By on April 21, 2021

Vantas

The Vantas VX SUV will go on sale in the U.S. in late 2022. HAAH Automotive Holdings and Sicar announced yesterday that they will import Vantas and T-Go vehicles. This is a prelude to HAAH and Shanghai Sicar Automotive Technology manufacturing vehicles stateside. The COVID-19 pandemic delayed their U.S. manufacturing startup.

Vantas

A letter of intent was added to their engineering service agreement. Sicar is a Chery Automobile subsidiary, one of the top Chinese automakers. Sicar has development and engineering capabilities to produce world-class vehicles. HAAH Motors Holdings is a Lake Forest, California-based firm that provides the expertise needed to manufacture, wholesale, and retail vehicles in North America. Together, the combined companies seek to redefine the automotive retail experience.

HAAH and Sicar will develop and sell Vantas and T-Go branded vehicles in North America. The first two vehicles will be the Vantas VX full-size SUV, and the Vantas TXL, a mid-size SUV. Two T-Go vehicles, one a pickup truck, are next. Additional SUVs and passenger cars with electrification and intelligence capabilities will follow. The first two Vantas SUVs will have internal combustion engines, although electric vehicles (EVs) will become the foundation of the company going forward.

“This agreement expansion is a major step forward as we prepare for the launch of these two brands in the United States and Canada, including future electric vehicles. It expands upon our earlier pact regarding the sales, distribution, and service of vehicles for the Vantas and T-Go brands. There is no question that electric vehicles are the future in North America, and we’re excited to let everyone know of our plans,” said HAAH Chairman and Chief Executive Officer Duke Hale.

[Images: HAAH Automotive Holdings]

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33 Comments on “2023 Vantas VX SUV and T-Go Coming to the U.S....”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “2023 Vantas VX SUV and T-Go Coming to the U.S.”

    Sure they are.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Highlander?

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      There can be only one!

      But, yes, this is a segment which is already fully served in the United States.

      I wish them luck, but it’s not going to be easy for them.

  • avatar
    tonycd

    If they do come here, it’ll be interesting in a couple of ways:

    1) Chinese carmakers are famous for making cars that are outright plagiarisms of other carmakers’ styling, but with vastly inferior substance and horrible crashworthiness. Much of US automaker regulations relies on voluntary compliance and self-enforcement. Wonder how that’ll work out here.

    2) Since the American public doesn’t seem to be up in arms about Chinese-made iPhones or the Chinese-built Buick Envision, wonder how the public will react to the idea of a Chinese car?

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      “Chinese carmakers are famous for making cars that are outright plagiarisms of other carmakers’ styling,”

      Well, these do look like every Hyundai/KIA/Honda/etc. on the road. If they are a good value Americans will buy them. We’ll see

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      You can bet that the Chinese took a look at the things the Koreans did wrong when they first entered the U.S. market, and they will not be making the same mistakes. While the larger SUV looks like everything else on the road-it still looks good.

      If you want to talk about inferior interiors-all one has to do is look inside my 2018 Silverado LTZ- a vehicle that had a sticker price of $54,000 when I bought it new.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      1. That car on top looks like Highlander copy.
      2. Half of all people, or more, have no idea where car is made

    • 0 avatar
      N8iveVA

      “2) Since the American public doesn’t seem to be up in arms about Chinese-made iPhones or the Chinese-built Buick Envision, wonder how the public will react to the idea of a Chinese car?”

      Envision isn’t a huge seller, plus how many people out there even realize it’s made in China? Whereas a new Chinese brand will have people asking where it’s from. My guess is that unless it’s vastly cheaper than a comparable vehicle it’ll be a no sale. People buying a $1,000 iPhone over the length of their contract is a lot different than someone knowingly spending $40k or more on a Chinese made vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “1) Chinese carmakers are famous for making cars that are outright plagiarisms of other carmakers’ styling, but with vastly inferior substance and horrible crashworthiness. Much of US automaker regulations relies on voluntary compliance and self-enforcement. Wonder how that’ll work out here.”

      My experience doing business with Chinese manufacturers is that they can make great stuff, or junk — and you get what you pay for.

      If your only goal is to cut costs, you’ll get a cut-rate product from a Chinese manufacturer. If you’re willing to pay for quality, you’ll get it from a Chinese manufacturer.

      China may be downright foreign in some ways, but my Chinese colleagues are trying to make money — just like everyone else on earth.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Most new ventures in the US automotive market crash on the shoals of distribution and servicing infrastructure. I’ll believe this has a chance when I see them standing up either a big retail operation or a big dealer network with established players. Until then, how do you say “Malcolm Bricklin” in Mandarin?

  • avatar
    readallover

    Growing up, a friends family had a VW Squareback wagon that was routinely parked as the dealer `waited for parts from Germany`. People won`t stand for that these days – and I do not care if Chinese parts are a day away by Fed-Ex (not that they could afford the warrantee costs to do that over the long haul).

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Right. Usually, an automaker will have a warehouse in the US–or more than one–that parts get shipped from, if the dealer doesn’t have them in stock.

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      It’s true that the American duty cycle is quite demanding.

      Most Americans depend on our vehicles for economic survival, and so we can’t tolerate downtime.

      That’s why Toyota and Honda are so popular.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    What about Bremach? https://www.bremach.us/index.html

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    So going to American Holding Company-the press releases go silent after September of 2020
    https://www.haahauto.com/

  • avatar
    Garrett

    Chinese companies attempting to sell vehicles is running before walking.

    The better model is to develop vehicles as captive imports, or to have existing brands develop the vehicles to be built in China.

    A Chinese made Volvo is still a Volvo. It’ll offer the same level of safety as the ones built in Sweden. That’s how you do it.

    How you don’t do it: bring some random car that looks like a different vehicle was ripped off depending on the angle.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      They are selling one of these models elsewhere. I believe it’s the smaller one. But they stated the dimensions could change slightly with the U.S specs for energy absorbing bumpers.

  • avatar

    I don’t want to discuss subject further but is it a 21st April joke? Vantas?

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      Inside Looking out-

      That’s referred to as a “hit and run” comment. Generally useless….

      • 0 avatar

        It is generally known as a “Guerrilla warfare”. Can be very effective if done right. We used it against Germans during WWII. But in this particular case there is nothing to discuss. The idea is ridiculous.

        • 0 avatar
          CKNSLS Sierra SLT

          Inside Looking out

          Yep-the same thing was said when the Japanese entered the U.S. market with small under powered cars. And again the same when Hyundai entered with cars that would fall apart shortly after leaving the showroom.

          For someone that quotes history-you sure seem to forget it.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    The Chinese have 2 choices here as an unknown quantity with a perception of not so good quality.

    1. Sell it like Yugo. Just make it so much cheaper than the competition that people have to take notice. They will need to be a bit better than the Yugo with respect to quality and creature comforts though to avoid the same fate. Hyundai played this game to a lesser degree.

    2. The Lexus Approach. Just make it so much better than the competition that people are forced to take notice and then focus on building the brand reputation and making the big profits down the road after that is done. Play the long game.

    Just marketing it as a competitive product I don’t think would do well. People tend to go with the known quantity all things equal and a Chinese product already has an uphill climb as “high quality” is not what springs to most people’s minds.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    Art Vandelay-
    My wife and I had this discussion last night. The point of the discussion is what would it take for us to buy a Chinese vehicle. My wife stated-and rightly so that all of us already buy plenty of products made offshore-by the Chinese and others. So we both agreed that the sell price of Chinese vehicles would have to be at least a $5,000.00 spread, and of equal quality. This was the same criteria that we used when we bought new my wife’s 2017 Santa Fe Limited-AWD. WE could afford any vehicle in it’s class-but focused on the difference in price verses the Highlander/Pilot. The Santa Fe currently has 40,000 miles and has proved a good choice thus far.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      We made the same choice on a Santa Fe Sport. It went the other way sadly as it was bitten by the Theta Engine issues at 48k.

      Still though, Hyundai seems to have a decent brand perception quality wise by most. The 10/100 warranty went a long way towards that (They were seen as crap, but cheap enough to make up for it prior to that warranty and stepping up their product offerings). A Chinese company is sort of starting off in the hole with respect to brand perception. You won’t know if “All things are equal” until that first round of buyers puts some miles on them.

      But after that first round of cars gets out there and they are a known quantity and do well enough with respect to quality, I think your approach is one many would take. The first cars are critical though. Any recall or issues will reenforce the skepticisim people already have. Even if it is something that has happened a hundred times to other automakers. It is a tall order.

      I’m personally in the “no way no how” camp on Chinese vehicles. It’s hard to avoid Chinese stuff. I typically try, even though it isn’t 100 percent. But a large ticket automobile is something I have plenty of other options.

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    Art Vandelay-

    Hyundai replaced my sons Theta motor even though the car was well out of warranty-and before the court settlement. They put him in a rental for a week as well. Those motors had issues-but Hyundai-IMHO stepped up.

  • avatar
    JLGOLDEN

    I respect those who are willing to invest in this venture, as well as the early adopters who spend real money to put these new cars in their driveways. Oh, but as others commented, it’s going to be an uphill battle for the new brand. Clever marketing, bargain pricing, and nothing less than EXCELLENT product will be needed for traction. Even then, until I see real owner reviews of both product and service experiences, I won’t buy or recommend the brand.

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