Price Wars: Ford Pits Brawnier Four-cylinder Mustang Against Chevrolet's Bargain V8 Camaro

Steph Willems
by Steph Willems
price wars ford pits brawnier four cylinder mustang against chevrolets bargain v8

A new addition to the Ford Mustang lineup arrives this fall, just in time to do battle with a new addition to Chevrolet’s Camaro stable. As sales falter, the pony car wars are heating up. However, while these two steeds do not differ greatly in price, their means of motivation are quite dissimilar.

Now that pricing has been revealed for the 2020 Mustang equally new Camaro LT1 — a bargain V8 model slotted below the SS. It’s four cylinders versus eight.

Ticking the box for the High Performance Package elevates the Mustang above the entry-level EcoBoost model, but it doesn’t quite reach GT levels. It does in some regards, though. The package adds a larger twin-scroll turbo and other alterations to a 2.3-liter EcoBoost borrowed from the now defunct Focus RS, then bundles it together with 13.9-inch front brake rotors and 255/40 R19 rubber sourced from the GT Performance Package. A tuned exhaust, rejigged suspension, and GT Performance Package aero add-ons complete the package.

Output is 330 horsepower, some 20 ponies more than the standard EcoBoost, with an identical torque figure: 350 lb-ft.

As CarsDirect reports, order guides show the package costing $4,995, with a Ford spokesperson confirming the price. This places the MSRP for a 2020 Mustang EcoBoost coupe with High Performance Package at $32,760 after delivery. Should buyers choose, they can boost the model’s prowess (and slightly surpass the price of a Mustang GT) by adding the Handling Package. The upgrade, which requires an equipment package, pushes the model to $36,755. A 10-speed automatic will cost you more.

Compared to this, Chevy’s Camaro 1LT borrows the 6.2-liter naturally aspirated V8 found in the SS, sending 455 hp and 455 lb-ft to the rear wheels via a six-speed manual for an after-delivery price of $34,995. That’s three grand less than an SS, but just over two grand more than a Mustang High Performance Package (you can call the car that — there’ll be badging). Of course, adding the Handling Package will see the Stang’s price leapfrog the Camaro’s by nearly two grand.

Levels of content between the two differ, of course, and in many cases this will be the deciding factor for those not afflicted with Ford vs. GM Syndrome.

Both models go on sale this fall, with the rival automakers attempting to stimulate sales by giving buyers what they want: more power. In Chevy’s case, the strategy is more power for less cost. If boosted four-bangers aren’t your bag, GM wins in the eight-cylinder field, at least in terms of price. Unfortunately for the General, the base Camaro’s turbo four pales next to the entry-level EcoBoost, delivering the slightly more expensive Ford a win on the bottom rung.

[Images: Ford, General Motors]

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  • Ol Shel Ol Shel on May 29, 2019

    I will take a Mustang LT1, please.

  • Art Vandelay Art Vandelay on May 29, 2019

    Eh, the correct answer is an LS swapped third gen Trans Am with a cage, T Tops, and Guns n Roses Greatest Hits...on cassette of course. Busch Light and Marlboro Reds sold separately. In all honesty we were at the pool this weekend and I saw several nice cars go by to include a new 911. But half the pool stopped when a beautiful, early 4th gen Z-28 with an exhaust pulled away from the stop sign.

  • Theflyersfan As a kid, a neighbor had one of these full-sized conversion vans with the TV and wet bar in the back. And it was so cool to go in - as a kid it was, driving it had to be terror at times with blind spots, iffy power and brakes, and the feeling that you're hauling your living room with you! Kids of the 1970s and 1980s had this experience. Afterwards with minivans and then CUV everything, not so much.And I'm crushed that a 1977 van doesn't have some kind of mural on the sides. Coyote howling at the moon, American flag, Confederate flag, bright stripes, something! You can't have a 1970's era van with plain sides! At least a "Don't Laugh. Your daughter's in here" bumper sticker on the back. I always get a Gacy or Bundy vibe with these vans...
  • Jeff S In the EV market Tesla is not a niche player it is the major player. According to the latest data of the California-based vehicle valuation and automotive research company  Kelley Blue Book, Tesla has the lion’s share with 75 percent market share in  the electric vehicle market in the first three months of 2022.Tesla has dominated the electric vehicle market for years in the United States. The electric vehicles manufactured by Tesla accounted for 79 percent of the new electric vehicles registered in the United States in 2020 and 69,95 percent in 2021. The decrease in the market share in 2021 might be explained by backlogs and the global chip shortage, but the company is ramping up its sales and has already increased its market share to 75 percent in the first quarter of the year. According to Kelley Blue Book, the top 10 EVs sold in the US in the first quarter of 2022 are;[list=1][*]Tesla Model Y[/*][*]Tesla Model 3[/*][*]Ford Mustang Mach-E[/*][*]Tesla Model X[/*][*]Hyundai Ioniq 5[/*][*]Kia EV6[/*][*]Tesla Model S[/*][*]Nissan Leaf[/*][*]Kia Niro[/*][*]Audi e-Tron[/*][/list=1]Tesla has delivered 310,048 vehicles in the first quarter of 2022, another first-quarter record. The success of Tesla is proven once again as the company has three electric cars in the top 10 most selling electric vehicles in the United States, while no other manufacturer has even two different models on the list.Tesla leads all others, selling slightly over 936,000 units in 2021. This gave the company a market share of nearly 14%.Mar 30, 2022https://interestingengineering.com/transportation/tesla-ev-market-75-percent-market-share
  • Jeff S I did not know Plymouth had a full size van prior to the mini vans. I did know about the Plymouth pickups and the Trail Duster.
  • Arthur Dailey When I grew tired of the T-Bird trying to kill me by refusing to start at the most inconvenient times/places, I replaced it with a '79 fullsized Dodge (Sportsman) van. Similar to this but with a different grille and rectangular headlights. The 4 'captains' chairs in my van were pretty much identical to the ones in this van. Mine certainly was not as nicely finished inside. And it was a handful to drive in snow/ice. One thing that strikes me about this van is that although a conversion it does not seem to have the requisite dark tint on the windows.
  • Jeff S I am not a fan of Tesla and they were niche vehicles but it seems that they have become more common. I doubt if I get an EV that it would be a Tesla. The electrical grid will have to be expanded because people over the long run are not going to accept the excuse of the grid can't handle people charging their EVs.
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