By on June 29, 2018

2018 Toyota Camry XLE front quarter

2018 Toyota Camry XLE V6

3.5-liter V6, DOHC (301 hp @ 6,600 rpm, 267 lb-ft @ 4,700 rpm)

Eight-speed automatic transmission, front-wheel drive

22 city / 33 highway / 26 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

27.4 (observed mileage, MPG)

Base Price: $35,295 (USD)

As Tested: $37,808

Prices include $895 freight charge.

It happened again. A neighbor, a casual acquaintance at best, messaged me on Facebook, asking for a used car recommendation. As usual, I suspect they were trying to get me to literally point them to a specific car for sale, but I’ve been roped into enough third-party late-night Craigslist-and-Cars.com binges to bite this time.

“Just buy the best Camry you can afford,” was my reply. I’ve given the same advice before to plenty of other non-enthusiasts, those for whom a car is merely an appliance. While I can easily rattle dozens of interesting choices to someone properly invested in driving enjoyment, I’d rather avoid the repercussions of recommending a 10-year-old M3 to a suburban mom who wants nothing more than a hassle-free commute.

Toyota pulled the cover off of the newest Camry in Detroit last year, and the rakish new styling has been flooding the streets ever since. Tim tested the four-cylinder model a few weeks back, but he wished for a bit more power. Fortunately, the gods of horsepower and displacement smiled upon me, and delivered upon my driveway this 2018 Toyota Camry XLE with the big V6.

Does the redesign tick the default box for enthusiasts, too?

2018 Toyota Camry XLE front

No matter how grounded to the ground it may be, the new Camry is not a sports sedan. I’m sorry, Toyota. Nobody’s cross-shopping an M3 with a Camry. But that’s okay. What the V6-powered Camry is is a surprisingly rapid family sedan that will not punish you on the commute. And if that commute is between cities, like those days I spent on the road as a traveling salesman, you will appreciate the way this innocuous cruiser sneakily reaches triple digit speeds without arousing the local constabulary.

Not that I’d know anything about that.

2018 Toyota Camry XLE rear

In the Brownstone finish and XLE trim of my test subject, this car is basically invisible. Again, the default choice. The wide lower grille-by-Gillette — seriously, it’s almost the width of the car! — thankfully is finished in matte black, again not drawing attention. I don’t love the cacophony of ridges and slashes that define the hood, but in darker colors the effect is muted.

2018 Toyota Camry XLE profile

Another detail that bothered me ever since first seeing the car in the flesh is the funky ridge on the C-pillar that extends the upper surface of the trunk, giving a faux-hatchback look. The Camry hasn’t been available as a Liftback since 1986. Toyota, you aren’t fooling anyone. On the sportier XSE trim, that crease is where the two-tone black roof meets the body-color pillar, making the appearance of a hatch even more pronounced.

[Get new and used Toyota Camry pricing here!]

Overall, though, the new Camry is destined — no matter the color — to blend into traffic.

2018 Toyota Camry XLE rear seat

The interior in my test car was rather dour, with a sea of black only occasionally punctuated with matte silver trim, a touch of wood(ish) above the glove box, and bright rings around the gauges. The body-color accent stitching on the diamond-quilted seats isn’t enough to brighten the somber mood inside.

2018 Toyota Camry XLE interior

Those dull-looking seats were heaven-sent after a couple of days spent with the in-laws, which necessitated two-plus hours in the saddle each way. The long, supportive lower seat bolsters, in particular, were especially welcome when sitting in an unexpected traffic jam. I emerged from the Camry refreshed, which generally never happens on that drive.

2018 Toyota Camry XLE gauges

The kids similarly had no complaints about their rear seat accommodations. The growing tweens never put an errant knee into my kidney, and had plenty of room to stretch out and lose themselves in their various electronic devices. They dozed off silently before the batteries died.

2018 Toyota Camry XLE front seat

I’ll register one annoyance — maybe it rises to the level of a complaint, but I’m not certain — but this new Camry shares an unfortunate trait with other Toyotas I’ve driven recently: a rather tinny sound when the door is slammed. Whether it’s a legitimate quality concern, I don’t know, but it does lend an air of cheapness that isn’t reflected in the rest of the car.

2018 Toyota Camry XLE dashboard

After venturing off the interstate and onto a favorite two-lane, the big Camry’s composure impressed. While I wasn’t hustling like I might with something more suited to apex hunting, the demure sedan with the big engine exhibited little body roll when cornering with gusto.

Indeed, the 2018 Toyota Camry is a surprisingly good driver. It’s big, roomy, powerful, and does everything quite well. There’s a reason over 350,000 of these roll off showroom floors year after year — quiet, simple competence goes a long way to building a winner.

 

[Images: © 2018 Chris Tonn/TTAC]

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75 Comments on “2018 Toyota Camry XLE V6 Review – The Default Choice for a Reason...”


  • avatar
    tonycd

    There might be enough room in the wayback for the author’s kids, but I was really disappointed in the loss of rear seat room in the newest edition of the Camry, especially for my head (a part of me I’m not willing to lose). It’s the one area that got worse instead of better in the car’s first rework in a quarter century.

    The new Camry is lower, wider and handles better, but it’s slipped in its suitability for the family sedan mission. I suspect Toyota looked at the crossover’s encroachment on sedan sales, decided anybody with rear seat passengers would now buy one of those anyway, and tried to preserve what was left of sedan sales by making its sedans better as 2+2 machines. I think this same thinking was the reason rear headroom was severely whacked in the current Prius. Anybody who’s looking at a Camry (or a Fusion, or even an Avalon, or several other rivals) with an eye to family use should be aware of the price of those now-voguish tapered rooflines, and try before they buy.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      “I was really disappointed in the loss of rear seat room in the newest edition of the Camry, especially for my head…”

      The roof lines of contemporary sedans (especially popularly priced ones) are criminal and I am convinced also contributing to the demise of the family sedan. If a sunroof is included many are becoming unusable for anyone 6 ft and above.

      I like to watch Alex on Autos and he’s just 6 ft tall but the number of sedans where (especially with sunroof) his head starts to brush the headliner or in the backseat he has to crane his neck is simply unacceptable.

      • 0 avatar
        Jerome10

        I agree completely that this contributes to the demise of the family sedan.

        Could be by design…those crossovers probably have fatter margins.

        • 0 avatar
          TwoBelugas

          The roofline is most likely the victim of a combination of the CAFE requirement which is squeezing cars the like the Camry hard, and ever more strict safety regulations that are making cars heavier and more complex not to mention the roof crush standards that took effect in 2012.

          They have to get every last drop of MPG they can, and aerodynamics is one of the few places to “improve” without too much additional cost compared to say, hybridizing everything.

          • 0 avatar
            Lichtronamo

            I agree that the roof lines on current sedans has to be tied into aero to meet fuel economy. There is no other way you could justify the compromises in rear seat ingress/egress and headroom or the very narrow aperture left to access the trunk. The style influences of the M-B CLS and Audi A7 go only so far to explain it. The effect of course, is to cause more people to buy more fully functional crossovers, SUVs and four-door pickups.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Need to step up to used LS for that rear passenger/rear child seat comfort.

  • avatar
    gtem

    This is the one I’d get, although I’d go back to the prior gen and find a heavily discounted K platform XLE-V6.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    I was hoping for a little more on how the 301 hp V6 performs in this car. That’s a pretty impressive amount of power for a family sedan.

  • avatar
    TwoBelugas

    37,808 for a Camry. Yowza.

    Might as well get an Avalon, or better yet, a few k more for an ES350 at that price.

    • 0 avatar
      syncro87

      Yeah, my thinking is that a 1-2 year old Avalon makes a new Camry V6 a tough sell.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      The comparable Avalon is about $1k more (for moonroof and audio upgrade to match that price on the XLE V6).

      But if you don’t want the larger platform …

      (And an ES350 is pushing $45k if you *care* about a glass roof and nav system to match the Camry, and beat it with some other options.

      I can see caring about the latter, and some people seem to like the former.

      But let’s not pretend the ES is just “a few k more” rather than “nearly 10k” to match.)

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        “And an ES350 is pushing $45k if you *care* about…beat it with some other options.

        But let’s not pretend the ES is just “a few k more” rather than “nearly 10k” to match.)”

        Talk about loose math. 45k-37.8 is 7.2k, it’s close to 5K than 10k LOL.

        Then again you said “pushing 45k”. So really we are talking about 44.6k? What does “beat it with some options” mean? Say a grand and half of options to “beat it”, that brings it down to 43k.

        Difference? 43k-37.8k=5.2k Hardly “nearly 10k”.

        For 5.2 k on a “nearly 40k” car you get to leave the plebs behind and joint the Lexus club. If you are spending money in that range on a sedan, you are keeping up with a crowd of some pedigree and that crowd is going to laugh at the Camry driver. “Value” buyers will never buy a V6 in a Camry to start with.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          To be fair the few Lexus drivers I know aren’t the sort to laugh at someone for the badge on their car, especially not a Toyota (hint: the Lexus drivers I know both graduated from Toyotas)

          • 0 avatar

            I’ll take “people who are Gtem’s parents” for $500, Alex!

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            Lol my folks are actually Honda and Mazda graduates (with a rusty 77 Corolla the lone yota), but my hybrid-ES owning in-laws have been an all-Toyota fam since getting burned by a Pontiac Transport in the late 90s.

          • 0 avatar
            Lightspeed

            I love my old GS400 because it is a Toyota (my first Japanese car actually).

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            “To be fair the few Lexus drivers I know aren’t the sort to laugh at someone for the badge on their car”

            Meet more Lexus drivers and you will see.

    • 0 avatar
      jmcdono362

      Or even better, I just came across a 2014 Lexus LS460 with 13K miles on it for 38K on the used car search sites.

      Why do people buy an average Camry new when they get a basically new Lexus LS460 for the same price? Both are bullet proof reliable.

  • avatar
    sfrunner

    I recently rented a 2018 4-cylinder Camry for 3 days. The 4-cylinder Camry has to be the most overrated car that I have had the displeasure of driving. The drivetrain is simply awful. When moderately accelerating the transmission immediately shifts to the next highest gear only to then abruptly downshift and then upshift again. Horrid drivetrain and horrid cheap plastic interior, and yes, I wondered about the tinny and insubstantial sound of the doors closing. And to pile on further the seats were abominable, at least with my 165 lb. frame. It was quiet and did seem to ride well enough until you hit a deep pothole and then the whole structure loudly shudders. Why in god’s name would anyone ever choose this over an Accord?

    • 0 avatar
      make_light

      If I hadn’t had the same experience, I would want to disagree with you. I want to root for the underdog. I WANTED to say that auto critics are absurd, and they should respect the Camry for everything it does well and offers to buyers.
      But you are 100% correct. The Camry rides and handles decently, that’s it. Everything else is cheap, noisy, and disappointing. The transmission sounds and feels like it’s fighting against you. And I drove SUBARUS for years, which are hardly known for their plushness.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Might consider that “rented” could be a problem here, given that modern transmissions supposedly all learn from how they’re driven.

      Thus rentals are going to have schizophrenic tranmission training.

      (I’ve driven a recent-year Camry hybrid – my parents’ – and seen no such behavior.

      I *suspect* it’s not endemic to the Camry as such.)

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I’ve had 2 2018 Camry rentals, an SE and LE. Both were eager to upshift by not any more than other modern automatics. I could make the car fumble a downshift with medium accelerator inputs on small hills, but general shifting was just fine. Rapid acceleration in particular was impressive in terms of fast and positive up shifts. The best part of the car is IMO the ride on the LE, absolutely exemplary, at the top of the current class from what I’ve experienced (have not tried an Accord to be fair). Power and acceleration in the base engine class of midsizers is at the top as well IMO. What I’m not crazy about is the interior design or quality.

  • avatar
    R Henry

    The whole V6 Camry thing doesn’t make much sense to me.

    Camry, by design, is a car built to be comfortable, practical, and economical. A V6 engine does not enhance the first two attributes in any way, and works against the third.

    That said, a bit under 10% sold are V6s, so there’s that…

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      In the 90s ones it definitely made more sense where the jump in power and smoothness was more appreciable. Since ‘02-ish when the base engine started to make almost 160hp while the V6 was in the low 200s the V6 has been more about just that extra bit of smoothness and low end effortless oozing acceleration feeling that many Americans like. In ‘07 the gap widened for a while where the new 2GR was paired with a 6spd and seriously outpaced the 4. Once the 4 went to 178hp and gained a 6spd again it felt better and very adequate. Now the 4 is up to 200hp and with the 8spd can snap off some really satisfying shifts if you get on it. From an acceleration perspective I found it very good, better than average for the midsize class. I have not tried the new direct injected V6 however. I will say adding direct injection took some refinement away from the 4cyl.

    • 0 avatar
      PandaBear

      It makes sense because old people like my FIL grew up with V6s, and complain that I4 has no torque (despite them never pushes the gas pedal more than 50%).

  • avatar

    That interior is just a dark cloud of nothingness. What’s the random piece of near-vertical trim to the left of the gauges? It’s just there, doing nothing. The little bit of wood on the passenger side is an afterthought as well.

    And the diamond quilting on the seats is too large, putting me in mind of some ’70s land yacht, without the benefit of sweet brocade fabric.

    I’m sure it’ll be a “good car” overall, but for this kind of money it’s either Avalon time, or perhaps sacrifice a little space and go for a luxury brand.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Heck for $37K you could likely haggle a dealer on a 300C Platinum Hemi, although I know the Venn diagram between 300 and Camry shoppers has a small overlap.

      I’m just sayin’!

      • 0 avatar

        You’re into Q50 money at this level as well. I think this Camry is one that by the time you get to V6 level it no longer makes sense.

        • 0 avatar
          Sigivald

          Q50 money and 2/3 the horsepower.

          I’m too lazy to look up the comparative torque curves, but I don’t think the Toyota V6 is going to lose TOO badly there.

          (The Q50 starts to get interesting, if not price competitive, when you add AWD.

          Also, this is where I complain about $37k luxury sedans NOT EVEN INCLUDING NAV in the base price.)

          • 0 avatar
            jmcdono362

            37K will buy you a really really nice off lease low mileage certified used luxury car loaded with features. Certified usually has a sweet warranty package too. There is simply no reason to buy this overpriced Turd.

            I personally drive a 2006 Lexus LS430 Ultra Luxury, so I am not biased against Toyota by any means. I paid 27K for it 4 years ago.

            My mother in 2016 bought a 4-cyl Camry XLE, also for 27K, and my 06 Lexus is light years better than her car. It’s much noiser, including tons of road noise, rides rougher, gutless, hard seats, etc. I could go on even more.

            Why spend 37K for a basic Camry when it gets you in a really really nice used luxury territory.

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        principal….

        Agreed. For that money, one can get a real nice 300.
        I think Jack B once said the 300 is what the big caddy should be.
        Or maybe it was autoextremist.
        Regardless. The point still stands.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          The one thing (and it’s not trivial) that the 300 is missing to really hit the classic American sedan mark is rear legroom and trunk space. Stretch the wheelbase a few inches, stretch rear overhang 6 inches.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Trunk room left the building a long time ago. The last remaining new “every man” sedan’s with large(ish) trunks are the Taurus and the Impala.

          • 0 avatar
            Truckducken

            Not to mention rear headroom. You’d think a car like the 300 wouldn’t compromise on rear seat utility, but I guess pushing SUV sales is where it’s at.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      I’ll get shouted down for this, but for a Camry buyer, you could also pick up an Acura TLX and stay in the it-will-outlive-you school of reliable Japanese transport, but with an interior two classes nicer.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I won’t shout at you. If someone looks at the market at roughly $35K transaction price (with a few grand on either side of it) there is a pretty large selection of choices in almost every category of vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          I’m assuming most of these V6 camries are selling closer to $30k even. At $35k as I suggest above they’d get eaten alive by leftover Avalons in their very own shared showroom.

          • 0 avatar
            a5ehren

            Yeah…V6 XLEs ain’t selling for sticker. Think more like $32k…though the Sienna XLE is way more car for roughly the same money if you’re in the family way.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            a5ehren, I’m inclined to agree. Somewhat related, I had a rental Pacifica Limited and just about fell in love. You basically forget you’re driving a minivan. Very nice driving car, and astoundingly efficient for what it is.

    • 0 avatar
      Lightspeed

      Toyota styling has been pretty, um funky, lately, but I think the cars are still great value. However it does beg the question, near $40K for this, or less money for a used Lexus ES or Infiniti G37 with AWD.

      • 0 avatar

        I think when considering the merits of a brand new car, it’s important to limit the “what ifs” generally to other new cars available right now which someone might shop.

        The used conversation quickly spirals wildly.

        • 0 avatar
          Lightspeed

          Haha! I tried to reign myself in! OK, Loaded Camry or base model Stinger?

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            I can’t find a local dealer carrying a Stinger GT “base” – they all want GT1 or GT2 or they automatically order AWD.

            But in that hypothetical match-up I’d get a Stinger GT base.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Yeah, not much about the engine.

    Saw a review online stating that it seems Toyota was not letting the motor have the full beans. That it simply didn’t rev fast enough or accelerate fast enough for a car with 8speeds and that much power.

    Did you feel the same way?

    Otherwise I’ve really liked the 1 new camry 4 cyl i’ve driven a few thousand miles.

  • avatar
    tonyola

    Wouldn’t you rather have a 2018 Accord 2.0T Touring for a couple thousand less? (And that’s MSRP – given the slow sales of the current Accord, you might even get a bit off.) I know I would.

    • 0 avatar
      Middle-Aged (Ex-Miata) Man

      I would definitely drive both, and I wouldn’t be a bit surprised if I preferred the Honda… but for my money I’d still rather have a Toyota V6 over a high-strung and largely-unproven turbo four mated to a Honda automatic with “four planetary sets and seven engagement elements” (per a Honda press release) crammed into it.

      And, just like others have said, I’d probably wind up with an off-lease 2017 Avalon over either one.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      With that Accord Touring, you also get stuff like memory for the driver seat that isn’t even available on the Camry — you need to step up to the Avalon for that, and probably remote-start and other stuff which is included in the Accord.

      I had a chance to drive an Accord Sport 1.5T CVT for a few days a week ago, and came away impressed with the car in general, even at the “LX+” trim level. As I’ve said for the last year, despite my misgivings about the turbos, I’ll likely have a 2019 Accord in my garage come this time next year. (Probably with a HondaCare warranty just in case.)

      If Toyota included what I mentioned above, and hadn’t cheaped-out on the interior bits (or had simply done a better job, as that center stack is a dog’s breakfast any way you cut it), and had truly tuned the engine and transmission for maximum output, this would be in the running, if nothing else that:

      1. The windshield still has a dark tint “brow” across the top, handy for not being blinded immediately when turning into the sun without sunglasses. (Can’t even get that on a Rolls-Royce, fercryinoutloud!)
      2. The Gentex inside mirror has a real, non-glare rim, and unlike everything else save for GM, Ford and HyundKia, it’s not the rimless design (which throws glare back at the driver along the edge) whose shape, an inverted trapezoid — “smiley”, always reminds me of the facial expression of a demonic, demented clown, and which feels so cheap, it feels like it’ll snap off the post after about the eighth adjustment, which is of concern, since you’ll be moving the mirror a little each time you use the HomeLink, meaning you’ll be constantly adjusting the thing! The older design in the Camry feels more substantial, like the one in my 2013 Accord!
      3. Obviously, the naturally-aspirated V6 has less risk of blowing up than a turbo!

      • 0 avatar
        Flipper35

        With cars other than Toyota you also get styling that doesn’t make your innards want to become outerds every time you see it.

        There are other handsome cars in this price range that are just as reliable and/or have a great warranty.

        This thing looks like the piggish creature from Galaxy Quest. After it was beamed up.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Last of the V6 interceptors.

  • avatar
    Daniel J

    They can talk to me when they get Android Auto.

  • avatar
    Fred

    It was the rear trunk opening on the preious gen Camry that convinced me that I didn’t want new sedan. I couldn’t get a s small plastic yard chair in their. Had to put it in the back seat. I recently picked up a couple of larger Adirondack type chairs and they fit easyly in the back of the TSX Wagon.

    Otherwise I too always recomend the Camry, it’s the most logical reliable car out there.

  • avatar
    threeer

    I want to like the new Camry, truly. But I just have a hard time with that front end…and an interior that looks decidedly downscale (at least in pictures).

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus

    After the initial surge, Camry sales are sliding again (-7.9% in May), and once more, the Civic overtook it in sales last month by about 5,000 units. Hell, the Corolla is nipping on its heels.

    I wish there was a site where retail and fleet sales are broken down. I’m pretty sure that would spell even more bad news for Camry (and Corolla). Oh, I forgot, rental fleet sales are only bad when its an American brand. Sorry.

    • 0 avatar
      gtem

      It’s undeniable that I’ve been seeing and driving a crap-ton of Camry rentals since the ‘18s came out.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        But remember kids: FCA is crap because it sells a ton of 300s to rental fleets. But Toyota is showing its reliability and durability by selling an undisclosed number of units to rental fleets. That’s just common sense.

        /s

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          No FCA has the reputation that they do for the sorts of issues too many buyers have had with their cars historicallly, not just any sort of stigma from fleet sales (I don’t think of 300s when I think of fleet queens anyhow). Sebrings? Sure. Toyota can no longer ask the premium that they used to for the Camry, there truly is less that makes it clearly differentiated as a leader. But assuming the cars continue to deliver on reliability and durability (even as others catch up in these metrics), they will continue to live off of that reputation in the used market.

          • 0 avatar
            TwoBelugas

            @gtem

            you should check Camry’s residuals. It ain’t pretty. Percentage wise it’s 52% depreciation versus 55% of 300. I don’t think their reputation is what they were back in 1999.

            https://www.edmunds.com/toyota/camry/2018/cost-to-own/

            https://www.edmunds.com/chrysler/300/2017/cost-to-own/

  • avatar
    Ion

    Is this an Ad? Where’s the bit about who provided this car. That was Farago’s main gripes with automotive journalism.

  • avatar
    riggodeezil

    Gee whiz, a super-expensive V6 Camry. Seems like ya might as well just set $8000 on fire and get the 4-banger with it’s novocaine-to-the-brain “driving sensation”. It ain’t a “sports sedan” and it ain’t a smooth-moving luxo-barge and it ain’t really even big enough to haul Bobby & Sally and all their snot-nosed little friends to soccer practice. Gramps ain’t getting it…he’s going for the Avalon (who the hell needs a fold-down rear seat anyways?) and mid-life crisis Comb-Over Guy sure as hell ain’t touching it. Pocket-protector number-crunching guy is going for the LE in some shade of silvery-gray and has already calculated that if he gets anywhere near advertised MPG he can go out to lunch one day a week. So exactly which group of mooks in the car-buying universe are ‘sposed to pop for this here V6 Camry?

    • 0 avatar
      9Exponent

      Have you even driven one yourself?

      • 0 avatar
        riggodeezil

        Nah…but i’ve eaten over cooked spaghetti noodles with water-down sauce. Same experience. Rode in a 4-banger rental. Meh. Served its purpose…as most rentals do. If you want a “powerful” sedan there are better options for less dough. An Impala with a V6 looks like a better deal all around…and you can pile more dead bodies into its huge trunk. Toyota makes a V6 Camry that hardly anyone buys but they no longer make a true small, simple pickup that (presumably) people want. Go figure… there’s clearly more than supply and demand at work in Ye Olde New Car Marketplace.

    • 0 avatar
      baconator

      @riggodeezil, pocket-protector number-crunching guy is buying a Prius or Prius V. Those cars are the undisputed champions of the total-cost-of-ownership spreadsheet. Which furthers your point, I think.

      • 0 avatar
        riggodeezil

        You’re right re: Prius. A Camry is probably what pocket-protector guy would think of as a shameful waste of money. Put a V6 in it and that’s pure lunacy. I’m sure Toyota doesn’t give a damn what I think about their swell faux sports sedan. They’ve somehow made beaucoup bux selling unexciting vehicles whose only real noteworthy quality is that they break down less than the other stuff out there…or at least they used to. Who knows these days. Hard to fathom what they command for a “mid-sized” pick up truck that rides about as well as Fred Flintstone’s car. Yet mook-after-mook snaps these things up like they were gold. A pick-em-up-truck that costs like a Caddy, rides like a bag of marbles, and has less utility than Grand-dads ol’ F100. Somebody at the Big T must have gotten an A+ in Marketing to Mooks: How to Make Bux by Selling Stuff People Don’t Need. Like an “off-road” truck to pick up Pampers at the Wal-Mart…or a V6 Camry to sit in traffic. Brilliant.

  • avatar
    thejohnnycanuck

    Actually I’d be quite happy with a V6 XSE. I think it’s a great looking car in that guise. And what are we down to now if you want a six cylinder mid-size? The Camry, Legacy and Passat are the only ones I can think of. You could add the Fusion Sport I suppose but it’s as good as gone (not to mention overweight and overpriced).

    So you get 300hp, bulletproof reliability and among the best resale values in the industry. So shoot me. In fact the only thing I really hate about the Camry is that Kyle Busch drives one.

  • avatar
    micko4472

    There are still a few 2017 Accord EXL V6s out there if you want a real
    sedan with a real engine and real tranny …

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    For some reason, I thought the V6 Camries only came with the pano sunroofs now. Maybe that’s just the XSE.

    Toyota just seems to be resting on their laurels of late. That’s what got the Big 2.25 in trouble!

  • avatar
    V16

    Interesting that the new Toyota Camry seems to be channeling the Porsche Panamera from the C pillar back.

  • avatar
    Carroll Prescott

    -Rude comment adding nothing to discourse!-

    -Mod

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Sorry Toyota but for nearly 40K I expect more. The cheap tinny sounding doors and floppy door handles are off putting. No USB ports or power outlet for back seat riders is just ridiculous along with no A/C seats, no heated rear seats, no Apple car play and Android auto. Add in the weird front and back styling and it’s a definite no sale for me.


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