By on April 30, 2019

Cummins, maker of the beastly 6.7-liter inline-six diesels found beneath the hoods of various Ram Heavy Duty pickups, claims it is looking into its emissions certification and compliance process.

In a statement released Monday, the decision to investigate the process came after “conversations” with the Environmental Protection Agency and California Air Resources Board. Specifically, the probe targets the revamped engines used in Ram’s 2019 HD line, not the 5.0-liter V8 found in the Nissan Titan XD.

“This review is being conducted with external advisors to ensure the certification process for Cummins pickup truck applications is consistent with its internal policies, engineering standards and applicable laws,” the company said. “Cummins has voluntarily disclosed the review to our regulators and other agencies and will cooperate with them to ensure a complete and thorough review and implement recommendations for improvement.”

For 2019, the Ram HD buyer has a choice of two Cummins flavors: a 370 horsepower, 850 lb-ft mill available in the Ram 2500 and 3500, and a class-leading 400 hp, 1,000 lb-ft variant available only in the 3500 (when equipped with Aisin automatic transmission).

2019 Ram Heavy Duty 6.7 liter Cummins I6 with 400hp and 1000 lb ft torque

Numerous changes separate the new 6.7L mills from their predecessors. Among them, a compacted graphite iron block that drops weight by 60 pounds, a new cast-iron cylinder head (featuring high-temperature exhaust valves actuated by in-block hydraulic lash adjusters), a new fuel delivery system, and new connecting rods, bearings, and crankshaft.

While neither Cummins nor Fiat Chrysler has elaborated on the probe, it brings to mind the recent investigation launched by Ford into how the company determines road load specifications for the fuel economy and emissions certification process. Ford now finds itself subject to a Justice Department probe.

“We are reviewing our certification process and it’s too early to tell what, if any actions, would or might be needed,” Jon Mills, a Cummins spokesman, told Bloomberg.

When contacted by the publication, an FCA spokesperson said the automaker is happy to cooperate as needed.

Ram’s 2019 HD line went on sale this month, with the upgraded turbo-diesel powerplants serving as a standout feature FCA hopes to beat its competitors over the head with. Execs no doubt hope the probe turns up zilch. The EcoDiesel fiasco is still too close in the rear-view.

[Images: © 2019 Matthew Guy/TTAC, Cummins]

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7 Comments on “Cummins Looking Into Ram HD Engine Emissions Certification Process...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    After running their statements through the BS translator:

    “Holy crap, the EPA and CARB may have busted us on diesel shenanigans, so we’d better get ahead of this and look like we’re cooperating or else our golden goose is cooked. And our engineers are feverishly working on Plan B tweaks right now. Also, we hope we won’t have to write some big checks for fines.”

    • 0 avatar
      mason

      Doubtful. Otherwise the investigation would be much more widespread than JUST the Ram pickup line.

      I’d wager this is something Cummins has seen on Rams end that they don’t like and are trying to get out in front of it before it turns into an ugly knock down drag out fight like the SCR recall where Cummins gave Ram exactly what they wanted on the back end and then cried wolf when Ram realized their bean counter approach backfired. Cummins has worked extensively with the EPA, I highly doubt they would ever intentionally cheat anything. It’s just not in their culture. Ram on the other hand….I don’t know.

  • avatar
    Illan

    Steph WIllens,

    i think the cummins 1k torque monster will be also available on the 2500. but without the House pulling towing capacity if the 3500.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    Holy crap, those are powerful engines. Like, briskly motivate a Greyhound powerful.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      except a Greyhound would use a 12-13 liter engine to get those numbers, because they’re more interested in longevity and not getting into p*ssing matches with pickup truck douches.


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