Tokyo Auto Salon 2021 Cancelled

Jason R. Sakurai
by Jason R. Sakurai
tokyo auto salon 2021 cancelled

The Tokyo Auto Salon, one of the world’s top shows for modified vehicles, has been canceled. Scheduled to take place January 15-17, 2021, the event was canceled due to concerns over the outbreak of COVID-19.

Held each year at the Makuhari Messe in Chiba City, Japan, the Tokyo Auto Salon is a mecca for tuner cars, primarily Japanese cars, vans, and SUVs, with performance and custom aftermarket parts and accessories.

The Tokyo Auto Salon Association, the organizer for the event, said, “As it is now vital to limit social contact and avoid gathering, we have made the difficult decision. While we know this is disappointing, we hope you can understand the steps we are taking to help keep our staff and participants safe.”

That being said, the Association will hold a Virtual Auto Salon, which will open on January 15th at 9 a.m. Tokyo time as scheduled, with details available shortly on their official website, www.tokyoautosalon.jp.

Enthusiasts from around the world flocked to the Auto Salon for the past 38 years. Unlike the SEMA Show, a trade-only show held each year in Las Vegas in November, the Auto Salon is open to the public, and many of the manufacturers and custom shops sell products that are on display.

The Tokyo Auto Salon features a variety of exhibitors showcasing the latest technology, performance products, and custom parts and accessories. Automotive-related video games, motorsports merchandise, and other products are on display and available for purchase at the Salon. It remains to be seen if there will be sales conducted through or in conjunction with the Virtual Auto Salon, a question that went unanswered at the time this story was written.

Supported by the Nippon Auto Parts Aftermarket Committee (NAPAC), the Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association, inc. (JAMA), and the Japan Automobile Federation (JAF), the Tokyo Auto Salon will likely weather the storm and make its return once it is safe to travel and the coronavirus has been abated.

[Images: Tokyo Auto Salon Association]

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  • Arthur Dailey Ford was on a roll with these large cars. The 'aircraft' inspired instrument 'pod' for the driver rather than the 'flat' instrument panel. Note that this vehicle does not have the clock. The hands and numbers are missing. Having the radio controls on the left side of the driver could however be infuriating. Although I admire pop-up/hideaway headlights, Ford's vacuum powered system was indeed an issue. If I left my '78 T-Bird parked for more than about 12 hours, there was a good chance that when I returned the headlight covers had retracted. The first few times this happened it gave me a 'start' as I feared that I may have left the lights on and drained the battery.
  • Jeff S Still a nice car and I remember these very well especially in this shade of green. The headlights were vacuum controlled. I always liked the 67 thru 72 LTDs after that I found them bloated. Had a friend in college with a 2 door 71 LTD which I drove a couple of times it was a nice car.
  • John H Last week after 83 days, dealership said mine needs new engine now. They found metal in oil. Potential 8 to 9 month wait.
  • Dukeisduke An aunt and uncle of mine traded their '70 T-Bird (Beakbird) for a brand-new dark metallic green '75 LTD two-door, fully loaded. My uncle hated seat belts, so the first time I saw the car (it was so new that the '75 models had just landed at the dealerships) he proudly showed me how he'd pulled the front seat belts all the way out of their retractors, and cut the webbing with a razor blade(!).Just a year later, they traded it in for a new '76 Cadillac Coupe de Ville (they had owned a couple of Imperials in the '60s), and I imagine the Cadillac dealer took a chunk out to the trade-in, to get the front seat belts replaced.
  • CaddyDaddy Lease fodder that in 6 years will be on the 3rd owner in a poverty bound aspirational individual's backyard in a sub par neighborhood sinking into the dirt. The lending bank will not even want to repossess and take possession of this boat anchor of a toxic waste dump. This proves that EVs are not even close to being ready for prime time (let's not even talk about electrical infrastructure). EVs only exist in wildly expensive virtue signaling status-mobiles. FAIL! I know this is a Hybrid, but it's a Merc., so it will quickly die after the warranty. Show me a practical EV for the masses and I'll listen. At this time, Hybrids are about the way to go for most needing basic transportation.
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