By on March 29, 2021

2007 Audi S6 in Colorado junkyard, RH front view - ©2021 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsWhen I’m wandering junkyards and looking for interesting stuff, I don’t pay much attention to Audis of our current century. No, I want to photograph old Audis, preferably ones from the 1970s. I make exceptions for discarded members of the Audi S family, however, because these cars do such a great job of demonstrating the ruthlessly quick depreciation of German luxury machinery that didn’t get the maintenance it deserved. Here’s an ’07 S6 that didn’t even see 15 years of use, found in a Denver-area yard last week.

2007 Audi S6 in Colorado junkyard, seats - ©2021 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe MSRP on this car started at $74,000, or about $96,150 in 2021 dollars, and the reviewers wrote all the stuff you’d have expected to read about it.

2007 Audi S6 in Colorado junkyard, V10 engine - ©2021 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsThe 2007-2011 S6 got a (slightly) detuned version of the S8’s V10 engine, giving it an impressive 435 horsepower and bragging rights for owners wishing to point out the closely-related engine powering the Lamborghini Gallardo.

2007 Audi S6 in Colorado junkyard, V10 badge - ©2021 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsI’d be willing to bet that this engine had the most horsepower (when new) of anything in this yard’s inventory on the day that I visited, beating out this S55 AMG and every one of the Chrysler Magnum and Ford Triton V10s in various trucks and vans.

2007 Audi S6 in Colorado junkyard, center console - ©2021 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsYou couldn’t get a manual transmission in the ’07 S6, which probably had zero effect on sales. Perhaps transmission woes knocked this one’s value down from “clean Suzuki Forenza” to “hooptie Pontiac Sunfire with thrown rod” prices.

2007 Audi S6 in Colorado junkyard, sticker - ©2021 Murilee Martin - The Truth About CarsTrue enough.


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70 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 2007 Audi S6...”


  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Not familiar with these, but I assume the cost of repair parts (and labor hours if you can’t do it yourself) leads to an early end.

  • avatar
    theflyersfan

    I’m guessing the first owner leased, the second owner kept it long enough to start to worry about what V-10 repair/maintenance bills were going to be in the near future, and the third owner just clobbered it into the ground. You can tell, even in a junkyard, that there was little love given to the interior of that beautiful car.
    I can’t fathom what maintenance on a crammed in a spot meant for a 6-cylinder engine had to be. I’m guessing that service would pay for the service manager’s kid’s braces, a boat, and a summer home on the lake to put the boat. But those engines could sing a beautiful tune…

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      This is why I’ll never ever again buy a FWD car with a transverse V6 engine. Got burned by a Ford 3.5L V6. My 20 year old Honda has the 2.3L 4-cylinder and everything is so easy to reach, I can do half the things myself after watching Youtube.

    • 0 avatar
      blppt

      “. You can tell, even in a junkyard, that there was little love given to the interior of that beautiful car.”

      Not necessarily. That era of VAG products were notorious for having the interiors fall apart/degrade at an astonishing rate even with moderate use.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Sadly, the centerpiece of this car was almost certainly the reason to trash it – an exotic engine that nobody could afford to fix, or even diagnose.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    Hard to imagine there’s too many 10 cylinder cars in junkyards anywhere.

    Sad to see this in there, but when even clean, well running examples can be found for <$10K it's not shocking.

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    You didn’t need a V10 to have maintenance issues. I owned a 2002 A6 with the 2.7 biturbo engine. The turbos started laying down a smoke screen about 500 miles short of the end of the CPO mileage limit. Dodged a $7K repair there. For almost every non-standard repair in front of the firewall it seemed to require getting the engine out of the car. I didn’t have any, but it was like a Sword of Damocles over my bank account. At 120k miles, I donated it to charity and got a $900 write-off.
    The two A4s I had were sold at 150K and 180K miles, but they each had the I4 and manual transmission. If you know someone who likes Audi’s style, fit and finish, persuade one to get it with the I4.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      The 3.1 liter v6 in my B7 was a joy to own from 80k to 145k when I sold it. Valve covers needed done, but it wasn’t a big deal at all. I grew really attached to that engine, it made power in a way that I really enjoyed. The i4 of the same generation did not have the NVH pleasantries they have now, glad to hear they were easy to own.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Many of these German engines are installed backwards, IE: the timing chains are on the rear of the engine. I assume this is done for weight distribution but is clearly a service nightmare. Engine out is the only way to work on them. Contrast this with American or Japaneses cars where you might need to pull just the radiator to give you enough access to do a timing chain.

      It’s V10 but its kind of small one at only 5 liters. I knew someone with a Gallardo and when he lifted the engine cover I was shocked at how tiny it looked in the bay of that car. Of course the Lambo is WIDE creating a bit of an illusion.

    • 0 avatar
      ktm

      I owned a 2002 B5 S4 with the same engine. I loved that car when it worked, but hated the feeling I got every morning when I sat in it to go to work and muttered, “please nothing break today.”

      28 days in the shop in a 6 month period. The dealership was really understanding and a joy to work with, but when I got to know the entire service department by name I knew it was time to let it go.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “German luxury machinery that didn’t get the maintenance it deserved.”

    While I have no doubt neglect does occur, I’ve always disagreed with the prevailing internet theory that all you need to do to turn your German car into an Lexus is use the secret fluids of the enchanted Black Forest and follow the double-secret maintenance schedule stickied at the forum.

    I’ve always liked the BMW E60, but when you read the model forums, you realize that German (and all Euro brands?) fans just operate on a different reliability scale compared to people buying other brands.

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      truth, ajla. their proposition may only be changing now, as the industry is in flux, but for the longest time they offered that little extra je ne sais quoi (autobahn behavior? status?) in return for very strict maintenance requirements. how one feels about it doesn’t really change the equation, that’s been the deal. That said, homework does matter in what to get and what to not get. I say this as one of the fans you mention.

      • 0 avatar
        cimarron typeR

        ajla, I wouldn’t be afraid of a 6 cyl. E60. That motor has only the usual expansion tank/radiator maintenance .From my experience it’s been easier to find competent, honest German car mechanics than any other auto makers.
        Interestingly, I wasn’t a fan of the styling of the E60 when it was released, but now I think they’re handsome. At the time, I guess I was an e46 owning snob.

    • 0 avatar
      Dawnrazor

      This is absolute truth with German cars, regardless of manufacturer.

      It doesn’t really matter how much you pamper, coddle, and spare no expense doing maintenance the “right” way, the damn thing will probably STILL make every effort to crush your spirit!

      The problem isn’t a lack of maintenance, but rather the multiple boneheaded (“clever”, if you ask them) engineering decisions that result in ridiculous expensive failures which are outside the scope of meticulous maintenance practices (i.e. alternator bracket oil leaks in BMWs that cost upwards of $2k to fix, or MB’s $1800/wheel Airmatic struts which are functionally just “wear items” that might give 30k of service (if you are lucky) before your vehicle starts looking droopy and gimped).

      • 0 avatar
        blppt

        My current pet peeve with my B8.5 A4 is that you have to get the freaking battery code-matched to the car at the dealer.

        You can’t just drop a new one in (which takes all of about 10 minutes to do) and call it a day.

        • 0 avatar
          White Shadow

          Actually, you can. If you replace your battery before it completely fails, then you can just swap it out and not worry about battery registration. If you really want to register your battery, you can do it yourself easily with an app like OBDeleven or Carista. You can also do it with a VAG-Com cable. But the easiest thing to do is to just swap out the battery before it completely fails.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      When talking about keeping cars like this on the road, normal preventive maintenance is half of “maintenance,” but the other half is willingness to drop many thousands of dollars per year fixing all the stuff that breaks. And there is a lot of stuff to break!

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I think that’s anything European or “luxury” at this point with a few exceptions.

        • 0 avatar
          Noble713

          “I think that’s anything European or “luxury” at this point with a few exceptions.”

          I’d love to see the concept of luxury draw more inspiration from products like the Mosin-Nagant rifle: rugged, war-proven, and throwing a bullet that has been in service since 1897. It should be virtuous to own things that don’t break. Only a peasant would participate in conspicuous consumption, buying hardware that needs to be replaced regularly.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      You could change the oil every 3k miles in BMWs, but the trifecta of gasket failures would stiff afflict them. Oil filter housing gasket, oil pan gasket and valve cover gasket. Add to that the normal engine cooling problems with garbage water pumps and the electrical issues, and you just need to know what you’re getting into with these.

    • 0 avatar

      Europeans have a great public transportation system. But then Japanese too.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      Serial BMW owner here, and I have to admit this is true. I was about to respond with “my E60 550i didn’t give me any trouble”, then I remembered that I had to have the alternator bracket gasket fixed twice.

      I put up with this because no one else paired a V8 or an I6 with a manual in a comfortable, practical package within my price range (I’m buying at the bottom of the depreciation curve).

      Fortunately for my bank account, BMW stopped making cars with enough appeal to me to be worth the trouble.

  • avatar
    Mike Beranek

    For every Audi sitting in a boneyard across the country, there are about 100 boring-ass early-2000’s Chevy Impalas with pushrod engines, crappy Play-Skool interiors, and cheesy styling, still racking up miles every day.
    High-end cars like this are built only for the first owner’s vanity, and then become disposable the moment something else shiny catches their eye.

    • 0 avatar
      spookiness

      Basically agree. When I started doing the junkyard thing several years, the number of German makes in decent cosmetic condition (Audis, VWs, esp.) was notable.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      That’s not really true. All automakers have similar margins. If this car was $75k new it was because it contained $65k worth of parts. A 25k Impala contains $21,650 worth of parts. But people think, “Oh this used S6 is only $25k. I can afford that.” Well it may be $25k but it still contains $65k worth of parts. With the same level of reliability as the Impala you’re looking at 3x the cost for each repair.

      There are no free lunches.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        This is correct and through probably a combination of German engineering culture and intention takes these cars down for the most part. Apple does the same with the MacBook, create economic conditions where the cost of repair outweighs the value of the item which leads to a new product sale in at least some cases.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        That’s disingenuous and almost entirely wrong. Bottom line margins are similar but this car didn’t cost three Impalas because it contained three Impalas. It cost three Impalas because it contained vastly more development and marketing and substantially less efficiencies of scale, doubly so in the S trim specific bits produced by the thousand and not by the million.

        The ruinous repair costs are only occasionally in the parts at all, and even less occasionally in the upmarket specific parts that an Impala doesn’t also have. They’re in the shop time at 150.00 /hr to continually replace inaccessible pieces and those pieces are inaccessible because the cars were designed to be crushed in 10 years.

        A once $80,000 King Ranch doesn’t kick you in the financial nuts to own.

        My once $20,000 Passat kicked me in the nuts every chance it got.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          Sometimes it is the labor; other times it is the parts. The most expensive repair job I’ve ever had done remains the front control arms on my ’08 LS460. The full set of 8 OEM control arms with the improved 2011+ bushings that don’t turn to dust after 40k miles cost over $3500 from the cheapest discount source I could find. Labor on that job was around $700.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The LS400 I know had some sort of expensive or exotic undercarriage as it was always the only expensive repair people would ever tell me about them. Not sure on LS430, shame to see something as pedantic as control arms was over four grand.

          • 0 avatar
            burgersandbeer

            Over $4k for a suspension overhaul is pretty horrifying. How long do the updated parts typically last?

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          “A once $80,000 King Ranch doesn’t kick you in the financial nuts to own.”

          Probably true. Still don’t want one, though.

        • 0 avatar
          jmo

          A quick googling says a new front air strut for the S6 is $587 and for the Impala is $127. I think you may be overstating your parts case. The cost to produce a Lambo V10 is no doubt significantly higher than the V6 in an Impala.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yeah a lot went into designing the Lambo V10.

            It’s exactly two VW 2.5 inline 5 cylinder engines joined at the crank. What could possibly go wrong….

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        There’s no way you’re getting $65K of parts on a $75K Audi. Get real, not even if you include union labor. $50K is for the badge alone.

        Geman cars (except VW) quietly generate STAGGERING profits per car that “Detroit” pickup makers can only DREAM of, while moving only a tiny fraction of those pickups (to rival their total income/net).

        • 0 avatar

          I once asked a big magazine editor what his best guess was…he said a car costs roughly half retail to make…so it makes sense…

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It varies wildly I’m sure. Except it’s high dependent on volume while the price is sort of irrelevant. Consider Lamborghinis, Ferraris, Bentleys, etc.

            There’s not much difference physically between a Camry and a BMW or Mercedes sedan. Parts are parts. They’re just stuffing or hanging parts on common shells/unibodies.

            But “Detroit” fullsize pickups would be sold at a loss (the way they’re normally sold, optioned, variations, packages, engines,etc ), even the Platinums, without radical volume levels.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            I knew a guy who tracked consolidated revenue and cost figures for every vehicle model the company sold in the western hemisphere (by country, by quarter). Whenever they would run into a cost or profit question they couldn’t answer, they called the big magazine editor. [Pretty sure this is what all the OEM’s do.]

    • 0 avatar
      blppt

      More like ‘exclusivity’. Not many can afford these monsters when new, so the buyer feels special. But a couple of years down the road, when resale is in the gutter, pretty much all of the “unwashed masses” can buy one.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    For every car like this in a junkyard there is someone out there whose finances are a smoking ruin. Every German car out of warranty should come with a big label saying “THIS CAR WILL COST YOU FIVE FIGURES ANNUALLY TO KEEP ON THE ROAD. BUY AT YOUR OWN RISK.”

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d say that depends on the German car – this one has a freakin’ Lambo engine, so, yes, its’ maintenance costs will be right up there with a Gulfstream jet.

      I have a ’15 A3 that I bought with 27,000 miles, and I’ve put 32,000 miles on in about two and a half years. The butcher’s bill? Well, it’s no Corolla. Sunroof motor ($700), new brakes and tires (about a grand), and a few hundred for basic maintenance. I was able to fix a HVAC problem on my own for about $150 (thank you , Youtube) that probably would have cost around $500 if I’d taken it to a shop. Not chicken feed, but for a car that performs like this, it’s not completely unreasonable, either. Still, I’m looking to get out of it in the next few months before anything really expensive hits.

      God help the guy who buys it thirdhand from me, though. And I think those thirdhand buyers are the ones who REALLY get burned on these, particularly on the top-flight models.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      This so much, it should be like the warning on cigarette labels but I’m sure like cigarettes those consumers will ignore it.

      Perhaps instead of labels, examples of actual service bills?

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      5 figures? No, but easily 4 figures. I guess it depends on what you get.

      My experience with my old e91 is that it’s $2k/year to maintain and repair. Just bank on it. That includes normal things like tires, brakes, oil, control arms, etc. It also includes all of the idiotic repairs needed because BMW doesn’t prioritize reliability or durability at all.

      My wife’s X5 – when we had it – was the biggest POS I’ve ever owned. Too many systems that broke consistently.

      Don’t buy an AWD BMW. Buy one with manual everything. I have no idrive, xdrive, cameras in bumpers, but I do have TPMS that hasn’t worked right in several years. I did have an electrical short in the hatch glass.

      Also, if you’re dumb like me and buy one, you’ll start to watch YT videos on how to fix more basic things like window regulators that don’t break in other cars, but break all the time in out of warranty BMWs.

      • 0 avatar
        Nick_515

        “5 figures? No, but easily 4 figures. I guess it depends on what you get.”

        jkross, this is the first time i’ve seen you moderate your dislike for these cars’ maintainance :) I always put aside two grand a year, but have never spend it all despited driving German for a decade now (unless there are tires involved).

        my E91 has been good to me. I bought it higher mileage (90k), but newer model 2012. I found TPMS and tire issues upon inspection; seller agreed to pay for a full overhaul of the system (brain plus all sensors) as well as brand new tires once I agreed to paying asking price. I’ve been changing fluids slowly alongside oil changes (diff; coolant; brake; and now scheduled for tranny). Currently at 120k, a very happy camper.

        My worst was a rear main seal leaking while on a trip, on an Audi hatch. But even that cost a grand to fix. I’ve never encountered anything like dal reported above. That’s a ton of money.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    This is why we can’t have nice things.

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    Sad to see that beautiful S6 in the junkyard.

    I had a 2007 Audi A4 2.0 TDI Avant (FWD) which racked up an incredible 650,000 km (I was the first owner) and was very reliable. Those were the days when I was averaging about 40,000 km a year. Wear and tear parts had to be replaced, naturally, and it needed a new clutch at around 330,000 km but given my consistent high speed driving style on the Autobahn, I accepted this and was pleased that the clutch even lasted this long. Servicing costs were expensive, but I was well aware of this when I bought the car brand new, and I could afford it, so what?

    In Germany you get violated with car taxes and outrageous rip-off fuel prices, and those hurt you more on a daily basis than a scheduled year-end service at your local car dealer which I gladly paid since I knew my local Audi dealership did things right.

    I miss my A4. It wasn’t a special car but it was enjoyable to drive, handled spectacularly for a front-heavy wagon and in my ownership experience was reliable. By the time it hit the 650,000 km it had earned its retirement. Managed to get 600 Euros for it at a ‘shady’ second hand car dealership run by some Turks who export old high mileage (and about to fail the TÜV) cars to Africa. Perhaps my Audi A4 is still soldiering on there…

    • 0 avatar

      Thomas, the purpose of these kind of cars is to pump out $$ from America to Germany, including out of warranty repair costs. Germany does not have oil but makes cars. For some reason I think that repair costs are lower in Germany. And BTW American freeways are not autobahns.

      • 0 avatar
        ToolGuy

        “For some reason I think that repair costs are lower in Germany.”

        Because German repair technician does not need to search through SAE and Metric sockets. Everything is Metric*.

        *Except the square-drive end of every Metric socket, which is measured in SAE units (1/2″, 3/8″, etc.). [USA! USA!]

        https://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/general-archive/drive-size-metric-sockets-93905/

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s just different in the US. An Audi or other German with that many kms or miles would be on its 2nd or 3rd owner, if not scrapped yet or hasn’t moved from where it was parked 2 or 3 years ago for one of many reasons.

  • avatar
    TheEndlessEnigma

    I have to assume a catastrophic German mechanical failure resulted in the ride to the junk yard. Either that or the 4 figure cost for the oil change.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    You basically have to become a knowledgeable mechanic for one specific car. The one in your garage or parking space. I don’t get it, I don’t see the love. But I’ve seen it done, and by total non mechanics.

  • avatar

    Keeping my e46 on the road for 334k miles…and it was a manual.
    Change the oil. Change trans oil. Replace expansion tanks. Seals go at the 7 year mark. Discover most work requires a lot of teardown, so that $24 seal lives under 2.5 hours of shadetree labor. When the intake hose goes, you get a lot of confusing codes, but the internet says reach around and yes, the hose is rotten, but you’d never know unless you read the forums…window regulators, both sides, $199 for the part but again an hour’s work and a thin wall 8mm is the special tool. There is ALWAYS a special tool with Germans…even lowly VW brakes demand you find a foursquare to get the carriers off to change a disc in the rear. WTF, a bolt is too complicated ? Torx cost too much ? Allens don’t impress your fellow rear brake engineers at other companies ?

    I became a youtube addict…and found you can buy parts on line from OE makers but not with the doubled price BMW box they come in.

    Normals are doomed…..That car would have been out of the drive at 120k if I had to pay for everything retail garage.

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      E46 is a great example of something that most people can keep going with the help of YouTube, but going to the shop for everything would be ruinous.

      At this point I think I can get the door cards off in about 10 minutes while blindfolded.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        I owned a VW Passat (aka Audi A4) and replacing window regulators was so common I bookmarked the site that showed how to get the door panels off. All four broke during my ownership… and I can’t even remember using the rear windows more then 4 or 5 times. It’s like they were engineered to fail every 2 years regardless of up/down cycles.

        And yes my brother was burned by the VW tool required for the rear brakes on his Golf R. I have never needed any special tools to do brake work before we encountered this car. With the Japanese cars I’ve owned you only need a few metric sockets. Everything is either a 10, 13, 20 or 23mm. And if you see a screw its a Philips head, there were no torx, no allens.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      And that is why they end up in the yard. I can’t help but ask why they have to be made this way? I understand the cost for premium materials, a high level of assembly, and refinement. But there is no reason those things have to come at the expense of reliability and serviceability. All makes have their weak spot, yes. IIRC, replacing a starter on a LS4XX requires removing the intake to get to it. But Toyota fit a quality starter on the car meaning it just might last the life of the car for most owners. The German would likely need two replaced. I just can’t accept that so many parts that fail are so difficult to get to. They should either be so robust that failure is unlikely (Like Toyota would do) or they should be accessible. As a guy who keeps things running a long time, I would never buy something that costs as much money DIY that a properly designed car would cost with a dealer doing the work. The German driving experience is wonderful and I put a high value on dynamics but not with the trade-off of constant cash/time drain. Not to mention dependability. Even my 29 year old car is trustworthy. What’s the point of having a car that you can’t count on?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Zee Germans: You should have had eight of our cars in 29 years!

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          I’ve been lucky enough to have seat time in two 330i convertibles, plus two 911s – one a 2009, the other a 2018. All courtesy of three friends. The driving experience was amazing – and I was sooo tempted to buy a few year old 911 instead of a new C7. The 911 is just a better made car, as it should be since the difference in the base price of a C7 and a 911 will almost buy a 2 series BMW. But as a keeper of cars for the time frame I do, the worry of continual 4 figure repairs scared me away. So far, I’m ok with the choice I made.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            There’s no real losing proposition between those choices, but I tend to agree with you though I am ignorant of Porsche’s exact servicing requirements.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Engine-out to change something minor likely doomed this.

  • avatar
    RedDuxMo

    More concerned about the Subaru next to it with “Bio Blood” written on the back window. They have those bloody wrecks in junkyards?! EEEEEEEEEEEEK!!!!!

    • 0 avatar
      theflyersfan

      It looks like it was in one of those “front overlap” crashes that just destroys some cars, and given the condition of that Subaru, I’m not sure anyone limped away from that one…

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    It’s doubtful that you’ll see many Audi R8s with the V10 in wrecking yards, unless it’s been crashed and burned like this one where the maintenance and repairs made them just too expensive to keep on the road. Most of them are owned by enthusiasts and folks who can pay for maintenance. Maybe the midship drivetrain on the R8 makes them just easier to maintain. Lowering the rear subframe to do the major repairs like the timing chains seems easier than the mandatory nose removal on the S4 and S6.

  • avatar
    3SpeedAutomatic

    A car like this was a tax write off for a surgeon or capital venture king pin.
    As soon as it was past warranty or lease terms, away it went.

    That’s why I’m hanging on to my 10 yr old Ford Escape. Easy to fix, easy to find parts, easy to maintain.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    I have a high threshold for automotive pain and I’m good at mental gymnastics to justify ownership costs, but Audi V10s are too frightening even for me.

    I’ve read you have to lift the engine to change the oxygen sensors. I’m still not sure if the forums are trolling me with that, but the possibility that it’s true was enough to scare me away.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    Fun fact: My 2011 Audi has been practically perfect since I purchased it new. Literally zero money spent on it if you don’t count maintenance items like brakes and tires. My 2009 4Runner, which is supposedly bulletproof, seizes the pistons in it’s front calipers every two years like clockwork, is rotting out it’s frame (although the body is still perfect), has had the wiper motor fail, then the wiper switch, and the brake light switch. All with less than 100k on the odometer. Go figure.

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