By on July 24, 2020

Korea’s answer to the BMW 3 Series and Mercedes-Benz C-Class earned accolades upon its launch, with some kudos reserved for the availability of a six-speed manual transmission paired with the base 2.0-liter turbo four.

You know what’s coming next. Due for a refresh for the 2022 model year, the G70 is in line for an automatic-only future.

You’ve got to give Genesis credit for at least attempting to placate the purist upscale sports sedan buyer. Sure, the stick couldn’t handle the uplevel 3.3-liter twin-turbo V6, nor, apparently, was it the most refined and enjoyable of units, but credit where it’s due. Genesis knew from the outset there wouldn’t be many takers for a manual rear-drive sedan, but it offered one just the same, attempting to show that it took the segment seriously.

A Genesis spokesperson confirmed the stick-shift’s upcoming discontinuation in an ABC News spot first referenced by CarBuzz. Earlier in the model’s lifespan, Genesis said the take rate for a manual-equipped G70 was about 4 percent.

Seems the public wasn’t very interested, and there’s no evidence that members of the #SaveTheManuals club are clamoring to get their hands on one before it’s too late. Just the opposite. In a message sent to Road & Track, Genesis said it has sold roughly 100 manual 2020 G70s — not nearly enough sales to keep the option around.

While the six-speed is still available for customers to order, Genesis wasn’t entirely sure there’s even one in its inventory. A rare beast, for sure.

Unless another automaker decides to go wild, we’re looking at a near future where no American can walk into a dealership and leave with a manual-transmission, rear-drive sedan. Not that they were doing that very often, anyway.

[Image: Genesis]

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69 Comments on “Refreshed Genesis G70 to Drop the Manual, of Course...”


  • avatar
    tallguy130

    ….sigh…. :pours out a little of my 40oz:

    Not surprising but still sad. Its a good looking car too.

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    “Sure, the stick couldn’t handle the uplevel 3.3-liter twin-turbo V6, nor, apparently, was it the most refined and enjoyable of units, but credit where it’s due. Genesis knew from the outset there wouldn’t be many takers for a manual rear-drive sedan, but it offered one just the same, attempting to show that it took the segment seriously.”

    I’m not sure giving the weak engine a bad manual is taking the segment seriously. More like checking a box.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Meh, maybe it handled better with the smaller engine.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        If I want an automatic 2.0T that handles I’d get an Alfa. You take the manual out of the equation and there is solid competition in the segment. That was sort of the killer app.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      And I’m sure they were very easy to get too. I bet you if you walked into a dealer and asked for one they would eagerly get it for you within a very short time and, of course, give you all the same discounts available on the 25 automatic cars sitting on the lot. Yeah, that’s it. Really too bad it failed because of buyer preference right?

  • avatar

    Duh. They are phasing manual transmissions out everywhere because it is expensive to certify additional engine/transmission combos, especially for a combo with a very limited take rate. It’s just economics. Sorry, but that’s the sad reality.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Not to mention the additional engineering and parts supply, and infinite (OK, 10-year) field support.

      Really, the G70 should never have come with a stick to begin with. Now Genesis has a few hundred unicorns to support.

      Hopefully the stick shares some its parts with other H/K cars, like the Stinger, maybe.

  • avatar
    jack4x

    The best theory I heard about the cancellation was that they knew it was coming approximately this soon, but calculated the gushing press/publicity from literally every automotive journalist about launching with a MT and later being the segment exclusive was worth the cost of compliance even if no 3 pedal cars were actually sold.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Just like the $35000 Model 3. Sounds like a solid theory.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        @SCE: Just like the $35000 Model 3. Sounds like a solid theory.

        Edmunds ordered one and reviewed it in March. Not sure what’s happened since the standard plus dropped to $37k. I’m tempted to call Tesla and see what the current price is. But it does exist and was orderable as recent as March.

        youtu.be/yXsBcpp5BKs

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      That makes sense and would explain the meh engineering that seems to have put into it

      There is at least one actual owner on here however that says the poor reviews are overblown so perhaps those reviews are based on normal auto journo BS. I drove a G70 and thought it was fine but the dealership didn’t get a manual before I swore off Hyundai so I guess it’ll remain a mystery to me.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        Genesis did give the manual-transmission model some performance things. It was the only way to get a limited-slip, performance brakes, and sport exhaust on the 2.0T trim.

        As far as reviews on the G70 6MT go, the written ones seemed to be lukewarm to slightly negative while Youtube ones were largely positive. YMMV.

        • 0 avatar

          YT car reviews (outside of Alex Dykes) are so fluffy and glowing that I can’t take them seriously. They’re intent on building their followers and personality cult, and continuing their free press car gravy train.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            I gravitate towards the ones that review old crapboxes. Most of the new car reviewers on YT just seem happy someone let them drive a new car.

          • 0 avatar

            I used to watch SaabKyle for old crapboxes from the used car dealerships. Loved those videos.

            What he does now, he might as well put a 10/10 sticker on the hood of each test car.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            KBB, Savagegeese, and Redline all seem relatively critical about things.

            Matt Maran is the only one that seems too positive about everything. And, some of the other ones are more “entertainment” channels than “review” channels.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Basically stuck in the MT from the old Genesis coupe.

        Oddly enough, the i30N and the Veloster N got a better shifter.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I was looking forward to the rumored 2.5 turbo being available with a stick. Que sera…

    This might leave the Hyundai Veloster N as the most interesting manual transmission equipped vehicle in the Hyundai, Kia, Genesis lineup.

    The N-line Sonata is supposed to have an 8 speed dual clutch auto, I hope it ends up being a damn good transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Apparently Hyundai is switching to wet-clutch DCTs, which is a wise move. The dry-clutch unit in the Elantra Sport triggered some bad Ford “Powershift” memories for me – lots of jerking around, plus a big warning sign hanging off the rear view mirror describing what to do when the transmission overheats.

      Wet-clutch units, like the ones VW/Audi uses, are FAR better.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        The only good dry clutch transmissions are of the single clutch variety that is actuated via your left foot and right hand (or left hand if you are in that part of the world I guess).

  • avatar
    AnalogMan

    I get it that manual transmission buyers are a small and shrinking segment of the market. But I think most manufacturers are making two big mistakes and would otherwise sell some more of them.

    First is not understanding the buyer, who would actually fork over money for a car with a stick. In the past manual buyers were looking to save a few bucks. They were looking for ‘economy’, and cars with sticks were often strippers with the smallest engines, lowest trim levels, etc. Those days are long gone. Now anyone that would buy a stick is an enthusiast and wants the most powerful engine, sportiest trim level, etc. Many (myself included) would pay more for a car with a stick, and just don’t want a token manual offered with the smallest engine.

    If Genesis had offered a stick with the V6, and even better, offered a stick in the Stinger with the V6, I bet sales would have been better (again myself included). It might not have accounted for half the volume, but it might have been enough to make a difference to them.

    Second is just not building enough of the things. It becomes a self-fulfilling proposition to say ‘no one buys sticks anymore’, but if you don’t build many, if buyers either don’t know about them or more often just can’t find one, then of course sales will be minimal.

    But then, Honda offered a manual transmission in the Accord sedan with both the 2.0 and 1.5 engines, and they’re cancelling it. It’s too bad, a 2.0 Accord manual was at the top of my list for my next car in a year or two. Not anymore.

    • 0 avatar

      “Many (myself included) would pay more for a car with a stick…”

      This trope is repeated endlessly by internet car experts, and is consistently proved as false for one of two possible reasons:

      1) It’s a lie perpetrated by the cheapskate “If I didn’t” internet car shopper, who demands a certain specification car and then finds every reason not to buy it. But they maybe might buy one used in eight years.

      2) It’s a true statement about these manual car buyers, but they’re such a small minority that there is zero logical or financial sense in catering to them.

      Your choice. But the trope needs to stop.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        I absolutely would pay more. But I freely admit I’m just part of group 2. Typically because of that fact I end up paying less because when dealers stock these vehicles they sit and sit. My Fiesta ST and Challenger were both sharing space on the lot with vehicles a model year newer and had cash stacked on the hood accordingly. No year old automatics (yeah there was never an auto ST but there were plenty of powershift crapboxes of the current model year.) This isn’t sustainable though and eventually they’ll all be gone and these forums will be full of “I was gonna” comments.

    • 0 avatar

      “It’s too bad, a 2.0 Accord manual was at the top of my list for my next car in a year or two.”

      You’re doing it again. You just asked for four different manual car options at different price ranges that don’t exist. Then you picked one that does exist but was cancelled, and said “well I was gonna…”

      • 0 avatar
        jack4x

        The problem with dismissing the argument out of hand is that it’s never really been tried. No car besides the $200K GT3 has ever brought back a manual after being discontinued.

        I don’t know the costs associated with developing (or more likely purchasing) a manual transmission, certifying a different powertrain, designing your manufacturing facility to build two transmission types, stocking warranty parts, etc. But that number is calculable and can then be divided by expected sales.

        Maybe for some cars the number is $10,000 and there’s no case. Maybe it’s $3000 and you’d get some takers. The math will likely never work on something like an Accord or G70 because of their low price and proven low manual take rate, and won’t work on a Ferrari because there aren’t enough sales to amortize over. But at some point, cars in the middle like Mustang, Miata, 911, M3 etc. are going to reach the point where a manual is a cost adder. Some may discontinue, some may start upcharging. That will be the test of the theory.

        • 0 avatar

          My point is that historically the take rate for manuals has declined sharply, and that’s why they’re going away.

          The number of people left complaining about their availability are small, and an even smaller percentage of those buy new cars.

          Most customers don’t like manuals. And dealers don’t like manuals. They’re not as efficient any more as automatics, and will make the car slower and have worse fuel economy.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I bet if Ferrari put a gated manual in a current model they could more or less charge what they please. I think that might be the one place it could actually work.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            @Corey,

            Convertibles make cars slower and less efficient too. They are also less popular now than they used to be. But they are fun to drive and because of that fact have loyal buyers who are willing to fund development costs because the option costs money vs a coupe. All I’m saying is that strategy has never to my knowledge been tried with a manual transmission.

            @Art,

            The fact that they haven’t is unfortunately the biggest argument against my idea above working for anyone.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Fair point @Jack. Honestly the people that pine the most about those gated shifters probably aren’t modern Ferrari owners. There is a cottage industry swapping some of those older but still modern cars to manuals, but they are cars which a manual was available in so not new.

            Sadly you are correct probably though…if Ferrari could make a buck here, I’m sure they’d have done it by now.

      • 0 avatar
        AnalogMan

        I’ve owner over 110 cars in my life (yes, I know, it’s a disease). Over 100 of them have been manual transmissions, and over half of those have been bought new. I repeatedly put my money where my mouth is, but I can only buy so many cars in one lifetime.

        • 0 avatar

          I think you have at least done your part, for the ones purchased as new.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I am in Awe @AnalogMan. USAA lists vehicles by the number you have insured. I am on “veh37”. I went back and listed them. Adding in the 3 before I switched to USAA, 24 of them are manuals. While many of the auto’s are my wife’s rides, I can’t touch your ratio. I salute you!

  • avatar

    They build what SELLS cost effectively. You wanting to buy one in a year or two means very little. Because the overall take rate does not justify the expense of producing it.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      You gotta love the “Only fools buy new” brigade’s constant moaning that automakers won’t build the cars THEY want to buy CPO 3 years down the road.

      • 0 avatar

        It is exhausting listening to the bleating.

        • 0 avatar
          SPPPP

          “It is exhausting listening to the bleating.”

          Well, don’t come writing an op-ed when the thing *you* like gets discontinued.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Pretty sure he is referring to the folks that never intended on buying (new) the car they are complaining about being discontinued.

            If you insist on buying used over the economics, fine, but don’t complain about having to select from the lease return or early trade ins from those of us that buy new.

            They offer these cars, they don’t sell in appreciable numbers so they kill them and without fail you get tons of “I woulda” posts. Meanwhile when it comes time to sell these same lowballers and tire kickers will find any reason to not buy your car that 3 years ago they were “100 percent going to get used in a couple of years” because they have moved on to the next enthusiast ride that they are just going to wait for used. Most of them are upside down in a Camry or Sonata anyway.

            It is tiring and it is why you can’t have nice things.

          • 0 avatar
            ToolGuy

            Art Vandelay is now the official arbiter of “tiring” – LOL.

            “I don’t always post 12 comments [so far on this page] on an article the day it is published, but when I do I express surprise and amazement that anyone remembers anything I said.” – A. V.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            Do you ever contribute anything other than your occasional trolling? It’s an internet discussion…feel free to scroll on or feel free to go fnck yourself. I don’t care which. Fncking toolbag

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            If you do take option B though Toolbag, try to get me out of your head. That is next level creepy.

  • avatar

    They build what SELLS cost effectively. You wanting to buy one in a year or two means very little. Because the overall take rate has not justified the expense of producing it. It’s that simple.

  • avatar
    emineid

    My personal ranking of stick shifts I own and drive:

    1. 2010 Honda Accord LX
    Extremely forgiving clutch, literally can’t stall even if I wanted. Wonderful shifting action, refined feel. This car is a specialist for around-the-town driving. You won’t stall and the shifter never refuses to go into gear at a stop light.

    2. 2007 Porsche 911 (rented last year)
    Precise shifter. Shifting action is not dampened. So clicking into each gear feels a bit like two billiard balls hitting each other. The clutch feel is okay, but it is possible to stall on steep San Francisco streets.

    3. 2009 Genesis G70
    The shifter action feels amazingly similar to the Porsche 911. Precise. A little bit rough in the friction as you row the shifter, sort of like bending a knee with some arthritis. But it never refuses to click into gear. The clutch has a weird hump in the resistance midway through and so it is possible to stall at lights, but you get used to it quickly.

    4. 1993 Geo Prizm (sold a long time ago)
    Loose shifter, but can shift with 1 finger. Clutch is very good. Everything feels loose but always dependable, never refuses to go into gear.

    5. 2002 BMW 325i
    Nicely isolated shifter for that luxury feel, but a bit rubbery even with new OE bushings. Sometimes refuses to go into 1st gear at a light, you have to try again. The clutch is vague, easy to stall.

    6. 2010 Ford Ranger
    Rough as a corncob, but gets the job done. Please don’t complain about the G70 having a long throw until you have driven a Ranger. Sometimes refuses to go into 1st or 2nd or other gears at inopportune times. The clutch action is actually okay, better than the BMW.

    All shifters should be rated subjectively on two things: First, how likely are you to stall at a light because of vague clutch action? Second, how likely will the shifter refuse to slide into gear on the first try? Either situation will leave you fumbling at a stop light as the vehicle behind you encroaches.

    Hyundai should have benchmarked Honda for shifting action. As it stands, the G70 shifter feels like a Porsche and the clutch feels like a BMW.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Honda typically gets the shifter and feel right. My friend and I traded off rides the other day. I drove is 18 Civic Si, he drove my Challenger R/T Manual. It was as good as any NA Miata I’ve owned (sort of my gold standard.) And equally satisfying. He said mine felt like Mike Tyson had the other end of the linkage and was fighting him and you really had to manhandle it. He did get out grinning though.

      I’m surprised about the BMW. Then again, my last manual BMW was an E30 3 series. It was great, but honestly probably better in my memories given the settings I drove that car in.

      I had a plethora of Ranger and Bronco II manuals. Yes, it is a long throw. What do you want…the lever is like a foot and a half long lol.

      I think FWD manual shifters are among the greatest improvements made in cars in the last 20 years. Even my Fiesta ST was up there with the Miata though it was in a bit of a wierd spot. My 90s FWD cars (in the 90s before they were worn out) were just sort of wobbly.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Can’t say I’m shocked.

    I think we’re looking at a day, soon, where it really will just be sports/sporty cars that have one.

    Miata. Mustang. Camaro. Maybe/perhaps/if we’re lucky the GTI.

    I would guess this segment is the only remaining segment where people seek out the manual and the take rates are high enough.

    unfortunately 40% take rate on 5000 annual sales might mean the take rate for the entire vehicle isn’t high enough. So yeah, we’ll lose the manual….and the car will be gone with it.

    • 0 avatar
      snorlax

      It’s been widely reported that GM won’t be making another Camaro after the current one, and I wouldn’t be surprised if the next-gen Mustang is auto-only. And as you say the slow-selling Miata and GTI might not be long for this world either.

      We’re rapidly approaching the point where it will not be possible to order a new vehicle with a manual transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Fun fact about the GTI: it’s quicker with the automatic. And to me, that tells a big part of the “why manuals are dying” story – once upon a time, a car was usually quicker with a manual than an automatic, but these days, that’s not always the case because automatics have become so good.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Mike, The majority of people prefer the distraction of phones and screens to driving. My wife – who does not take any enjoyment in driving – sees driving like loading the dishwasher.

        Nice, smooth, quick automatics make that chore just a little less gruesome. The idea of shifting is just another item on her ‘to do’ list.

        I’m under intense lobbying to not get another MT car, but we have a pact that neither gets a veto on the cars we pick so long as the family can fit in them. I tolerate her SUV love and she tolerates my MT love.

        Happy wife, happy life – that cuts both ways.

      • 0 avatar
        FormerFF

        VW’s DSG is a very nice transmission for a sporty car. Porsche’s PDK is brilliant, I’d be hard pressed to not choose them over a manual.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        I think it has much less to do with “new automatics are faster/more efficient” and more to do with “I just don’t want to be bothered with shifting.” That’s why I also think Americans will be up front in the line of accepting automated/autonomous driving. We just don’t want to be hassled with all of that “driving” stuff. Tongue in cheek, but there is probably a fair amount of truth to it.

        I DD a manual (2012 MB B180) and am eying a used 1-Series 5 door as a potential replacement. Only a manual is being considered. Granted, those are used purchases, but I dread going back to the US in several years and being confronted with such a dwindling list of manual-equipped vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      Include WRX and STI to that list, plus BRZ/86 should they continue.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Won’t be a Camaro. GM is killing it again and if it does return it will be an EV they say. The car so nice, they killed it twice!

  • avatar
    JMII

    I didn’t even think the current G70 had a manual. I just assumed 4 door = no stick shift. I have slowly come to the sad realization that my current C7 might be the last 3 pedal vehicle I’ll own. The pickings regarding manual transmission are becoming slim. Heck just finding a 2 door coupe is getting near impossible.

    There was a time when a manual was just the cheap option. Then it became the sporty option. None of that applies today. Sports cars pivoted to DCTs for superior acceleration. The popularity of autos means sticks no longer have a price advantage. Also thanks to 8 and 10 speed autos or CVTs manuals lost their MPG advantage as well.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Even through most of the 90s sporty cars were more likely to have a manual because the best you were going to get was a 4 speed in an automatic. Couple that with the lower HP numbers back then and they were objectively faster. In the lower trim cars with double digit HP a manual could make them much quicker…some of those cars still had 3 speeds as the Auto option.

      That isn’t the case anymore. The people that want manuals want them for subjective reasons like “being involved” and “an analog connection”. That’s fine, but those of us that are willing to buy what is generally the slower option just because we like having our left foot occupied is a tiny market. With respect to cars like the Accord you have horsepower numbers that were exotic car territory back when people were snapping up manuals. You don’t need a stick to make modern cars not feel like a penalty box.

      You’ll see them for a few more years in things like Jeep’s, Broncos, the remaining Pony Cars, Miatas and cars like that, but the days of manuals being in low spec family haulers or even sporty versions of those aren’t coming back and I am under no illusion that my grandkids are going to even have the option.

  • avatar
    Boff

    The upcoming M3 is the only MT RWD sedan that I can think of, and then again there’s not necessarily a guarantee that it will be available. And we don’t know how uglified the car will be. I’m halfway through the lease on my M3, and it looks like a good candidate to buy out at the end.

  • avatar
    parabellum2000

    My wife has one of the 2.0 Sports with the 6speed. It’s a great car. The engine is way more powerful than I would have expected, handles beautifully, and the suspension manages to be sporty and comfortable at the same time.

    That said the transmission isn’t great. I much prefer the 6sp in my GTI which is nowhere near as good as the one I had in my RX8. My biggest gripe is that you have overcome a heavy detent to push it into reverse. I can’t seem to do it on purpose, but I’ve done it by accident a few times!

    When we test drove the automatic version it didn’t feel anywhere near as alive as the manual. I don’t know if it was just the way the auto was tuned, but it wasn’t fun to drive. If they can improve the tuning on the auto I think thier buyers will be very happy.

    Overall the transmission is less of an issue than the dealer experience, that’s the greatest problem facing genesis. Did you know that the whole “we will pick your car up for service” thing is completely at the discretion of the dealer and most won’t agree to do it, they won’t even give you a loaner if you wait!

  • avatar
    2kriss2kross

    As much as I support variety in the automotive market, I’ve grown sick of the hardcore #SavetheManuals movement every time a manual car is phased out. People been saying “A manual was going to be my next car” for years and sales keep declining. Manufacturers don’t measure sales expectations through Internet forums or used car lots. Put your money where your mouth is or quit bellyaching.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    I never thought I would be saying this but BMW needs to look at Hyundai (I mean Genesis!) to get some better design ideas. But here we are.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    What’s sad is I really thought Genesis did it right. There were those who whined about the fact that the manual wasn’t available in a truly bare bones G70 but Genesis had things (on paper) set up the way I would have wanted it.

    Mid-trim, pretty good creature comforts, Harmon Kardon audio, manual trans and LSD for the rear. Only real draw backs were the tiny trunk (10 cubic ft) and no vents for the rear seat passengers.

    Yes I would have been willing to buy new but not until my wife had her next “Mom’s Taxi” that would be large enough to carry the whole family off to Disneyland.

    I bought a car in a dying segment anyway (a wagon). Maybe I’ll make that my MO – every 6 or 7 years I’ll buy a vehicle in a segment that probably won’t exist by the time I’m ready to buy again.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I think there is some irony to manual die-hards always claiming they don’t care if a stick is slower because they are all about the je ne sais quoi of mechanical involvement but then also complain if the manual isn’t offered with the higher-output engines.

    • 0 avatar
      jack4x

      Speaking only for myself on this one:

      -The gap between engines is not equivalent to the gap between transmissions. The manual G70 does the 1/4 in about 15 seconds. The auto 2.0T is like 14.5, and the V6 is about 13 flat. I can live with sacrificing 1/2 a second, but 2 seconds is a lot.

      -I don’t particularly mourn the loss of manuals in everyday cars as much as some here do. I was never going to be an Accord buyer, so that car going to auto only doesn’t bother me. Same for most other cars where the performance gap might be noticeable every time I drive it. The cars I care about MTs in are high-powered enough that the speed distinction will be at the barest edges of what I can experience on the street. My Viper might be an 10.9 second car if it had a DCT. But 11.5 with a stick is a sacrifice I’m willing to make, because apart from full throttle on open roads or going on track, I just won’t notice.

      -There are other benefits to larger engines besides acceleration. Sound quality, towing confidence in trucks, unlocking of other option packages, etc.

    • 0 avatar
      snorlax

      It’s not really that difficult to understand. I enjoy driving a manual more than an automatic, and, independent of choice of transmission, I enjoy a more powerful engine more than a less powerful one.

      Also, in real world driving I’m not doing any 0-60 or 1/4 mile runs, so those numbers are more or less irrelevant. When I’m flooring it, I’m most likely either passing or merging, which means I downshift and THEN accelerate. In such a scenario shift times don’t matter, and an automatic transmission can if anything degrade performance by upshifting when I don’t want it to.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I rarely see many G70’s on the road in the NYC metro area though I did see a red one the other day. What struck me was that the exhaust tips are just on the passenger side which must be the 2.0. The 3.3 version has dual outlets.
    Maybe it’s the branding, lack of dealerships for now or just other makes offer better deals on their $35-50k sport sedans but I see far more Alfa Giulias, Audi A3 and 4, BMW 3 and 4 series and Benz CLA and C-class on the road.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    The auto transmission in the regular 2.0t G70 is no raving wonder. It’s some no-name H/K 8 speeder, sort of a copy of the 8 speed ZF, softened. Anyway, if you have your boot in it with boost and rpm well up and then have to lift off suddenly, the transmission has a fit. I tried it in second and third. There’s a giant whoomph and jerk and a feeling like you stuck it in low gear at 50 mph by mistake and let the clutch out in a manual — big deceleration until the transmission finally picks some higher gear or another. Refinement you’d expect for half the price is missing. H/Ks stike me as cars assembled from a catalog of parts that aren’t really tuned together. Not poor parts, just unco-ordinated parts.

    I mean, my best pal has a 2011 Sonata that acts exactly the same way when you cut the throttle suddenly. He knew exactly what I meant when I described the G70 symptom to him. He also works at a Chrysler dealer — it’s OK, the billionaire owner has 39 dealeships of all makes and has his employees covered all ways to Sunday, or is that Hyundai. I’ve been in his car numerous times, and it ain’t a bad old bus, with the emphasis on bus. Despite 13 recalls that required no repairs, it works fine, even has that supposedly dud 2.4l, which is a “may or may not grind its crankshaft to pieces” situation. Good parts, just not together as a whole. He doesn’t care about anything but reliabiliy being a warranty manager, but was highly impressed by an Altima he and some company guys rented for a 600 mile round trip! Oh yeah, CVY and all.

    With the G70 2.0t, no way to hold a gear, noisy from tire roar at the rear, no sense of sport, no back seat, and no actual fun I could discern. 3850 lbs. No doubt the 3.3t turns it into a raving loony monster, but I wasn’t prepared to spend that kind of money. Made me wonder at all the praise heaped on this thing. It’s like shopping at Amazon for clothes and shoes, you got no idea what’s really going to happen until you open up the cardboard box. People seem to have awarded the G70 five stars from the comfort of the home PC. You got to go and drive these things, people. Don’t stop at one, drive the lot to get some perspective — be your own reviewer. That’s what I did.

    The Mazda6 turbo 6 speed auto aces it over this thing. That’s the car I drove 15 minutes after the G70, and what I bought a year later, way cheaper. But basement/internet experts still claim the G70 is great. Sure. Had me a great little beat up of the back roads in the 6 turbo today. It’s why I’m in a great mood. What an engine, transmission and steering! Hee hee. Yup.

  • avatar
    emineid

    The G70 2.0T with automatic transmission sounds like a different beast than my 2.0T with stick. As soon as I got mine, I took it on the Tail of the Dragon and flogged it as hard as I could around the corners, and the handling and the confidence it inspired in me were impeccable. The comfort and the handling and the sense of quality on an 800-mile road trip was very comparable to the BMW 440i that I rented last year as well. Very close. Yes, they say that Hyundai/KIA used the 4-series Gran Coupe as the benchmark for the Stinger development, and it shows in my experience with my G70. My G70 came with the Michelin Pilot Sport 4 tires. These tires are *phenomenal.* These tires are amazing. On a whim, I swapped them onto my 2010 Honda Accord, and these tires turned the old Accord into an absolute beast around corners, just as good as a 440i or a G70, up there with a 2007 Porsche 911! I am not exaggerating. At anything close to legal speeds, this has been my experience. Perhaps the G70 2.0T auto comes with a lesser tire? Genesis website lists Michelin all seasons for the auto and the Pilot Sport 4 for the stick shift. Tires do make all the difference. I felt that the 440i felt a tad more solid than the G70, but the 440i also weighs several hundred pounds more, so there is that. I also did another experiment where I put Goodyear Assurance Comfortred tires on my G70 just to see, and these touring tires turned my G70 into an absolutely ordinary sedan that felt like a wallowing FWD boat around turns. So yes, in my experience, the tires can make *all* the difference. In fact, in the future, if I want a sporting experience, I would just slap some Pilot Sport 4 on whatever car I had, rather than spend the money on a G70 or a BMW or a Porsche!

  • avatar
    thornmark

    the value of manual equipped vehicles will go up

  • avatar
    SuperCarEnthusiast

    Many so called car enthusiasts say they prefer a manual to brag, but they actually own and drive automatics.

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