Even Europe Has No Use for a Range Rover Evoque Three-Door

Steph Willems
by Steph Willems

The most attainable Range Rover, and easily the least desirable, will no longer be offered sans rear doors. While the five-door Evoque soldiers on for the 2019 model year alongside its ridiculous convertible sibling, the automaker says there will no longer be a three-door available anywhere on the planet.

It’s just the latest evidence that automakers aren’t interested in shelling out for seldom bought body styles just to satisfy a handful of nonconformist buyers.

Hold on, you’re thinking, hasn’t Jaguar Land Rover already deep-sixed the three-door Evoque? You’re correct, but that decision only affected the North American market, where the Evoque three-door disappeared for the 2018 model year. In Europe and elsewhere, 2019 brings a lineup devoid of anything that could accurately be referred to as a “coupe.”

Actually, if you happen to be one of 999 ultra-wealthy buyers, there technically is a coupe (the SV Coupe) on offer in 2019, but the model’s extreme exclusivity means you won’t find it on many shopping lists.

News of the three-door Evoque’s demise, arriving via Autocar, comes as the automaker readies a second-generation of the compact SUV for a global launch. That model appears next year as a 2020 model, and it seems certain there’ll be no three-door variant. Autocar cites sources who claim 95 percent of the Evoque’s sales came from the traditional five-door model.

“From the 2019 model year, Land Rover has rationalised its Range Rover Evoque bodystyle offering to concentrate on the five-door model and convertible, which account for the majority of sales,” a company spokesman told the publication.

In a land awash with unibody utility vehicles, Range Rover’s long-in-the-tooth Evoque — which appeared in late 2011 as a 2012 model — saw a U.S. sales peak in 2015. Over the first five months of 2018, Evoque sales slipped 45.6 percent in the United States.

[Image: Jaguar Land Rover]

Steph Willems
Steph Willems

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  • Dal20402 Dal20402 on Jun 08, 2018

    One less variant of yappy Shih Tzu to afflict the roads.

  • Big Al from Oz Big Al from Oz on Jun 08, 2018

    I view the Range Evoque as Range Rovers Cadillac moment. The only people who buy them are the most insecure wannabe nickel millionaires around. The Evoque is not a Range Rover, no where's near one. You can buy a Kia or Hyundai CUV that is more desirable. Even the RAV4 is more desirable.

  • Dartdude Having the queen of nothing as the head of Dodge is a recipe for disaster. She hasn't done anything with Chrysler for 4 years, May as well fold up Chrysler and Dodge.
  • Pau65792686 I think there is a need for more sedans. Some people would rather drive a car over SUV’s or CUV’s. If Honda and Toyota can do it why not American brands. We need more affordable sedans.
  • Tassos Obsolete relic is NOT a used car.It might have attracted some buyers in ITS DAY, 1985, 40 years ago, but NOT today, unless you are a damned fool.
  • Stan Reither Jr. Part throttle efficiency was mentioned earlier in a postThis type of reciprocating engine opens the door to achieve(slightly) variable stroke which would provide variable mechanical compression ratio adjustments for high vacuum (light load) or boost(power) conditions IMO
  • Joe65688619 Keep in mind some of these suppliers are not just supplying parts, but assembled components (easy example is transmissions). But there are far more, and the more they are electronically connected and integrated with rest of the platform the more complex to design, engineer, and manufacture. Most contract manufacturers don't make a lot of money in the design and engineering space because their customers to that. Commodity components can be sourced anywhere, but there are only a handful of contract manufacturers (usually diversified companies that build all kinds of stuff for other brands) can engineer and build the more complex components, especially with electronics. Every single new car I've purchased in the last few years has had some sort of electronic component issue: Infinti (battery drain caused by software bug and poorly grounded wires), Acura (radio hiss, pops, burps, dash and infotainment screens occasionally throw errors and the ignition must be killed to reboot them, voice nav, whether using the car's system or CarPlay can't seem to make up its mind as to which speakers to use and how loud, even using the same app on the same trip - I almost jumped in my seat once), GMC drivetrain EMF causing a whine in the speakers that even when "off" that phased with engine RPM), Nissan (didn't have issues until 120K miles, but occassionally blew fuses for interior components - likely not a manufacturing defect other than a short developed somewhere, but on a high-mileage car that was mechanically sound was too expensive to fix (a lot of trial and error and tracing connections = labor costs). What I suspect will happen is that only the largest commodity suppliers that can really leverage their supply chain will remain, and for the more complex components (think bumper assemblies or the electronics for them supporting all kinds of sensors) will likley consolidate to a handful of manufacturers who may eventually specialize in what they produce. This is part of the reason why seemingly minor crashes cost so much - an auto brand does nst have the parts on hand to replace an integrated sensor , nor the expertice as they never built them, but bought them). And their suppliers, in attempt to cut costs, build them in way that is cheap to manufacture (not necessarily poorly bulit) but difficult to replace without swapping entire assemblies or units).I've love to see an article on repair costs and how those are impacting insurance rates. You almost need gap insurance now because of how quickly cars depreciate yet remain expensive to fix (orders more to originally build, in some cases). No way I would buy a CyberTruck - don't want one, but if I did, this would stop me. And it's not just EVs.
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