By on February 14, 2021

Bolt EUV

In launching the Bolt EUV and EV, leave it up to Chevrolet and Disney’s Imagineers to spin a pretty good tale. Nick Cho, the creator of TikTok, better known as YourKoreanDad, was the host of their launch video.

Bolt EUV

Cho tells us Chevrolet is debuting Super Cruise for what it claims is the first true hands-free driver assistance feature for compatible roads, which I am told is different than what is available now on Cadillacs. Are compatible roads going to be like those shown at Disney World, with all the Bolt EUVs heading in the same direction, evenly spaced, without any cross-traffic? The only ride more hands-free than Super Cruise is Disneyland’s Autopia.

Bolt EUVThe energy feature on the myChevrolet app lets you know if the next charging station is going to be beyond the estimated 250-mile range Chevrolet was able to achieve. As Dalya Aboona, Chevrolet’s EV charging specialist said, “The app will take into consideration the weather and driving terrain, to help give you an accurate estimation of your range, and the time you will arrive at your destination.”

Range anxiety will vanish, Chevrolet contends, as more fast chargers are installed. Our readers questioned why there are different chargers, rather than one standard, just as there’s only one gas nozzle size regardless of who built the pump?  Are we less concerned about running out of gas than we are getting to a charging station we can use? Could it be because AAA doesn’t list electricity as a roadside assist that they can provide?

Bolt EUV

The Star Wars analogy has an X-Wing fighter pulling alongside, and the Bolt driver hitting the Sport mode button, instantly propelling them into hyperspace. What the Bolt EUV does have is a permanent magnetic drive, 200-horsepower motor with 266 lb-ft of torque under the hood. One-pedal driving doesn’t require you to apply the brakes, even though there’s a disclaimer that said to use the brake pedal if you need to stop urgently. This requires you to make a split-second decision to brake or not if your Bolt hasn’t already. Regen on Demand stores energy when you come to stop, although to what extent wasn’t made clear.

Available this summer, the 2022 Bolt EUV starts at $33,995, and the EV is priced at $31,995. Readers noted that the EV is $5,500 less expensive than the current Bolt. Chevrolet will also pay for the installation of level two charging with the purchase of either vehicle, something I didn’t elaborate upon previously because it seemed more confusing than anything.

For those who are curious what Chevrolet is offering, here’s their quote in its entirety: “Offer available to eligible customers who purchase a 2022 Bolt EV or EUV between 2/14/21 and 6/31/21. Home charging installation promotion includes purchase and installation of a 240V outlet (NEMA 14–50 outlet and new 40-amp breaker in existing panel) from a GM selected vendor. Installation must be located at Customer’s primary residence as reported on the Customer’s vehicle purchase order. Additional costs to the Customer may apply. Customers who do not meet parameters for a standard installation may be eligible for alternative charging offers. Additional information and limitations, including but not limited to, how to take advantage of this promotion, will be available closer to the start of production of 2022 Bolt EV and EUV.” A specific dollar amount being offered would be my preference, so I could compare it with what an electrician would charge for a home installation, but that’s not how the offer was worded.

Last but not least, the comfort level of the 2022 Bolt is said to be better than that of its predecessor. Comfort being subjective and entirely dependent on your physical attributes versus design parameters the automaker is working with, I didn’t think it was pertinent to discuss it at this time. Outside of  GM, no one has tested either Bolt and could provide that information. We’ll see how well it performs, drives, and fits once we get closer to its release date.

[Images: Chevrolet]

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84 Comments on “Chevrolet Bolt EUV and EV – It’s a Small World After All [Update]...”


  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    Are the seats still going to be sized for a Korean grandmother?

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      That’s probably the most important question. When I drove the OG Bolt the EV part was well done but the seats were punishing.

      • 0 avatar
        deanst

        The seats have been improved/replaced. Why the author of this piece decided to emphasis snark at the expense of reporting information is beyond me.

        • 0 avatar
          conundrum

          His understanding of electricity is also tenuous; “sucking up volts”, now what the heck does that mean? Nothing, as he also just learned about range anxiety, he says. Really? After 15 years of Tesla?

          The real description of these two newish EVs can be found at C/D, and no, they don’t have Ultium batteries.

        • 0 avatar
          N8iveVA

          Plus no mention of the size difference of the EUV versus the EV. Or that the Super Cruise is the first generation, not what’s available on 2021 Caddys.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          If we regularly drove our 2019 long distances, better seats could be worth trading it for a 2022. But we don’t, and we won’t. The 2019 is a brilliant city car and in our usage, where trips rarely exceed half an hour, it will do fine for years to come.

    • 0 avatar
      Joseph Kissel

      “Range anxiety, a term I just learned … ” Is this the author’s way of telling us they have very little experience and authority on this subject? The term has been in general use for a good decade. While I can appreciate a random impression on a subject, it’s not really why I visit TTAC …

  • avatar
    ajla

    It’s not pretty but at least it looks less like a Pokemon now.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    Role reversal: Jason provides the snarky comments in advance, and leaves it to the commenters to research the vehicle.

    First stop (EV not EUV):
    https://www.caranddriver.com/news/a35494747/2022-chevrolet-bolt-ev-revealed/

    Highlights:
    • Big price drop (nice job GM)
    • They improved the seats based on customer feedback (well done)
    • Faster Level 2 charging

    Not bad for a non-Ultium vehicle.

    [Looks like new GM is adapting to the future better than old TTAC. Hmmmm.]

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      And a free charger install too!

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        @ NormSV650 Sir, I would think that “free” from GM will be like “truth”; it will wear many faces. There are some on here who will go ” I give ole Clancy a case of beer and 30 feet of wire and he can handle the installation just fine.” The rest of us living in the burbs will have to make an appointment with one those home repair places that advertises “if you can’t, we can!” Never mind applying for permits and waiting for the county inspector(s). I’d need to see the actual contract to see what GM will actually pay for.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenn

        “And a free charger install too!”

        Do you ever stop jumping up and down for GM?

      • 0 avatar
        RangerM

        “And a free charger install too!”

        No. It’s installation of the 240V plug only (which is something, but not a lot).

        Your local power company would probably do it for nearly free (or heavily subsidized), as well.

        You buy the charger.

        • 0 avatar
          probert

          Hello very smart poster: The Bolt comes with a 240 volt charger – usually a $300 – 600 item. Buy the car, buy the charger.

          • 0 avatar
            RangerM

            The smart ones always read the fine print,

            “Offer available to eligible customers who purchase a 2022 Bolt EV or EUV between 2/14/21 and 6/31/21. Home charging installation promotion includes purchase and installation of a 240V outlet (NEMA 14–50 outlet and new 40-amp breaker in existing panel) from a GM selected vendor. Installation must be located at Customer’s primary residence as reported on the Customer’s vehicle purchase order. Additional costs to the Customer may apply. Customers who do not meet parameters for a standard installation may be eligible for alternative charging offers. Additional information and limitations, including but not limited to, how to take advantage of this promotion, will be available closer to the start of production of 2022 Bolt EV and EUV.”

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Yeah, God knows I’m not the giant GM fan, but I didn’t get the snark…this seems like nothing but a solid vehicle in the segment.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      This is my favorite comment in recent memory. Nice work.

  • avatar

    no one wants a Bolt. no one.

  • avatar

    “Nick Cho, the creator of TikTok”

    Wasn’t Al Gore who invented TikTok?

  • avatar

    “use the brake pedal when you need to stop urgently”

    Ha, I use one pedal driving when driving my ICE cars. It means I drive smoothly and anticipate how traffic moves. E.g. I bought my previous car new and drove it up to 175K miles mostly on freeway and never replaced brake pads or rotors. I had zero issues with car if you wonder if engine braking is not good for your health.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “Range anxiety, a term I just learned”

    In automotive circles, it’s a decade-old term.

    “One-pedal driving that doesn’t require you to apply the brakes means the car is thinking for you”

    Um, no, that’s called regenerative braking. No thinking, just electromagnetic physics.

    Jason – Snarky writing aside, you haven’t done any homework on EVs, and obviously don’t know what you’re talking about. You don’t even have to like EVs to know these basic things.

    This is one of the worst car writeups I’ve ever read on TTAC. Help us out here, Tim.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Only one man can save you from this nonsense.

      Bring Back Bertel Schmitt

      • 0 avatar
        el scotto

        @ Art Vandelay, Sir may I suggest a “Go Fund Me” page for the Baruth brothers to take control of TTAC? It’d be more fun than chipping five bucks for a Friday night kegger.

        For anyone writing an article on an EV. Please, oh please do some research first. Yes EVs do attract speed demons who love the instant torgue EV provides. A great many of today’s EV owners are gearheads using computer programs/some serious spreadsheet work/even slide rules. These guys could’ve figured out the ultimate carb/cam/headers & exhaust back i the day. Instead they hit the start button and go about their low-maintenance way.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          The Bolt is not a good fit for “speed demons”. Its acceleration performance is about equal to that of a Soul Turbo and its other dynamics are about equal to a Sonic LTZ. It isn’t a bad car, and I appreciate the somewhat conventional interior and ergonomics compared to other BEVs, but one can certainly find a higher-performing vehicle for the $32K MSRP.

          • 0 avatar
            HotPotato

            Fair point and accurate comparisons… although you can go buy the current 2020-21 model Bolt brand new today for about 10 grand less than that. This is GM, where incentives change constantly and MSRP is *very* much just a suggestion.

            As an owner, I can say the acceleration is pretty amusing at any speed — a nice change from other affordable EVs where power drops off a cliff on the highway.

            If you’ve ever driven a second-gen Volt, you know GM can make an EV that has precise steering and tracks like an arrow on the highway…and this is not that EV. Apparently it holds its own well in autocross duty though.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        …Bring Back Bertel Schmitt…

        I just had to hear about how to put down horses with a Bolt. I’m afraid of what Bertel would want to do with one…

    • 0 avatar
      wolfwagen

      My thoughts exactly.

      How old is Jason? 10? and he just learned the term Range anxiety? WTH!

      I just read his bio. If he really grew up in the business, he really should know more. I don’t know if he is just trying to be clever, funny or snarky.

      Oh for the days of Jack Baruth!

    • 0 avatar
      C5 is Alive

      “Help us out here, Tim.”

      I’m not really sure how that would help matters. Healey’s a pretty awful writer, too.

  • avatar
    Michael S6

    Why does GM keep bringing out tiny subcompact EV while the meat of the market is where the Ford Mach-E is ?
    And for their next act, bring out a monster truck Hummer. They sure know how to cover the market lol.

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      The bolt actually has more headroom and leg room – but is narrower and has less storage space with the seats up. For $10,000 less and more range, that makes sense for a lot of people, Admittedly, Ford will sell a lot more Mach-Es if they can make it reliable and not do something disastrous on the roll out.

    • 0 avatar
      Steve Biro

      We get a tiny, subcompact EV because the money has gone into Supercruise. – something I would never use.

      And note that you need the myChevrolet app to locate charging stations. That implies a vehicle that is constantly connected to the Internet. Which means GM is gathering information about where you go and how you do it – and selling it to third parties.

      All kidding aside, this is a big part of the problem I have with EVs. It’s not just a switch to a new propulsion platform. It’s submitting to a world in which one is A) removed by technology from the direct driving experience and B) constantly monitored.

      With my phone, I can turn off location services or switch it off entirely if I want. And even if I never use Supercruise and find a way around the nannies, I still have to pay for them.

      • 0 avatar
        Old_WRX

        Steve Biro,

        “Which means GM is gathering information about where you go and how you do it – and selling it to third parties.”

        Is it just me or do other people on here think all this corporate snooping is (oh, alright, I’ll say it…) immoral?

        • 0 avatar
          Steve Biro

          I don’t think many people here like the idea at all. But most people don’t think there’s much they can do about it. As for me, yes I think it’s immoral. But as long as it’s not illegal, they’re going to do it. Which is why we need federal privacy legislation.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      When the Bolt EV is all you have at the moment, not a lot GM can do but to try and improve on it and stoke some sales.

      Kudos to them for not just letting it wither on the vine. Its not bad for what it is, reasonable range, reasonable price.

      It seems to me that leasing new EV’s for the foreseeable future is the best plan for early adopters. The tech is marching pretty quickly I would hate to plunk serious money down just to have my car be obsolete in a few years time. Its almost like the smartphone industry in its early years. Big advancements year over year which slowed to a trickle and people stopped caring, started hanging on to their devices longer and longer because they already do everthing that 99% of the population was asking for.

      EV’s will get to there eventually, right now, I just feel like its too much trouble when I already have a great transportation solution.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Hey moderate this you shitheads!

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Now take that ban hammer and shove it up your a$$ you $#!+heads!

  • avatar
    tylanner

    EV anxiety?

    That’s the building anxiety one feels when there is no practical reason why you shouldn’t get an EV…yet you refuse.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      When it’s 10 below I want to run the heater and defroster. I’m sticking with gas.

    • 0 avatar
      wolfwagen

      HAHA NO.

      It’s called a choice. I literally have a 10-minute commute to and from work every day. I could ride my bike if the weather is nice. I don’t. I don’t want an EV. I literally hop in my car and go, when I need gas it takes just minutes to refill. If I decide to drive a gas-guzzling monster truck or an EV, it’s my choice. If I decide to take either on an extended trip it’s my MFing,GD Choice.

      Don’t give me the crap about the environment either. I’m old enough to remember when they said the earth was going to cool, then when that didn’t work, it was going to warm and the ice caps were going to melt and manhattan would be underwater by 2010. When that didn’t come about they called it climate change. Ask yourself a question. If the asshole environmental celebrities really cared about the environment, would they be jetting around the world in multiple private jets to have conversations or get awards? NO. would they own more than one house? NO. Own more than one car? NO, and if they did it would only be an EV or a hybrid. How about pulling up to the awards show in a giant limo? IF they cared, NO. Have custom-tailored, designer clothes? NO. Travel with an entourage? NO.

  • avatar
    mcs

    ” A friend who lives in Michigan noted about EVs in general, “250-mile range, 300-mile round trip to my cabin, wonder how far I’d be walking in freezing weather?””

    What a stupid innacurate uninformed example. Maybe you should have done a bit of research before coming up with this one. I took a look at the quickcharger map for Michigan on Plugshare and was surprised at how many are located in Michigan now. For a 300 mile round trip from let’s say, Dearborn. There are chargers at 100 to 120-mile mark like Bay City, KawKawlin. There are also quick chargers at Clare, Mt. Pleasant, Bad Axe. Further up on 75 there are a couple at Gaylord, Indian River, Petoskey, Kalkaskam Roger’s City. A couple in Cadillac. Houghton Lake Marathon is getting one soon. I’m not even counting the level 2 chargers. Michigan is really getting their act together in terms of quick chargers. Over a weekend, an outdoor 120v outlet would reduce the time needed to quick charge. You could also get off-grid solar and some batteries to charge during the week when you are away to give the car a level 2 charge on the weekend for the return trip.

    This site isn’t about accuracy. Maybe “The Fiction About Cars” would be a better title for the site.

    “Range anxiety, a term I just learned”

    Sounds like a line from someone totally divorced from the automotive world and doing their best to keep it that way.

    • 0 avatar
      Kendahl

      The PlugShare website seems to include Tesla Supercharger locations. I wonder about compatibility — Tesla chargers with non-Tesla vehicles and non-Tesla chargers with Tesla vehicles.

      We live a few miles west of Show Low, Arizona. A BEV would handle all of our local transportation needs with nowhere to charge but at home. Although there are no nearby Superchargers, PlugShare lists two in Show Low and a third in Pinetop-Lakeside, a few miles south. I’m curious enough to check them out.

      One of my concerns about BEVs is having to plan a long trip around the locations of recharging stations. In 2019, we made several trips between Show Low and Omaha, Nebraska. The shortest route includes a leg between Trinidad, Colorado and Colby in western Kansas. It’s nearly 300 miles with no Superchargers. PlugShare shows several non-Tesla locations which makes a big difference. No idea how fast they are.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        This will make things easier:

        https://techcrunch.com/2021/02/11/planning-500000-charging-points-for-evs-by-2025-shell-becomes-the-latest-company-swept-up-in-ev-charging-boom/

        I suspect their accountants figured out the chargers are more profitable than gas pumps.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        On Plugshare you can filter out any type of station that doesn’t apply to your car.

        Non-Teslas can’t use Tesla Superchargers, although they can use Tesla destination chargers with an adapter.

        Teslas can’t use most non-Tesla fast chargers, although they can use a particular type (Chademo) with an adapter.

        That’s just for fast charging. Any electric car can use any level 1 or level 2 (slow and middle speed) charger, by and large.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Exactly. A quick five-minute top-up and there’s enough range to make the round trip. Maybe the guy thinks the only place to charge the batteries is at home.
      In all the time it takes to use the restroom the car is rarin’ to go.
      Maybe that’s the best logic the anti-progressive bunch have, which is no logic at all.

  • avatar

    TTAC used to be one of my favorite websites. Poorly written articles like this one have me checking out other websites much more often. I actually found information about both the Bolt EV and EUV on Car and Driver. This attempt at an article was shameful.

    • 0 avatar
      C5 is Alive

      It’s fairly obvious the current ownership prioritizes bargain content contributors and the insertion of decidedly Left-leaning rhetoric wherever possible. Actual, informative automotive reporting seems to be… I dunno, maybe fifth on their list?

      My bet is that TTAC’s dead inside a year; possibly a lot sooner. We’ll know the end is irrevocably nigh when they hire Norm.

  • avatar
    mor2bz

    Will this represent competition for Tesla? Musk never, but for a few cars,delivered on his $35K car to save the world. Since I will never own either, I can give my 2c. I applaud Chevy for using smaller motors. Nobody needs to go 0-60 in 3 sec. if they are in a hurry to save the earth. The “big three” were to be better able to produce higher quality assembly and paint. Maybe this will not be true as Tesla adopts casting machines for panels. I wonder how much Tesla tech is used in the Chevys, as Musk made so much info open-source. I think it is true that those first to the punchbowl in manufacturing have a great,if not unbeatable, advantage – if they do it well and are not overpriced. The great threat for Tesla was always to the competition from others who had more manufacturing experience. VW was to be this competitor.

    I have always been on the fence regarding Tesla. Chevy has not changed that.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      These new GM EVs are homely, which comes as a surprise to me. I don’t think the 1-gen Bolt EV is bad-looking, but they’ve doubled down on the goofy with the EUV.

      Tesla builds quick, attractive EVs, and that really helps to sell them. Like you, I don’t need a 3-second EV; I drive a 10-second EV.

      These GM entries present no threat to Tesla. But having more mfg experience won’t help a competitor catch Tesla – passion will. Tesla paid for its EV lead with years of sustained losses… what other mfr is willing to sign up for that? Maybe VW, but that’s about it.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        If the bill that gives back the EV tax credit back to GM and Tesla, the Bolts are going to be relatively cheap. With my state’s subsidy applied, I might be able to pick one up for $22k. At that price, you can afford to add some of the aftermarket upgrades available like coil-overs and a big brake kit.

        https://jalopnik.com/new-bill-could-revive-ev-tax-credit-for-tesla-and-gm-i-1846261172

        https://ev-mods.com/collections/chevy-bolt/products/chevy-bolt-ev-coilover-kit-bc-racing-q-22-br

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          Coilovers, maybe. Can’t imagine you’d ever need a big brake kit though; you’ve got like 75kW of braking any time you lift off the throttle in L.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            ” Can’t imagine you’d ever need a big brake kit though;”

            Good point. From my experience, the regen can be like engine braking in steroids, especially if you vary it. It is 3,500 lbs, but I’d research it before doing the brakes.

            After following one thread on the BC coil-overs on chevybolt.com, I’d want to do more research there as well. One person that bought them ended up getting rid of them because of the stiffness of the ride. He drives similar roads to me, so I’d be careful. I’d spend more time in the forum if I were to get one. I’d definitely do some sort of suspension upgrade. I’ve done that on everything I’ve owned including BMWs. I live in the midst of lots of fun, twisty roads and suspension upgrades make even runs to the store a blast.

  • avatar
    probert

    ” A friend who lives in Michigan noted about EVs in general, “250-mile range, 300-mile round trip to my cabin, wonder how far I’d be walking in freezing weather?” You should tell your friend that after the 250 miles is used up, he can refresh that and drive another 250 miles!!! Might want to do periodic wellness checks too.

    • 0 avatar
      Old_WRX

      “should tell your friend that after the 250 miles is used up, he can refresh that and drive another 250 miles!!!”

      Correct me if I’m wrong, but I seem to recall than even ICE vehicles require periodic fuel transfusions.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    TTAC Death Watch?

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “with a flat floor, there’s more legroom than in vehicles with a driveline tunnel.”

    Finally, a second real advantage (after instant torque).

  • avatar
    gasser

    Price. This EUV is $10 K less than a Mach E. Along with GMs frequent discounts and some discount leases, I think they will have a real price advantage. That said, I wouldn’t buy one with all the bells and whistles, because that approaches a Tesla 3/Y in price. The Tesla is larger and has a lot of “upscale” appeal. I think that resale in this rapidly evolving segment, is the big question mark. I would lease one, but probably not buy.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Nothing will change in the short term. Tesla will still own the niche segment and offer comparative resale to ICE, everything else will still sell poorly and punish owners vs leasers in terms of resale.

  • avatar
    Garrett

    Here’s the problem: it’s not a Tesla.

    I looked at EVs just to do full due diligence before buying my most recent vehicle. If I didn’t get a Tesla, the charging options away from home sucked.

    I don’t even really like Teslas – too much dependence on screens.

    Until there is an electric car that:

    1) looks good (nobody is there yet really)
    2) has an interior that looks good and is functional (again, not there)
    3) has a great charging network

    It’s a hard pass.

    Plus, I watched a video where a guy did a 2,000 mile trip in summer and winter. For 30 hours of driving, he needed 8 hours of charging. Basically, ever 4 hours you have to stop for an hour worth of charging on average. My last road trip would have been impossible to do with those parameters, as I couldn’t even find a fast food place reliably every 4 hours.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      For the life of me, I can’t figure out why other mfrs don’t cozy up to the Supercharger network.

      A ridiculous flaw with EV ownership is the lack of a common charging protocol. For a long time, I’ve believed that the Tesla protocol should become the standard in the US, but it looks like that won’t happen as long as CCS is promoted by VW’s Electrify America.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        If the government was serious about an EV world, they’d standardize the charging. That’s why I know they’re full of crap. Yet they step in and ban a major battery maker. If LG doesn’t care enough to sue SK, screw them.

        • 0 avatar
          Old_WRX

          ^^Yes^^

        • 0 avatar
          RHD

          How about a maximum of three charging connector styles? You can then choose the one you need, just like you choose hoses for octane levels. All sites must charge all vehicles. Done.

          And the car must be removed as soon as it’s fully charged. And if you park your lifted diesel 4X4 there, it’s subject to towing and/or unlimited vandalism.

          • 0 avatar
            wolfwagen

            Where do you live that they have different hoses for different octane levels? I haven’t seen that in forever. There are usually only 2: one for gas (with buttons to push for your grade of fuel and one for diesel(Larger hose due to larger tanks).

            So 1 or 2 different charging styles should be enough.
            BTW if you vandalize someone lifted diesel 4×4 you will be lucky to be drinking out of a straw when the owner gets ahold of you

        • 0 avatar
          wolfwagen

          AGREED +1000

  • avatar
    aja8888

    I would not buy any EV at the moment. Resale sucks. Right now there are a shitload of used Teslas being advertised on Carvana in my area and they have been listed for a good bit of time. Not many are being sold. I’ve even seen Leafs a few years old with 30K miles on them for $6K.

  • avatar

    This “article” was the death knell of TTAC for me. I will check back periodically to see if the corpse has been brought back to life. But I think it’s too late to resuscitate.

    • 0 avatar
      MGS1995

      The snark is unfortunate. On topic, EVs won’t be all things to all people but they do have their place. I have a Camry that I use for my 60 mile round trip commute. I would happily replace it with an EV if there is something similar to my Camry at a similar price point. The Bolt isn’t quite it. I have another vehicle that I use for traveling so range is not a problem.

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