By on November 11, 2017

It’s a near-silent swan song for a duo of electrified Ford models. The Ford C-Max, which debuted in late 2012 in both hybrid and plug-in hybrid form, hit its sales peak during its first full year on the market, declining every year since.

As Ford Motor Company shakes up its U.S. production landscape — ironically, to bolster production of trucks and SUVs — the ungainly-looking C-Max is on its way to the cemetery. The automaker has confirmed the ceasing of production of the C-Max Plug-in, with the Hybrid variant to follow in the middle of next year.

The discontinuation, confirmed by Ford in a message to Green Car Reports, comes as Ford gears up the Michigan Assembly plant for future production of the Ranger pickup and Bronco SUV. The $700 million upgrade means the slow-selling C-Max bites the dust, with production of the compact Focus sent to China.

Both models were originally expected to set up shop in Mexico, but Ford’s decision to kibosh its proposed plant saw one model culled and the other sent on a long boat ride.

“Ford C-Max Energi production has ended,” Dan Jones, Ford’s North America Car Communications Manager, told Green Car Reports. “We will continue to make C-Max Hybrid  at Michigan Assembly Plant until mid-2018.”

Production of the Ranger is expected to commence at Michigan Assembly in late 2018. As for the automaker’s green cred, there’s newer electrified vehicles in the works, including a fully electric crossover due out in 2020.

The C-Max Hybrid was America’s eighth best-selling hybrid vehicle in October, capturing 3.71 percent of the U.S. hybrid market. Sales of the plugless variant sank over 18 percent over the first 10 months of 2017, even with October sales rising over 33 percent compared to the same month a year prior.

The C-Max Energi, on the other hand, was the fifth best-selling plug-in hybrid in October, making up 8.54 percent of that particular segment. Sales of the plug-in variant sank 16.7 percent, year-over-year, though year-to-date sales are actually up over 20 percent.

Ford’s green twins earned a black eye early in their lifespan. The automaker faced criticism and lawsuits after real-world fuel economy didn’t match the vehicles’ lofty EPA ratings. The regulator was forced to dial back the stated fuel economy of both models, with the hybrid version receiving two haircuts. Combined fuel economy for the latter model fell from 47 mpg to 40 mpg.

Ultimately, the Blue Oval was also forced to hand over some extra green to these early green car buyers, compensating for the extra fuel consumed.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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65 Comments on “Low Energi: Production Ends on Ford’s C-Max Plug-in, With Hybrid to Follow...”


  • avatar
    Massiv

    Sad… I have a loaded C-Max Energi going back off-lease after a truly excellent 4 years with the car. My wife and I really enjoyed it, and it’s incredible at its mission as an urban runabout. Although it only had 40km range, that’s more than enough to round-trip your errands, and if you ended up dipping into the gas engine it was still extremely fuel efficient. Fun drive too – lots of quick torque off the line, like a little go kart.

    • 0 avatar
      mattwc1

      Quick questions,

      I am seriously thinking about this to replace my road warrior Honda Insight.
      Are there any outlying issues that you had with the car?
      How is the road noise and driving dynamics?

      My Insight is a terrible new car purchase but a steal as a used car. However, the evident cost cutting is present. There is pronounced road noise and the IMA is fine but other hybrid systems are much more refined. There are plug in stations at my work and the commute would easily fit in the EV range.

      Thanks

      • 0 avatar
        Massiv

        Hey,

        Generally it’s been solid, nothing major except in the first two winters the charge door would sometimes freeze shut and need to be played with. Road noise is decent, but my other car is an MKC, so my comparison point is a lot quieter. It can spin the winter tires too easily, but I think that’s a function of electric-based torque application.

        It’s optioned up, and enjoyable. If you’re in the Toronto area, you’re welcome to connect and check it out.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheatridger

        The overall noise is lower than any car I’ve known, including VWs and SAABs. Road noise is tire-dependent, but with the stock Michelins it’s never bothersome and usually almost silent. Engine noise is slightly intrusive at open throttle, but active noise cancellation keeps it at a low level. Wind noise is low, too. Altogether, it makes just enough noise to remind me I’m hurting through space at speed, and that’s no bad thing.

        My C-Max Energi’s handling is fine in normal driving. Steering is fast and precise, like with any other Focus. Grip is limited by the energy-saving tires, and using that grip is limited by the lightly bolstered seats. There’s also 400 lbs of battery in the trunck, with a fairly high CG. I soon found I couldn’t storm the on-ramps like with my GTI, but following the slow-in, fast-out rule, it’s never a problem to reach full lane speed for merging, even uphill. It has an 8-second 0-60 time, after all. The power and performance is similar to my old VW TDI.

        Lastly, it’s a heavy car, and that pays off in a smooth, big-car ride. Suddenly it’s like all my familiar routes have been repaved.

        It’s a great car. Read the online reviews from owners, who say the same. I’m so glad I got mine, plus a hybrid version for my daughter.

  • avatar
    Syke

    Pity. I had seriously considered one of these on my last car buying venture. Unfortunately, a bit out of my budget.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Plug-in hybrid prices are like college tuition rates. You shouldn’t focus on the list price, because viruually everyone gets a discount.

      My ’17 Energi TItanium cost around $28,000 list. I financed that full amount plus sales tax at zero-percent interest for six years. My combined state and federal tax credit will total $9007, so it’s effectively a $19,000 car now. If your state is so generous, you might do better with closeout pricing. Over the first 5,000 miles, I’ve paid about a nickel a mile in combined gas and electric costs.

      I don’t know your budget, but as the owner and supporter of an aging VW, I feel like I couldn’t afford not to buy this Ford!

      Used C-Maxs coming off lease can be had in the mid-teens. My daughter’s 2014 Hybrid , 50,000 miles, costs about $200 per month in payments.

  • avatar
    JEFFSHADOW

    I do remember having used Ford Probes on our lot in the mid-1990s. Even then Ford should have known about the disparaging meaning of the name as far as most women were concerned.
    Ford’s original plan was to have the Probe replace the Mustang.
    “C-Max” just sounds like a slice-and-dice birth method, occurring some months after the Probe, of course.

    • 0 avatar
      anomaly149

      It makes a bit more sense when you remember that Europe has a B-max (with really cool doors) based off the Fiesta (B-car), and an S-max based off the Fusion/Edge platform (Saloon?). The C-Max P/HEV might have been designed/built in the US, but the non-hybrid is very Euro.

      It’s kinda cool, there’s a whole car / van / crossover thing going on: Fiesta (3, 4, 5 door) / B-Max / Ecosport, Focus (4, 5, wagon) / C-Max / Kuga, and Mondeo (4, 5, wagon) / S-Max (Galaxy) / Edge.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      It’s a weird name, but not THAT weird.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      I think “C-Max” was a fine name for the European market where many buyers will understand the reference (i.e. maximum roominess in a C-segment vehicle), but a bad one for North America where the reference to “c-segment” will be lost on most buyers since that classification isn’t used as much here. That, along with the absence of companion B-Max and S-Max models, probably confused many Americans.

  • avatar
    I_like_stuff

    bbbbut everyone loves green energy and EVs and stuff.

    • 0 avatar
      mcs

      Some of us that buy EVs don’t want to bother with having to drag around that lump of iron and deal with ICE maintenance. I have an EV with enough range that I don’t need to worry about a backup gas engine. Plug-in hybrids also have god-awful slow 3.3 to 3.6kW level 2 onboard chargers. Full EVs have 6.6, 7kW, or above chargers. Much less charging time.

      Once you get used to the smoothness and quick response of an EV, any ICE car seems like a total POS. I understand EVs aren’t for everyone, but for those of us that are able to own one, they’re really fantastic vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        Wheatridger

        I would worry a lot more about the lack of that ICE engine. I’d worry about range, especially in my long cold winter. My C-Max battery recharges in five hours, while I sleep. How would I gain by three-hour charging instead? That’s still longer than I’d sit at any gas pump.

        This question isn’t so black-and-white as you think. My C-Max Energi IS an EV for every short trip between home and the city center. Any time I want to drive farther, it’s a very efficient hybrid. It covers every need I have for a car, short of towing and off-roading. It’s always ready for me, anywhere I might want to go. For me, that’s well worth an oil change every year or so, and a stop at the gas pump every three weeks.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    I have never met anyone who didn’t like their C-Max, and I’ve met quite a few owners of them. Distinct form factor, in addition to hybrid powertrain. Sad to see it go.

  • avatar
    EMedPA

    I looked at one of these to replace my old Focus wagon. Too much cargo room was eaten up by the battery, especially in the Energi. I wish they’d built the ICE-only model here in the States.

    • 0 avatar
      la834

      Ford was originally planning to sell the European-market ICE-only Grand C-Max as simply the C-Max here. The Grand C-Max is sort of like the departed Mazda 5, a bit longer than the regular C-Max, sliding doors, and an available third row seat. They decided at the last minute not to and instead sell only the regular-size C-Max and only in hybrid and PHEV versions.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Falsified MPG scandal, ungainly dimensions (yet very practical), not very attractive, and sat weirdly within the product lineup where it wasn’t quite SUV, or CUV, or wagonish 5-door.

    I’ve never really read one bad thing from anyone who has owned one.

  • avatar
    fastwilly

    For those of us on the far right side of the height Bell Curve, the C-Max offers what few other small cars can, more than 41 inches of headroom. I’m more comfortable in a C-Max than a Mercedes S Class.

    Too bad the inside bottom lip of the doors trap salty water in the winter. In the rust belt there will not exist a clean looking, rust free, C-Max ten years from now.

  • avatar
    dwford

    It’s amazing that only 4 years ago, Ford was the alt-energy darling, bringing the Focus Electric, Fusion Hybrid and Energi, C-Max Hybrid and Energi, and the Lincoln MKZ Hybrid all to market at the same time. Now they are all woefully out of date, poor selling and about to be dropped without immediate replacements.

  • avatar
    Old Scold

    Cannot tell these apart from Escapes. They are visually identical to me.

  • avatar

    This and a 5.0 F-150 STX are possibly the two best values Ford offers right now throughout its entire lineup. Period.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Just for the record, my C-Max Energi is reporting 65 mpg lifetime for its first 5000 miles. For a plug-in hybrid, gas economy varies greatly by your driving habits. Two daylong drives in the mountains have lowered my lifetime score. About 20% of my driving was in pure EV Mode, so the subtract that and you get 52 mpg on gas, but there’s regenerated braking power in there, too. Soon the math gets too deep and you realize how small the actual gas costs and savings have become.

      By any measure, this car is extremely cheap to run. It’s halved my fuel cost compared to a 28 mpg car, and surpassed my expectations.

      My daughter’s Hybrid C-Max is reporting mpg in the high 30s, just after a 2000 mile highway drive. In the city, it breaks 40 mpg easily. With either one, I wouldn’t trade the C-Max’s peppy performance for a few more MPGs. How many people realized this car goes from 0-60 in eight seconds? That’s on par with a 1980s GTI!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      V6 MKZ?

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Hopefully this is confirmation that the Escape Hybrid will return and maybe an Energi version too. The old Escape Hybrid sold pretty well, made a lot of fans and the main reason Ford dropped it was to give the C-Max a chance.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    I would have been interested in an Escape hybrid. It’s puzzling that they didn’t do one, after the first-gen hybrid model. No hybrid CUV I’m aware of comes close to the C-Max fuel economy, though.

  • avatar
    Hank

    Same old song. Ford builds a good car, never tells the marketing department (because it’s not an SUV or pickup), lets it die on the vine, blames the market.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    This is a shame, I recommended one of these to a friend of mine, and we went together to go test drive one. Toyota should be humiliated by how much better the C-Max is than the Prius. In terms of performance, comfort, interior materials quality, etc, the C-Max is vastly superior to the Prius, and unlike the Focus it’s not an unreliable POS, from what I was able to tell the C-Max is holding up very well.

    As far as road noise is concerned, I didn’t notice much of a difference between the C-Max and my ’14 Lincoln MKZ, so I’m sure it’s worlds better than a Honda Insight.

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      I’ve had the same experience – why anyone would buy a Prius over the C-Max is one of the car market’s great mysteries. The only explanation that makes sense is that Prius buyers are so afraid of US automaker reliability they are willing to accept awful driving dynamics, ugly styling, and bad interior fittings in order to get Toyota reliability. The bad reputation of US cars and general dislike of green cars also effects the resale values, which makes the C-Max one of the best used car values on the market today – 2013 models with reasonable mileage are now under $10K, while fully equipped 2015 models are now dipping under $15K.

      • 0 avatar
        gtem

        I’d say the C-Max’s poor interior packaging may have something do with it, the lower “real” MPG numbers (and how well documented Ford’s cooking of the numbers on that were in the news) and rightly or wrongly picking the Toyota badge for reliability/resale reputation. I agree though, the C-max had superior driving dynamics and are an incredible bargain.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          The interior packaging of the C-Max is actually very good. Well, outside of the trunk losing room to the battery. I wish Ford could have designed a more elegant solution.

          • 0 avatar
            gtem

            “Well, outside of the trunk losing room to the battery.” That’s my entire point. The Energi is particularly bad, it ends up being this parcel shelf looking thing with little depth to it. I guess the car itself is quite short with a lot of vertical space, and by the numbers is pretty close to many compact hatchbacks or subcompact CUVs. But on the topic of comparisons to Prii, the Prius V (which is about 10 inches longer) has 34-40cu ft seats up (variability due to sliding second row) and 67cu ft with seats down.

          • 0 avatar
            Featherston

            Rear seat room, however, is fantastic in the C-Max versus the (regular) Prius. So Ford may have robbed Peter, but they did indeed pay Paul.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Great bargain but going to be more of a hassle in five years to unload vs Prius. If buying now, I say stick to hybrid and get the lowest mile’d version for around 10K, which you should be able to coast on price wise. Energi commands a premium over hybrid, but range is more of an issue and I would be concerned on exotic parts vs hybrid.

        MY13 Hybrid SE range is $10,1/22K mi to $4,1/209K mi.

        • 0 avatar
          gtem

          Any sort of Hybrid is a bargain right now it seems. If I really cared about MPG, I’d scoop up a lightly used Prius V, seems like they are almost like lot poison right now.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        I’ll help with that, stingray.

        I bought a Prius over a C-Max (and other choices) a year ago for my wife. She wanted low price, high gas mileage and excellent reliability. The C-Max hadn’t been out long enough to beat a 2010 Prius on price, the Prius was so reliable and durable that its expected reliability negated its advanced age, and its real-world MPG beat the C-Max by nearly a third.

        As icing on the cake, she’s technophobic about complicated controls, which was a giant black mark against MyFord Touch – and avoiding the worst versions of MyFord Touch meant either taking a bottom trim level, or a car so much newer it’d be far more expensive.

        To summarize: Lost big on gas mileage, lost on reliability, lost on price, lost on usable controls. I like the C-Max, better than the Prius in fact, but not enough to give her less of everything she valued.

        And as a kicker, truth be told, I like the Prius much better than I expected now that I sometimes drive it (full disclosure: the scarce top model’s better seats, quicker steering and sportier wheel/tire spec make a real difference).

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    I’m on my second 2013 C-Max hybrid. I had an SE The was totaled in an accident, and I replaced it with an SEL. It is a great city car. My lifetime MPG is 42.2. It is quick and roomy, with a lot of equipment. MyFordTouch got a lot of bad press, but once they got the bugs out, it works great. Used C-Maxes are bargains now. Remember that a C-Max with 40,000 miles on the odometer only has about 20,000 miles on the engine. The C-Max hybrid would make a great car for Uber or Lyft drivers. Look for one with Myfordtouch,, navigation and heated seats.. you should be able to find one that looks and drives as good as new for 12,000 to 15,000. I have nothing against the Energi plugin version, but I need more cargo room than the Energi has.

  • avatar
    brettc

    I’m still leaning heavily toward a C-Max to replace my Sportwagen next year. Seems like the perfect fuel efficient oddball car for me. Sad that Ford kind of gave up on it in the beginning, but I’m glad they spent the time to give the 2017 model a mild refresh last year and added Android auto and carplay to it (cough cough – looking at you, Toyota).

    I saw somewhere (can’t find the site now) that production is supposed to end in May 2018. I guess that’ll give them time to retool Michigan Assembly for their upcoming cash cow vehicles that the masses think they need.

    If anyone decides on a 2018, the only changes are adding metallic blue and Hot Pepper red for new colour choices. (Kona blue and ruby red metallic are deleted for 2018)

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Here is the culprit to the demise of CMAX.

    From a major publication discussing Consumer Report’s findings on CMAX.

    Moving to the Ford C-Max Energi, it seems that if you so much as glance at it the wrong way, it then breaks down. Okay, maybe that’s an exaggeration, but Consumer Reports found the C-Max Energi to be the least reliable of all vehicles included in the ownership survey. Mr. Fisher notes that the C-Max Energi received the “worst rating in the entire survey.”

  • avatar
    Conslaw

    For the past two years , the C-Max hybrid has risen to the “recommended” status because reliability has risen to at least average. Most of the early problems related to MyFordTouch and the low voltage battery system. With recall fixes, even the older cars are at least average in reliability, and average is pretty good these days. As we’ve discussed at length in TTAC comments, the fuel economy controversy was a problem of inflated expectations rather than poor performance. Ford screwed up by piggybacking the C-Max onto the more aerodynamic Fusion for EPA ratings. Around town, I consistently exceed 40 MPG except when the heater is going constantly. With no heat or AC it is 44–46 MPG. On the interstate, it is 38 to 44 depending on speed, temperature and wind direction. Sure, a Prius does better, but a Prius won’t do 0-60 in 8 seconds. Any car that will beat the in town MPG is less roomy, slower, more expensive or a combination of these traits.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I have driven a C-Max numerous times and I came away with a much more positive view than I had anticipated. If I were in the market for a hybrid it would be on the top of my list. I would say you can get a deal on one but for what you get the list price is really not bad.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I have driven a C-Max numerous times and I came away with a much more positive view than I had anticipated. If I were in the market for a hybrid it would be on the top of my list. I would say you can get a deal on one but for what you get the list price is really not bad.

  • avatar
    darex

    We have one at work. What impresses me about it is how solid it is — like German luxury car solid. The doors are especially impressive in that way. I like how it drives, and the seats are comfortable. It’s unlike any other “domestic” Fords, but it still suffers greatly from the plague of nearly all current Fords: ugly dashes, horrible knobs and switches, and a virtually unusable SYNC system. The last part ruins the car for me.

    In terms of space and general layout and space, however, as mentioned above, it’s a fantastic city car. It’s the perfect size!

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      You don’t have to use SYNC at all. There’s physical knobs and buttons to manage the HVAC and Audio systems, steering wheel buttons and full access by touchscreen. I use voice only to hear and respond to a few texts, and it hasn’t failed yet. This is Ford’s third iteration of the system, and most of the complaints concerned early cars. Consumer Reports has recommended the C-Max for the past few years now

      • 0 avatar
        darex

        Yeah… those volume and HVAC knobs: Tiny, smooth, and oh so cheap-feeling!

        When you have to hit an awkward sequence of 5 buttons every time you want to play Bluetooth Audio, it’s b.s.

        Our car has SYNC 2. I’ll take your word for it that SYNC 3 is better. How could it not be?

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          Sync 3 is as good as anything out there. 2 may be the worst. The 2 systems really are night and day. I got the base sync in my F150 because I hated the sync 2 system and then replaced it with an aftermarket Android Auto system.

        • 0 avatar
          Wheatridger

          Like in most Fords, the volume is adjusted with a nice-feeling chrome knob almost an inch across & high. It’s instantly accessible by sight or touch, because it’s unlike any other control on the dash (but it is like an iPod, remember?). Source and Sound buttons are long and thin, also distinctive. The climate panel works like a VW, or many other cars. All trims have dual zones. Is that cheap? HVAC and audio controls are also duplicated on the touchscreen, of course. With most EVs, Tesla most particularly, that’s all you get, a huge touchscreen to manage everything. If that’s what you want, you should like the new cars upcoming.

    • 0 avatar
      Wheatridger

      Coming from the VW/Audi school, I despised the look of the Ford dash, but I accepted it to enjoy this wonderful powertrain. In daily use, the Ford’s dash makes sense and works well. The iPod-like audio controls are well-marked, large and distinctively shaped. They sit on a shelf where you can rest your hand for precise aiming. The screen above is inset so it’s well-shielded in all sun conditions. No, it ain’t pretty, but it may be more ergonomic than any modern. German of Swedish car I’ve owned. But what about that silly little motorcycle-style speedo cluster? I hate that, too.

  • avatar
    Whatnext

    Another bright idea from Ford as oil prices start to rise.

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    given the depreciation, everyone who is an Uber driver should buy a used C-Max hybrid.

    net profit/mile > vanity.

  • avatar
    flipsaug

    Bought a used 2013 Energi. LOVE IT!
    Commute about 10 miles to work and back all on battery. Sits high for my bad back and, unlike my friends with a Prius, I don’t have to pull out Rosary Beads while merging onto a highway. Gets me 40mpg in Hybrid mode.
    An anesthesiologist sold me on it and did say she had to explain her carefully considered choice to her perplexed country club friends.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Nobody drives a C-Max for vanity, if that’s what you meant. But rideshare drivers take note- this car was developed for the Euro class called “people movers,” and that’s what it does best. Combining a medium-high CUV roofline with a low floor gives tremendous headroom, like a micro-van. Over there, it competed with a raised & stretched Golf Plus.

    I’ll never forget the week when I tried out Lyft driving. I felt so sorry for one customer, actually a happy group of four XXL-sized urbanites out for the night. Not fat, just big people. Three were packed into the back of my GTI, shoulders overlapping. They never complained – I should have tipped them for that. My new C-Max would be a better experience for all concerned. The seats are a bit thin, but the overall back seat experience is luxurious, especially if you get the sunroof.

    Rideshare pay is lousy, of course, but it would be fun to answer the daily question, “What kind of car is this?”

  • avatar
    chevysrock39

    My 2015 Energi lease goes back in June.. I am surprised they are stopping production but I am not surprised at the low take rates – the looks off-put some folks. Mine has been spectacular – 1st oil change at 15K miles and roughly that interval thereafter, and only one real “something broke” repair – the hatch had a habit of getting bound up on occasion. The dealer was able to adjust it in 15 minutes and the issue never re-occured. A friend is a dealer tech at Ford and said he has yet to see a single Ford hybrid come in to his dealer with battery issues. I have averaged 42MPG over the life of the car, with very little plugging in – a feature I thought I would use more. Driving straight highway at 75-80MPH 500 miles to Las Vegas got 38MPG – more than OK in my book. Very quiet, rides very well (as it should weighing 4010LB on the scale at the dump). 190HP is impressive for a hybrid – it does spin the tires fairly easily in the rain, which the traction control catches rather quickly. I ran it out at the drags a few times and went 16.30s which is on par with older V6 Camrys and the like. On electric it is a much slower ride – I had to try it once and creeped over the finish line at 19.95 at 60mph.

  • avatar
    bobmaxed

    My login name was penned in homage to our C-max SE Hybrid. 2014 and fully paid for. I’ve read the forums and the 2013 model did have problems with batteries and transmissions. Ours has been trouble free.
    Hope to get 7 more years out of it. Outside of recalls its never been back to the dealer. I put snow tires on it for the Winter. My wife picked this over a Mazda 5 and the large Prius. I hope to never buy a SUV.

  • avatar
    Nedmundo

    My dad has a 2015 C-Max, and absolutely loves it. I’ve driven it a few times, and have been favorably impressed. It’s solid and comfortable, and drives well. In theory, it would be perfect for us because we live in downtown Philly, but its enormous turning circle is a serious buzzkill. I noticed this almost immediately when I first drove it, and my dad has complained about it.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    I’d call that the car’s biggest flaw, but living in the suburbs, I can adjust. The self-parking feature might make up for it for some. Part of the problem is how modern styling, with high hoods and blunt fronts, makes a car look much longer than it is. Self-parking scares me when it’s at work. The nose cuts so close to the car I’m parking behind, I expect to hear a sideswipe! But it’s really not that close, the parking sensors are showing me.

  • avatar
    oxbowfrm

    Replaced my Wife’s 2010 Prius with a 2016 SEL Engergi. At the time we were going to buy her a new Prius but with the cash on the hood the out the door on this was over 8K less than the Prius and this was a plug in vs. just a hybrid. The CMAX is quieter, rides better, handles better, has excellent pickup, and the interior is top notch for it’s class. On the down side I find the seats uncomfortable, wheel spin is an issue at times – possibly due to extra battery weight, and we had an electrical gremlin that left us with a totally dead car for no apparent reason. Also, it is effectively a 3 seater should you need carry any amount of luggage or “stuff”. Would I buy one again? I would need to know more about long term reliability but my wife loves it and that is what really matters.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Glad to hear from others with real positive experiences of the car. Long term reliability remains to be seen. The oldest cars, 2013s suffered many recalls and some major transmission failures, most handled under warranty. Personally, I wouldn’t buy one of those, but neither would you.

    Consumer Reports now recommends these as new and used cars. The only US C-Max forum I’ve found is small enough to read fully in a week or so, which I did, of course. There is no, repeat, no subforum for engine issues. Infotainment problems do arise, as in all cars. There’s little talk of battery replacement yet. My new ’17 Energi came with zero defects, and my daughter’s 50,000 mile 2014 Hybrid has needed no work since purchased in May. Seems like a reasonable risk, for a car that costs about a nickel a mile in fuel and watts.

    Don’t forget the 2017’s new surprise feature- you can turn off the center display screen when you’re not using it. Every car should offer that distraction-killer, and I was delighted to find mine does (the 2014 doesn’t).


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