By on August 27, 2018

2017 Ford Focus S sedan - Image: Ford

After Ford’s decision to cull all passenger cars except the Mustang, Blue Oval brass felt confident that existing and upcoming Ford trucks, SUVs, and crossovers (or crossover-like vehicles) would be more than enough to keep current car owners in the family.

That’s probably wishful thinking. A new survey of Ford sedan owners shows that the allure of other brands — those that still sell sedans — is enough to lure plenty of them away from the Ford flock.

The Cox Automotive survey, first reported on by Automotive News, reveals a fractured community of sedan owners. Half of the Ford sedan owners surveyed said they’d switch brands and purchase a new or used vehicle from a rival automaker when it comes time to ditch their car.

Though Ford owners weren’t a large wedge of the survey’s respondents, their answers show that Dearborn can’t count on light trucks to keep the family in one piece. Higher margins and new-to-the-brand buyers are good, but CEO Jim Hackett specifically said his company wouldn’t abandon car owners. Instead, Ford plans to reinvent the car.

“We don’t want anyone to think we’re leaving anything,” Hackett said in May.

Of the Ford sedan owners in Cox’s survey, only 10 percent said they’d swap their car for a Ford SUV or crossover at trade-in time. Five percent said they’d purchase a Mustang, while only 3 percent said they’d get behind the wheel of a truck. The majority of sedan owners surveyed said they opposed Ford’s decision to ditch all but one of its passenger cars.

Give this finding whatever weight you feel it deserves, as Ford wasn’t exactly facing skyrocketing sedan sales when it sent in the executioner. Quite the opposite. Still, no automaker wants to see customers jumping ship.

However, exactly what vehicles will replace these entry-level and low-end products still isn’t clear. Without something new and semi car-like to show off, what are existing owners supposed to look at and pine for? Right now, Ford’s main focus lies in launching the upcoming Bronco SUV, unnamed “Baby Bronco” crossover, and Ranger pickup. Rumors exist of a five-door, high-roof vehicle bearing the Fusion name — likely a slightly lifted, crossoverized vehicle in line with the future Focus Active.

According to Ford, seven of the nine new nameplates it expects to add over the next five years are light trucks, and the remaining two might be electric in nature. That doesn’t leave the automaker with a lot of product to woo, say, a Fiesta or Fusion owner with.

[Image: Ford]

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84 Comments on “Oh No! Maybe There’s Some Loyalty to Sedans After All...”


  • avatar
    phxmotor

    New Coke. Classic Coke.
    New Ford. Sedan Ford.
    Nobody got rid of Classic Coke. Nobodies getting
    rid of Sedan Ford.
    Marketing ploys.
    Both.

    • 0 avatar
      smartascii

      The difference is that Coke (New, Classic, or otherwise) isn’t a lifestyle product. You buy Coke instead of Pepsi because you like it better, not because you see yourself as a “Coke person.” This is not true of cars. There are *lots* of people who think of themselves as “Jeep” people, even though the most adventuresome thing they’ve ever done with their car is to park on the grass one time. There are also people who buy BMWs and never do anything sportier than accelerate a little bit to pass a truck. So an ever-dwindling number of people are left who will buy non-luxury sedans for the same reason the minivan market is shrinking: customers think those vehicles say something about the owner that they don’t like. It’s an emotional decision, and the people with the means to indulge it are the ones buying new cars.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I’m certain they all bought their Ford sedans at firesale prices, highlighting Ford’s problem. “I’ll only buy your sedan if you take a loss on the sale” Ford has indoctrinated its sedan buyers to the old JCPenney business model to their own peril.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      I paid $36,500 + tax for a plug in Fusion four years ago.

      My previous two vehicles were an Aerostar and a Focus. Someday the Fusion will need to be replaced. It will not be with a crossover or truck. If Ford is no longer interested in my business I will go elsewhere.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Just steer the sedan buyers toward an overpriced, Fiesta hatch on stilts, and problem solved.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Hackett is a complete moron.

    He’s not fit to run an ice cream stand.

    The autoextremist has a good rant on Ford and Hackett. Spot on.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Ford hasn’t figured out how to sell a mainstream sedan at a profit in…. 20 years?

      What do you suggest they do?

      • 0 avatar
        salmonmigration

        Look at the Dodge Charger. It’s an old-school approach to the sedan that actually appeals to people (long and powerful, not stubby and fuel-efficient).

        Ford makes a new full-size that’s a Charger-fighter and they’ll print money all the way to the bank. They already have a platform with the Mustang.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Charger is not much better shape. New listings here are for 20-30% off and it’s heavily dependent on fleet sales and cheap gas. FCA just has the buoys of RAM AND Jeep as opposed to just the F-150 like Ford.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Look at the Dodge Charger. It’s an old-school approach to the sedan that actually appeals to people (long and powerful, not stubby and fuel-efficient).

          The Dodge Charger in its mass volume trims is a fleet queen (good fleet as in government AND bad fleet as in rentals) and a sub-prime darling.

          Charger sales peaked in 2013, plateaued and are in decline now. As far as popularity, the RWD full-size sedan in America is all but dead. Ford and GM both abandoned the segment. For FWD full-size sedans Ford and Hyundai abandoned the segment, Avalon sales peaked in 2013 and have since plummeted, Impala sales have plummeted (however GM does make a profit on E II cars), and the LaCrosse is on life support.

          Additionally, if I want a car from FCA not called Alfa or Fiat, my only option in the remaining brands is Charger or 300 (built on the same platform). On the subject of the 300, Chrysler 300 sales peaked in 2012, and then dropped significantly in 2013 and have plateaued.

          A winning combination is not, “hey, let’s sell a 15 year old platform car and just keep putting bigger engines in them). Chrysler tried that strategy in the previous decade (hey, we’ll put a Hemi in everything) and we know how that story ended.

          • 0 avatar
            Lockstops

            Selling cars with a discount does not mean making a loss.
            A decline of sales numbers from previous years does not mean that they are making a loss.

          • 0 avatar
            salmonmigration

            The gripe about the age of the LX platform is also to my point, though. Even a 15-year old car is still pulling profits for FCA since the segment is so anemic.

            Ford has a modern platform (S550) with which they can dominate the segment.

            Hell they could call it Thunderbird and nobody would really blink an eye.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          Say what you want about the LX sedans, but FCA reports that they are still making the company a profit, which is something Ford claims none of their cars were doing.

          I’m not saying “build a Charger” is the answer for Ford, but people shouldn’t pretend like it is *impossible* to sell a profitable non luxury sedan in 2018.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          You can’t scale the platform up enough to make a big sedan with the S550 – the best Ford could do would be to build a small sedan off the Mustang platform.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          @ salmonmigration

          The S550 platform cant scale up for a full size sedan (although you can do the reverse and scale down – GM obviously did that with the fifth gen Camaro but weight will always be an issue since its just not possible to trim all the fat).

          About the best Ford coul do is make a similar size sedan in a more upright and space effcient configuration.

          Not that it wouldn’t be cool though, especially if they raided the parts bin full of Mustang goodies and had a manual trans option in there as well.

          Frankly it would probably fall on deaf ears though and befall a similar fate as the Lincoln LS.

          Too small for the traditional V8 big sedan buyer and just wouldnt appeal to the small sedan buyers that want the prestige that comes with a MB or BMW badge even if such a sedan was capable of giving those cars a run for thier money at a good price point.

          At best in such a situation Ford might win over temporarily embarrassed MB/BMW sedan seekers desperate enough to step into a Ford store and willing to take the ridicule for a little while and some Mustang fans with family on the way but I doubt it would be more than that.

          • 0 avatar
            nvinen

            raph, Ford already has a fully developed full-size RWD platform that was sold with a derivative of the Coyote (which would probably bolt straight in) – the Ford Falcon. I believe it’s still being made in a LWB configuration for the Chinese (LHD) market. The only thing stopping them from building them in NA is that they aren’t interested in doing so.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Make better sedans.

        What they have isn’t bad – not by a long shot – but it isn’t fresh.

        But I don’t think Ford ever gave a s**t about sedans anyway – it’s all F150, all the time. It makes sense, because the F150’s a silly moneymaker for them – push the button, collect the checks. But this also assumes the F150 will continue being Tom Brady for them. That, in turn assumes 1) continued economic health, 2) continued low interest rates, and 3) competition that never gets better.

        • 0 avatar
          Steve Biro

          FreedMike, your line about Ford’s sedans not being fresh points to a fundamental problem Ford has had for at least the past 35 years: The company creates excellent product (i.e. the original Taurus, Ranger, etc) and then allows that product to age with very few updates along the way. Sales finally — and understandably — fall off, Ford decides the market for that vehicle is bad and then kills off the vehicle. They’ve done this over and over — to the point that it’s obvious the company has a cultural problem. Ford doesn’t seem to be interested in — or capable of — keeping product competetive once they bring it to market.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Yep. And the problem extends to CUVs as well – the Escape is getting stale, and the Ecosport was stale the minute it came here (it was an older product sold overseas for years, then brought here).

            The only car they’ve done justice to is the Mustang, if you think about it.

            I just don’t think these guys have much interest in anything that’s not called “F150”. It’s understandable but dangerous – the truck market rests on a LOT of assumptions that aren’t necessarily going to continue, like continued low gas prices, continued economic expansion, and (most importantly) continued low inflation and interest rates.

          • 0 avatar

            This problem is in Fords genome, that’s how Ford was born – unable to make decision to update the current model. When Henry Ford came up with model T Ford became #1 automaker in the world. But Henry refused to update model T for decades until Ford’s survival was at stake. Ford never really recovered since. Never become #1 again. And then Henry II, then incapable and overly idealistic Bill.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Ford’s sedans have some issues for sure, but there are definitely worse cars in the compact/midsize segments (Sentra, last Jetta, Forte, Altima, pre-refresh Passat). Hell, Powershift aside- a huge aside I admit- the Corolla has been a worse car than the 2012+ Focus.

          Plus the “better” entries in these segments are down in sales and prompting cash on the hood. So on top of Ford’s individual brand hurdles, there are market headwinds too. What exactly does Ford stand to gain by essentially giving sedans away?

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        Figure it out. They’ve been building cars for over 100 years.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          So you mean to tell me you’ve been crying about Ford all this time but don’t have a clue on what they should do to right the ship?

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Clearly I do have a clue. I just gave it to you.

            Other manufacturers can make money on cars. Ford needs to figure it out.

      • 0 avatar

        How does Mazda make a profit selling half as many cars as Ford. PSA has already turned around Opel in just 15 months.

        I guess Ford is just poorly run.

        • 0 avatar
          Lockstops

          Well, the proof is in the pudding: Ford used to own Volvo and Land Rover.

          First they failed at managing those valuable brands. Then they _really_ failed by giving away those weapons to their competitors, which now (properly managed of course since they aren’t incompetent losers like Ford managers) are taking away market share and profits from Ford.

          Hell, even Aston Martin, now being run by competent people, is making a profit. Good job Ford…

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            @ Lockstops Ford failed with brands in the same way that any American company would since they just see a brand which was probably a real fear Enzo Ferrari had when Ford was backing an oil tanker full of cash up to the office back door.

            You could bet real money that if Ford would have acquired Ferrari they would have squandered it.

            Not that there isn’t plenty of passion in the domestic auto industry its just plagued with bean counters and stock analysts that have an inordinate amount of leverage in the industry.

        • 0 avatar

          Words of wisdom, finally! I would add “poorly run for decades”

      • 0 avatar
        fIEtser

        EV, it’s the only way. Anything else they bother developing will be obsolete the day it goes on sale.

  • avatar
    thalter

    Current satisfied Ford sedan owner here (2017 Fusion purchased new). And no, it was not a fire sale model (top of the line Platinum, with AWD and some dealer installed accessories). Previous car: Lincoln MKZ. I am not interested in a SUV or truck of any kind, nor am I interested in a Mustang.

    If Ford doesn’t have what I am looking for when it is time to get my next car, I will look elsewhere (Mazda 6 Signature is looking pretty good, especially if they add AWD to it as rumors suggest).

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The resistance to trading “up” to a CUV is likely price-related.

    Think about it – you’re asking someone who spent maybe $18-20,000 on a well equipped Focus to consider dropping $25-30,000 on a Chinese made Focus Active, which is basically they same thing he’s driving now, just with some plastic cladding and AWD. Or maybe that Focus customer would take a look at an Ecosport, in which case, he needs a goddamned intervention. Meanwhile, that Focus customer has about 1,332 other $18-20,000 sedans to choose from when trade in time comes around. It doesn’t take a business genius to predict how that movie ends.

    Same calculus for Fusion or Taurus customers, except they’re trying to sell those guys $40,000-plus CUVs.

    I don’t see how this “strategy” ends any other way than Ford becoming a lower-volume company with higher margins. And if that’s the case, then they should just say so and drop this foolish “all our sedan drivers will start slobbering over Ecosports” nonsense. Either way, the stock price tells me that Wall Street ain’t buying what Hackett’s selling.

    • 0 avatar
      sutherland555

      Astute assessment. An Ecosport costs roughly the same as a Focus hatchback. If one’s being objective, which one is really the better vehicle?

      Going up one level, the Escape costs the roughly the same as a Fusion. I know which one I’d rather have but I am also increasingly in the minority.

      Ford’s only saving grace is that they still have the Focus and other cars in Europe. It wouldn’t be too complicated or expensive to get it to meet North American regulations if they really needed it over here sooner than later.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    I’m amazed it took Ford this long to realize what they were doing. It took me 3 seconds to understand. Ford had to do a survey. Therein is the core problem.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Ford will drop cars.

    Toyota and Honda and Hyundai have lots of good ones (and perhaps GM, if they are intelligent enough to select long-term viability over short-term greed).

    Matthew 13:12

    Mark 4:25

    For anyone who has something will be given more; but from anyone who has nothing, even what he does have will be taken away.

    The Asians will grow even stronger in cars.

    Any sustained spike in fuel prices will make Americans realize that if their ancestors could fit in Pintos, Vegas, Datsuns, and VW Beetles, today’s (much roomier) thrifty small cars will do just fine, thank you.

    All it could take is something stupid in the Middle East….or some mindless provocation with Russia.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think the biggest threat to the truck/CUV market isn’t war or gas prices – it’s inflation and interest rates. Maybe consumers won’t turn away from CUVs or trucks because gas costs a buck more a gallon – after all, it goes up and down – but they will if inflation pushes the price and/or rate make the payment go up by a hundred bucks a month. That’s not hard to do when you’re financing a $45,000 F150.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Interest rates are the elephant in the room. I could see that just pushing more people into leases though.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Interest rates will push leases higher as well, though, and in that happens in two ways:

          1) Lease “money factors” will increase.
          2) If interest rate and cost hikes increase the cost of CUVs and trucks to the point where sales start to fall, then that hits resale value. Therefore, lease residuals would also be affected.

          More domestic production and higher costs for imported goods will definitely produce inflation, which, I think, was the reason why previous administrations didn’t push for things like tariffs. The current administration doesn’t seem interested in that. It’s possible that the inflationary effects of trade policies would be offset by the increased domestic production, but at this point, who knows whether that’ll actually be the case?

          I see the potential for LOTS of unintended consequences here, and lots of them might happen to the blue collar workers that the president relies on for support. If so, that’d be ironic.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            I’m thinking if sales fall, used inventories will also shrink, drying up supply and increasing prices no? Seems like after the recession the dearth of off lease cars had a knock on effect all the way down the used car chain. Used car prices seemed to double overnight around ~2010. That was enabled by low interest rates so maybe higher interest rates today will help stave that off. We are headed into an interesting period.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        45k for an F150, add in ttl, finance for 72 months and your payment is still over $700.

        Are people really pulling in salaries that can support this?

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          It certainly makes it easier when the borrowed money is either a freebie, or incredibly cheap.

          Interest rates are bound to rise, which has already had a major effect on the industry I work in (mortgage lending). Auto lending will inevitably be affected as well. In turn, that affects real estate, construction, and auto manufacturing. Lots of folks work in those industries. Many of them are ardent supporters of the current administration. I’m not sure if they all get what could happen here.

          It’s possible that ripping this scab off eventually heals the wound. It’s also possible that the wound never heals. Lots of what-ifs and unknowns here. But that’s not how it was sold to the American people.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      @ tomLU86

      If an embargo type situation would work now it would have been tried. The US doesnt need to worry about the ME or Russia. The embargo worked back then because the US had become so reliant on cheap ME oil and with EV’s looking to come on strong here in the coming years the threat of an embargo goes down toward zero. Oil as as a weapon is well on the way out. Just look at SA and thier move to go beyond oil as a key source of wealth. Im fairly certain they aren’t far behind the military when it comes to prognosticating well future and as a result where to keep the money flowing from.

      Probably a bigger threat would be China strangling the electronics market by trying to inflate the costs of rare earth materials like they attempted a few years ago.

    • 0 avatar

      “if they are intelligent enough to select long-term viability over short-term greed”

      You are talking about American company here – abandon hope: utterly impossible.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    You don’t need the survey to see a fallacy in Ford’s plan to purge sedans. May be they will increase per unit profit but there are still plenty of sedan buyers. Sedans are light, cheap, easy to live with cars.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    We’ve beaten this to death, Fords big problem is that they have no prestigious proven profit machines. Lincoln SUVs might, but so far suspect build quality like in the Conti might do them in.
    It’s too bad that they were so attached to the bottom line that they gave away JLR and Volvo
    I think the Koreans do a better job of building ,pricing non-F150s at this stage of the game.
    I’m sure gas will spike again in the next 3 years of so,shoot , even Missouri is very close at raising gas tax for the 1st time in never.Hopefully, quarterly earnings won’t be around at that time or Ford will quit building Mustangs.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    Just put a trunk lid over the bed of a 4-door F-150 and call it an LTD, chop off the cargo area roof on the Explorer and replace with trunk lid and call it a Torino, repeat on Escape and call it a Maverick, and Eco-Sport and call it a Pinto. Problem solved.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    If only they’d have actually made a REAL Taurus (i.e. with Charger-like space inside). 3.5L ecoboost, 365-400 hp, AWD – exactly what I’m looking for.. But SO cramped and uncomfortable on the inside..

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      What is a “real” Taurus? The originals were Camry/Accord fighters. And spare us the lies, you have no intention of buying one of these no matter what they put in it.

      • 0 avatar
        turbo_awd

        I guess you can throw around “lies” accusations pretty freely on here without getting moderated. My first response to your slander is still awaiting moderation..

        You have no idea how long I had the Taurus SHO at the top of my “when it’s time to start looking for a new car” list, only to be QUITE disappointed that it wasn’t going to work. See my username? Yeah, I really HATE the idea of an AWD turbo car.. (that’s sarcasm, before you think I’m lying again).

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      They made a “real” Taurus. It’s called the….Taurus

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      This is not my experience with a current model Taurus, and I frequently drive around with three or four adults, two with mobility problems, and we are husky people.

      • 0 avatar
        turbo_awd

        The front seats were uncomfortable for me, the center console way too wide (pushing into my leg). My wife/kids felt the rear seats were way too stiff and when I moved the seat back to where I like it, there was little room behind me. I’ve also found the center console too wide on Genesis (pretty much all of them), so the G70/G80 were quickly crossed off the list. Thankfully the Stinger isn’t as bad.

        We’ve sat in Chevy SS and Charger (both what I would consider the Taurus’ “natural” competition) and dind’t find these issues in either one of those. YMMV.

        My parents rented a Fusion when they came to visit, and it was quite nice inside, with plenty of room – was looking forward to the Sport model. Alas, I’ve heard the Sport model (I WANT > 300 hp from my next car, that’s just where I am at right now) has no end of transfer case issues.. So unfortunately, don’t want to get into a platform with known issues with even small power increases (yes, I modify my cars).

      • 0 avatar
        brn

        I’m with MrGreen. People are way to critical of the Taurus. Very comfortable. Confident on the road. Easily carries five adults in comfort. Stadium seating. Rear trunk swallows a wheelchair easier than our SUV.

        It may not be for you, but it’s a good car.

  • avatar
    Lockstops

    I never understood that decision. And overall the huge aversion to keeping models onboard that don’t make huge profits, as if they’re cancer…

    The acquisition cost of new customers is very high so to me it’s unfathomable that they decided to kick out a large part of their customer base even though the sedans were not loss makers! So what even if a few passenger car models would even be losing some money and a few making very slight profits? Surely that’s better than handing out a large part of your customers to _your competitors_!? Of course not even nearly all of them will switch to a completely different type of car!

    Sounds more like the CEO wanted to get the image of a ‘visionary’ and a ‘brave leader who isn’t afraid of creative destruction’…only they’re not visionaries and they’re doing it wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Do you understand the concept of profit? Explain how Ford selling cars at a loss makes sense. They get a “new customer” in a Fiesta/Focus, who then move up to a Focus/Fusion, and then a Fusion/Taurus… and Ford loses money every time. Is that how you would run a business?

      • 0 avatar
        Lockstops

        My point was that they’re not selling cars at a loss. Even if one model would be sold at a minor loss for a while, other car models will be offsetting that with their profits. Also that minor loss isnt’ as bad and costly as giving that market away to competitors _and_ making you spend more than that on marketing to get the same amount of customers for your SUVs as you just lost in cars.

        A small percentage of sedan buyers will always move to SUVs/CUVs, just not necessarily right away if you yank away the car offerings all of a sudden.

        As I said: Ford does not lose money on cars, especially if they would make proper cars for a change. But how could people like Farley accomplish that?

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          They are selling at a loss, unless you have something more substantive than this suggesting otherwise:

          http://www.autonews.com/article/20180430/RETAIL01/180439974/ford-sedans-north-america

          Market share is worthless if you have to pay to maintain it rather than profit from it. Especially when the losses are incurred across 4 of your volume models (Fiesta/ Focus/ Fusion/ Taurus). Ford has its management issues but they’re not so dumb that they’d give up profit. Selling those 4 models in the US was costing them a lot of money.

          Besides, it’s not like the cars are completely dead. If demand changes they can just bring over the new cars they are already building overseas.

    • 0 avatar

      To be a visionary Hackett should just copy whatever Japanese did. He would just ask Mazda CEO for advice. If GM paid attention what was happening at NUMMI everything would be just alright, and no one would be dead (I mean brands).

  • avatar
    John R

    It seems like any reasonable portfolio should have a couple hedges for when – not if – the worm turns. Ah, well.

    I guess the Mustang’s architecture isn’t flexible enough to turn a 4-door out of it?

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Corporate Average Fuel Economy
    Greenhouse Gas Emissions Regulations

    Ford will not have a prayer of meeting either requirement will a lineup devoid of cars.

    Thankfully Ford is not stopping design and manufacturing of cars, they are just stopping manufacturing and sale of cars in North America. Time for Ford to start making campaign donations. They need Trump to stay in office forever.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      Funny you mention CAFE.

      Under CAFE2025 the Taurus will need to get double its current MPG to be compliant. The Fusion needs to get 50% more mpg, and so on.

      Does Toyota have a plan for when the Camry needs to get around 47-50 mpg combined to stay compliant and still keep a reasonable entry price?

      • 0 avatar
        Oberkanone

        Camry Hybrid LE delivers 52 mpg combined today. Toyota is well positioned. Highlander Highbrid delivers 27 mpg combined.

        It’s not difficult to see the problem to meet emissions and economy with SUV and Trucks.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          “Camry Hybrid LE delivers 52 mpg combined today. Toyota is well positioned. Highlander Highbrid delivers 27 mpg combined. ”

          So everyone can look forward to a 4k price increase on every Camry and 5.5k increase for every highlander(assuming Toyota isn’t losing money on the hybrids).

          Cool.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            CAFE and compliant real world FE figures have never been at parity. I’d bet Toyota is close to compliant with future regs as is.

  • avatar

    It is now time for the Malibu to carry the water for all US family sedans. The Malibu is the last man standing.

    How does little Mazda survive selling only 75000 6’s a year.

    This whole saga has been one big nightmare. Why would anyone want a Ford dealership today?

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Ford sedan. Why buy one? There is no logical answer. Even a cheap price does not work because everyone assumes Ford products have reliability and resale issues.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    I’ve always heard the GM never really made up the sales they lost when they discontinued Oldsmobile, Pontiac and Saturn; Ford never made up for the lost sales when they discontinued Mercury; and Chrysler never made up for the lost sales when they discontinued Plymouth.

    More recently we’ve seen Chrysler abandon the compact and mid-sized sedan market and supposedly they’ve never made up for those sales. I expect that Ford will follow Chrysler’s example.

    Things look good for the Japanese and Korean auto manufacturers.

    • 0 avatar
      TwoBelugas

      I look forward to the 15k Corolla sized sedans that get 50mpg combined. I’m sure they can get another 15mpg combined from their current EPA mpg rating in the next 6 years without impacting the price to consumers.

      • 0 avatar
        Oberkanone

        $19,620 is lowest MSRP for base Corolla. Perhaps $15K for a Corolla is possible since no one wants sedans. Supply and Demand at work.

        Cost prediction model to meet emissions regulations is available from EPA. It’s too complex for me to figure out.

        Added cost is a given.

    • 0 avatar

      GM indeed never recovered from cancelling those divisions. They went from 27% market share to 17% in just ten years. Just about all the former Saturn owners went back to the imports. I predict Ford will probably lose at least a few market share points by cancelling their entire car lines.

  • avatar
    Fusion2010

    I’m currently on my 3rd Fusion and when I heard that Ford was dumping the Fusion I was upset, I have test drove all sorts of cars from other brands but the Fusion was always the best all around car for me. I can’t see myself buying an Edge or Escape or anything SUV or Truck just to stay in the Ford family, they’re nice vehicles and all but I love my sedans and especially love my sedan with AWD living in the snowy Ottawa valley in Ontario Canada.

    I had a 2006 SE V6, which I traded after 3 years on a 2010 SEL V6 which I drove for 7 years and 250,000 KM, that car was amazing. It was one of the first 2010’s to leave the factory it was incredibly reliable, it never left me stranded, it started everyday and ran perfectly. Even when I was trading it in dealerships were impressed with how good it still looked and drove with that many KM’s.

    I traded that car in on a 2015 Fusion Titanium AWD, and before I bought this car I was close to buying an Camry XSE V6 but there was too much wind noise and tire noise and the interior was too cheap but I will say it was damn fast. I checked out Honda’s and the Chrysler 200 when it was still around, Hyundai’s and Kias but the Fusion was the best of both worlds. It drive great and it’s quiet and comfortable on the highway and gets great mileage and is fast and the AWD is great and has been great in the 90,000KM i’ve put on it so far (aside from the sometimes glitchy and always crappy MyFordTouch and the capacitive buttons on the centre stack which are garbage).

    It’ll be a sad day indeed when I can no longer get a Fusion, for my life and needs it fits perfectly and I have had great luck with the 3 I’ve owned over the last 11 years and 400,000 KM i’ve put on them combined.

    I keep hoping they’ll change their minds about dumping the Fusion at least but it seems unlikely so i’ll be moving onto a sedan from another brand most likely.

  • avatar
    bd2

    There are still a good # of buyers who want a traditional 4-door box sedan.

    There should be enough sales in the NA, EU and China markets for Ford to continue invest in a compact and midsize sedan (such a 2 sedan lineup would cover most sedan buyers).

    Lately in China, CUV/SUV sales have fallen while sedans have increased marketshare.

    • 0 avatar
      nvinen

      One of the things I really enjoyed when I went to China was seeing so many sedans and so few SUVs and trucks on the roads. It was almost like their cars were viewed as a means of getting around rather than status symbols.

  • avatar

    What I hate most when team is fully dedicated to the new product, spends days and nights to overcome challenges and meet deadlines and suddenly higher management comes and orders to stop development, “drop everything you are doing”, mothball the project (normally forever) and start working on the new project. Until the same thing happens with the new project.

  • avatar

    The heat was too hot in the kitchen for Ford. Seat, PSA, Mitsubishi, and Skoda were just too much for Ford to handle.

    Ford – what a disgrace!

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