By on October 20, 2017

2018 Honda Fit LX - Image: © Timothy CainSubcompacts, if they ever were in favor, have quickly fallen out of favor in the United States. In 2017, sales in the first three-quarters of the year plunged by more than a fifth, year-over-year. The Honda Fit, modestly updated for the 2018 model year, is on track in 2017 to fall to a five-year low of around 50,000 sales, a far cry from the nearly 80,000 American Honda sold a decade ago.

The Honda Fit, not now in third-gen form nor in any prior iteration, has never sold on the strength of style. There have always been less expensive subcompacts, faster subcompacts, and better-equipped subcompacts, as well.

There have not, however, at least not during the Fit’s tenure, been any subcompacts that offer the flexibility of the Honda Fit. But does the fact that the 2018 Honda Fit is likely the only current subcompact that could operate as my family’s lone vehicle make up for the fact that the Fit lags behind rivals in key areas?

2018 Honda Fit LX - Image: © Timothy CainNow entering the fourth model year of its third generation, the 2018 Honda Fit benefits from extensive availability of the Honda Sensing suite of safety gear (lane keeping assist and adaptive cruise, for example), retuned suspension, an acoustic glass windshield, and more sound insulation.

But in essence, this is the same vehicle for 2018 that it was for 2017. That means the driver’s seat doesn’t slide back quite as far as it ought to. Thigh support is nearly nonexistent, and what little soft foam support there is remains of insufficient quality. Wind noise at the A and B-pillars is excessive. Hooked up to a continuously variable transmission, the 130-horsepower 1.5-liter isn’t a particularly happy revver. Lacking the smoothness expected of a Honda four-cylinder, the 1.5 protests with a harshness that diminishes the driver’s desire to accelerate. Riding on the Fit LX’s 185/60R15 rubber, there’s not enough grip for the Fit to feel sporty, and the third-gen model doesn’t provide enough feel and interactivity to foment fun.

And yet the 2018 Honda Fit is at its core a veritable minivan, in the true sense of the word mini. Slap a pair of sliding doors on this 161-inch-long monobox and you’re about as set for the frugal school run as is possible.2018 Honda Fit LX - Image: © Timothy CainHonda says there are 39.3 inches of rear legroom in the Fit and 96 cubic feet of passenger volume overall. That’s more legroom than you’ll get in the back of a Honda Civic sedan and more passenger volume than you’ll find in a Volkswagen Jetta, two cars that stretch much farther than the Fit on much lengthier wheelbases. Throw another 17 cubic feet of cargo capacity behind the rear seat and the Fit becomes an inordinately spacious subcompact car. And that’s before you introduce the adaptability of the Fit’s second-row Magic Seats, which can essentially introduce a second cargo area when you’re travelling with three passengers aboard.

But is versatility the answer if Honda demands a Fit premium? After all, Nissan Versa sedans sticker from as little as $12,875 with enough rear legroom for NBA forwards. The new Kia Rio is distinctly more refined than the Honda Fit and starts below $15,000. The Toyota Yaris iA, essentially a Mazda 2 in sedan clothes, starts below $17,000 with the fun driving mannerisms once linked to the Honda Fit.

Yes, versatility may be the answer. Yes, versatility may be such a valuable extra in an otherwise capable (if not outstanding) car because in the case of a family of four with a large dog, for example, no other car in this class can cope with our needs.2018 Honda Fit LX interior - Image: © Timothy CainThat’s always been the Fit’s claim to fame. Even if it isn’t the most attractive, the quickest, or the most affordable, or the most handsomely equipped subcompact, the Fit does what I need it to do.

Despite the newfound installation of extensive safety gear at the low end of the lineup, however, a higher grade would be tempting, largely because the 2018 Honda Fit LX appears far more poverty-spec than it actually is. Replacing these covered wheels with alloys, swapping the CVT for a six-speed manual, installing the 2018 Fit EX’s fog lights, and gaining a sunroof won’t turn the Fit into a beauty, but it will extinguish the one-lakh-car look of the Fit LX.

At $19,035, just $170 more than this $18,865 tester, the basic 2018 Honda Fit EX may well be the n0-brainer in the Fit range.

[Images: © 2017 Timothy Cain]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars and Instagram.

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73 Comments on “2018 Honda Fit LX Review – What if It’s the Only Subcompact for You?...”


  • avatar
    Tinn-Can

    So the only thing that differentiates the LX and the EX now is the sunroof, wheels and fog lights? My wife likes her Fit. I think it’s really loud and twitchy for as much highway driving as she does. I really like being able to stow stuff under the back seats like you can do in a truck.

  • avatar
    mcarr

    Does it still turn about 4,000 rpm at freeway speeds? That was a turn-off for me.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      ^This. It’s simply baffling why Honda didn’t fix this when they went from a 5-speed to a 6-speed. I can only surmise that they were concentrating on the home (or other) markets where the Fit isn’t taken on highways very much.

      Whatever the logic, it’s bizarre.

      • 0 avatar
        eyeofthetiger

        Fiesta 1.0 Ecoboost runs about 2,500 RPM at 70 MPH. It is so relaxed on the highway. 5th gear is a good, old fashioned overdrive. Downshifting is required for much acceleration, but maintaining speed is no problem due to the insane torque band. Other subcompacts are gutless screamers.

      • 0 avatar
        King of Eldorado

        I have a 2011 5-speed that turns 3750 rpm at 75 mph. I think the engine simply doesn’t have enough torque at that speed to make a higher gear feasible. You would need to downshift at even the slightest upgrade on the interstate. But my theory raises the question of why they moved to a 6-speed with closer-spaced gears in the first place. I suspect it was a marketing thing: gotta have 6 speeds because competitors have them.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenn

        Toyota, with a later generation of Prius, realized greater MPG could be attained with an increase from 1.5 to 1.8 liters. A similar upgrade to the Fit would probably do the same, while providing enough power to finally offer a useful overdrive ratio to lower RPM and noise at highway speeds. I can only surmise it’s not about logic – it’s about cost cutting.

  • avatar
    Heino

    I guess they now use rupees in PEI.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    I dislike sunroofs and would never pay for one. Too much road noise and wind when open, can get too hot, often develop leaks and/or rust.

    Don’t care about wheel covers. Have steelies on from the end of October until mid April.

    Have used my fog lights roughly 3 times in the last 20 years. And can’t stand other drivers who do not understand how to use them and leave them on, constantly. Also being so low set, fog lights often get damaged by road debris and even snow drifts.

    So then why would I prefer an EX? Or is this just a disguised Ace of Base article?

    Now get off my lawn.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      The best implementation of a moon roof I’ve experienced is in my 4Runner. I’ve talked about this at length before, perhaps fellow 4Runner owners can back me up. The beauty of that lowering rear window on 4Runners is that with an open moon roof, you get fairly smooth airflow through the cabin, even at speeds of 70+ mph. Nothing like the buffeting noisy mess you typically deal with. You have to assume the engineers worked things out to be exactly like this, it just works so well.

      • 0 avatar
        MrH42

        Yep, the 4Runner moonroof is awesome. I’m a convertible guy, but usually pass on the moonroof because it robs of precious headroom. My 4Runner is the only one I really like, and it’s because of the rear window like you described.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        As an alternative for most other vehicles that don’t have a ‘breezeway’ application of a lowering rear window, cracking the rear, side windows an inch or two also works well to decrease the open sunroof buffeting.

      • 0 avatar
        focus-ed

        “best implementation of a moon roof” my a.. This is the only vehicle that offers the driver and front passenger less headroom that any compact I’ve ever been in. Literally I have to tilt my head towards the moonroof opening to avoid hitting headliner. A joke in a vehicle this size.
        Lowering rear window is nice though.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          No doubt the low roof has been a 4Runner “trademark” since its inception. The high clearance/floor and attempt to keep center of gravity low has its consequences. IMO the 4th gen has it the worst, the 5th gen was actually an improvement. I’m 5’11” with an even distribution of torso/leg length and I never brush my head, but it’s certainly close.

          I’m speaking more to the interaction between the moonroof and open rear window. cruising around the OBX with this setup is absolute bliss. Throw some fishing rods in the back sticking out the rear window, air down the tires and you’ve got it made.

    • 0 avatar
      Coopdeville

      Front “fog lights” on US domestic or domestic-intended foreign cars are so far away from the definition of a fog light anymore as to be unrelated (what’s the point of a fog light that can’t be operated independently of the main, blinding-in-the-fog, headlight?)

      What’s the big deal if left on? It’s more an additional driving light at this point and I can’t remember ever being blinded or otherwise distracted by them at night.

      I tend to leave mine on. They light up the ground to the sides which helps me see around corners in my neighborhood at night.

      Now the rear fog lights on German and British imports that morons leave on at all times, blinding all the traffic behind them on a clear dark night? Get rid of those. I’d bet dollars to donuts that the other group of people don’t even know they exist and therefore don’t turn them on in the fog where they would be helpful.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        I like the concept of the rear fog light but certainly drivers need education regarding its use.

        As for front fog lights how many misaligned after market or even factory fog lights have you noticed?

        • 0 avatar
          Coopdeville

          Ok, I’ll give you the aftermarket point for sure, I didn’t think about those. Even worse now are those huge LED light bars that are showing up on a certain subset of lifted trucks and SUVs, and you really got to love when they slap them on the grill at eye level and blind everyone on their morning commute.

          • 0 avatar
            eyeofthetiger

            Oh yes. I love the green LED light bars mounted on the roofs. It’s such a cool colour to be blinded by. It’s like an alien abduction.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        Years ago, before the brand was cancelled, a few Oldsmobiles had rear fog lights. As one might imagine, most of the dolts driving them left the rear fog lights on 100% of the time.

        It’s really a shame that US drivers simply don’t understand (or even care) about the proper application of fog lights, particularly the rear ones, since they ‘are’ a very valid, useful safety item.

        • 0 avatar
          Coopdeville

          I forgot all about those! The Aurora for sure, with those separate in-bumper lights, but did the Intrigue have them too? Integrated or separate? Don’t remember.

          The biggest offenders around here are Audis by far, followed by Jags. The occasional Merc but I find that its rare. Someone needs to commission a study.

          • 0 avatar
            rudiger

            I don’t think the Intrigue had the rear fog lights. If it did, they weren’t separate units like the Aurora but were integrated into the taillight assemblies.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Since cornering lights have gone away I leave the fog lights on in all of my vehicles with them as they do help you see around the corner a bit. All of the factory ones I’ve had do a good job of lighting up the fog line which is what they are designed to do.

        The reason that they are all set up so that you can’t have them on w/o the low beams on is that some states specifically forbid their use as the sole forward lighting. Others that don’t specifically say that have provisions that require the use of headlights and other vehicle lights when atmospheric conditions mean that you can’t be seen for XXX feet without them. In other words if it is foggy enough that that fog lights would be of any benefit then the use of headlights is required.

        So no one is going to wire their fog lights from the factory that would allow you to operate in a way that could get you a ticket in some states.

        • 0 avatar
          MLS

          While driving the other evening, I was surprised to see that the Jeep Renegade, of all vehicles, had cornering lights. A subsequent Google search confirmed that the Renegade illuminates one of the fog lights when the wheel is turned or a signal is activated at 20 mph or less. And the feature is even programmable via the UConnect system.

    • 0 avatar
      King of Eldorado

      Totally agree about the fog lights. “Road debris” broke one on my 2011 (2d gen) Fit a few year ago, $300 to replace at the dealer. Now the glass cover on the other one is cracked, but it still comes on. The only reason I know that is that I turned it on to check when I noticed the crack; I never actually use them, partly due to living in the near-desert southwest.

  • avatar
    cicero1

    I’d rather walk.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      A man after my own heart. Not as bad as a Camry, but I’d always buy a Golf over a Fit. Since I don’t hate myself.

      • 0 avatar
        HotPotato

        Of course you would — it’s a higher class of car. The Golf is a large premium compact. The Fit is a mainstream subcompact. A Fit is comparable more to a VW Polo, I suppose, or whatever its Skoda cousin is.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    The Fit struck me as a vehicle with a narrow purpose: a maximum-capacity, short-haul, urban runabout.

    Dial up 75 mph on the freeway, and verges on being unacceptable.

    Unless you really need the back seat and cargo room, a Yaris iA is VASTLY better.

  • avatar
    stingray65

    The problem with the Fit is for the money they charge you can easily go 1 or 2 sizes up and have plenty of room, far greater comfort, and better performance, with likely no penalty on fuel economy. So unless your parking situation demands the smallest possible footprint, there really is no reason to buy a Fit in North America.

    • 0 avatar
      stuntmonkey

      The Fit works here in Vancouver where relative commute distances are short, streets are narrow and parking spaces tight. However, it would be so much better if it were Golf-ish sized, based on the Civic platform and at least had the 2 litre K20 engine.

      • 0 avatar
        ccbc

        Funny, I just moved from West End with the “amazing” on-street parking to an underground parking in North Vancouver. I had no problem to fit my MK4 Golf anywhere in the West End, but I find it too large for the tight underground parking (between a wall and a post… nice). My neighbour is the owner of a Fit and it seems perfect for his parking stall.

        • 0 avatar
          stuntmonkey

          Now that everything in Vancouver is condo, parking scrapes on concrete posts are par for the course around. I’ve thought about starting a post called “Vancouver Scrapes By”, but that would be a riff on that other famous local FB group…

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Agreed 100% with Stingray.

      But I do really appreciate the magnificent job Honda did with packaging on this car, and I’d like the way it drove if it weren’t so damn loud.

      I have to wonder how many mpg would get sacrificed to put enough sound deadening into this car to make it livable on the highway – two or three? Whatever. I’d make that trade.

      • 0 avatar
        rudiger

        That’s the thing about Hondas: there are trade-offs for the benefits. A case in point is the ‘magic’ folding rear seat or flat load floors in their SUVs. That stuff is great until one realizes the way they achieved it was by eliminating the spare tire. So, it’s then not-so-great when you have a flat.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    My parents have a perfect application for a Fit as I have described many-a-time, as a mini farm-hauler, even transporting bee hives (yes with bees inside). The rear row of seats is basically permanently folded with a tarp in the back. Sadly, their ’07 with 88k miles is now starting to show signs of rust on the rear quarter panels. A life of heated garage keeping combined with living in a hilly Central NY town with prodigious road salt application in the winter, as well as extended exposure to dirt roads, is taking its toll. The low weight and front wheel drive give it surprising traction driving across their sloped field. Ground clearance with the base model is a reasonable 6 inches or so. As a rule we avoid long drives in it, even 30 minutes on the highway in that thing gets old fast. When it’s finally replaced, it will be with some sort of compact 4wd truck with a usable bed height (used Frontier?)

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      I would still recommend a Krown application. Cost is about $125 in Ontario, so probably less expensive in the USA.

      From what I have been told it will even help to slow down ‘rot’ on previously untreated vehicles.

      We had a manufacturer’s rust recall on our Kia. The manufacturer was required to check for rust damage to the undercarriage and front end, replace any damaged parts and then apply a ‘rustproofing’ to the vehicle. We have ours Krowned regularly and I check the undercarriage at least twice per year, when it is up on a hoist. The Kia dealer could find nothing wrong with our vehicle (corroborated by our local independent mechanic), unlike a great many same model year vehicles showing significant rust.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        My dad is the worst about staying on top of so much as keeping cars washed. Nearest Krown place is a few hours away, I’ve had good luck applying Fluid Film at home. I’ve given up on trying to get through to the guy.

        • 0 avatar
          Arthur Dailey

          Fully understand. The Buick that we inherited had never been washed or had the interior cleaned throughout its entire life until we got it.

          Even before changing the filters and the fluid, I detailed and had a ‘rustproofing’ treatment applied.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      @ gtemnykh – I’m guessing your parents’ Fit came with the optional Lucas Wire Harness Smoke(TM) generator, built under license by Hitachi or DENSO, in order to keep the bees sedated.

  • avatar
    dont.fit.in.cars

    At six foot five point five, I don’t fit in a FIT, if I did, the FIT would be it.

  • avatar
    Ubermensch

    I see a lot of these around here but I just don’t see the appeal. With all the highway and interstate driving I have to do driving the Fit is just a horrendous experience in those situations. I love the packaging but the engine, transmission, noise, etc… just make it a miserable experience to drive on highways. I would take a Golf, Mazda3, or even Fiesta over the Fit if you routinely have to drive on the highway.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Even not having driven any of them I’d guess the Golf is likely to be the most serene highway cruiser.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Yep, Golf is a great highway car, and a Jetta wouldn’t be far behind in my book. I knocked out a 1,000 mile trip between Denver and St. Louis this summer in mine…quiet and refined at 85-90, and got around 35 mpg (it’d have been more like 40 mpg if I hadn’t been stuck blasting the A/C the whole time). Great seats as well.

        Civics are also excellent little road cars.

        Mazda3…not so much.

        And Fit…no way.

        • 0 avatar
          stingray65

          FreedMike – sounds like the Autobahn effect, where even the smallest German cars are designed to run long-distances in relative comfort and economy. In the old days, a Beetle could run all day at top speed (65-75 mph), but comparable French, Italian, and English cars would throw a rod while trying to keep up. Japanese small cars are seemingly designed for the urban congestion and low speed limits of Japan, otherwise they wouldn’t make cars like the Fit that painfully spins 3,500+ rpm at 75 mph, but is wonderful around town.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Besides saving me $10/month on gas, what does this dog do that a Soul can’t?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I’d put money on the Fit’s quality and reliability being better than a Soul’s in the long term…but yeah, what you said.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      Particularly when one considers that at the price of the top-tier models, it corrects the one major complaint of the Soul, i.e., you get the turbocharged engine.

    • 0 avatar
      Malforus

      Smaller turning circle, way more capable of carrying upright furniture like TV’s (fold up the seat bottoms and you can fit taller items).

      The Fit also has incredible visibility for a car with its cargo volume so its great for maneuvering in tight spaces or for those who are parking challenged. Very easy to get stuff in and out of for when you need to cary stuff since the seats fold flat to the floor.

      It literally comes down to if you are dimensionally squeezed in your regular puttering around or you frequently have to maneuver in less car friendly areas.

      Really comes down to usage, the Soul and the Fit are both very affordable cars that provide basic transit with plenty of room so it will likely come down to the intangibles.

      But if you need to move apartments the Fit allows you to stack boxes which you can’t do in the Soul because the cargo compartment height. Which can mean a huge difference between cargo volume and usable cargo space.

      The Soul is a bigger car but

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “Lacking the smoothness expected of a Honda four-cylinder”

    where they ever been smooth? I found this being a myth.

    Fit is just to much $$$. It is a way for Honda to say, “be stupid, take fit”

    Mexican made car is already enough not to buy.

    $19K. Dude, is this made of gold?

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      Then I must say, proud to be stupid then. We went right past $19k and went for the EX-L w/navi. Somewhere around $25k OTD.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        I came out $20.2K OTD with Mazda6. I don’t care if there is no leather, sunroof or navi. I have a driving machine, dude. I can navi on the phone. Besides, I don’t even need it. Leather? – forget it. Not only I have trouble to sit on it, what about Chromium 6?

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    I have not read one review which would encourage anyone to take a road trip in this car. As a city runner-it’s just OK.

    NOT one of Honda’s shinning achievements.

  • avatar

    I’ve long admired the Honda Fit from the moment the second-gen came out but to be honest, I’d struggle to sign for one. I love the fact that Honda has the balls to make something so versatile and fuel-efficient that isn’t a massive crossover but there’s something about the Fit that just exudes Eau de Dork. Even in the nicer EX and EX-L trims it is undeniably nerdy. If the Fit were a car it would have thick-rimmed glasses, talk with a slight lisp and constantly change the subject at cocktail parties to something about math.

    Could I have one as a second car? Absolutely. But I don’t think I could walk out to my garage every morning and have that be the only thing I see.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    Given all the negativity here for the Fit I suppose someone should speak up for it.

    My wife drives a fully loaded Fit EX-L w/ navigation. We have had it for a year and before that she drove a 2007 Honda Fit base from when it was new. In the last 10 years we have taken it on a 2000 mile road trip as well as several trips in the 200 to 1000 mile range. It has proven to be an excellent family car. The 1st gen came up a little short on gas mileage, but with the new one we easily beat city EPA getting about 32 or 33 mpg in town.

    I pretty much grew up in the back seat of a 1991 Civic sedan. The Fit is filling the exact same role for our daughter and I think is a better match for what I experienced in that old Civic than the new Civic.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Your gen 1 was an automatic I assume? Our ’07 base manual regularly got summer tanks in the mid 30s, and that’s in hilly urban driving in Ithaca mind you. Road trips returned closer to 40mpg, with a few tanks on state 55mph highways in the 42-43mpg range. I used to be impressed by that highway number, then I’ve had some newer rentals (’16 Elantra, ’16 Jetta 1.4TSI, Passat TSI) that all returned 40 mpg in much faster highway driving. 30+ mpg even in the dead of winter on snow tires around town doing short trips in that Fit will never not impress me, however.

    • 0 avatar
      CKNSLS Sierra SLT

      Devilsrotary-rent a Ford Fusion, Sonata, or even a Chevy Malibu for your next road trip and come back on here and let us know how it compares to you “excellent road trip” in the Fit.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        Then rent an A8, 7-series, and S-Class and compare those too. After that, rent some compacts, some CUVs, and some trucks for further comparison.

        Start a website and monetize the whole thing. With enough experience, you could become the guru of analyzing vehicles for road trips and make millions.

        After you’ve made enough to start a spin-off site reviewing rented yachts, hopefully that will be lucrative enough to start another reviewing rented private jets.

        From 30,000 feet, you can then point and laugh at the suckers who take road trips in midsize cars and suffer through 69 dB of misery just to travel slowly among the proles without any service from a private stewardess/escort.

        I look forward to your reviews, as well as some sort of future reward for putting you on the right path and changing your bum life.

        • 0 avatar
          cargogh

          Thanks rpn453. I didn’t bother with a response, but the one in my head suggested the 7-series and the S-class. You’ve added the A8 and so much more helpful input. Nice job.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      “Given all the negativity here for the Fit….”

      My 18-yo grand daughter from Brownsville, TX, got a 2017 Fit LX for HS graduation from her parents this year and she traveled from Brownsville to West Palm Beach, FL, to San Diego, CA, and to my home over a two-week period; she loves her little car.

      She left us for Brownsville this morning.

      Fuel economy is excellent even at Interstate speeds, the phone interface and USB work flawlessly, so what’s not to like? Hell, I filled up her gas tank for her and it only cost me $22 for 10 gals.

      With a range of 40+ mpg, you can cruise a long way.

      Why spend more money for a rental? Her Fit is a great ride (for one person.)

  • avatar
    jansob

    I think it’s way more suited to Japan. I just bought a 2018 Hybrid Fit here and love it. Great economy, parks anywhere, and you could fit an elephant inside. Never drove the previous generation, but this one is quiet and drives very well. It’s a bit lacking in front legroom, as noted, but our longest trips are usually less than an hour….I doubt it would be very nice on a multi hour interstate trip. We looked at cars with better legroom, and they were either less practical (sedans don’t hold as much as hatches, especially with kids) or far larger, or far more expensive. Sometimes all three. Full disclosure: I live very close to work, so I only drive on weekends….if I drove it every day I might not be so forgiving about the legroom.

  • avatar
    cargogh

    I washed my white ’17 6 sp EX yesterday thinking how it’s held up well over the last 13 months/28K. I had to order it to get a manual, gambled if Mexican made was bad, since Honda dealer couldn’t answer and corp refused to say where it would be made. Autotrader’s new VINs starting with HG for every manual assured me it would not be Japanese built. I haven’t known the difference, though I think maybe the paint might be thinner.

    When the next year’s models come out, I always wonder if I’ve screwed up by missing an improvement. Not this time. I did see the “acoustic glass” and wondered how much that would help. But also noticed 161 so there’s another 1″ of debatable styling on the nose. Didn’t really care about the other upgrades seeing there was no higher 6th gear, or turbo option. Even the lowered Sport continues to ride on same sized Firestones.

    I read about fog/driving lights. I leave mine on resulting in seeing more deer than I thought possible standing at the side of the road. I did replace the right bulb after hitting a kamikaze opossum and blowing it. No other damage. I’ve never been bright-lighted. In fact now that the majority of my driving is rural, it lets oncoming drivers know I’ve shifted from bright to dim. The Fit does have good overall lighting.

    As for the sunroof, I can barely hear it in tilt position. I use it nearly daily. After baking in sun, it’s great to exhaust the cabin when the AC first comes on. I try to get a sunroof on every vehicle I get and have never experienced a leak (in closed position). I got a small water stain on an Audi 100 headliner years ago.

    Last week I drove 250 miles to Louisville. No doubt about it, the 3900+ rpm at 80 is annoying. Not a pretty sound and it provides the sensation of leaving the front door open while the house AC is cranking in terms of efficiency and wear and tear. I routinely get 42 mpg following aggressive country drives, but a steady 75-80 yields just 35. Stupid. It’s not like it doesn’t require downshifting on hills anyway. 114 lbs/ft only does so much. I made an 1800 mile round trip to FL and realized how improved NVH is compared to 30 years ago in my ’78 Fiesta S or ’86 Omni GLH turbo. But I’m 54 now and it was the first time I ever considered about lumbering around in an old Continental.

    I’m fractionally under 6′ and have been driving closer to the steering wheel which is adjusted nearly all the way up for as long as I remember. I get in shorter driver’s car and sometimes slide the seat forward, so I have no problem with the Fit’s limited travel. On the other hand, occasionally on a long droning ride, I’d like to stretch a little and it would seem the seat is jammed. It’s not. There’s rear limo legroom so why doesn’t the seat go back another 3″.

    It’s time for a clay bar and a wax before winter. I try to keep it well maintained. I’ve noticed over 38 years of owning cars, clean ones do better, kind of like feeding and flea treating a pet. I only owe $7900 on it so it would make a great trade-in. I don’t love it, but really like it and have not regretted a single time having bought it. There was no other car better suited for me during the first 10 months and 26K. I hauled everything and parallel parked multiple times per day. With the short length, great outward visibility and back up camera to sight the yellow paint, there is not much better.

    The Fit has been everything I expected and more. I’ve unloaded it before and the stacks it carried seemed as big as the car.
    I like the size, love hatches, and as usual with Honda, gas mileage has been better than rated.
    But since a job change and a drastically shortened commute, the Fit no longer checks every box. I’d hate to have to replace it right now. I’m not sure what I’d go for, but the ’18 isn’t screaming, “I’m the one.”

  • avatar
    Joss

    Surely most would spend a bit more on the monthly and lease a Civic over a Fit? The EX sported nav over the LX before. Is this still the case? CR doesn’t like Versa Note. The previous Versa-hatch had an edge over the Fit in mechanical refinement. Fit tweaks seems to continue as class-leading practical but retains it’s noise and mechanical crudeness.

  • avatar
    sjd

    I just bought a 2018 Fit Sport as a third car and love it. I find it only slightly noisier than my 2015 Civic Si and a lot quieter than my modified 2010 Mazda MX-5. Yeah, I could have gotten a Civic cheaper but I wanted a small hatchback.

    I only drive manual and opted for the 6-speed. While I was a bit worried that it only has 130 horsepower the car gets up and goes just fine. Just don’t be afraid to drop a gear if need be. I think it is pretty refined for an inexpensive car and fun to drive.

    I took it on the highway for the first time today and had zero issues at 130 km/h. Concerns about this car on the highway are completely overblown. Seriously, what hyperbole.

    Are their things I don’t like about it? Sure. There is a lack of steering feel and I agree with Tim’s concerns about the seats. The high beam lights could be better and the clutch engagement point is vague. I’m glad there is a volume knob but would like a tuning knob.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    If what you want is a quieter, faster, more refined Honda Fit…buy a Chevy Bolt EV. Twice the money up front, but you make up a chunk of that with tax credits/rebates, and another chunk by never paying for gas or routine maintenance.

    No?

  • avatar
    CKNSLS Sierra SLT

    Devilsrotary-rent a Ford Fusion, Sonata, or even a Chevy Malibu for your next road trip and come back on here and let us know how it compares to you “excellent road trip” in the Fit.

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