sure.

Obviously much judgment must be reserved until we drive the dang thing. But most of my worries that Chevy would drop a terribly designed overpriced car on us have been assuaged. The price is right, the styling is attractive for the most part, and the specs sound good on paper.

Yeah, I am missing the manual. And yeah, the designer responsible for the HVAC control layout decision needs to perhaps be transferred to GM’s waste-management division.

I still have mixed feelings about the C8, but they’ve shifted more towards the positive side of the ledger, and that has nothing to do with any of the usual OEM attempts to sway coverage via food and booze. It’s simply a better car, on paper and at a glance, than I expected.

We’ll see how it all shakes out down the road, when actual all-season rubber meets actual road. For now, it’s enough to say that despite a few glaring mistakes and missteps, the C8 isn’t a dud. At best, it’s a big leap forward, at worst, it’s still likely to outperform the C7.

The hype may have been more justified than I thought.

[Images © 2019 Tim Healey/TTAC]

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201 Comments on “2020 Chevrolet Corvette C8 Reveal – Mixed Feelings...”


  • avatar
    wooootles

    TL;DR:
    $60000 for base model
    490hp (495 with options)
    0-60 in less than 3 secs (with Z51)
    Enough space for golf bags (to appeal to the white New Balance crowd)

    I look forward to the type of bashing this car gets from the B&B. I am sure these upcoming hottest of takes would be amazing (and laughable) to read.

    • 0 avatar
      JoeBrick

      @wootles- TLDR ???? What The F is wrong with you ???
      You are too uninterested to READ the article yet you deign to think that we will value YOUR opinion ? You are on the wrong website, Pal.

      • 0 avatar
        wooootles

        @JoeBrick – calm down, pardner. I read the entire thing and stayed up all night watching the presentation. It’s just my summary of the most important numbers out of the whole thing (and the most shocking, IMO.)

        People are already starting to fixate on ToO mAnY bUtToNs as their reason to hate the whole car, so yeah, that’s annoying.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      That HP figure bugs me more than anything else, you can already tell thats deliberately held held back for a later variant.

    • 0 avatar
      GogglesPisano

      I hate to say it, but it’s pretty ugly.

      • 0 avatar
        JoeBrick

        I think the public will disagree. Bottom line:
        Forget the Mustang Bullit-this car IS a bullet.
        It is even SHAPED like a bullet.
        Forget the Mustang GT-350 and GT-500. Forget about the Widebody Dodge.
        Forget about ALL NEAR-$60,000 SPORTY CARS.
        This car blows them all away.
        From now on, if you want to charge the Big Bucks, you must compete with THIS.
        (BAD NEWS FOR YOU)

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          This might be bad news for people who charge big bucks for pony cars, but it probably won’t make a dent in the exotic car market or Porsche’s market. Corvettes and Vipers have been faster around a road course than Porsches and Ferraris for decades. People who spend thirty-five grand on dress-up options don’t care.

        • 0 avatar
          ilkhan

          And yet I’d still rather drive a Bullit than this. Its an interesting car, and probably performs at a much higher level, but even as someone who has gone to the track I don’t need that much performance. I’d probably grab a C7 before this too. Much better as a DD and weekend toy.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    It’s hard to believe that a car like this will start at $60K. I don’t particularly like it, but I can see where a lot of people will

    Datass

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

      Those are exactly my feelings, too.

      My opinion of the C8 – overwrought styling with flagrant DLO fail, ridiculous interior and all – became much brighter when Reuss announced the sub-$60K base price. At $59,999 it would still be just $4100 more than the current base price for a 2019 C7 Stingray, which really does seem like one hell of a deal.

      That said, I also wonder how soon it will become all-too evident where GM cut costs.

      • 0 avatar
        JoeBrick

        The new Corvette is amazingly priced just $840 above the MUSTANG GT-350.
        I can hear the crying coming from over at Ford HQ in Dearborn.
        OK Ford, now let’s see you make a Ford GT for $60K MSRP. LOL !
        Be sure to tip your waitress, I’ll be here all week…

        • 0 avatar
          JoeBrick

          I think that this may kill the present Mustang. What I mean by that is that Ford may have to make a COPY of this- and call it the next Mustang.
          Look at the way Ford is desperately copying the Jeep Wrangler and Jeep Gladiator.
          You know they want to compete in more markets than just pickups, but they will be making only pickups, SUVs, and the Mustang soon. Who will buy a $60K Mustang (or Challenger or Camaro) when you can own a mid-engined Vette ? And Widebodies sticker for as much as $80K- look it up on the Dodge website.

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          This is no substitute for a GT350. It would need a stick and an engine that spins as fast as a dozen-year-old Honda Civic. The Mustang is better looking than the C8, more practical, and available in configurations for drivers in addition to passengers. Really, the only things wrong with a Mustang are the things wrong with every Ford. Building an automatic mid-engine car uglier than their own GT won’t address that.

    • 0 avatar
      Secret Hi5

      It’s so shocking that even DW dropped his blackface shtick.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      Well that’s always been the Corvettes rationale, lots of performance for less money.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      What I can’t fathom is what corners had to be cut in order to get the base price down that far! Interior design being one, with the plank of buttons!

      GM is circling the drain, all right! The C7 design grew on me! But now what? Is the engine going to need to be dropped to change plugs? What other stuff is waiting to snag owners?

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        @sgeffe per GM regular maintenance items wont require dropping the engine. Swapping FEAD belts won’t for example (nor would changing the plugs) but replacing the oil pump would.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Faux-rrari with many China-fabricated components, bizarre cockpit, and square steering wheel.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’m tickled about the price, my wife’s Corvette dreams are not dead…

    But looking at that interior I guess it’s great if you don’t like the person sitting next to you.

    Can you even hold hands while stuck in traffic?

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    The proof will be in the driving. Nothing else matters.

    I hope that one of the supercar experiences will have some in their fleets, I’d like to give this one a try.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      Exactly. I understand the legacy of the looooong hood and it has a certain coolness factor I admit, but all this starting at $60K is a game changer in many respects. The looks are appropriate, though the layout doesn’t allow it to be quite in line with what our tiny brains expect to see when we hear the word “Corvette”. Changing the layout was a bold decision, certain to upset Corvette faithful, but time and progress marches on. The armrest button cluster?/ridge? may be a stroke of brilliance. Again, our minds just aren’t trained to see this in car’s interior. All the buttons right where/near where your arm naturally lays, also easily accessible to a passenger. I wouldn’t write it off yet. Exciting reveal overall. No matter how you slice it, way more exciting that another front engine rear drive C8 could have been and maybe that’s the real victory, all the press and discussion it will generate…..all the potential new buyers who aren’t worried about it being able to carry their country club gear but are simply buying because its a reasonably priced supercar. Keep in mind also, Ferrari, Porsche, Lamborghini have not always had mid/rear engine layout on all their vehicles. The layout, in the end, is really an unreasonable thing to get hung up on when there is so much goodness to be had.

      • 0 avatar
        Tele Vision

        If you habitually let your right arm ‘naturally’ lay on the centre console whilst driving – you’re not really driving. Do you drape your left hand over the top of the steering wheel, too? Two hands on, all the time.

    • 0 avatar
      Trev Limiter

      Or rent one on Turo. That’s what I’d do.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    p.s. – Fat Camaro a$$, every button ever developed by GM laid out in linear fashion on center console, and looks like it was ensconced in a Guangzou- Province fabricated plastic body kit with massive rear quarter “gills.”

    • 0 avatar
      JoeBrick

      @DeadHead- Where can I get one of those Anti-GM Random Phrase Generator apps ?
      I need one of those for the Silverado reviews…

      • 0 avatar
        Lockstops

        You need to have a traumatic childhood simmer for a few decades, that’s the secret. It was clear that he was destined for a future of internet comments section trolling from the get-go when his parents named him DeadWeight…

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          @Lockstops: If that were true, they why don’t I use the same kind of language with Ford products? To me it’s been the Fords that have earned all the detriment they receive–it’s why their brand name is so often broken out as, “Found On Road, Dead.”

  • avatar
    jack4x

    I’m jaded about almost all new cars lately, but a mid-engine, naturally aspirated 500 hp, American made vehicle on sale for $60,000 is really impossible to complain about.

    This site is quick to pile on GM when they do something bad or dumb, which is often enough, but sincere credit is due here. This car looks like a monster and I’m very interested.

    • 0 avatar
      NG5

      Yeah, a naturally aspirated V8 in a mid-engine car for 60K seems great. I am more interested in this car than I expected to be.

      If it had a manual I would probably feel a little pained that I couldn’t buy one. And honestly, I would probably prefer a torque converted automatic over a DCT. I like my cars to last; that’s my only remaining concern here. The drive and the durability remain to be seen.

      I’m impressed.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        I’m impressed as well. I don’t like the rear end, and the lack of a stick is a likely deal killer for me. I will still try a test drive in a year. But wow. Very impressed indeed.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    There is more to a car than all out performance and “ring” times.

    That said, did they lop the back of a Camaro off to put on this car to make room for the engine back there? I see hints of a Saleen S7 in the front, not that that is a bad thing. The wheel and line of buttons looks wrong here.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Agreed. 99+% of driving is not racing, track time or trying for a new record at the Nurburgring. So comfort, visibility, ergonomics and drivability count, and none of those could be assessed at the initial unveiling.
      0-60 times are great for bragging about, but if put to the test will likely result in a very expensive traffic ticket.

      So what we have here is fast, okay, but the exterior styling is 2 1/2 stars our of 5, and the interior is maybe 2 stars. Maybe it’s nicer in person.
      The price point is good for marketing purposes, at least until the additional dealer markup gets added. (“Built to a price” applies here, without a doubt!)
      Chevy needed to hit it out of the park, but hasn’t quite done that yet. They have left plenty of room for improvement.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “I still have mixed feelings about the C8, but they’ve shifted more towards the positive side of the ledger”

    This is how I feel as well. There is still some apprehension, but it is also far from the disaster I feared was coming.

    I’d really like to see a review of the base car, but I’m sure the press car you guys get will be optioned to $85k.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Even @ $85K it’s still a relative bargain for it’s class, that’s the cost of a nice Suburban

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Likely true, but $85k is too much of a stretch for my bank account.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Between the Suburban or the Corvette at that price, I’d take the Corvette–there’s literally no reason a Suburban should cost so much.

        That said, there are things to like about this Corvette–but the name is not one of them. It’s no longer a Corvette nor a Stingray–it’s a completely different car and needs a name to match. To me Corvette means ‘sexy’ and this thing just ain’t ‘sexy.’

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      To ajla’s point, I would also like to see a review of the base version. It’s a sub $60K performance car, review it as such.

      I’m of a similar opinion about most vehicle reviews. Review what people will buy, not maxed out.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    @Tim-

    What was the trim level on the models they had on display?

  • avatar
    d4rksabre

    Mixed feelings my butt. This thing looks great. Most interesting American car since the Viper.

  • avatar
    redgolf

    That oblong steering wheel – right out of a 1960 Plymouth Fury! Does it have the “push button trans” also? ;-)

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    While almost a complete departure from the C7, I give a lot of props to folks at Gangzooo Motors (there ya’ go DW!) for modernizing the Vette’. I don’t think the folks that hack on the vette’ will be able to use the same tired old tropes as to why their Porsche/Ferrari/Lambo/Whatever super car are better cause their engine is in the back somewhere doing it’s thing for weight transfer and stuff. Plus, the part I love, they kept the LT engine so you get durability and reliability wrapped in an awesome package that Jiffy Lube can do an oil change on for less than $80. (not recommending you go to Jiffy Lube…but you could)

    Interior is a bit wonky, but it seems like the McLaren interior is wonky too and I kinda think that was what GM used as a template. McLaren performance and looks for 1/3 the cost. GM has finally made the common mans super car to appeal to the non-jort wearing, non-white New Balance sneaker wearing crowd. I think the value of my C6 just dropped 30%…

    • 0 avatar
      NG5

      I agree about the engine. Pretty cool they managed to keep the engine so simple.

      I wish they could find a way to use a more common transmission (e.g. manual or locking torque converted auto) and that would eliminate my (only??) big reservation about the car.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        I honestly don’t know enough about the transmission used to have any opinion at all. I drive a C6 with a T56 6sp which has been called agricultural…so I am thinking that I am kind of a plebeian when it comes to these things. My other complete automotive shortfall is that I do not notice hard plastics, so I completely miss the context every time this is brought up as to why a car sucks, or doesn’t. Every car I have ever been in has hard plastics, I am unable to discern which are harder than others.

        Full disclosure, I like my Gangzoooo Motors cars/SUV so I probably give the hard plastics that I don’t notice a pass.

        My money is that Gangzooo is working with Tremec to come up with a MT that will fit properly with the rear engine mounting and this will be an option later, perhaps 2021 MY. Obviously, I could be way wrong on this.

        • 0 avatar
          NG5

          I have driven some awful manual transmissions (thinking back to a Type 2 VW, rear engined Vanagon with a shifter on the floor), but I’ve heard good things about Tremec’s work. I hope you are right.

          Re interior, I wouldn’t care too much as long as it is worth the drive. A decent manual, and the way this car looks on paper, would be plenty to have me checking them out some day. New, maybe, if I ever had the money, just to support the fact that they actually made the damn thing.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            The Tremec in the C7 is a rather nice unit. Not a Honda, but frankly I like the mechanical feeling of engagement. Sadly I don’t think the cost to develop the manual makes business sense. The C7’s unit can also find (sort-of) in other cars but for the C8 that might not be possible. One thing that makes Corvettes affordable is the ability to share parts (modified of course) with other vehicles. That’s why the Blackwood V8 is most certainly going to end up in this car for other iterations.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I see the evolution of the previous mid engine Corvettes that were supposed to be introduced over the past 50 odd years.
    Starting at $60k is less than the Camaro ZL-1 and the frunk makes it practical for daily driving.

  • avatar
    Jon

    Tim,

    Did GM mention if the 8 speed was outsourced or in house?

    • 0 avatar
      d4rksabre

      It’s a completely new transmission made just for the Corvette by Tremec (per Autoweek). I guess they couldn’t find anything off the shelf that worked for their needs.

      https://autoweek.com/article/corvette/7-ways-2020-c8-unlike-any-corvette-history-and-3-ways-its-same

      • 0 avatar
        Lockstops

        Why is there always something missing? Seems that even the Z51 will not have a mechanical LSD, just ‘eLSD’ which is software using the rear brakes…

        Then again with this car the aftermarket will take car of that. Hopefully. Eventually. Please tell me it will be on offer, and the bespoke DCT won’t make it too difficult!

        • 0 avatar
          scott25

          I can guarantee they’re saving the LSD for the Grand Sport (and the Z06 equivalent of course)

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          The eLSD uses clutch packs, its not “just brakes”, its pretty sophisticated in how the PTM software uses it. My C7 Z51 has it. The Z51 adds a bunch of track focused items so this is standard for Corvette trim levels.

          • 0 avatar
            Lockstops

            @JMII:
            Do you have any sources for that? When I watched the video about the C8’s eLSD it looked very much like an open diff and brake control, but it was hard to tell whether there was something extra in the diff assembly. The explanation of how it works sounded exactly like brakes-only, and seemed to avoid any mention of mechanical LSD.

            eLSD is also what other companies call their ‘virtual’ LSD.

            I’d really like to get confirmation on this.

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            No source on the C8 but the eLSD in my C7 Z51 works this way. Why would they go backwards?

            Scroll to the bottom of this page for details:
            https://www.edmunds.com/car-reviews/track-tests/2014-chevrolet-corvette-stingray-z51-suspension-walkaround.html

            And another:
            http://gmauthority.com/blog/2013/01/deep-dive-the-chassis-of-the-2014-corvette-stingray/

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            The eLSD works superbly. I can attest to that!

      • 0 avatar
        Jon

        According to the article, it was designed by GM but will be built by Tremec. Is this correct?

        • 0 avatar
          slavuta

          GM transmission…. hide

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Oh FFS, seriously?

            Based on what???

            Do we dare mention Ford’s miserable history and the current DCT issues? Or how about Honda and their 5-speed automatics which were basically a grenade with the pin pulled from the factory? Nissan CVTs? Toyota 5-speed manual?

            The solenoids in the ye-old 4-speed auto for the GMT800 and early GMT900 trucks are so easy to access many companies are including them in the filter kit – if you’re dropping the pan just replace.

            The GM 4-speed auto that went into millions of W-bodies was as reliable as the sunrise, sans when an LS4 was attached to it. The 6-speed is equally reliable and used a long list of vehicles.

            You could far, far, worse than a GM automatic.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I haven’t personally managed to do worse than the GM 4L40E that came in our new 1994 BMW 325is. It was replaced at 30K miles and again at 60K miles. The second one we had to pay for half of. Sold it with 90K miles. It had lifetime transmission fluid that apparently lasted as long as conventional fluid only the dealer wouldn’t replace it.

        • 0 avatar
          Lockstops

          @JMII:
          Other companies have gone backwards, and apparently they save a lot by skimping on it. Especially when it comes to base versions I’m super sceptical.

          All car companies (except FCA at least) can be so slimy about tech details these days, especially with everything related to drivetrain they tend to have absolutely no proper technical info available. Just look at AWD systems: which company has detailed technical data of their car models using different AWD tech? LSD is similar, why would car companies go out of their way to admit that they have a cheap ‘virtual’ system in there instead of the more expensive mechanical one?

          So thanks for the info, it gives me hope. They keep saying in the video that it’s “electronic LSD” even though with a mechanical system the correct term would be “electronically controlled LSD”. But then they did say that they had eLSD on the C7 and they’re keeping it in (even though they only talk about how they kept the software…), and that it works like a clutch, so I think your info on the C7 will apply to the C8!!! Awesome news!! We’ll just have to wait a bit for absolute confirmation.

          • 0 avatar
            Lockstops

            Addition: I looked closely at the video on a high-res screen and it looks like there is in fact a multi-plate clutch pack in the diff!! Fantastic!!

            Holy wow, they even say they control it taking in account tire temperatures!!!

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            The eLSD in the C7 accounts for tire temp too.

            Some of the user interface stuff you see on the dash touchscreen in the reveal video is the same my C7. They added the “Z” button to switch to a personalized set of settings quickly.

            One of the reasons I bought a C7 was all the tech and engineering that went into. I’m not a fan of GM in general, but the Corvette team is almost like a skunkworks division. They really do some real trick stuff. For example there are 10 different drive modes (on the Z51 package) so you can set up the car to handle and feel however you desire.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            I think a lot of what you see in the display of the C8 is the same programming as the C7; just displayed a bit differently. JMII, I am also not a GM fanboy, but the C7 was just to damn good not to give it a go. I did buy an extended warranty though…I’m not a fan of four-figure repairs. I could have bought a used 911 if I was comfortable with that…

          • 0 avatar
            Lockstops

            I have never bought a Corvette but have always respected them.

            With GM it hasn’t only been the Corvette. The Holden/Pontiac G8 was pretty great, and especially the Camaro (1LE) is an absolute masterpiece (in many ways: managing to make the Camaro a very affordable car overall and then making such an astounding ‘supercar’, a real drivers’ car out of it).

          • 0 avatar
            Lockstops

            BTW so appartently eLSD will not be standard, comes with Z51. Not 100% confirmed but looks like it.

            Shame, the idea of a very base C8 was really appealing to me since it doesn’t look like it’s missing anything relevant for fun daily driver use (I live in a colder climate and don’t have a need to track it often if at all). Z51 package will probably be well worth the price but I’d still have liked to not have it be mandatory (I find mechanical LSD to be absolutely mandatory) and hike up the price somewhat. For daily driver use over here with all the snow we get and even in general I would’ve liked to avoid the Z51 front spoiler lip too.

  • avatar
    EquipmentJunkie

    I like the exterior styling of the Stingray a lot. The numbers look good in terms of price, performance, and therefore value. Looking forward to seeing one in the flesh. This opinion comes from a non-Corvette person. Interior design kept me from liking ‘Vettes for the past 25 years.

    My first reaction to the interior is mixed…better than earlier models, but I’m still not sure I like the retaining wall between the driver and passenger. To me, the placement of the switches will be too difficult to find/use while driving.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    P A T H E T I C

    A U T O M A T I C

    S C U M

  • avatar
    DEVILLE88

    This is one bad a$$ Corvette!!! this will beat the pants out everything out there this side of a Bugatti. The interior is amazing!!! the car is amazing!! please keep your Cayman(a lesser car)comments to yourself this is truly world class!!!

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      I can hear Tesla laughing at you from the next room.

      • 0 avatar
        Lockstops

        You’re kidding, right?

        What can Tesla offer that holds a candle to the C8? That acceleration and power for that price? A true sports car that is a joy to drive? An actual interior? A car that isn’t designed by hiring a Mazda designer to hastily slap on a several generations old design as fast as possible in a way that’s as easy to produce as possible? Tesla can’t even build a car to post-90’s East German standards, get paint to stay on their cars.

        • 0 avatar
          mcs

          @lockstops:

          “A true sports car that is a joy to drive?” While it’s obviously a 4 door sedan, it’s still a joy to drive. Take a look at the reviews and the success that modified Model 3 performance has had on the track. It has Laguna Seca lap times that can match Cayman GT4.

          https://www.motortrend.com/cars/tesla/model-3/2019/tesla-model-3-performance-track-mode-release-version-review/

          ” Tesla can’t even build a car to post-90’s East German standards, get paint to stay on their cars.”

          For the most part, that’s BS. Yeah, stay away from a car build during a production push from the tent, but otherwise, Bob Lutz says they’re world-class at this point. I see plenty of them every day and they seem fine. Even the 2 cars I’ve seen with panel alignment issues could be easily fixed.

          https://www.roadandtrack.com/new-cars/a28008116/tesla-model-3-build-quality-bob-lutz/

          The Corvette in the past has had horrendous quality. The C3 we had when I was a kid was far worse than any Tesla I’ve ever seen. Orange peel paint and windshield wipers that would randomly collide and hang up in the rain. Lots of rattles. A total piece of junk that almost made up for the crappiness in other ways.

          Obviously, they have improved since the C3 days. My friends C4 still seemed like a rolling bucket of bolts, but it was okay. I like the C5 and C6. C7 styling was a little tacky for me, but okay. C8 styling is a bit improved. Hopefully, the quality has improved, but with any new car, there are bound to be issues.

          As far as interiors go, the interior is fine. Sure, it’s not some peoples taste, but some people like the clean look. I’m not sure I’d want that look in a pure sports car, but I wouldn’t want the C8 interior in a sedan – well maybe.

          I’m waiting to see what the E-Ray (the name GM trademarked for the “electified” version) looks like. Hopefully full BEV. It’ll be interesting to see how it compares with the new roadster. Probably the same performance for half the price if either car gets built.

    • 0 avatar
      JoeBrick

      It remains to be seen how it all works and drives. GM’s new electrical architecture package still had bugs on the test vehicles. All joking aside, here is my opinion so far, judging only from the few photos that I have seen-
      Looks- Exterior, very good although less smooth than the C7
      Interior, a disaster
      Price- excellent !
      Bottom line- it all depends on workability, which I expect will be OK, and the technology, which I have less confidence in. Because GM.
      A few years ago, I would have said that GM would do everything in its power to make its Halo car the best it could be and not screw it up. But seeing the job they did on their cash cow, the Silverado, I wonder if Mrs. Barra actually knows anything at all about building and selling cars. I know she had a high degree from the Michigan Institute of Terminology, but is that enough to run anything, let alone one of America’s largest auto companies ? Or does she just want to be the first female Captain of Industry to transform a car company into something else? Like a maker of roboticly-controlled media rooms on wheels, rented by the hour like a no-tell motel room to worker bees who couldn’t afford a tranportation device of their own ? Because no middle class.
      Back on topic- I hope this is a success, despite the messed up interior.

      • 0 avatar
        JoeBrick

        Update after watching some of the videos that are now available-
        I LOVE the look of it, the body is GORGEOUS ! The rear opening looks very good, there seems to be more than adequate room for luggage. It looks fantastic with the roof off, interior is growing on me with ONE exception-and I could always tape over the hideous buttons with a long strip of Gorilla tape. *scheming how to afford one of these as we speak*

        • 0 avatar

          Gorilla makes good products here in the USA for taping over ugly buttons. They’re even headquartered in my part of town.

          • 0 avatar
            theflyersfan

            I used to support some of the systems at Gorilla – buy Gorilla, buy local! We still know how to make good stuff!

            I do wonder the country of origin parts breakdown on this new Corvette. With a Camry and Sienna being more “American” than a Mustang and Camaro, I hope the Corvette doesn’t fall into that “cheapest part” trap.

        • 0 avatar
          cognoscenti

          I’m going to reserve judgement on that vertical line of buttons until I try them. People tend to forget the immense value of physical buttons, and just assume that screen menus are sufficient – they are not! Also, don’t forget that one of the benefits of a mid-engined layout is a low cowl – you don’t want to build a high dash to hold buttons and end up compromising the view.

          • 0 avatar
            JMII

            Appeared, I’d rather have physical buttons then deal with a touchscreen. Plus the buttons appeared to be mostly for the HVAC system, fan, temps, heated seats, etc. The reason for so many is they are likely duplicated for driver and passenger.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Buttons are nice, but I don’t have any faith in the work of a company that allowed them to be presented in a single column of nineteen similar buttons. What else is completely idiotic that you can’t see?

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            Hope they have a nice tactile feel. The ride selector control in the C7 is a beautiful piece of engineering. If that was the benchmark we have a good chance of nice switchgear…

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I like it way more than I expected. Closeup photos do it a disservice by making it look out of proportion.

    But that column of buttons was a bad decision.

  • avatar
    JMII

    As the owner of a 2014 C7 Z51 3LT M7 here is my hot take:

    GOOD –
    Price, very reasonable
    Performance, sub 3 seconds? WOW, just WOW
    Engine N/A V8 with clearly more to come
    Front end style
    Lower dash, more seat travel
    More exterior and interior color options
    No plastic inside
    Roof still fits in the trunk
    Has a usable trunk!
    Front axle lift with GPS is brilliant
    Over the air updates, super cruise

    BAD –
    Ugly rear end, however the C7 was viewed this way too, but now it looks normal to me and flows with the rest of the car
    No manual (blah, but predictable)
    Even longer, 5 extra inches when I already feel the C7 is too big, ugh

    MIXED –
    Buttons, seems odd but could be useful as putting everything in the touch screen sucks
    Overall style trying a bit too hard, very NSX like, will need to see it in the flesh
    Dash seems busy, what is up with those “wings” on the edges?
    Steering wheel… can’t comment until I get my hands on it
    Drive selector look kind of wacky

    I’ll keep a close watch on how things go, but this is a 5 year out vehicle for me as I only buy used. So far my ’14 C7 has been flawless as a daily driver and track toy. After a year (with 4 track days) only 3 things have broken: a cargo retaining clip, reverse sensor and the SiriusXM antenna. I fixed each one myself for under $80 total. I also put $50 into replacement stainless steel brake bleed nipples as I snapped the OEM ones under what I thought was minimal pressure during a track day brake flush. There are some minor fit and finish issues, typical of GM, but the interior is light years ahead of anything out of Bowling Green prior. Car gets 20 MPG in mixed used (commuting) with a high 33 and low of 6.

    • 0 avatar

      The good thing about GM parts is they cost $12.

      The bad thing is there are a lot of them in each car, and they were all made for $3.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        They are pretty cheap – I just replaced the driver’s window regulator on my daughter’s ’13 Cruze, and and the ACDelco (GM) part was just $77.93 from Amazon, including the motor and transmission (those parts are made in Mexico by Bosch – no “Made in…” notation anywhere on the ACDelco box).

        The thing is, it died at 99k because a cheap nylon part that fits on one of the guide rails for the regulator (and has the drive cables hooked to it, and the metal clamp for the glass) broke in two, which then caused the cables get twisted and tangled.

        I wonder about parts like this on the Corvette.

        • 0 avatar
          JMII

          Sounds like the window regulators in VW products… except they cost more and break constantly (I had a Passat I know).

          Lots of the ‘Vette’s parts are the standard GM parts bin stuff. For example the broken cargo clip? Shared with their CUVs. As mentioned by Corey this both a good and a bad thing. It keeps the cost of ‘Vette down but also means you’ve got the same wiper switch in your $80K super car as your Cruze.

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          GM window regulators, yes, much like the German ones, they fail because of some $0.25 piece of plastic. But if you let the dealer replace it for you, it will cost you something like $450. (It’s hard not to get suspicious about this being on purpose as a dealer pension plan.)

          My past experience includes 1 W-body, 4 doors, 8 years, and 9 window regulators. Eventually it becomes like muscle memory. I would suggest that lubing the window guides might help them last longer.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Not that I’m a potential *buyer for this car but I’m unhappy with the dropping of the manual. A quick online search showed a 23% stick shift take rate in 2016. That’s a pretty good number.

    *actually a used Vette is an excellent performance deal. When it comes time to replace the Mustang I may do a 2-seater so plan to check out the Vette, along with a Cayman or Boxster.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    I have a feeling a lot of those buttons are redundant and those functions will primarily be accessed in the infotainment.

    • 0 avatar
      Secret Hi5

      I’d bet that the original concept had no buttons – Only the touchscreen.
      So what’s better (worse?)
      -Touchscreen-only controls with no buttons, a la Tesla
      or
      -Physical buttons in an unusual layout?

      • 0 avatar
        SPPPP

        Unusual layout isn’t the real problem. It’s the way that a host of identical buttons are all jammed in a straight line. How can you operate those without looking and puzzling?

  • avatar

    Ive got some thought’s and prayer’s.

    -The italic script on a horizontal squared surface looks wonky and should be changed, moved, or deleted.

    -The front end is fine, but the back is only going to work in certain colors (white isn’t one of them).

    -V8 power of that magnitude, in the middle, for $60k, should be praised. Nobody else does this. Nobody. It’ll be on a different performance level to the Supra, and is not comparable to that vehicle. Compare to R8, NSX, maybe Cayman/911, but at considerable discount.

    -The button wand is one of the worst things I’ve seen om a modern car, and is a 1992 SSEi sort of design gimmick. Poor.

    -Automatic doesn’t bother me, as this class of car is always automatic now. Not even Ferrari does manuals.

    -I dont think this should’ve been called Corvette. I know they need the name recognition, but still an MR layout bothers me with that name. Call it the GrandSport or Stingray or something. It’s not Corvette any more.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      This rollout of the MR layout is just to soften us all up for the real kick in the nuts that will come when they offer a SUV variant with a Corvette moniker on it next year. I could totally see it happening.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    They should have done the reveal in Newport Beach. Tustin? That part of Tustin is on the edge of Santa Ana. I would drive over there to see it, but I don’t have an invite. Oh well.

    I think I like it.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    If GM marketing knows the Orange County and Southern California supercar market, then they know the last Sunday of every month is an important day. At 7AM on the last Sunday of each month, all the supercar manufactures and owners show their stuff at MOULIN on Bristol St in Newport Beach, Ca. You see everything there … all the latest Mclarens, Aston Martins, Lambos, Ferraris, Ford GTs, Porsche GT2 and GT3 …. it is all there, as well as all the movers and shakers. Very important monthly supercar event. We will see if the new Vette makes a showing. GM in Detroit, are you awake? I will be looking for you and will be disappointed if you are not there with your new vette. Because, you need to get a foot into this supercar market.

  • avatar
    scott25

    It seems pretty much everyone’s misgivings about the Vette going MR were forgotten when they announced the price, and in right there with them. I imagine there’ll be a lot of typical GM cost cutting, but their ability to make this car for THAT price is very impressive. And I’m sure the car in it’s many trim levels will manage to crest $200k once they come out with the EV/Hybrid 1000hp version which will be able to run with $1M+ hypercars.

    The pricing is the final bullet in the head of the Camaro. I and many others figured it would move upmarket to replace the C7, but now there’s no reason or space for that to happen. It might be RIP for good this time.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The upmarket Camaro was my vote too… but now its apparent the ‘Vette is GM’s sports car and its priced to sell.

      While the MR is a big change the materials and parts seem on par with the current C7 which explains the price. Its the engineering short cuts that worry me. IE: have they put enough cooling into this thing? Can this new DCT handle the abuse? What about the reported pre-launch problems: twisted frames? electrical issues? what happens when they stick a super or turbo charger back there?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “The pricing is the final bullet in the head of the Camaro.”

      Well, now that the Corvette is a mid-engine “supercar” for $60k, maybe GM can turn the Camaro’s dial off “11” and create a more relaxed/cruiser-friendly muscle car.

  • avatar
    CammerLens

    I’m impressed that GM is able to wring 495 emissions-legal horsepower out of a 6.2L NA 2-valve pushrod V8 with fixed values for cam lift, duration, and overlap. Makes all the bulky complex DOHC 4-valve variable-valve-timing efforts by other manufacturers seem a trifle overwrought.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      GM has said it was mostly due to better packaging of the intake and exhaust systems. The rest was the result of cam that favors the exhaust side – that leads me to believe at least from the factory the NA engine isn’t going to see much more in NA form.

      The engine of course relies on its large displacement for decent power but look at what 6+ liters does when you add 4v heads with full VVT you get engines like AMG 6.3 belting out over 600 horsepower naturally aspirated.

      There is no way your going to get that with a single cam limited VVT 2v engine that has acceptable durability and emissions.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Just chiming in to say it is *possible* to get 645 hp from a factory installed naturally aspirated single cam 2V engine that passes emissions. As long as you’re willing to bump displacement a bit :) Mine does have more sophisticated cam-in-cam VVT though.

        A V10 or V12 version of the GM small block would be a neat experiment.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    YUM!

    But is it faster than a C7….

  • avatar
    NeilM

    Corey Lewis writes: “Ive got some thought’s and prayer’s.”

    I pray you’ll learn about apostrophes.

  • avatar
    notapreppie

    I’m in.

    I don’t like people so I don’t care about the separation. In fact, can we go a step further put up a clear divider between driver and passenger?

    Sciatica makes me like the DCT.

    I’m not even that turned off by the eLSD (I’m sure I’ll be able to plunk down $10k to put a mechanical one in within 12 months).

    Just have to find $70k.

    Tim/Editors: any chance you can provide some higher resolution versions of the interior photos?

  • avatar
    pb35

    Yes, please. I’ll take a black one.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    Yet another car that I would like to “decontent”.
    1. Replace the leather seats with cloth. No heat is necessary.
    2. A budget V8 around 350-400 hp
    3. A manual 6-speed
    4. A non-removable roof
    5. No dynamic settings- just tune it right from the beginning and go with it.

    And sell it for $40-45k. I know I’m dreaming, but that’s the C8 I would buy.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      I gotta tell you the thing I like most about my C7 Z51 is the mag-ride and PTM settings. The car rides amazingly over a variety of surfaces, can be tweaked with a twist of the knob and the traction control sorts things out on track beautifully.

      Go used and your behind the wheel at under $40K. Keep in mind the ‘Vette market is full of garage queens, most of these cars see more wax then miles. No complains with the C8 being only $60K as rumors put the car at $100K because that is where the performance is at. Also understand that the base C8 will have none of the fancy eLSD or mag-ride suspension stuff so can still have that pure experience if you want it. Just forget the manual as sadly that ship has sailed which is why I’ll have my C7 for several more years to enjoy the 3 pedal action.

    • 0 avatar
      JoeBrick

      @MikeB- I would not call it ‘dreaming’. I would use another word for it.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      The engine isn’t a substantial change from GM’s run of the mill stuff – as I pointed out in another reply the increase in power didn’t require serious work to the engine and is mostly the result of better intake and exhaust packaging plus some fiddling with the camshaft. There were also gains to be had with dry sump oiling system.

      Putting a 300-400 horsepower V8 engine in there would have likely cost more since the oiling system is virtually a requirement given the car’s handling even in base form (said to be able to generate over 1g with all season tires) and simply dumbing down the 6.2 with a tiny camshaft wouldn’t be the most efficient choice. Nor I suspect developing a purpose built 5.3 for the vette would make much sense.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    That thing needs a name change. Let’s call it a Camaro instead of Corvette…

    Why? Because it no longer inspires the image of the hourglass shape of the curvy hips, waist and bust in silhouette the way the C2, 3, 4 and 5 carried.

    My first impression of this fully-revealed package is a C7 front end with a Lambo rear end tacked on.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    What could possibly go wrong with a (likely Chinese built) Getrag transmission*?

    *Eyes Mustang GT.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    “I did see some elements that reminded me of other two-seat halo cars. From one angle, I saw Audi R8. From another, Ford GT. The wedge shape made me think a little about the Acura NSX. And the taillights, of course, borrow from the Camaro.”

    I think a lot of that is just the nature of a mid-engined car. There’s a lot of packaging compromises that push them toward the same shape. The Camaro lights, that’s just a family thing. I think most mid engined cars look kind of the same in silhouette except maybe the Lamborghini. It’s only the details that make them stand out when you move around them. If you just had a variety of mid engined shells with no emblems or lights, I bet A LOT of people, even “car people”, would have a tough time telling you which mid engined car that is.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      NSX front/side and Camaro rear is about right. However the C7 already had the Camaro’s lights, so the C8 is just an evolution of that.

      What I don’t like is the BIG, SQUARE butt on the C8. Putting the exhaust on the outside, which is required to go around the trunk, makes it look even wider. Normally wide on a sports car is good thing… but here? Sorry its just not working. It needs a diffuser or something. Did it back into something and get flattened? Its almost like they realized the car was getting too long and just ran out of plastic.

  • avatar
    carguy

    This must be designed by the Camaro team:
    It has great performance, sleek sheet metal and an interior designed by drunken interns.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    I would say “shark jump” – but Fonzie actually made it over the shark.

    Claustrophobic footwell and greenhouse (perhaps I should wear a pencil skirt and slouch?).

    The bundling board is an interesting feature… how large is the back seat?

    The further this vehicle gets (in space and time) from the CAD screen, the worse it is going to look.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Sure looks good in white. I really like it.

  • avatar
    Best_Ever

    Nice Lotus, Audi, Acura/squashed and mangled Camaro/could be any car. Way to rip the personality and soul out of Corvette. I’m sure it’ll be a great car. But it wont be a corvette. Grats GM, you’ve done it again.

    • 0 avatar
      DEVILLE88

      Don’t see how you can say that,all the traditional Vette cues are there. I would have preffered round lights in the back but thats all i would change. this is a world class Corvette and definately the bargain sports car of the world. I’d rather this Vette than a Porsche or Ferrari

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    “Budget Ferrari” styling coupled with Malibu tailights, can I call this the “Super Fiero?” Reminds me if Acuras newer NSX, the “Budget Audi”.

  • avatar
    ajla

    One thing TTACers will like:
    The blue, plum, and tan interiors come with matching colored carpets and trim. So it isn’t just a standard black interior with different color seats.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    It’s only day 1 so just initial impressions.

    First I saw the pictures and was disappointed – it looks like a supercar, and I want my Corvette to look like a vette, not a supercar.

    Then I saw the 3 second time, again, this is a super car, a vette does not need to be this. So still disappointed.

    Saw the 60k price – everything changed right then and there. I think I gasped out loud.

    I think I’m on board now.

  • avatar
    FThorn

    Bravo GM/Chevrolet! The car is as expected, for good and for worse. But the price point makes it the bargain of dare I say, the history of the automobile.

  • avatar
    MeJ

    It’s not a total disappointment but… I was worried it would look like the renders floating around out there and, unfortunately, it does, kind of. It looks proportionately better but most of the details are too similar to the renders. The front isn’t too bad, but the rear end is more over-styled than the Civic Si!
    I like the interior, although I would prefer a round or just a flat bottomed steering wheel. And I actually like the row of buttons. It keeps the dash from being too cluttered and most of those buttons are “set and forget” anyway.
    I really like the engine and compartment, probably the coolest part of the car.
    And the performance to cost is honestly, ridiculously good.
    I just wish it had the styling that would make turn around and smile every time I parked her. And with this styling I just don’t think I would.
    6.5 out of 10 for me.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    So, GM finally turns the Corvette into a Pantera. It only took them a half century to get around to it.

  • avatar
    craiger

    Are the grill panels functional? I’d like to think that they wouldn’t go with fake ones.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The didn’t do fake ones on the C7 so I assume they are real on the C8. GM does a lot of talking about air flow and CAD simulations. For the ‘Vette they work hand and hand with their race program to trying to balance drag against cooling. Time will tell if they got it right.

  • avatar
    webebob

    This car screams “James Bond” – um, well “Emilio Largo!” The svelte front end and right there amidships, it appears another, larger haunched-hip model has been attached to it. That’s it! It is the DISCO VOLANTE, part big-butt yacht, part high speed hydrofoil. The inside, with a passenger prison-walled seat guaranteed to keep JB from fiddling with his watch, and no legroom to reach for his heel hidey-hole. A plethora of buttons all in a row for the fiendish weapons Largo has to make MI6 miserable. And of course the red lined joystick one. To separate the lard ass from the sports car when required. Maybe the sooner the better.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    More than a year of B&B keystrokes on how this would sticker for over $100K, how killing the Camaro was so stupid, there won’t be anything at the basement.

    $60Kish will get you 495 HP out of a naturally aspirated engine that is lightweight and mechanically simpler than other cars in this class. 0 to 60 in 3 seconds (faster with an optional exhaust upgrade which will cost what, $2K at the most???), enough room to hold a full luggage set, an awaiting aftermarket, support, and parts community, and at least what can be called moderately good looks.

    $60K.

    A GR Supra Premium is $54K and comes with all the fun of a BMW engine with the Toyota service department working on it.

    It isn’t even a contest.

    Oh and since GM is so good at repeating their history according to the B&B, I will point out that the Corvette engine? Over the next 5 to 10 years will find itself under the hood of other GM offerings.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      What’s it going to end up under the hood of? Camaro? Caprice? SS? CTS-V? When was the last naturally aspirated V8 installed in a Cadillac sedan or coupe?

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        What was the last NA V8 that punched at 500 HP with NVH that would be acceptable for Cadillac built?

        Oh ya, it just got built.

        Obama Clinton China something something…

        • 0 avatar
          ToddAtlasF1

          GM is putting 2.7 liter turbo fours out of their laughing stock trucks into Cadillacs and you swallowed that it was NVH that kept them from selling every LS or LT powered ATS, CTS, or CT6 they could make. Who cares if they put this in a truck? Just the other day people were saying that a supercharged Escalade was repellent, even though it makes all the sense in the world. Too bad it took the failure of the second generation Camaro that these buffoons condemned with a chopped greenhouse to make it happen. I get why you like their cars. You’re a kindred spirit.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Exactly this, GM has nothing to put this engine into, it could sell like hot cakes in the right car for the right price but GMs focuses on building 7 flavors of minivans and a couple sedans that should have been left in the 80s.
        Great engine that turns heads but GM has shot themselves in the foot because they don’t have jack to do with it outside of the Corvette.

        It may go into the trucks but they seem designed to repel potential buyers so no win for anyone that’s had the miracle of vision. GM has said its turning its SUVs to IRS so they’re useless and will never amount to anything more than the Armada or Sequoia once that change happens, doesn’t matter if it had this engine for $35k at that point.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      “Over the next 5 to 10 years will find itself under the hood of other GM offerings.”

      From your fingertips to GM’s product line I hope. I’d love to see this engine in other cars.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      @APaGttH – that GM engine is already under the hood of other GM offerings. What you wont find are the intake manifold, headers and dry sump system responsible for a big chunk of that power increase.

  • avatar
    Tony Moody

    The row of buttons is LOL. The passenger seat looks like a chiropractor’s wet dream to drum up business. And the exterior is, well, somehow already dated.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Well they nailed it. This could go wrong in so many ways. They only had a very narrow pathway to success. And I be damned. They freaking nailed it. Sure I miss the center exhausts. The rear spoiler is strange. And the interior, in a McLaren way magnificent in its peculiar way, I have gotten used it. Bravo Chevy and GM and Corvette team. BRAVO.

  • avatar
    Noble713

    Pros:
    -RHD (yay Japan-friendly!)
    -costs the same as a new Supra
    -almost 500hp NA V8

    Cons:
    -no manual trans
    -ugly both outside and inside

    I LOVE the C7…but this looks like a 458 Italia kit car made from Camaro body panels mixed with an imitation-Huracan dash stuffed inside. It’s just not working for me. But the idea of importing a used one into Japan 5 years from now still holds some appeal.

  • avatar
    craiger

    If any car company other than GM introduced the C8 today people would be falling over each other to see who could spout the most hyperbolic superlatives.

    Fantastic car. World beating.

    Well done, GM.

  • avatar
    OneAlpha

    Wow, I knew it was going to be ugly but…this is awful.

    Engine out back, coil springs, NO MANUAL…

    And it looks like a Camaro that went and got ass implants.

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    The new Corvair 2!

  • avatar
    Matt51

    What if GM threw a party and no one showed up? GM had to pay reporters to attend.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    When I look at the availability of leftover new C7s going back to 2015 and 2019s listed for $44K on cars.com, it is remarkable or ridiculous that GM spent money on a C8 at all.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I’d love to buy a Corvette as a commuter car but they’re off their rocker for the starting price. Use less exotic materials and lower the price, I haven’t understood why it starts at $55k for a C7, though as you say $10k discounts have been on and off for years now and realistically is what sells these. With the discounts I think it’s reasonable but even then most dealers stack the $70-80k versions.

      That’s why I new this C8 was going to be a useless venture, it was going to jack up the already high price even higher, as we can see it did. Do you get what you pay for? Certainly, it costs money to have a mid engine car, do 99% of people care? Not until they realize how much basic engine work costs in such a car. I sure hope this is one generation and done because it seems like a massive step back in accomplishing building the everymans Sports car.

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        Base prices at intro

        1984 C4: $21800 ($53,200)
        1997 C5: $37500 ($59,700)
        2005 C6: $44300 ($57,800)
        2014 C7: $52000 ($56,500)

        The car has stayed within the same basic pricing structure for the last 35 years. In that time, horsepower has gone from 200 to 500, amenities improved exponentially, performance gone from an also-ran to world class, etc. The price is the last thing I would be ripping on with the C8, it’s highly doubtful anything under $100K will be able to match its all-around performance.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          The problem isn’t “the C8 is too expensive”. As you’ve shown mid to high $50k (adjusted) is usual for the Corvette since the 80s.

          This problem is “GM needs to unf*ck the Camaro”. The Camaro is supposed to be the entry to mid level GM performance car but it is a complete iron maiden to drive.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            I’ve been a lonely defender of the Camaro here against what I feel are overblown auto journalist type complaints about interior layout and visibility, both of which I found to be perfectly fine for a performance car when I test drove one.

            At $38K for a base 1SS and with that “what were they thinking” face, GM is seemingly doing everything they can to make my job tougher though.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            The visibility and chopped roof of the 5G and 6G Camaro made me physically fatigued driving them around. There is a chance I’d “get used to it” but that’s a big $40k+ gamble.

            The Camaro’s problems are really highlighted when driving the Mustang GT, which is immensely more comfortable and has a rear seat that is at least cross-town usable (while the Camaro’s is just an upholstered cargo shelf).

            And yea, that situation has kind of always been the case, but the on-road performance delta between a basic SS auto and basic GT auto is really becoming thin these days. Add in performance packages or put them on a road course and maybe the Chevy still has the advantage, but how much of that is really from the concept car roof?

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            For as long as I’ve known him, a friend of mine has had two vehicles for his own use. His wife has had various Ford CUVs, but he has an F350 V10 he bought new in the mid-2000s and he had a hair-shirt GM sedan for commuting. The F350 was just for towing his boat and trips to an island with vehicle beach access. Two years ago, he traded his commuter car for a new 6G Camaro SS.

            He hasn’t said much about it since his initial excitement over hitting 120 mph on entrance ramps, but I haven’t seen him drive it since a month after he bought it. He’s put more miles on the F350 since he got the Camaro then in the decade prior. I haven’t talked to him about the Camaro, because I don’t like pretending I’m impressed by the folly of others, but I heard from a mutual friend that he’s considered selling it.

            There was a rental Camaro convertible behind me at a stop light yesterday. I couldn’t help but to notice how much of the windshield was occupied by the Virginia 7/19 state inspection decal. Camaros look great on spec-sheets. Whoever is designing GM’s sporty cars and approving said designs is out of their depth.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            If the Camaro is uncomfortable around town and the visibility fatigues you, then I have to caution you against your Viper dreams, at least in a coupe. I’m 5′ 10″ and the leading edge of the roof is in my field of view at all times, even with the seat in its lowest position.

            I guess living with that car for 4 years now is why the Camaro doesn’t bug me. Pillbox windows, low roof, and weird ergonomics are just an accepted part of the performance car experience for me. And I prefer the LT1 to the Coyote by enough that I can put up with a lot. If I needed the car for a daily driver, I can see preferring the Mustang, but if I really need to drive it that much, I’m probably buying a Challenger anyways.

            All that said, sales results and the general tone of comments on this and other enthusiast sites tell me that yours is the popular position. Sucks that it seems like it’s going to end with the demise of the Camaro, and the small block going Vette and truck only.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            “If the Camaro is uncomfortable around town and the visibility fatigues you, then I have to caution you against your Viper dreams, at least in a coupe.”

            You’ve convinced me. I won’t buy a Viper as a daily driver. I won’t buy a Camaro as a daily driver either, and a Camaro isn’t special enough to buy it for any other reason. What percentage of 2 and 4 series BMWs are daily drivers? Whatever the exact number, it is the majority of them. There is no reason the Camaro shouldn’t be just as pleasant to commute in.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @Todd,

            Wasn’t trying to convince you of anything, ajla has talked about buying a Viper before and it was him I was replying to.

            As for BMW though, the performance peer of the Camaro SS is the M4. What percentage of those are daily driven I wonder? I’m willing to give up some ergonomics, visibility, and comfort for $30,000 in savings, but if you feel otherwise, hey it’s a free country.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            Plenty of M cars are daily drivers. The point is what’s missing most conspicuously from the Camaro would have cost GM and buyers absolutely nothing, and that is good design. Commuters don’t need three textures and two shades of leather to be comfortable, but they need to see stoplights without craning their necks and a seat they don’t need to crawl in and out of.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Let me say I don’t think the C8 is over priced for what your buying, but it is overpriced for the name plate, and further goes to show how overpriced the C7 was that for $4k more they can sell a car that has changed the entire architecture. They should have split the corvette into two lines this C8 and an updated lower cost C7, building just the C8 was a bad move.

          And yes the Camaro isn’t somewhere I want to be, I’ve been in both a 5G and 6G and while I may be able to live with the 5G if I had to, I feel absolutely claustrophobic in the 6G and wouldn’t feel comfortable driving it let alone riding in it for anything more than short distance. Neither the Mustang nor Challenger have this issue.

          I want to like the Camaro but it’s not very good at its job, and honestly I’m not smitten on the design, I was excited in 2009 when pictures were released but it never really materialized to be what they hyped, and the 6G is nearly indefensible outside of the handling which is a small part of the fun on anything outside a go kart.

          • 0 avatar
            Matt51

            ” They should have split the corvette into two lines this C8 and an updated lower cost C7, building just the C8 was a bad move.”

            Exactly. And GM could still do this.

  • avatar
    Richarbl

    The thing that surprises me most about the C8 is the fact that neither TTAC or Jalopnik have mentioned that it will be built in RHD and presumably sold around the world same as the Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Doesn’t really mean anything to anyone in America, most of the world has draconian laws that tax engines bigger than a peanut, so while this car may cost $60k here it will certainly cost $100k+ for the same base car once it makes it to many other countries.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        But don’t we also have gas guzzler tax? +, soon we will have same laws. T/he green deal is coming

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Gas guzzler tax doesn’t apply to base Corvettes, they get excellent MPG, I’m waging that the new corvette will exceed the C7.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            If they do the hybrid plugin, it will exceed most Priuses.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            Good point, Hummer. If memory serves–and I haven’t double-checked this–a design criterion for the C4 and later Corvettes has been that it avoid the Gas Guzzler tax du jour – at least when it’s in its base form. Kind of a cool aspect of the model, as far as I’m concerned.

            Some thoughts on the C8:

            – The sane base price isn’t *that* big of a surprise. A lot of wet-behind-the-ears journos don’t realize that correlation isn’t causation. Expensive Ferraris and Lambos don’t mean that we also haven’t seen affordable Fieros, MR2’s, and X1/9’s.

            – I’m reserving judgment on the C8’s practicality until I see one in person. GM claims it’ll hold two sets of golf clubs, but from the pictures it looks like you’ll need to take them out of the bag to accomplish that. I could be wrong. It does look less practical than the C4-C7, which probably means nothing to the wipe-it-with-a-diaper demographic (which *is* an important demographic for any performance car). Conversely, there are a chunk of Corvette owners who actually use it as a car. This will matter to them.

            – I’m also withholding judgment on ease/cost of service. Apart from the Ford GT, current mid-engine cars all come from prestige nameplates. Tough to tell how much of upkeep cost stems from the badge and how much stems from the location of the engine. My guess is that C1-C7’s are easier to service, but that may be premature.

            – Jay Leno had a worthwhile remark that the row of buttons was inspired by the vertical radio in the C3. I’m not sure if it’s a great idea in the C8, but at least there was some thought behind it. Point to Leno, zero points to Healey for that insight. Regardless of their location, give me a button any day over a touchscreen.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            You know after I wrote my last comment I looked up the Vette MPG, I remember it being a big deal when introduced that the 2014 Vette achieved 17 city and 29 HWY, and when you look up 2014 those are the numbers you see.
            Oddly when you look up a 2019, which is the exact same car I see 16 City and 25 HWY which is totally different for the same car with the same specs. I’m under the impression GM May have manipulated the C7 numbers to boast the C8 numbers whenever they come out.

            As to your comment we still have a lot to learn about the C8, they have us all the good points but I’m interested to see the car in action in the real world with drivers that aren’t as forgiving as GM.
            As an Engineer I’m fully aware that modern engineers utilize computerized models of cars to find the stress points and find ways to strengthen those areas, but experience shows me that the old way of over building everything was a much safer bet, I’m very interested to see how this turns out. This is likely why we heard reports of frame ripping, engineers relied to heavily on computer models.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I am going to reserve judgment.

    It looks better than I expected, the claimed performance-to-price ratio is impressive (if it’s really base 60k it’s not cheap, but given claimed acceleration/handling talk, it could turn out be a relative bargain for that price).

    BUT – This is GUANGZOU MOTORS (GM). They do not deserve ANY benefit of the doubt whatsoever. Rather, EVERYONE should view this new vehicle with complete cynicism from a quality*, reliability, durability and in all other respects, because this is a Guangzhou Motors (GM), and “what’s past is prologue.”

    *See many reports of serious electrical issues, bending/twisting of frames, etc., regarding the C8 in development, with severe incidents reported very close in time to the reveal.

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    Long hood – short deck > that was/is/and should be .. the way to go with the Vette .. >)
    This design is .. awkward .. > .. proportions are .. “backbreaking” .. >) .. it’s ugly ..
    (.. and U can make a “handsome mid-engine sportsler” > 458 Italia , Ford GT , 1-gen Audi R8 ..)

    It’s got a proper engine, though (not some funny eco-boost-blown V6 like Ford ) > and I like what they’re gonna do with it > SuperChargers .. etc .. >) .. , ..but still It doesn’t look as hot as Ford GT ..

    There’s/was a slight chance that Dodge will bring back some kind of “Hellcat” Viper as a Corvette rival .. but now .. ?!? ..

    Viper > classical Long hood – short deck > not Vette anymore ..

  • avatar
    cprescott

    My reaction was an uneasy stomach and visual eye damage.

    This thing is hideous inside and out; the exterior looks like three people designed it – one for the front taking every supercar gimmick and plastering it all together; one to do the rear end to take the cancelled upcoming Camaro rear end and fixing it to the back of this thing. And one to do the side profile where this is a ghastly cap-forward look that is not as sleek as a Chrysler Company LH model. The passenger compartment is cramped looking, shifted well too forward, and the only reason this is a mid-engined is seriously because for 40 years the company failed to make one so now was the appointed time. That extended rear makes the car look like a cab-forward El Camino look. The whole after of the b-pillar area is so unskilled in its design that the ghastly black air intake/door handle becomes the overwhelming feature. This is first grade level of artwork here.

    The inside is a mess beyond all saving other than to set it on fire.

    Is GM now so inept that this is the BEST CORVETTE that they could come up with for the 2020’s?

    I am no Tesla fanboi, but it would seem to me that since a Tesla is likely to be faster than this Corvette, why not introduce the latest and greatest Corvette as an Electric Stingray with all the torque that this chassis could muster and you’d end up with sub 3 second 0-60 times WITH superb handling? Instead we have all the effort it took to move the engine from front to mid (not much effort at all) with no hint of it being a modern vehicle (since the 1970’s mid-engined cars are a dime a dozen and even a Pontiac Fiero had this). But an all electric Stingray would have been modern, demanded matching styling that would evoke “Stingray” like the 1967 one evoked a shark from the Mako Shark.

    what is unsettling is that GM has wasted an entire decade on worthless psuedo electric and electric cars with nothing to show for it in the overall advancement of electric cars. In one swift movement (and a surprise one), the Electric Stingray would have shown that GM is serious about electrification with a halo car so bold and delicious that Tesla would look like the work of Studebaker in comparison.

    Alas, fools will fall for a vehicle that will never be sold for $60k and which is as old school in overall development as something from 1970 and is not that far removed from the 1896 Ford Quadracycle which had the driver sitting on the engine and it had four wheels.

    Disgusting effort from a company that has long phoned it in as if they have zero vision for excellence and are so proud of their “participation trophy” known as the c8.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      This unhinged rant is delightfully idiotic in almost all respects but my favorite parts are the idea that somehow making this electric would make it handle better (????), while 500 hp mid engine cars are old school and “dime a dozen”.

  • avatar
    Firestorm 500

    DeadWeight couldn’t have said it better himself.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Looks to be a great performance car for the money as always. Too bad about the exterior and weird interior though. Double shame about the lack of manual transmission. Still I would take it over the even uglier BMW Supra!

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    I’ve admittedly meandered a bit in my thoughts on this latest Guangzhou Motors “all new, old tech,” mid-engined, Fauxrrari plastic body-kit clad C8 Stinkray, but have now definitively concluded that it will…

    …be for the douchiest of douchebags, mostly for men between the ages of 56 and 76, wearing lots of gold jewelry and silk/polyester blend clothing, same as ever.

    It will be a tragicomedy watching early adopters paying ridiculous dealer ADM prices to be the first to have it, but those numbskulls will get get what’s coming to them in terms of quality control issues, vast/rapid depreciation (as 2nd and 3rd larger waves of C8 Stinkrays are no longer internationally held back and unloaded in larger volume), so as they say, CAVEAT EMPTOR.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Perhaps you’ll be found correct, and I think avoiding the first year out of the factory would be prudent.

      However, what would you recommend as an alternative? Anything else is either going to be $100K+, have worse performance, and/or also be of dubious long-term quality. I guess you can snag a leftover C7, but that will probably stop being an option by this winter.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    ajla- For those somehow feeling compelled to live the “Vette” rolling stereotype lifestyle, used C7, but NOT the Z06 or ZR1 variety (all FI Vettes are disasters in terms of ability to stay out of limp mode and not catch on fire).

    The average Vette owner is approx 65 and drives their Vette approx 2,437 miles per year, on weekend, sunny days, at speeds of 45kph to 65 mph, on only the smoothest roads, to nowhere, before returning their Vette to their garage, after washing it, and parking it in the driveway until dusk, because they think it has Ferrari or Lambo cred.

  • avatar

    I appreciate GM shaking this up….the mid engine for a real sportscar is better…I have fond memories of an MR2, and think the Cayman IS better than the 911. If the C8 was just an evolution of the C7, it would be boring, or god forbid, if a 6, they’d have lost the plot entirely.

    The lack of a manual isn’t a problem. Today’s autoboxes are faster than you or I can shift, and I’m a save the manuals kind of guy.

    Interior is OK. Exterior is great unless you are following the car, at which point you realize one of the designers cribbed it from his bored high school kid’s notebook.

    $60k is a tease, like, oh, a $35k Tesla. You’ll not see one on a lot, the first six months-year will be ADP special time, probably starting at 10k minimum bonus for the dealer principals’ mistress fund.

    There will be a few early bobbles in production…everything is too new and there’s a lot of new tech here-how GM handles this for a small luxury market will be key. The “genuine GM parts” problems will be for the second owners so we won’t see that for a while.

    I like it and can’t wait to see one in the wild, and/or take one out when the Classic Car Club gets one.


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