By on December 15, 2020

“Is the 2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E a proper Mustang?”

It’s a fair question, and one that I’m not sure I can answer. For many of you, a Mustang is a two-door, rear-drive car powered by a V8. If that’s the case, then this is NOT a Mustang. But if you are looking for a car that’s probably more fun than it needs to be, with decent storage and practicality, then the Mustang Mach-E might be something you want to look at. If you extend the Mustang definition to mean “a fun car,” then the Mach-E delivers.

Most of my day was spent in a Premium all-wheel-drive trim of the Mach-E, with the long-range battery. That car makes 346 hp and 428 lb-ft of torque. It’s EPA-estimated range is 280 miles in this guise, and Ford claims a 0-to-60 mph of less than 5 seconds.

It doesn’t feel as quick as a Model Y Long Range off the line. Tesla seems to apply maximum torque immediately from its dual motors, while Ford appears to be taming the torque delivery a tiny bit. That doesn’t mean the Mach-E is slow by any means, but the first 60 feet will probably go to the Tesla in a drag race. Once you’re moving the Mach-E rapidly builds up speed, and it’s easy to pass “go to jail” speeds without noticing.

Even though the Mach-E I was in was all-wheel drive, the traction control system would allow a tiny bit of play when going around corners. A Tesla will immediately shut down the fun, at least in non-Performance variants, whereas the Mustang lets you have a bit of play. It gives the car a bit of character that you don’t feel in the Model Y.

Depending on drive mode, steering weight varies. It doesn’t have feel like you’d expect in an old-school sports car, but the steering is precise and the car will go where you point it. In Unbridled, which is what Ford calls the sportiest setting, the Mach-E even makes noise inside the cabin that builds as the speed does. It’s not fake engine noise, but it’s more than just a whoosh of the electric motors. I didn’t mind it, but some might not like it.

The driver’s aids are top-notch on the Mach-E, including standard lane centering and adaptive cruise control. This system is actually similar to Tesla’s standard Autopilot offering, and works well at keeping you in the lane on long trips. In fact, because the Mustang uses sensors in addition to cameras, there are fewer false braking events in the Mach-E. Thank goodness.

Next year, purchasable by an over-the-air software update, owners will be able to enable a hands-off driving mode similar to Cadillac’s Super Cruise. There is active driver monitoring to make sure you are paying attention. I wasn’t able to sample this tech yet, but it’ll appeal to some who do a lot of time highway commuting.

Recharging the Mach-E is a relative breeze. It comes with a charging cable that you can use to trickle charge at level 1 speeds, or it can plug into a NEMA 14-50 plug to charge at level 2 speeds. Ford claims that this charges the car at around 20 miles per hour. A public level 2 charging station, or Ford’s home charger it’ll sell you, can charge up to 30 miles per hour. Of course, your charging rate will vary based on amps of the charger, voltage available, and other conditions.

For high-speed charging, the Mach-E uses a CCS connector and can support a peak 150 kW charging rate. That means you can add 61 miles of range in approximately 10 minutes. Your mileage, will of course, vary.

Ford added a bunch of charging innovations to the Mach-E, including support for Electrify America’s Plug&Charge technology, single payment for multiple networks, and advanced EV route planning. While the demos all look impressive, it’ll take a longer-term loan to try them out to see how well they work.

Visually, the Mustang Mach-E is a looker. It has aggressive haunches and a long nose. The grille up front is painted to match the body work, and there’s a big Mustang horse right in the middle. The angular LED headlights point inwards, giving the Mach-E an angry face.

Around back, triple bar LED taillights mimic those on other Mustangs, and there’s a big Mustang horse again in the middle of the lift gate. The powered rear hatch has a spoiler atop it.

Inside, the interior is minimalist but still usable. While many of the controls for the vehicle live in the 15-inch center touch screen, which also has a physical rotary knob bonded to it, there is a 10.1-inch instrument cluster that shows you important details, like speed, right in your line of sight. How quaint.

There is a wireless charging pad up front, and USB-C ports to keep devices charged. The new Sync 4a technology supports wireless Apple Car Play and Android Auto, has built-in trip planning functionality to take into consideration battery state of charge, and a B & O audio system.

Rear-seat passengers will have enough room for most trips, but larger adults might not want to go across the country in it. Rear seat headroom is actually pretty solid, and the panoramic roof adds a ton of light to the cabin.

Pricing for the vehicle I was in was $56,200 with destination. That includes the extended-range battery and Rapid Red paint. Rear-wheel drive, standard-range models start at $43,995 with destination. All models are eligible for a $7,500 federal tax incentive, plus there are local incentives in a lot of places. Consult your tax advisor, though.

There’s a lot more to making a successful EV than just building a good product. But I do like the product they built. It’s comfortable, it’s quick, and it has the tech and features to make it easy to charge and easy to live with. So, they got the first step right. Plus, this car gives us a glimpse into how serious Ford is taking future electrification, and many of the features you see in the Mach-E will make its way to other EVs, like the upcoming F-150 EV.

I think it’s fair to call it a Mustang. It’s a fun car to drive. It’s not a high-performance GT version, but that is coming. But with the standard models being more fun to drive than the equivalent Tesla Model Y, the GT might be quite the hoot. If this is the future of Mustang, and the future of Ford performance, it’s not a bad future at all.

[Images: © 2020 Chad Kirchner/TTAC]

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96 Comments on “2021 Ford Mustang Mach-E First Drive: Tesla Model Y Challenger...”


  • avatar
    statikboy

    “All models are eligible for a $7,500 federal tax incentive, plus there are local incentives in a lot of places.”

    I take it this is in the US. What are the incentives in Canada?

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    Is the Porche Cayenne a real Porche? they all asked that in 2002. Nobody questions it today.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      You can’t beat city hall.

    • 0 avatar
      John R

      That isn’t the same question. We aren’t asking whether the Mach-E is a Ford or not. The question is whether or not it is justified to be called a Ford MUSTANG.

      Phrased appropriately the Porsche analog would be, if the Cayenne was instead called a 911 for example, “Is the Porsche 911 – [Sport Activity, AllRoad, etcetera, take your pick] a true 911?”

      Is the answer “no”? Then it is no here, too.

      • 0 avatar
        AKM

        When the cayenne came out, Porsche only made 911s and Boxsters. So the Op question is actually justified.
        By the way, the answer is “no, the cayenne is not a real porsche”.
        The E-mach is not a mustang.
        A 4-door car is not a coupe.
        An SUV has no sport in it.

        But really, it’s all about the marketing. And there are people who buy cars because of the marketing, while others buy cars because they like cars. So who cares?

        • 0 avatar
          John R

          I don’t see how that is. You literally named another model that was made in addition to the 911. It was never intended to be trim level or sub-model.

          If the Boxster didn’t exist or if Porsche had called it the “911 MR” or something else there may be an argument. But through virtue of the fact that it was given it’s own name further proves the point.

          Before the Boxster there was 928. Porsche, arguably, intended to replace the 911 with the 928, but were smart enough to never call it the 911.

          The premise of the original question is still flawed.

      • 0 avatar
        legacygt

        100%
        Applying the Mustang name here shows a lack of imagination. But Ford is bad at this kind of thing. Remember when they ruined the Taurus because someone decided the design should include a lot of ovals? And then they killed the Taurus when someone decided all their sedans should have names starting with “F.” Brands are hard to build and Ford has one of the best with the Mustang. It’s understandable that they might want to leverage it but they also run the risk of diluting the brand and/or confusing customers.

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          I thought extending the Mustang family to include a slightly lifted 4 door hatchback that has potential for monster torque and (per the limited reviews thus far) handles quite well was a stroke of brilliance. No one is going to confuse the Mach-E and the GT. I’ll take one of each, the GT preferably in Bullitt form.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          I agree, but Mustang survived the “Mustang II” and although a huge seller no purist ever thought it to be a “real” Mustang the same thing here, the Mach E will be a big seller I predict whether anyone will ever consider it a true Mustang

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Oh I do.

      Protip: Its not.

  • avatar
    Rocket

    Sounds promising, but this minimalism thing is getting out of control. I know Ford had to keep costs in check to ensure profitability, but I personally would have paid a bit more for some freakin’ buttons. Hopefully the Lincoln version wears a more traditional center stack.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “If you extend the Mustang definition to mean ‘a fun car,’ then the Mach-E delivers.”

    I do not extend this definition. I guess this mean that the Taurus SHO, Contour SVT, and Fiesta ST were also Mustangs.

    Beyond the goofball name, it seems like a nice enough thing. However the “ace” for Tesla is the supercharger network. Without that the MachE driver will be stopping at Walmarts and malls when taking long trips.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Personally, I’d skip long trips in anything electric, including Teslas – supercharger network notwithstanding, having to make a half-hour stop every five hours would be a turn-off for me. For now, I’d buy something gas-powered if I was an Interstate road warrior.

      Will this turn off some buyers? Yes. But the folks who buy Teslas go into the deal knowing the limitation of their vehicles, and buy them anyway, and I suspect it’ll be the same for this model as well.

      • 0 avatar
        AKM

        I don’t like peeing in bottles, and like to stay hydrated. So the idea of driving 5 hours without stopping just smacks of college dorm-room atmosphere…
        20mn pause every 2 hours is a great thing. Also allows for a little stretching in order to not be disabled by 45…

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          “20mn pause every 2 hours is a great thing.”

          Do what you got to do then.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          I don’t, and probably can’t, drive 16 hours straight anymore either but hanging around a charging station parking lot is not the break that I had in mind.

          • 0 avatar
            mcs

            @Dan: The thing is that you don’t have to hang around the parking lot. You can leave since it’s an unattended charge.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @mcs: it’s still an inconvenience, and doubly so on when you’re talking about an expensive car.

            But this is the level of current tech we’re talking about – I’m sure that in a few years, range and charging times will improve.

          • 0 avatar
            dukeisduke

            @mcs

            “The thing is that you don’t have to hang around the parking lot. You can leave since it’s an unattended charge.”

            And go where? This thing isn’t a long-distance road-tripper. The people that buy these will instead fly if they need to make a longer trip, and also probably have the money to buy plane tickets without a 14-day wait.

        • 0 avatar
          statikboy

          AKM

          Agree with the sentiment, but the kinds of places I usually like to take extended stops to stretch out my legs and brain don’t have chargers.

          Fuel and pee breaks take 5 minutes… Stretch and sanity breaks require the wilderness.

  • avatar
    Dan

    800% more desirable than Tesla’s unisex mannequins and 50% less desirable than an actual Mustang.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    Is it just me, or are all these electric vehicles priced at “whatever makes sense plus $7,500”[email protected]

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      If that was true, everyone would be doing it. Without significant volume, EVs are terrible money losers – which is why everyone has waited to see how Tesla does.

      Tesla started becoming profitable when their volume hit about 150,000 cars a year.

      So pricing an EV at what makes sense for the market could drive you to bankruptcy if you don’t sell enough of them. And pricing an EV at what makes sense for your business could do the same.

      In Ford’s case, their half-hearted commitment means they can afford to lose some money on the Mach-E and F-150EV if the volumes never climb; those losses would easily be offset by F-150 sales. Committed companies like Tesla – and soon VW – must strike a more delicate pricing balance.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      I’m with you, Kosmo. Pricing for these seems like a monkey threw darts to determine MSRP.

  • avatar
    JMII

    The massive iPad stuck to the dash screams Tesla… come on Ford this was too obvious – need to try harder here. The outside looks nice and this non-Mustang SUV-ish thing is likely the electric vehicle that most people could actually live with. Pricing is on point, range could use a 50 mile boost to give people a bit more cushion.

    I just feel they shouldn’t have diluted the Mustang name with this thing. Pinto wasn’t going to be used but given Ford’s history what is wrong with Falcon or Galaxy?

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Agreed on the terrible display – it’s a copycat in a really bad way.

      The choice of the “Mustang” name was easy – it generates press from the controversy. “Galaxie” would never get the same attention.

      • 0 avatar
        iNeon

        Galaxie(stylized GalaxiE or Galaxi-E) would probably generate just as much banter/chatter– but it probably needs to be reserved for a flagship, not a little runabout.

        My inner TNG-era trekkie f’in loves that we live in the future. This car is so fun. They’re going to sell a metric isht-ton of them.

      • 0 avatar
        Joey21

        What can’t these things be incorporated INTO the dash rather than the stand off vertical tablet look? Doesn’t matter who makes the car – I don’t like the look. Also – I don’t really need that much screen. Our current car has a 6″ screen more or less. That’s plenty if the screen has high enough resolution – which ought to be a no-brainer since cheap tablets are available with beautiful resolution screens now for under $50.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    There is a lot going on with that frunk. (It offers insights into the mindset of Ford Motor Company that I’m not sure I wanted to have.)

    [I don’t want to say the tail lamps are overwrought and tacky, so I won’t.]

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    The two screens would kill the deal for me, but if I had to make a choice I would get this over the Tesla. Having the screen in front of the events is dumb. I don’t always want them pointed my way.

    It isn’t a Mustang. At least the Mustang II pretended to be V8 rear drive.

    I am sure they will sell lots of them, same as Tesla does, they just won’t be selling to me. I will buy an all electric with a proper interior center stack and integrated gauges. I like the LCD gauges, but they have to look like they were part of the design process.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      I don’t like the look of the ipad-stuck-on-the-dash look, but I like the practicality to a point. I like analog gauges and toggle switches, but when you have so many switches and gauges that it starts to look like the flight engineers console on a B-29, it’s gone a little far. I don’t like the looks of the big screen, but I like the largest display I can get. Pick one. For me, it’s good and bad.

      “It isn’t a Mustang. At least the Mustang II pretended to be V8 rear drive.”

      The original 64.5 Mustang had a standard 170 cid straight 6. There are people that argue that Ferraris can only have V-12s and that the 928 wasn’t a real Porsche. I think that some people even argue a Mustang can’t have independent rear suspension. They seem to be evolving Mustang into a performance sub-brand. Personally I would have rather seen the Mach-E as a Torino. Maybe even have Torino as an electric sub-brand. I hate all of the i and E (no fan of the E-Ray name, Manta Ray was better) branding on EVs.

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        You can have the screen look like the designer had it in mind when doing the dash, like the RAM big screen. Or you can have it look like an afterthought like this. The screens are a necessity for many functions, I just don’t like how they are executed on a lot of them and I have a car with the LCD gauges, but they are properly integrated, not stuck on top like a LEGO vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        Russycle

        I’m a bit torn on the speedo display too. I’d rather have it more integrated, but having it mounted so high means you barely take your eyes off the road to glance at it, which is good for safety. I could see it being a distraction at night, it would be nice if you could make it red to minimally impact night vision.

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    God I hate those night vision destroying ergonomic catastrophes. It’s gonna be all touch screen, all the time. Absolutely no reason for it. You stare at computers, televisions, phones, screen devices or all kinds all the time. Here’s another one (or two) in your car. Great. No thanks.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Screen overload is a plague on the industry.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I tend to agree with Imagefont – the dash kills the Tesla Model 3 for me. But I give Ford credit for far better execution here = there’s a real gauge cluster and a physical knob for the radio, and it looks like you don’t have to access some stupid sub-menu to turn up the A/C, or adjust the mirrors.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      The dash was probably the final and best selling point for me on the 19 Ioniq EV:

      https://i.ytimg.com/vi/Fbb5IMMXgf0/maxresdefault.jpg

      After struggling with the display during a Model 3 test drive, I literally breathed a sigh of relief when I saw this.

      I’ve enjoyed the usable mix of buttons and touchscreens. It all works pretty well together, and all important info is right in front of you. Unfortunately, Hyundai added a big square display in the 2020 model.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I guess the big question here isn’t really “is this is a Mustang?” – clearly it isn’t. But I like the style, it sounds like it’s a runner, and I give Ford credit for doing a dash that looks to be far more user-friendly than anything Tesla has at the moment.

    I suspect it’ll be a moderate hit for Ford.

    • 0 avatar

      It’ll be interesting to see where the sales play out in the middle market EV sector. This, VW, Tesla, any others I’m missing?

      So far, Ford is the only one creating a new thing and tying it to an old name. That may be a disadvantage in the end. The name creates a comparison and expectation and the car will never stand fully on its own merits.

      • 0 avatar
        Lichtronamo

        At some point, other makers will have to decide if the new names continue or do they adopt the established names: VW ID3 becomes the Golf. Does Honda drop Civic, Accord, CRV et al for new names or is it a transition to electrify those models.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        The Model Y is the obvious target here, but I think Ford is actually aiming this at people who buy conventionally powered compact luxury CUVs (Porsche Macan, Jaguar I-whatever, BMW X1, etc). Tesla has proven that luxury car buyers like EVS, but I bet lots of people in that market who would theoretically buy a Model Y are turned off by the weird styling, the silly dash, and Tesla’s spotty quality record. This car looks slick, has a far more conventional user interface. Plus, whatever you think of Ford quality, this clearly isn’t going to be manufactured in a tent.

        Same marketing idea behind the Model 3, if you think about it – it’s basically the BMW 3-series for the 21st century (and it’s no accident 3-series sales have tanked since the Model 3 came out).

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “I bet lots of people in that market who would theoretically buy a Model Y are turned off by the weird styling,”

          Which the Mach-E also features.

          “the silly dash,”

          Mach-E seems to have copied Tesla’s.

          “and Tesla’s spotty quality record.”

          Ford’s is stellar?

  • avatar
    John R

    This is a good product in search of a charging network that makes sense.

    With regards to the name. This is not a Mustang. Just because it’s fun to drive doesn’t make it so. The Focus RS is fun, too. There was zero impetus to have called that a Mustang.

    I understand the motivation by Ford to call it a Mustang, coolness by association. In practice it almost never works. Is the “RAV4” cool? Is the “CR-V” cool? No, but Toyota and Honda can barely keep them on the lot. Why? Because the product is good.

    Ford would be better served calling this an Escape/Fusion/Falcon/whatever Mach-E instead.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    People forget that Ford owns the name “Mustang”, so they can use it for a delivery van if they want to. But the public *feels* it has ownership of the name, and the image it creates in its own mind.

    This is similar to an actor who has become typecast, who tries to break out and do other roles – but is really only known for their original role. Is Alan Alda allowed to be anyone other than “Hawkeye”? Not in the mind of the public.

    As for me, if I ever own a Mustang, it would probably be this one. I have no interest in the others.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I don’t think anyone “forgets” that Ford owns the Mustang name or thinks they hold public ownership. However I also don’t think it is unreasonable for people to criticize corporate branding decisions. Maybe this works out or maybe this blows up in their face.

      If Alan Alda makes a movie where he portrays Aretha Franklin then people might consider that a poor career choice.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        He’s been a pretty convincing baddie in a few films; I prefer Hawkeye.

      • 0 avatar
        Moparmann

        Alan Alda went on to be cast in other roles; Max Baer, Jr. never could overcome “Jethro Bodine”. I concur with ajla; personally I find the “Mach E” naming to be silly and derivative, and I think the car may be liked for what it is, rather than because of a marketing ploy.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    The Cult of TSLA will not be impressed and Mock-E isn’t going to be the success Dearborn tells you it will be. 80-90% of the nation is on hard times but sure they have $60K to blow on a toy – how many are still commuting again? How many kids are being driven to school? Of those two, how many want a “CUV” with little practical utility?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Well…

      1) When this was introduced a year ago, a pandemic like the one we have going on right now was basically the stuff of science fiction. So…bad on Ford for not being to able to predict what amounts to an act of God, I suppose?
      2) This economic downturn has been BRUTAL to the working poor, far less so for the white-collar-office-worker crowd, and generally beneficial for the affluent. Notably, Tesla sales are up. That tells you something. The working poor weren’t going to be buying any new cars, much less one that costs this much.

      Would this sell more units without the COVID downturn? Undoubtedly. But I don’t think the downturn is a death knell for this model by any means.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        This is a play on expanding the pure EV market beyond Tesla. In 2019 land, I still wouldn’t bet on it let alone now. If Ford were serious it would have offered the Edge in EV and called it “Lightning” for 10% more than the top trim Edge (about $47K). This is Ford’s attempt at the BMW X6, which last sold 35K units worldwide in 2018. Ford does not have the international panache of BMW, so it will have to sell the bulk in USDM and CDM while competing with Tesla. If I could buy puts on the venture, I would.

    • 0 avatar
      thegamper

      It sort of pains me to say, but I think this is probably better looking that anything Tesla is currently selling. The price actually seems somewhat reasonable as well.

      I think it will at least be a mild success for Ford (probably not from a profits perspective). I doubt they plan to flood the market with them anyway. This is after all, really a Beta test bed for future Ford EV’s. I am sure there will be a lot of learning yet to come for Ford after real world miles at the hands of actual owners.

      If there was a more robust rapid charging network and enough credible people convinced me this could get 100k trouble free miles, I might even be interested in something like this.

  • avatar
    mcs

    A few things missing from the review. Like, does it have a heat pump? What did the reviewer get for miles/kWh or Wh/mile? For navigation to charging stations, is there a feature that preheats the battery en route to get it ready for charging. A new thing with EVs is double-pane insulated glass to make the HVAC more efficient and is another feature to look for. Reviewing EVs is a new thing and is still evolving and is going to take learning and time to get right.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Your questions are good ones.

      In defense of TTAC, there are of course other sites who specialize in EVs and will provide this information. Eventually, TTAC will catch on.

      It seems Ford released a bunch of Mach-Es at a press event, so Mach-E “first drive” reviews are popping up everywhere. Opinions vary.

      Anecdotally, I saw one that reported 2.7 miles/kWh. That’s not great, but they were also certainly lead-footing it for the review.

    • 0 avatar
      Joey21

      I was looking for that kind of info too.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    How did it perform in self-driving mode when compared to…a Tesla?

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    Don’t understand why Ford went to such an effort to Mustang-ify the exterior but the interior looks like a modified Tesla. They had an opportunity to modernize the Mustang interior for an EV similar to adapting the exterior cues.

  • avatar
    SPPPP

    If they can fix the dash design and get rid of the massive iPad, make the interior a little more inviting, give it a sunroof that opens, and cut about $15k out of the price, I might be marginally interested.

    I know, I’m being difficult. I am just not looking forward to our apparent motoring future of limited, expensive choices.

  • avatar
    gasser

    How does the ride quality compare to the Tesla Model Y? I have read that the Model Y rides very harshly which is a deal breaker for me, as I am living in a pot hole ridden, 3rd world country called Los Angeles. Also, being 73 years old, and having had several new Fords over the years, I will pass on any new Ford for AT LEAST a year. The new Explorer convinced me that “Quality” is no longer Job #1 at Ford.

  • avatar
    GogglesPisano

    Nice car, and like a Tesla, a hideous center console screen. Boring and impracticle.

  • avatar
    GogglesPisano

    Nice car, and like a Tesla, a hideous center console screen. Boring and impracticle.

  • avatar
    namesakeone

    I wondered why they would put the Mustang name on this vehicle. Why would Ford use a name that has always been a sport coupe or convertible–one still in production as that coupe or convertible, no less–on an SUV? Why not call it, say, a Thunderbird or even a Falcon or Fairlane?

    The answer seems to be that this is the future of the Mustang. Even though they sell 100,000 copies of the beloved coupe (and convertible) a year, the profits aren’t what they would probably like, since Ford no longer offers another rear-wheel-drive car (or any car, for that matter) to share its platform and components and lower manufacturing costs. The obvious solution, of course, is to put it on a platform that is shared, or at least has sharable components, and while they’re at it give it appeal to a broader audience–one that they seem to think is clamoring for yet another SUV. To Hell with its history. Forget three pedals; give them (in the future) three rows.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Call it the Model E and be done with it. It sorta fits with the naming scheme where all crossovers start with an E and it kind of harkens back to Ford’s beginnings.

    Then again Tesla may have patented the naming convention of Model (followed by a number or letter).

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Tesla was going to name the Model 3 the Model E, until Ford sued for the rights to “Model E” in a petty move.

      Now, besides copying the center display from Tesla, Ford actually using the name “Model E” would seem weird in an EV field already flooded with Teslas whose name start with “Model”.

      Interestingly, Ford seems to have last used the “Model” designator in 1948, and actually sold a Model S and Model Y way back when:
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Ford_vehicles

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Well Ford first applied for the Model E trademark in 2000, (Before Tesla was founded) got it approved, withdrew it, reapplied and withdrew it again well before Tesla applied for it.

        The reason their Dec 2013 application prevailed over Tesla’s Aug 2013 application is those earlier applications and approvals.

    • 0 avatar
      RHD

      Galax-E would have been a better name that what they are using now.

      Ford has several legacy names that would carry over very well. Just off the top of my head, how about the
      Territor-E
      Capr-E
      Prodig-E

      or are these all too Edge-E?
      The convertible versions would be too Flex-E.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    Well, considering Ford got a slew of auto journos to have a couple of mile bash, if they were lucky, in the Mach-E and chauffered otherwise four-up, it’s been interesting to read the “reviews”. Some people have advanced imagination. C/D said the ride was simply amazing and boy isn’t it quiet. MT said it crashed heavily over railroad tracks. This guy here says the steering was direct “in the car I was in”. Right. When is this beast actually going on sale? Maybe the journos will then have one to themselves for an actual review that might be useful.

    I do like the luggage divider in the “frunk”. Very tasty.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    You can call it a Mach-E all day long, heck, I’ll call it a Mach-E all day long. It isn’t a Mustang.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Gawd, is that screen JB Welded to the dash???!

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Well sonny, back before the electric SUVs, we drove cars, and they had touch screens that were actually built into the dashboard, not a slapped on iPad.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    The basic technology on display here is relatively amazing. Range is soooo far beyond my first EV from a decade ago. Performance is impressive and will go up from here. (Plus low maintenance.)

    The energy density of gasoline is… impressive. That we are this close this soon to having a viable substitute is again, relatively amazing.

    By my understanding, Ford isn’t doing a lot of original research here, but is largely using ‘off-the-shelf’ technology. Which implies we could see some very interesting competitors show up at the party soon.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    Always self-insure. Foolish behavior aside, don’t fool yourself. Insurance companies aren’t charities.

  • avatar
    FAHRVERGNUGEN

    EV aside, that darned grill looks as goofy as Gronk with a mouth guard. Until contact, that is.

  • avatar
    raynla

    I think the only real question about the new Mustang EV should be…“Will it safely make it out of the parking lot after a Cars And Coffee meetup?”

  • avatar
    Tstag

    I still like the Jaguar I Pace the most. It’s the best looking and the interior is not Tesla like, which is a good thing for me

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    This thing isn’t a Mustang. Even the 1976 Mustang II MPG Cobra II (2.3l four-cylinder, four-speed manual) was a coupe with two doors.

  • avatar
    jschinito

    love it! can’t wait for mine to arrive in a few weeks.

    ordered mine as soon as it was possible…rwd premium (skipped awd since i live in california and the large battery – upcharges not really worth it as we have a minivan for long road trips).

    so around $35k after rebates there’s nothing that competes with it in terms of space, features, performance, style.

    and i have no hang ups with the name.

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