By on August 22, 2018

2018 Hyundai Elantra SE

Surprises are rare in the car world, given that most companies leak like a screen door on a submarine (or endlessly tease a new model *ahem, Challenger, ahem*), but it occasionally does happen. Last night in Park City, Utah, Hyundai took the wraps off a mid-cycle refresh for its Elantra, an event that was unexpected by all hands.

The 2019 model’s styling will surely be commented upon by a news author here on the site later today. Until then, it is worth revisiting the current model in an effort to understand how it continues to hoover up sales to the tune of about 200,000 cars annually.

The base Elantra, in SE trim, has an equipment list longer than a Michael Cohen guilty plea. Air conditioning is standard, a feature your author considers a new-car essential. It would appear from the comments that many of the B&B feel the same. A tilt/telescope wheel and height adjustable driver seat are on tap but, oddly, selecting the no-charge manual transmission causes Bluetooth capability to vanish from the spec sheet. Perhaps the company doesn’t think we can talk and shift gears at the same time.

A 2.0-liter inline-four lies under the hood, making 147 horsepower. A six-speed manual transmission is available on the SE, the only trim where one can spec that shifter, save for the expensive Sport model (which carries a different engine).

2018 Hyundai Elantra SE

On the current car, a natty set of tail lights that look like triple afterburners have been traded for lines-n-slashes in 2019. All eight colors are offered gratis, refreshing when so many manufacturers limit choice to the greyscale on base models.

Don’t worry about flat-black side mirrors belying your frugality. The base Elantra has that covered – literally – with body-colored caps. Power windows (with one- touch service for the driver) and a 60/40 split rear folding seat appear on the SE, but cruise control does not.

The base model does deploy rear drums – a minor disappointment. It attempts to make up for this thumb-in-the-eye to safety by offering side curtain airbags for the front and rear passengers as standard, along with the expected inflatables up front. The driver gets a knee airbag, too. Fifteen-inch steelies are found at each corner, shod in reasonable 195/65/15 rubber.

2018 Hyundai Elantra SE

Hyundai’s warranty reassures a lot of new buyers, guaranteeing five full years of roadside assistance, no matter how much you drive, while the powertrain is covered for twice that time frame.

Incentives generally go unmentioned in this series, but it is definitely worth noting that certain markets can find $4,600 leasing cash on the hood of a base Elantra. With an MSRP of $16,950, that’s nearly 30 percent off. Now there’s a surprise.

[Images: Hyundai]

Not every base model has aced it. The ones which have? They stoke the fires of our flinty cheapskate hearts. Any others you can think of, B&B? Let us know in the comments and feel free to eviscerate today’s selection.

The model above is priced in Freedom dollars and shown with American options and trim. Destination charges can go pound sand. As always, your dealer may sell for less.

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73 Comments on “Ace of Base: 2018 Hyundai Elantra SE...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Some real nickel and diming here. At this point cruise control is like 3 lines of code. And how are drum brakes still cheaper than disc brakes in 2018?

    • 0 avatar
      cammark

      In 2018 we have more manufacturing methods to choose from, but the same old ones are still cheaper than others.

      rotors need to be double-disc ground to be any good. that’s an extra step therefore extra cost. drums, for the most part can simply be turned on a lathe and installed. drums are also a more forgiving shape for casting.

      A wheel cylinder is smaller, simpler and doesn’t require a separate mounting bracket (mounts direct to the backing plate) like calipers for rear discs do.

      it’s also super simple and cheap to fit the parking brake function. even some very modern rear-disc equipped vehicles use a drum-style parking brake inside the rotor “hat”

      • 0 avatar
        ptschett

        Another possible aspect: weight. I bought an ’05 Dakota new, and I remember Dodge touting that they saved something like 15 pounds of unsprung weight by having rear drums instead of discs. They were fine for a front-heavy (when unloaded) 4×4 pickup with no sporting pretentions.

    • 0 avatar
      eggsalad

      It’s not even that. All the code is there. You really just need to add the switch and a bit of wire, available on eBay as a kit for under $100.

      The forums are full of people who have added cruise to the Ace of Base. It appears to take less than an hour, even for a rank amateur.

      It’s just Hyundai being cheap. If the kit can sell for $100 at retail, I imagine it would cost Hyundai less than $30.

    • 0 avatar
      Russycle

      I don’t mind the drums, they’re good enough and nobody is going to track this thing, but no bluetooth or cruise? Ridiculous.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      As eggsalad has mentioned, the code is there, as is the clutch switch on manual cars. All you have to do is pop out the switch plate and add the switch. Bingo…cruise control is ready to go.

      They aren’t really saving any money withholding cruise, they are just sticking it to you on the base, manual car.

      In Hyundai’s defense, Honda does something similarly asinine with the Civic. The base car gets intermittent wipers with a fixed interval, while all other trims allow you to adjust the delay. Basically, to enable the variable delay, you switch the fixed delay stalk for the wiper stalk with the adjustment ring, and attach one wire to the control unit. Honda saves a few pennies per car, at most…they are really doing it to shaft the base model drivers and push them toward the next trim up.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        “In Hyundai’s defense, Honda does something similarly asinine with the Civic…. [T]hey are really doing it to shaft the base model drivers and push them toward the next trim up.” +1, syncro87. This actually is pretty common amongst compacts and subcompacts. The math must somehow justify this: Offer a trim level that you can advertise as very cheap but also include a (minor) poison pill or two so that you can upsell people. Cruise control and wiper function are an easy way to do this.

        As noted above, rear drums are a different story. They entail some pluses and minuses, but enough of the former that they make sense in some 2010s vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      ppxhbqt

      It’s not so much a matter of cost, but of the demographic at this trim level. It’s something some folks think will be something else to break or will cause them to go out of control or they’re sure their partner will use to wreck their ride. Or even if it’s $30, it could be the $30 that loses the sale to someone else. It’s not for the logical crowd.

      • 0 avatar
        DweezilSFV

        People that sweat the $30 and long time overall cost of the vehicle are far more in tune than the so called “logical” crowd that only thinks in terms of the lease payment.

        Chances are they won’t be buried in debt and living paycheck to paycheck given their lack of “logic”.

        Those bottom feeding idiots.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    Elantras replaced Corollas as the choice of non-enthusiast motorists on a budget in my parts years ago. It’s Elantras and, to a lesser extent, Civics. Corollas are rare.

  • avatar
    redapple

    I would gladly trade rear disc for drums to get the A/C. But, then again, i just dont like KIA Hyundai products.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    My mother in law had one and it was a decent vehicle, but we also had one as a rental and the steering had an on center feel like it was sitting on the top lobe of a cam constantly wanting to go off center. It was a horrible drive on the interstate.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    FACT: Hyundai and Kia make vehicles as solid, reliable and durable as Honda now, at a much lower actual transaction price. Many of their vehicles are better than Honda competitors.

    FACT: Hyundai and Kia have focused on dramatically improving ergonomics, solidity of chassis, interior materials, switchgear, gauges, ease of service, paint quality, suspension components, reliability /durability of engines, reliability/durability of transmissions,’etc., while Honda has taken a cliff dive regarding all these same criteria.

    FACT: Honda is mutilating the former goodwill and great reputation it built from approx 1984 to 2006 by now doing the very un-Honda like thing of rolling out absolutely half-baked DI turbocharged engines coupled with CVTs, which shall prove troublesome by metrics of reliability and long-term durability, while also cheapening suspension components and interior materials and switchgear on many of its vehicles, while Hyundai and Kia keep dramatically refining/improving their engines, transmissions, interior materials and trim, suspension design (geometry and quality of components), quality of pretty much everything else…

    FACT: Honda is implementing some very bland to actually hideous exterior designs, and still charging a “Honda Tax” for their now middling offerings, while Hyundai and Kia are doing just the opposite while they’ve dramtically improved their NVH, quality, reliability and durability.

    FACT: Honda is continuing to circle the toilet bowl, turning its back on the core qualities that once made it the standard bearer of quality, reliability, durability and design, while charging far too much for their vehicles relative to Hyundai and Kia.

    FACT: I just had a ’18 Sonata rental that is more solid with better interior materials and a much more solid chassis, and better steering and tracking and driving dynamics, than an Honda Accord.

    F*ck Honda.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      Get more Mazda.
      I gave Optima nice drive, I drove Elantra sport. Not bad. But not Mazda. Genesis on the other hand seem fixing all “not Mazda” issues and adds manual on top of it.

    • 0 avatar
      KevinC

      I’m inclined to agree. We recently traded the wife’s Mazda3 for a loaded Soul turbo, and I’m shocked – SHOCKED – at how good of a car that thing is, and what a tremendous value it represents. It only stickered for about $28k with literally every possible option including full-length pano sunroof, and after a hefty $3k or so discount, was an absolute steal. Yet its driving dynamics, fit & finish, interior materials, switchgear, Harman-Kardon branded infotainment system, on and on, are al top shelf.

      She never loved her Mazda3, the infotainment system being a particular source of frustration, and it sounded like crap too. Very disappointing for the allegedly high-end Bose-branded option.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Sorry, I really don’t see any value in $25K Kia Soul. There is Kia Forte SX with same engine/transmission and hatch and fully loaded for under $22K. I can see value in that thing.

    • 0 avatar
      johnds

      Fact: Hyundai/Kia have to potentially replace a million or more engines due to a manufacturing defect. Shhh…

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      That leading consumer testing magazine, famous for testing toasters as well as cars, still has the Civic on it lists of recommended new cars. But they now rank the Civic below the Corolla, Kia Forte, Mazda 3 Kia Soul and Hyundai Elantra.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      DW raises some valid points. Hyundai has indeed come a long way, and may in fact have reached approximate parity with American Honda.

      BUT…

      …personally, I’d say Hyundai is still just a smidge behind. It is the subtle details where Honda still edges out Hyundai. Hyundai can’t do steering feel quite as well as Honda. Brake feel, similarly just a step behind Honda. In general, Hyundai’s suspension work is not quite as sophisticated as Honda’s typical work. As Hyundais age, they tend to feel a bit worn and thin a little quicker than a Honda.

      Styling is subjective, so I leave it out of the equation. Dynamically, Honda still comes in a touch above Hyundai. Hyundai has a lot going for them. I think they are very good cars, pretty reliable. Honda indeed has slacked off in recent years, and isn’t perhaps as good as they once were.

      I’d still say Honda, even given their decline of late, still has some space between themselves and Hyundai. There isn’t a huge gap, but there is a slight gap. The Civic is a better car than the Elantra, and the CR-V is a better car than the Tucson. The Accord is closer to the Sonata, but probably still wins because strangely, the turbo engine in the latter is a disappointment.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        syncro,

        I beg to disagree on this: “Brake feel, similarly just a step behind Honda”

        From my tests over 2017 I found Honda brakes being numb and not very telling in Accord and few models of Civic – Si, Sport, etc. Elantra Sport on the other hand had brilliant brakes. Now, this is the problem. I have not tested other Hyundai. But if bunch of Civics and Accords say Honda brake story…

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    At this price point, I would prefer an ‘old fashioned’ AT over a CVT. So score one for Hyundai here.

    Rear drums. Not a problem. Cheaper and easier to maintain.

    60/40 split folding rear seat, A/C, height adjustable driver’s seat, and tilt/telescope wheel. All good. I am assuming that the back-up camera is included as a ‘legal requirement’.

    No Bluetooth with the MT is a head scratcher. Isn’t Bluetooth now a regulatory requirement in some jurisdictions? We got a MT with the Sonata and it came with Bluetooth but the MT ‘scratched’ the heated seats.

    What about heated seats? My ‘significant other’ now considers them to be mandatory. In Canada possibly more important than A/C?

    Finally no cruise? What’s up with that. That for me might be a deal breaker.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      Heated seats are on upper levels trims, just like every other auto brand. Which brand offers standard heated seats on base level ?

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Quite a few in Canada. I can’t look them all up, but during my ‘search’ for a new vehicle for my ‘significant other’, she insisted that heated seats were a requirement and many of the vehicles that we investigated had heated seats, even on their base models.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Even the ‘base’ Jetta has heated front seats ‘standard’.

      • 0 avatar
        cdotson

        My 2014 Elantra GT, base model, manual trans, zero-option daily driver has Bluetooth and heated front seats.

        Edit: it also has cruise control.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      When I was compact sedan shopping back in 2012 what sank the Koreans was this strange refusal to bundle cruise control with stick shift transmissions.

      Besides that I think these latest Elantras are just about as competent as it gets in the compact class. I had a rental last year and got an easy 41mpg in highway driving without any sort of hypermiling. Ride/Handling balance was well done, NVH was decently controlled, engine/transmission did not elicit any particular complaints, interior was roomy and comfortable. I prefer the midsize class myself but functionally speaking the Elantra would have all of my bases covered as a commuter and secondary family car.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      MT Sonata? What year? My pretty basic Mazda3 came with Blue Tooth in 2011

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Bluetooth has been standard on all levels of Sonata since at least 2011. Even our manual. However the MT option deleted heated seats.

        I think that the review might be incorrect, as I believe that some jurisdictions require Bluetooth on ‘new cars’.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Their website shows heated seats as standard on the Elantra on Canada.

      However, air conditioning is not standard in Canada (it just says “pre-wiring” for the base trim).

    • 0 avatar
      bullnuke

      I’m betting that Bluetooth and cruise, which are actuated through the steering wheel, require a different clockspring/wiring bundle that interfaces with an automatic-only wiring bundle. Cruise also requires an additional microswitch on the clutch to sense clutch engagement, and a microswitch on the master cylinder, things only an MT would require, and there’s probably a cheaper Clarion (or equivalent) head unit without Bluetooth functionality. In addition to saving a few pennies (or several won) per vehicle on hardware it appears that, like most manufacturers, Hyundai is gently but relentlessly prodding customers toward automatics for a more accurate/higher calculation of average fuel economy possible with an all automatic fleet of this model. Just my opinion FWIW. I installed cruise on my ’99 F350 7.3L MT years ago using Radio Shack components for around $20 (Ford wanted $488 to do it for a new steering wheel and master cylinder + installation) and became familiar with what prewiring exists on low level trims (mine is an XL).

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Our MT Sonata does have cruise and it was not an option or upgrade.

      • 0 avatar
        syncro87

        Bullnuke, no, it is literally as easy on some Hyundais and Kias (the Soul, and Elantra for example) to add the steering wheel control buttons. The rest of the stuff is already there on MT cars. Remove old non cruise blank on the steering wheel, add the OEM switch, you are in business.

        • 0 avatar
          bullnuke

          That’s kinda what I figured, syncro87. I wasn’t sure if there were a switch on the clutch pedal – that would really be the limiting factor. The computer brain already has the logic in it. As most of their vehicles are autos I figured that the wiring was already there like on my F350 but I wasn’t really sure how cheap they were. I used a Radio Shack project box for mine as I would have needed a new steering wheel.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      “At this price point, I would prefer an ‘old fashioned’ AT over a CVT. So score one for Hyundai here.” Agreed. I also like that four of the six Elantra trim levels come with a port-injected engine. My 2¢ is that DI-only engines are the unhappy medium between a port-injected engine and a dual-injected engine.

    • 0 avatar
      ShoogyBee

      If you visit Hyundai Canada’s website, you’ll find that heated front seats are standard across the board on all Elantra sedans.

      https://www.hyundaicanada.com/en/showroom/2018/elantra/specs

  • avatar
    VW4motion

    Hilarious how this Elantra has been taken over by the Corolla for top rental cars. This is in numbers and not quality. Because this base model destroys the Corolla.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Wonder what these base models are selling for? It has to be ridiculously cheap.

    You can get the 6 speed Sport model for $18.5K. HID headlights, LED tail lights, leather, heated seats, Android auto/carplay, sunroof, etc.

    I’ve had my Sport for a year and half and I love it.

    -4 time Mazda owner
    -4 time Honda owner

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      You know, I liked Elantra Sport, even more than Si (especially considering price difference). But for same money you just mentioned I ended with Mazda6 Sport MT. Not as peppy as Elantra Sport, which just blows you away. But interior, switchgear, controls and comfort, + J-vin. I only give Elantra win in engine sound and brakes. But clutch was not very good in terms of uptake and weight. But it is really the interior that killed my interest.

      • 0 avatar
        nels0300

        I actually bought a 2003 4 cylinder Mazda6 with a manual brand new. I liked everything about that car except the rust.

        Before the Elantra Sport, I had a Camry V6, so I was accustomed to having a little oomph. I already had a 4 cylinder Mazda6, Elantra was something different, more power, more bells and whistles, and it drives nice.

        Plus, where I live, 2.0L Mazda3s, not Mazda6s, are the same price as an Elantra Sport, and they don’t compare at all. I drove both, the Elantra Sport is WAY more fun to drive.

        • 0 avatar
          tallguy130

          I went through the same comparison before getting my Sport and the price was so much less then the Mazda6 it was a no brainer. Plus more head room on the Sport. It’s absolutely not given the respect it deserves.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            tallguy,

            price is something you establish when talking to a dealer. Saying “price was less” is meaningless without naming the numbers. Price will be different on different days. You need to know when to walk-in into that store.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      I test drove a MT Elantra Sport sedan and was highly impressed. The main thing that kept me from pulling the trigger on one was the suspension. On the concrete highway stretch during a test drive, I was bouncing up and down like a low rider Civic with a coffee can exhaust. It was like whac-a-mole. On glassy smooth pavement, the thing was a hoot, but the suspension was too bouncy on expansion joint style highways for me to use the thing as a daily.

      Very fun to drive, though, and high bang for the buck factor. If odd suspension tuning and Hyundai’s mediocre steering feel aren’t deal breakers, I’d recommend the E Sport.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    But I’d really rather pay another $4 to $5 grand to get a jacked up SUV version.

  • avatar
    Hogey74

    Interesting seeing the entry-level specs on these. In Australia it’s basically not possible to buy a new car without air con or a bluetooth stereo head unit. Some drums are still fitted to the very cheapest and smallest cars. I would have expected a higher spec in the US… dunno why, just assumed. They’re pleasant enough transport for the price and given the warranty I think a real option when compared to better-driving, more comfortable second-hand cars. Not my choice but understandable.

    Hyundai benchmarked Toyota and quietly went about their plans. None of their vehicles excite me but I appreciate their attitude and persistence. I’m the car nut among my friends and family and I now tell people they need to consider Hyundai and Kia. Several people I know have bought them and are happy.

  • avatar
    SirRaoulDuke

    I am not sure where you got your information, but cruise is indeed standard on automatic equipped SE’s…I am looking at the Build and Price right now.

    The sweet spot for a commuter appears to be the Value Edition, which throws in all sorts of stuff for $19,850; my local dealer looks to be asking around $17k for one. Look up the specs on one of these and you will see that is a hell of a deal.

    Honestly right now I would rather have an Elantra than a Civic or Corrolla. They are better looking and better equipped for the price and there is zero loss in reliability or build quality…frankly I think the Elantra will outlast the Civic and its CVT.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      The driving dynamics of the Civic are significantly better than the Elantra, though. Steering, brakes, suspension tuning. On paper, I’d agree with you, but having driven both, the Honda is the better driving car by a decent margin.

      Bang for the buck, though, assuming driving dynamics are not important, high for the Elantra. Something tells me you’ll be rewarded later at trade in time buying the Honda, though…maybe at least to the extent you saved money up front. You do get a few more toys on the E for the money. If you’re buying new and driving for ten years, the Hyundai indeed offers high value and will last as well as a Honda for the most part.

      I’ve sold Elantras and Civics used on Craigslist, and both in great condition. I had 5x the interest on a listed Honda, sold it far faster and for top dollar. I had few inquiries on the Elantra, had to practically give it away to get it out of my driveway. One personal anecdote, but FWIW. In my area, at least, a used Civic is a lot better merchandise (large city in Midwest USA).

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I’m amazed by the loss of Bluetooth on the manual models.

    WTF Hyundai? Manual drivers don’t want to take a call hands free? Don’t want to listen to their streaming music app or podcasts?

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      People say, “Hyundai as good as Honda” – this is best example. Honda skimp on necessary features in low trims, so they can lure you into higher trim. Hyundai learns the business and acts in similar manner.

    • 0 avatar
      tankinbeans

      I’m going to imagine it’s a mistaken omission in the article. Way back in 2011 I bought a bog standard Kia Forte with manual windows, locks, mirrors and it came standard with Bluetooth connectivity. The challenge was deciding to use the AirCon or have windows open especially if expecting a call. Also, if you happened to stall the car while pulling away from a stop light it would take forever to reestablish a connection.

      My manuals with Bluetooth since seem to have incorporared a buffer so a stallout isn’t a huge problem if you’re in the middle of something on the phone.

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I’ve commented before but I think the sweet spot on these is the ‘value edition’ trim with heated seats, moonroof, and a few other goodies. I like that you can get an interior that isn’t black. I also like the more conventional dash with integrated display (not tacked on tablet) and a host of actual buttons on the dash also. Not exciting, but probably a fine daily driver on the budget end of things. Just saw the 2019 refresh. Not a fan, bit too Toyota for my taste.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      For me as well. My ideally optioned 2018 car would have:
      – a naturally aspirated, port-injected engine
      – a traditional slushbox (so sue me; most of my driving is crawling from red light to stop sign)
      – a/c (assumed on all US cars at this point)
      – power locks and windows (assumed on all US cars at this point)
      – non-heated but decent-quality-cloth seats
      – sun roof
      – automatic climate control
      – an alloy wheel/tire combo with as much sidewall as possible

      The Value Edition doesn’t match that exactly, but it’s one of the few model/trim levels that comes close. The only others that come to mind are some trims of (1) the Forte, (2) the outgoing Taurus, and (3) some FCAs.

      – – –

      Refreshes almost always make a car look worse.

  • avatar
    dont.fit.in.cars

    “Drum brakes a minor disappointment”.

    Total time to replaced read disk pads. 15 minutes. Rear drums including adjustment 45 minutes.

    Tossing 4K on a hood? Kick 2 Benjamin’s to vendors and make it the best bang for the buck.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      When exactly was the last time you had to replace drums on a car made in the last 30 years due to wear?

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I have a different question. Does this car has EBD? Kind hard to see EBD with drums. I’ve noticed that my current Mazda6 has no nose-diving at all. And I also noticed that rear brakes have more wear than front. In old school – front does 70% braking and wears faster. I think, these 2 connected. More power applied to rear, more often, to keep car leveled.

        • 0 avatar
          tankinbeans

          That’s an interesting thought. In a few months when I switch to my winter wheels I’ll have to take a peak at the brakes to see if I notice the same wear pattern. Of course by then my car will probably only have about 22k miles on it.

        • 0 avatar
          rpn453

          Dive under braking is the result of center of gravity height and controlled by the suspension. Brake distribution is not a factor, though better braking will cause more dive, all else being equal.

          Recent Mazdas with EBD often do wear the rear pads more than the fronts. The rears are used more under light braking than they would be with a fixed system.

          If you had a FWD car with 60/40 weight distribution and fixed brake distribution, the load under heavy braking with street tires is around 70/30, so the brakes would be set at probably 75/25 or maybe even as much as 80/20.

          But if you’re braking on slippery surfaces where weight transfer is negligible with that setup, the rear tires will contribute very little and braking performance will be poor.

          If EBD allows 60/40 brake distribution while braking at the limit on a slippery surface, it would improve deceleration by about 33% compared to a fixed 80/20 setup.

          I only have 85k miles on my ’04 Mazda3. The fronts have minimal wear and will probably last the life of the car. The rears will probably need replacement by 150k. It has excellent braking in winter conditions. Pedal feel is not mushy but it is flexy due to a flimsy firewall mount.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            Interesting. In my ’11 MAzda3 I had to cut front rotors off the spindles. Rotors went completely rusty ka-boom on inner sides at about 65K or so. Rust damaged pads and the whole setup crashed. But I am not surprised if earlier model had them lasted longer. My 98 Protege fronts lasted into 130K or so.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            The effects of the salt are minimized here on the cold and dry prairies. After 14 winters, you have to look closely to find any body rust on my rust-prone car.

            I’ve had to cut a few rusty nuts and bolts off older vehicles, but never any brake components.

  • avatar
    tonyola

    “The base Elantra, in SE trim, has an equipment list longer than a Michael Cohen guilty plea”. Here that whirring noise? That’s Tom McCahill spinning in his grave.

  • avatar
    tsoden

    I bought my Elantra in 2014 (2013 model). Compared it to the 2014 Corolla and 2013 Mazda 3. The Corolla did NOT impress me – the styling was fine, but it just did not feel as refined – engine was quite coarse, and I really was disappointed by the lack of brightness on the standard LED headlamps. The 2013 Mazda 3 would have been much cheaper – was quite refined, BUT the back seat was too small. Even though the 2014 redesign 3 was out, it was not even a consideration due to inflated costs compared to the outgoing 2013.

    In the end, the 2013 Elantra (GLS trim) has suited me just fine. hard to beat a 5 year bumper to bumper warranty too. The car has been quite solid – only a couple minor quirks that the warranty covered.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    Even in Las Vegas, where dealers don’t even try to make good deals, these are routinely advertised at $13.5k, which makes them a screaming deal.

    But they’re thin on the ground, because they’re either loss leaders, or bait-and-switch-mobiles for people who want/need an automatic.

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