By on July 10, 2019

2019 Hyundai Tucson front quarter

2019 Hyundai Tucson Ultimate AWD

2.4-liter inline four, DOHC (181 hp @ 6000 rpm, 175 lb/ft. @ 4000 rpm)

Six-speed automatic transmission, all-wheel drive

21 city / 26 highway / 23 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

24.7 (observed mileage, MPG)

11.0 city / 9.1 highway / 10.1 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

Base Price: $33,995 US / $39,431CAD

As Tested: $34,130 US/ $39,562 CAD

Prices include $1045 destination charge in the United States and $1805 for freight, PDI, and A/C tax in Canada and, because of cross-border equipment differences, can’t be directly compared.

I’ve owned this pair of New Balance running shoes for at least 10 years. I don’t know why I call them running shoes – I’m a fat, middle-aged guy who doesn’t run unless being chased by a predator. Anyhow, they are old, worn, with dark stains from 10w-30 and greenish stains from mowing the lawn. These are not casual shoes to wear out on the town – unless your idea of date night is a run to Home Depot. They aren’t fancy, but they are always comfortable and will seemingly never wear out.

This 2019 Hyundai Tucson is the automotive equivalent of those shoes. I’m not saying it’s covered in grass stains or is otherwise ugly – but neither is it a flashy special collectors-edition limited colorway pair of hypebeast sneakers. It’s simply a solid, comfortable car that is incredibly easy to live with. I put a ton of miles on the Tucson in my week with it, and it felt like home. Like those old suburban dad shoes.

2019 Hyundai Tucson front

I’ve gone on the record with my distaste for the entire crossover genre. They unsuccessfully ape the looks of a rugged SUV, while generally not performing as well as a similarly sized sedan. Cargo space can be at a premium as well. But a few crossovers straddle the line well.

2019 Hyundai Tucson rear

I’ll grant that the fuel economy isn’t stellar here on the Tucson if comparing to a sedan. That said, for a tall all-wheel drive wagon, I was happy with nearly 25 mpg over a week with a bunch of interstate driving. I was inching close to four hundred miles between fuel stops, which I can assure you is just beyond the range of a ten-year-old’s bladder.

2019 Hyundai Tucson interior

I’d never subject a crossover to a serious off-roading excursion, but occasionally a trek through the woods on a groomed trail is necessary if headed to a secluded campsite. I was able to easily conquer a steep driveway lined in very loose gravel at my sister-in-law’s house – a driveway that bested the transfer case on a “real” SUV, by the way.

2019 Hyundai Tucson front seat

Those highway miles were pleasant enough – save the Tri-State Tollway around Chicago since I don’t have an I-Pass. But the twin-cam four cylinder was powerful enough to launch from those tollbooths with enough verve to merge without drama. The ride was unremarkable – impacts with potholes were muted, and expansion joints were dispatched without cowl shake.

2019 Hyundai Tucson rear seat

The Tucson isn’t much to look at, I’m afraid. While it’s unoffensive, it blends into the parking lot immediately, especially in this shade of metallic grey. The dark plastic cladding lining the lower extremities and the wheel wells is straight out of central casting for “Generic SUV.”

2019 Hyundai Tucson dashboard

One weird touch is the color of the trim surrounding the side windows – or, specifically, colors. Atop the window, it’s black. Below, it’s polished chrome. The two meet awkwardly at the top of the rear quarter window. I’ll admit I didn’t notice it until I looked closely at the photos, and thought it was a result of photographing with a potato. But once I looked at other angles, I drove to my local Hyundai dealer to verify. It isn’t my hackery with the lens, I’m afraid – and now I cannot unsee the transition.

2019 Hyundai Tucson profile

The interior is mercifully free of any weirdness. It’s basically the same interior found in nearly every current Hyundai, with only minor detail tweaks. The infotainment, while of the “iPad glued to the dash” variety, is large, clear, and simple to use. The HVAC controls are intuitive, though I’d prefer a knob to control fan speed over the pushbutton. Plastics are perhaps a touch hard in some spots, but no worse than most competitors in this price range.

2019 Hyundai Tucson gauges

I logged a good bit of windshield time with the Tucson, and the driver’s seat never made me complain. It’s relatively flat, but supportive enough to keep me from aching after hours in the saddle. The kids had plenty of space in the second row as well, and thirty-one cubic feet of cargo space behind the rear seats was plenty for everything we had to haul. I’m sure if we had a dog, rather than three cats who absolutely go insane at the sight of their carrier, that Fido would be happy in the tall, reasonably deep cargo space.

2019 Hyundai Tucson cargo area

I love that a wireless phone charger is fitted to this Ultimate trim, but I’d prefer it have some sort of positive phone retention. Flat phone pads such as this one are fine if the car never moves, but my phone tends to slide a bit while driving, thus losing connection to the charger. Not a big deal on my trip, as I plugged into USB anyhow to access Android Auto – so I could use Waze to avoid the bulk of Chicago traffic.

2019 Hyundai Tucson center stack

You’re wondering why I subtitled the review “This Old Brown Shoe.” Well, George Harrison was my favorite Beatle, and he had a B-side named “Old Brown Shoe” in 1969 that I particularly enjoy. Well, a new color for the Tucson this year is Sage Brown, so were I to buy one I’d have to choose that hue.

2019 Hyundai Tucson Screenshot

Ever the cheapskate, I’d forgo the Ultimate trim and spec the SEL trim that most dealers tend to stock. I would also lose the panoramic sunroof (I’d rather not sacrifice headroom for a piece of glass), pedestrian detection (that’s what my eyes are for, right?), leather, and ventilated front seats (this one might hurt). As central Ohio weather generally doesn’t require anything more than front-wheel drive, I’d skip all-wheel drive. That gives me a perfectly capable commuter at $26,645.

At that price, it’s a shoe-in.

2019 Hyundai Tucson rear quarter

 

[Images: © 2019 Chris Tonn, screenshot courtesy HyundaiUSA.com]

 

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56 Comments on “2019 Hyundai Tucson – This Old Brown Shoe...”


  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    The Tucson is one of those appliances that does its job well, but without an ounce of ceremony. Thus, to those of us in the comments section, it loses some points compared to its more-stylized or “fun” competitors, including its own platform sister (the Kia Sportage).

    There are also those of us who think the very existence of the crossover is offensive…for reasons that, plainly, sound ridiculous. There is a difference between dislike or preference against, and outright hatred.

    *But* consider how many people love the idea of a generally reliable, safe, functional, competitively equipped, and affordable vehicle that’s easy to step into. Quite a few. I appreciate that this review, like your other plain-car reviews, keeps that lens in mind. This Tucson is not designed to go around the Nurburgring at speed, or tow 8,000 pounds, or ford three feet of water.

    Keep up the good work.

    P.S. the Tucson is not the only car with partial-chrome window trim that ends in a weird place, but I’m glad you pointed this out. On the (now-discontinued) second-generation Cruze, L and LS models had no chrome window trim, LT models had partial chrome that looked a lot like that of this Tucson, and only Premier models (which I owned an example of) got the full chrome window surrounds.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I guess the question is, what does this offer to make it stand out from other CUVs?

      It isn’t agressively ugly (which can be a rarity in 2019) but general competency sounds like its greatest virtue and that isn’t too hard to come by in this class. Unless you have a great relationship with your Hyundai dealer I don’t see what would get someone to buy this.

      • 0 avatar
        jh26036

        I’ve been shopping this segment pretty extensively and I will say the Tucson content value proposition is very strong. The biggest letdown is their combined fuel economy sticking around the low 20s via Fuelly. In this day, that’s just too far off from what I consider acceptable for a non turbo 4 CUV. A CX-5 is in the mid to upper 20s and so is the Rav4.

    • 0 avatar
      cprescott

      As far as what this is, it is at least not hideous to look at like the Toyoduh and Honduh versions which inflict eye damage at each glance. Furthermore, unlike the Honduh models, this has wheels and tires that are proportionate and do not look like thin Conestoga wheels which are set too far inward for appearance balance.

      Other than that, I still loathe it.

    • 0 avatar
      cprescott

      As far as what this is, it is at least not hideous to look at like the Toyoduh and Honduh versions which inflict eye damage at each glance. Furthermore, unlike the Honduh models, this has wheels and tires that are proportionate and do not look like thin Conestoga wheels which are set too far inward for appearance balance.

      Other than that, I still loathe it.

    • 0 avatar
      legacygt

      That partial chrome does look awkward but at least it looks intentional. The car that drives me crazy is the Mercedes GLS. Where the chrome that runs across the top of the side windows meets the chrome that runs along the bottom there is a seam. It looks awful. The strips are at roughly 90° to each other and they are of slightly different thickness and contour. It looks cheap and these sell well north of $100K.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        The crucial question is would it still be as comfortable/comforting after 5+ years of ownership, or once it is off warranty?

        Perhaps the MPG issue is because Hyundai still uses an AT rather than a CVT? And if this is so, would that not be a comfort to owners?

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          They switched to a CVT on the Elantra recently (and also killed the 6-speed manual, on both the base and Sport versions), so you can probably expect the Tucson to follow suit sometime.

    • 0 avatar
      VJW

      We just bought the 2019 Tuscon and we love it. The cabin is very quite, and the engine is easy to drive gently in normal mode. The six speed auto is butter smooth. We drove a 2019 RAV4 and it was really noisy. I asked if the top trim level is quieter – Nope there all the same. The Honda CRV has a CVT transmission which I don’t trust for the long run. Any way you cant go wrong with the Tuscon!

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        We had an excellent ownership experience with a 2011 Elantra, bought new for my grand daughter’s HS grad gift.

        She kept it all through her college days, with 150+ mile roundtrips four times a week.

        Never a problem. Only regular oil&filter changes, done by moi.

        But it did eat the original Kumho tires quickly. Replaced them with Michelin and got better wear.

        Then replaced them with Pirelli just before she sold that little car, because Pirelli were the cheapest I could find at Discount Tire.

        Still in use today by the new owner. Still no problems except for regular wear and tear, like tires, belts, brakes and windshield wipers, antifreeze, and AC recharging.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        “We drove a 2019 RAV4”

        Is there any reason you didn’t try the hybrid version of the Toyota? For people not towing and staying on-pavement that seems like the killer app in this segment.

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          THIS. This class is just “small wagons on stilts,” yet it struggles mightily to return real world MPG any higher than 22-25 MPG. This job calls for a hybrid.

      • 0 avatar
        jh26036

        The gasser vs hybrid RAV4 is a world of difference. I drove the gasser and thought the noise was a complete non-starter despite liking the rest of the car. I recently drove the hybrid and totally completed the package. It is fairly quiet, faster than anything else in this segment minus turbo CX5, and real world owners are getting upper 30s mpg combined.

        The Toyota eCVTs have been proven with reliable fleet use all across the world. It’s hard to really make that argument against Toyota with CVTs and longevity.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Although I bought a $30K+ Kia, the Theta II engine family has had enough issues during it’s life to end up on my “don’t buy it” list.

  • avatar
    Moparmann

    My question is: Would you be able to drop the options/items that you listed, or would you find that they come in bundled packages?

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    It is what it is, your basic, everyday, unpretentious crossover. Ok, but I understand there’s a huge market for just such a vehicle. Perhaps that’s why I see them everywhere doing the family thing they were designed to do. It’s today’s version of the much maligned station wagon then minivan. Our kids will hate them and will drive anything but when they grow up

  • avatar
    Rnaboz

    Chris, I don’t have I-pass either. However, when going to my sister in WI, we note toll # and time. When you get home, go to their website and put it all on your credit card. Same price as paying cash and saves 45 minutes of waiting in line.

    • 0 avatar
      mmreeses

      7-day grace period on the IL tollway system, not many prominent signs to convey that fact.

      And for non-locals traveling through, try your best to avoid the Chicagoland area highways during the rush period (7a to 7p, with a tiny midday lull).

      You get it, you don’t get out.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      I have an I-pass and I live in Wisconsin, even if I only go to Chicago once a year I refuse to sit in the pay-toll line

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      They don’t have license plate tolling?

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        They do but requires an active I pass account with transponder the catch is that they allow up to 5 electronic tolls at the discount price before they’ll start charging full toll price.

        I mounted my transponder on a holder I got from Amazon instead of mounting to the glass. Easier to transfer to a rental if necessary.

  • avatar
    cprescott

    Those who advocate and like CUV’s, SUV’s, and Crossover’s are the worst kind of fools – they whine that there are those of us who hate the blobs of mass that are impossible to see through at traffic lights – which are bulky, do the same thing that station wagons did years ago, and aren’t that much more fuel efficient. It is as if it is okay to kiss every SUV, but dare speak ill of the roadmonsters and you are a special hate monger.

    In short, I loathe these vehicles; still I understand people like them, but I will never. Those who buy these do limit my choices as a CAR person which I detest even more since the seagulls have found a new food source and be damned to those of us who want something efficient and right sized.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      Pick-up trucks are ok, right? ;-)

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I think you’ll have to get over it.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      I’m sure the 1950 Plymouth owner felt the same way when after 7 years started shopping for a new car, only to find everything was longer, lower, wider.

      I’ll take the convenience and comfort of a CUV any and every day over a sedan. And even though I’m a big guy (6’3”), a compact CUV is imminently more comfortable than a compact or even mid-size car. To each their own I guess.

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      Yeah but. Here’s things I had forgotten existed when I went from my not-quite-a-CUV-thing-but-close-enough C-Max, back to a low-slung sedan:

      1. Just by cutting in close to the curb to park in a sedan, scraping the paint off the lower front fender behind the bumper.
      2. Just by my passenger having the misfortune to be by a rock, high curb, or bulbous tree root in a sedan, scraping the paint off the lower passenger door.
      3. Just by the fact EVERYTHING else on the road now sits higher than a sedan, having to drive EXTRA defensively and actively make eye contact with other drivers, who seem aware only of vehicles sitting as tall as they do.
      4. Just by driving through a dip or driveway, scraping the front air dam (hopefully not ripping it off).
      5. Impact harshness. Sedans lack wheel travel, and some of them (mine) slap the bumps hard.
      6. Blind spots. The big boi was a fishbowl. The sedan has massive blind spots at every pillar. MASSIVE.
      7. My lousy muscle tone. It’s a bit of a production to get in and out of a rakish low-slung sedan. Getting into a taller vehicle is just a matter of sliding your arse right in.

      The C-Max combines what I like best about cars (tidy size, precise handling, great MPG) and what I like best about CUVs (tall hatchback cargo space, excellent visibility, easy to live with). Unfortunately it was under-engineered and under-built (mine creaked like a pirate ship and twisted like an aftermarket 1980s convertible). Based on my first five years of ownership, I just didn’t trust it out of warranty.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    My friend has a 2018 blue Tucson in SE Plus trim with the smaller 2.0 engine that he bought new last year. A few things about it stand out. It is very quiet going down the road and rides nicely. Perhaps due to having smaller sized tires than the higher Limited and Sport trim levels. Also noted- the 6 speed Hyundai automatic shifts very well and the interior seems to be of good quality. Certainly far better than another friends 2016 Rav 4. On the negative side is the buzzy slow 2.0 engine that struggles with 3 aboard and the A/C blaring and mpg as a result is not that great. He typically sees 22-23 on the average but has never cracked 26 on the open road. It is AWD but that kind of mileage makes me not regret my 2017 Impala LT 2.5 at all.

    • 0 avatar
      quaquaqua

      I had a 2.0L Tucson as a rental and I got 36mpg on a tank of gas going to and from Chicago, mix of highway/traffic/stop and go. Can’t imagine your 4 cylinder Impala could accomplish that. People just drive differently.

  • avatar
    bd2

    The Tucson got a much needed interior upgrade w/ its refresh; unfortunately, the sheetmetal took a step back (a little step – not like the facelifted Elantra, which was a huge step).

    But even w/ the refresh, the Tucson is starting to show its age (at least there’s going to be a Tucson N or N-line, so the current model will go out w/ somewhat of a bang).

    The next gen Tucson should be a bit larger (as competitors like the CR-V and RAV-4 were already larger and since have only grown further w/ their current iterations) and yet lighter (new platform) and more efficient (new powertrains starting w/ the 2.5 Theta III mill).

    It’ll be interesting what Hyundai designers have in store for the next Tucson; hope it’s more like the Santa Fe than the Kona or Palisade.

  • avatar
    incautious

    Rumor has i,t that it was George himself playing bass on Old Brown Shoe as opposed to sir Paul. By the sounds of it I would say that’s true.;-)

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “I’ve owned this pair of New Balance running shoes for at least ten years. I don’t know why I call them running shoes – I’m a fat, middle-aged guy who doesn’t run unless being chased by a predator. Anyhow, they are old, worn, with dark stains from 10w-30 and greenish stains from mowing the lawn.”

    HA! I’ve got *two* old pairs of New Balance walkers, one that’s my last retired pair that I wear for stuff like working on props for this fall’s high school marching band show (yes, I’m the oldest guy on the pit crew) so I don’t get paint on my new Columbias. Then there’s the pair before that, which I wear only for mowing the yard and working on cars. I keep having to Super Glue pieces of the soles back on those (pieces that were originally glued on at the factory), and I’ve missed a couple of pieces, that disappeared. The other day my wife was asking when I was going to throw them away – to which I replied, “Never!”

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Back when your humble narrator here was REALLY big – we’re talking 320 pounds – I had all kinds of foot problems, and bought a pair of NB 990s. They were awesome. Made in the US, as I recall.

      I dropped about 120 pounds a couple of years back, so I don’t have foot problems anymore. These days, I wear Chucks with a good insert, and that works just fine (or I’d recommend the Chuck Taylor Pros, which are designed as walking shoes).

      I’d heartily recommend the 990s for anyone whose feet aren’t in good shape – they’re pricey, but they’re excellent.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Chris, my choice in Tucson trim would be the same as yours. But, alas, not for some time to come. Also, the Rogue is a good option instead.

  • avatar
    bd2

    Saucony > New Balance

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      My wife seems to be particularly tough on sneakers but due to bunion surgery several years back has to wear supportive sneakers with a stable footbed.

      Saucony were the only ones she ever had fail faster than New Balance.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      New Balances’ American made sneakers are second to none that I’ve tried, their rest of the world (China, Thailand etc) shoes are hit and miss like every other manufacturer.

  • avatar
    Raevoxx

    The face-lift and interior updates are very nice. Unfortunately that came with dropping the 1.6T / DCT option.

    Argue all you want about the appropriateness of a DCT in a CUV, fact of the matter is that it lost a more potent engine option.

    Though my theory is that the…. Tucson N-Line…. will see it come back, or will get the 2.0T. With what transmission, I’m not sure. The wet clutch 8sp DCT I’m pretty sure is being developed for the 2.5T, and I guess it could go into the 2.0T?

    I can hardly believe they will put the 2.5T in it, even detuned..But if the rest of the lineup adopts the NA and turbo 2.5, I can’t see why they’d keep the old 2.0 around.

    The working theory for the Veloster is 1.6T for the Turbo and R-Spec, 2.0T FWD for the N-Line, and the 2.5T AWD upgrade for the full N.

  • avatar
    MKizzy

    I drove a loaner Tuscon 1.6T Limited which shares the same powertrain as my Sonata for a day during a service appointment. It was attractive, pretty decent on gas, and quick once the slow DCT takeoff behavior was accounted for which made it more “interesting” to drive. Its biggest fault was a small gas tank that gave it about 200mi less driving range than the Sonata.

    The restyle replaced the Tuscon’s once attractive nose with a generic one that is too square and moving the rear reflectors higher on the back makes the rear look awkward. I understand Hyundai’s decision to drop the DCT since auto journalists (esp. Consumer Reports) and owners ignorant of the DCT transmission’s quirks cried foul. What I don’t understand is why they didn’t just pair the 1.6T with the 6 speed slushbox and keep the power and fuel economy competitive; or better yet, use the Elantra Sport’s 201hp version. The sum total of the changes made the Tuscon a bland gas hog compared to its competitors. I hope the next Tuscon is more interesting.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      “I understand Hyundai’s decision to drop the DCT since auto journalists (esp. Consumer Reports) and owners ignorant of the DCT transmission’s quirks cried foul.”

      So you drove a loaner but didn’t live with it for a long period of time? For the record—the Tucson uses a different DCT setup than the sedans.

      Hyundai was buying cars back due to false neutrals, overheating warnings and various others issues that were not customer related. It’s the same song and dance that Ford did with the PowerShift in the Focus/Fiesta.

  • avatar
    Polka King

    “I’ve gone on the record with my distaste for the entire crossover genre. They unsuccessfully ape the looks of a rugged SUV, while generally not performing as well as a similarly sized sedan.”

    I don’t mean to be critical, and I mean this in the best way possible, but you’re an idiot. Crossovers don’t give a shit about “rugged SUVs”. All they are is the perfect size and shape for moving people and stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Then why do we have plastic bumpers on these crossovers that imitate the look of skid plates, and why do manufacturers try to sell crossovers as SUVs, many times going as far to showcase them in an off-road environment that is carefully fielded to be gentle enough for a corvette to traverse? Why does the Jeep brand sell one SUV and a multitude of crossovers as an off-roading brand?

      Clearly manufacturers sell and consumers buy crossovers under the guise of being a wanna be SUV.

  • avatar
    Dan

    10 years? I wish that I could get 10 months out of a pair of sneakers. Between being a big guy and being on my feet most of the day anything soft and comfortable is literally worn down to the belts by then.

    As far as this Hyundai, I know it’s 2019 so you can’t have a V6 anymore but 35 grand on the sticker and a driver short of two tons and they can’t even boost the four? Seriously? Not only does the expensive one not get something good, the poverty trims that they don’t share with the press – and keep in mind that this is Hyundai so that’s 75% of them – get the 1999cc hamster wheel as found in an Elantra. A $7,000 cheaper, 500 lb lighter Elantra. Yuck.

    Yuck.

  • avatar
    thehyundaigarage

    Typical Hyundai, take a good looking vehicle and ruin it on the “refresh”

    Not only is the refresh for 2019 boring, but then they drop the reliable Gamma 1.6T and replace it with a ThetaII. So now we’ll see these Tucsons within the next year at our service department, all awaiting short blocks..

    I’ve never had a customer at the dealership complain about the DCT in their Tucson (short of the initial recall for a reflash) after I took them for a drive and explained to them how it works and why it’s doing what it’s doing.

    I firmly believe the majority of Hyundai DCT complains stem from a lack of education to consumers. When we show them how they function and they understand their quirks, we never have the customers back with issues.

    I’ve got a 2016 1.6T and I love the thing. Feels peppier than it’s 175HP would suggest, and a light foot returns 30mpg on the highway.

    I’ll keep it!

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Why make a transmission for a mass-market vehicle with “quirks” in the first place?

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      “I firmly believe the majority of Hyundai DCT complains stem from a lack of education to consumers. When we show them how they function and they understand their quirks, we never have the customers back with issues.”

      Or they take it somewhere else. 4 dealers and the same song and dance to have someone ACTUALLY DRIVE IT hooked up to a diagnostic tool.

      • 0 avatar
        thehyundaigarage

        Don’t get me wrong, I won’t sit here and defend every single Hyundai DCT. We’ve had legitimate issues with them, and we fix them when they have a real problem, but a lot of the time it’s been a matter of education. Those same customers are coming back for service on a regular basis without complaint.

        Also, when a customer comes in with a complaint, every one of them goes on a test drive with a tech, and if we feel anything abnormal, it gets drive data recorded with GDS and put on a hoist and repaired.

        2016 Tucson’s and Velosters with the new 7 speed had their teething problems, yes, but have been sorted.

        Now, a 6 speed DCT in a non turbo veloster? Well, it got the nick name “eco [email protected]$t” for good reason….You can’t fix poor design at a dealership.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Nice write-up. Competent vehicle.

    But pretty thirsty IMO.

    At least Hyundai still offers cars. In the event of a fuel price spike or shortage, they’ll be OK.

    Tom

  • avatar
    gtem

    “a driveway that bested the transfer case on a “real” SUV, by the way.”

    Do tell!

  • avatar
    IBx1

    What a miserable vehicle this is. New Balance shoes would be more Toyota; this thing is a pair of AND1 shoes from Walmart.

    • 0 avatar
      SPPPP

      I think AND1 is a pretty poor comparison for the Tucson. AND1 trades on attitude, the Tucson does not. (Just to confirm this, I had to look up and double-check the headline to make sure I was commenting on the right vehicle.) If it has to be from WalMart, I think this vehicle is from the Faded Glory brand. (Both serious statement and pun intended.) Unassuming, middle-of-the-road clothing that does the job and resembles well-known brands, while being constructed in a cheaper way.


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