By on September 28, 2017

2018 Kia Stinger GT - Image: KiaLet’s face it. Most American car buyers in 2017 don’t actually want cars. You know, the traditional passenger car. Most car buyers who actually want cars don’t want full-size sedans built by mainstream sedans. And among the few car buyers who actually want full-size volume brand sedans, the overwhelming majority — 99 percent, in fact — do not want a Kia Cadenza.

The U.S. market is about to get a lot more difficult for the Kia Cadenza, which is currently priced from $32,890. Admittedly more powerful than the forthcoming 2018 Kia Stinger, the Kia Cadenza is a nearly five-year-old front-wheel-drive luxury barge in a semi-attractive Kia body.

The 2018 Kia Stinger, on the other hand, is a flashy new cut-price sports sedan hatch, a model deserving of some anticipation that’s priced from $32,795, or ninety-five dollars less costly than the chronically unpopular Kia Cadenza.

2017 Kia Cadenza - Image: KiaOf course, comparing the Kia Stinger and its twin-turbocharged V6-engined Stinger GT sibling with the Cadenza is not what Kia wants consumers to do. The 2018 Kia Stinger will cost thousands less than supposed competitors such as the Audi A5 Sportback and BMW 4 Series Gran Coupe. By the time the Stinger reaches the $40K tipping point — or $39,895 to be precise — it’s already equipped with a 365-horsepower twin turbo 3.3-liter V6. The A5 Sportback starts at $43,575; the 430i Gran Coupe at $44,095.

Imagining legions of German-intended luxury car buyers making a switch to the Kia requires an enormous leap, but that explains Kia’s significant price advantage. It remains to be seen how much of that advantage is wiped away by more rapidly degrading resale values. Fortunately, Kia’s not entering the market with a half-hearted effort.2018 Kia Stinger GT2 RWD - Image: KiaOn the basic $32,795 Stinger, Car And Driver reports, standard equipment includes leather seating, a seven-inch infotainment unit with Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, dual-zone automatic climate control, and the eight-speed automatic transmission that’s married to each of the Stinger’s engines across the board. A Stinger Premium trim pushes the price up to $37,895, Jalopnik says, by adding a sunroof, LED lighting, a special gauge cluster, and a larger touchscreen with navigation. All-wheel drive is a $2,200 option on these and other Stinger GT models.

The Stinger GT is offered in three different forms: GT, GT1, and the aptly named GT2 variant. All GT models receive the hood vents that appear to be trying too hard to convince us, Pontiac-like, of performance. To the basic $39,895 GT, which is equipped like the basic non-GT Stinger, the $44,395 GT1 adds the Stinger Premium’s content.2018 Kia Stinger GT2 AWD interior - Image: KiaThe top-spec Stinger GT2, $50,395 with rear-wheel drive or $52,595 with all-wheel drive, includes standard safety kit like automatic emergency braking, adaptive cruise, lane keeping assist, and auto high beams (available elsewhere in the range) plus a limited-slip differential, a power trunk, and head-up display.

Kia’s pricing isn’t yet set firmly in stone for the 2018 Stinger, but don’t expect any meaningful changes. The fact that the Stinger undercuts the Cadenza does it no favors — this latest Kia must fight the same battle that the Kia K900 and Cadenza have so far failed to win. “But it’s a Kia,” will be the common refrain, no matter how pleasant it is to look at, no matter how great it is to drive. For goodness’ sake, that’s essentially what the boss of Kia’s Genesis corporate partner already said.

Securing the sales of each and every sports sedan buyer that manages to see past the badge is vital, and by pricing the Stinger appropriately, Kia stands a chance.

[Images: Kia Motors]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars and Instagram.

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81 Comments on “2018 Kia Stinger is $95 Cheaper Than 2017 Kia Cadenza...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    Are those a$$holes really going to restrict the LSD to the $50K model?

    • 0 avatar
      davewg

      That’s a big reason I’m thinking about crossing this off the list. I’m definitely not paying $50k+. It will be interesting to see what transaction prices are like. I suspect that GT2 Stingers will be rare…

      • 0 avatar
        srh

        I am surprised that lower-volume manufacturers are unwilling to take a chance on more flexible configurations. Give a base price with everything an added option.

        I get really tired of seeing cars fail that might have succeeded had the manufacturer not reserved the choicest option for the most expensive trim level.

        • 0 avatar
          ash78

          But there are some exception, albeit rare ones. For example, the Golf Sportwagen only has AWD available in the bottom trim. Very unusual.

          Otherwise you have to go with the Alltrack, which could technically be considered a trimline, but they don’t consider it as such.

    • 0 avatar
      Drew8MR

      It’s ridiculous. 365 modern horses to an open diff? I almost argue it’s irresponsible to leave it off with the big motor.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        I’m with you guys. I would believe than an LSD should be on all models since I beleive these are more for differentiating models.

        However you might be surprised to hear AMG and McLaren have open diffs on their cars and these things have 550-600-650hp.

        This to me defies common sense however my prejudices are going against many multiples of white coat German and English PhDs who are ex F1 so if these guys have enough electronics to make an open diff work then…

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      They should absolutely add it as a dealer option. That’s poor form. But they are learning! I think they will correct this.

  • avatar
    srh

    As the owner of a 4-series Gran Coupe, I think this is a great looking car. From certain angles it resembles the 4-series, though that could be said about most cars of this ilk. The price fully decked out is a bit higher than I’d expect, but if the base config isn’t too impoverished, I could imagine buying one.

    I mean, I /won’t/ buy one, because I’m not currently in the market. but I could certainly imagine it!

  • avatar
    davewg

    A Kia Stinger GT was on my potential buy list, but at $49k I just don’t think I have the stomach for that. I’d potentially be then looking at the 4 cyl models, and if that’s the case I think there might be better options.

    It’ll be interesting to see where the Regal GS lands pricing wise, though I thin k the Stinger might be the better drivers car…

    Trying to figure out my list of cars has been a hair pulling, maddening process.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I have that same 2.0T right now and I think it is an AMAZING motor. everyone I know that drives it really really likes it.

      With that being said, I am a potential stinger buyer and I actually think the 2.0T is where I’d like to be. expect about 32-34 MPG coupled with massive torque from a stop and it will be a blast of a DD car.

      My wife drives a v6 Cayenne and it has plenty of power for sporty daily driving and she loves it… but it could use a tad more torque. The 2.0T will have better real world driving dynamics than a traditional V6, making it a good motor for this kind of car.

      The V6TT will technically be a better performance car for the real “Sport Sedan” buyer, but I don’t know if its worth it when it comes down to it. The 2.0T puts down better power numbers than mid-range 3 series BMWs with similar torque curves, and is solid all around. If your really looking for a top tier performance vehicle with disregard to fuel economy, the SS is a better buy, the WRX may be a better buy… One of the reasons I couldn’t stomach the SS wasn’t the cost of entry but the fuel economy for a DD car!

      So I agree with you on most fronts, but I think for the “Sporty DD car”, the 2.0T Stinger with some options in the mid to high 30s will be the sweet spot. Plenty of torque and power for fun driving in your neighborhood, good fuel economy for long hauls, the tech and look to feel like your in a sporty sedan, and a live-able price point.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        50 grand for a Kia is a big ask. Especially one that a layman can’t easily distinguish from a $18k Optima.

        • 0 avatar
          motorrad

          Have you seen one in the flesh? I live in Korea and I’ve seen a few, trust me Helen Keller won’t mistake it for an Optima.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            I saw a few Stingers as well in Korea. There are some common design cues, but it’s a bigger and more substantial car than the K5.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          Whose paying $50k for a kia?

          isn’t that like saying who would buy a camaro for $74,900? (a loaded camaro)

          99.9% of buyers get nowhere near the $74,900 price point.

          I would venture to guess the same with the Stinger. Most will sell for $28,000 to $34000 after discounts and rebates, which puts in right in line with average new car sales. Is there a better 4 door sedan for about $28k? I’m not sure.

      • 0 avatar
        ACCvsBig10

        they shoulda used the 3.3l v6 from the sorento as the base. It would have allowed them to hit the market from both sides, compete against all the consumers that buy 30K+ fwd v6 sedans and stick it to the germans with their downsized base engines.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          Their 2.0t is an excellent engine. Don’t forget about other things like fuel economy.

          I’m a likely stinger buyer and I will certainly opt for the 2.0t. Great torque- peak torque is at 1400 RPM! It’ll be fun to drive and fuel efficient.

          They aren’t going to be competing with BMW on BMW’s terms, they are carving out their own niche which is the right way to go.

          • 0 avatar
            ACCvsBig10

            i have their 2.0t in 270hp form before they detuned it because they werent hitting the mpg they claimed in the sonata. While adequate for a 3500 pound car, Its probably gunna feel more sluggish in vehicle that weigh 200-400 more.

            Pretty sure they’re competing with the audi sportback for 10 grand less.

          • 0 avatar
            xtoyota

            Don’t forget the long warranty 10 year/100K
            5 year/60K bumper to bumper

      • 0 avatar
        davewg

        Interesting perspective. Maybe I need to closer at the 2.0T given the kind of driving I do. Mostly local, a few longer trips per year. T

        There’s just something about having that big motor though….

        The Regal GS might be compelling, but I worry about it not being as much of a “drivers” car as even the Stinger appears to be. I’ll be interested to read reviews of Stingers with then 2.0T

        Every time I look a potential purchase, for the $ I keep coming back to the Golf R. I know – it has its flaws, but…one of them being it’s size.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          If you can stomach the size, there are amazing cars at the small end of the spectrum… Golf R, Focus ST, Civic Type R…

          I think all of these will technically out-value the Stinger unless your looking for a large midsize sedan… The minute you get to a large midsize sedan front (I know that sounds like an oxymoron), the competition is quite bare, which is why I think the stinger is targeting that.

          for someone who can’t fit in those small sedans, has a couple of kids, or needs to haul some people in the back seat, instantly all those excellent players on the small end are gone-

          I wish I knew what Kia’s goals were. If they are trying to carve out a nitch and have low expectations for the stinger, it will be a huge success.

          If they are looking to move it as a volume player, they’ll be in trouble.

          • 0 avatar
            TMA1

            I think the Stinger’s also carving out a unique niche with that hatch. Suddenly you can load stuff, people, and still leave a pair of black stripes on the road. I’m interested!

      • 0 avatar
        davewg

        Oh, and I agree about the SS. Great car. A friend owns one, but I couldn’t stomach the price. They were a fantastic deal when they ran the 20% off MSRP, but I wasn’t in the market for a car at that point. Now they’re mostly gone – at least the desirable 6 spe d manual. – and stilly pricey.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        We will have to see which 2.0T Kia puts in this. If it’s the one in the Genesis coupe, which gets it to 60 in 5.7s and through the quarter in the low 14s, they will be on the borderline of competitive as the BMWs/Audis this is aimed at are 13 second cars. If they put in the one in from the Optima/Sonata, which gets those to 60 in the 7s, they will be DOA. I agree that they should have made the 3.3 NA V6 the base motor.

        • 0 avatar
          arach

          Its an interesting question honestly.

          I’m guessing the optima/sonata, and thats because of what all the reviews say about suspension… that its capable, but clearly made for daily driving with a softer suspension.

          Hyundai/Kia sacrificed peak power in the 2.0T for the sonata/optima specifically to move the torque and power curves down to where they are used for DD duty. That means they are quite weak at high RPM performance driving, and quite strong at stop light pickups that most DDers are looking for. They frankly “feel fast” but aren’t.

          For this reason, it really depends on where Kia is targetting. Are they targeting the looks of the sports sedan, but going after mid-size sedan buyers and asking them to “upgrade”? Or are they going after sport-sedan buyers and asking them to “downgrade”. If its the latter, your right- they need the Genesis 2.0T. If its the pior, they will go with the optima/Sonata.

          However, since both motors are technically the same motor, I’m hoping they can discern the difference with tuning alone, and therefore have a good distinction between “Sport” mode and “comfort” mode. If you can have the optima/sonata “motor” for DD duties and the Genesis 2.0T for sporty driving, I think customers would be quite pleased- otherwise they’ll hear complaints from one of the two.

    • 0 avatar
      DuffMan

      Hey davewg the Stinger was going to be on my list for next vehicle but the msrp for a well optioned seems excessive. I went from the Regal to a Fusion Sport. With the discounts you do get a nice car for the money

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      IMO the G70 is a much better looking car and will apparently offer a 6 speed manual as an option in the US on the 2.0T model. It’s too bad they don’t seem to be planning on this option in the Kia, as the slightly larger size and the lift gate do make it appealing despite the lass attractive styling (and it will presumably be a bit cheaper).

  • avatar
    carguy

    The Stinger looks good but there are two things concern me:

    1. In the Motor Trend track test the $49K 3.3T GT model was beaten by a 4 cylinder RS Camaro. I know it’s not a track car but that is not a good metric.

    2. Kia rates of depreciation will significantly raise the cost of ownership.

    • 0 avatar
      davewg

      Depreciation is worrisome. Not sure if the $10k delta to an Audi or BMW is enough. My guess is these will lease like crap too. If the leases are decent that changes things somewhat. Maybe.

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      I don’t see why that’s a big deal. the Camaro is an amazing sports car. The Stinger is a 4 door sedan… No one buys a 4 door sedan expecting it to best a sports car? You know the Camaro SS is faster than the Porsche Panamera S?

      The Camaro doesn’t have back seats. You can call those back seats, but you can barely fit your pet goldfish back there. I owned one. the stinger is a Sedan, for 4-5 people to ride in.

      No one is comparing the Panamera to the Porsche 911? I see this as the poor man’s panamera, and to that I say, “YESSS”

      When it comes to rates of depreciation, this will LOWER the cost of ownership. See, I bought a Hyundai that was owned for 7 months for 39% off new money. So If I can get a stinger for 39% off MSRP… wow, thats a heck of a car for the buck ;) but your point is well taken. While the percentage drop is huge, the amount isn’t. I was shopping for a panamera. 65k miles on a panamera will get you $50k off the starting price. 65k on a stinger might depreciate it by 5%… but that’s only $22,500.

      Plus oil changes will be only about $25 compared to $100 for a Porsche or $75 for a Camaro… those little things add up quick! Thats one of the things I love about my Hyundai. I pay $15 in gas a week and $50 a year in maintenance. That is $830/year. I drove a porsche for 2 years and now my wife drives it. It costs me $3216/year for the same driving (18 MPG + $200/year in maintenance).

      Over 5 years, thats $11,930.

      Am I crazy to compare a porsche to a kia? I don’t know, but I cross shop them myself. The biggest problem with my hyundai is its not that fun to drive, so I have to have a spare “fun car”. I feel like the stinger will be just enough fun to drive as a DD, but with a low cost and maintenance structure to be the perfect DD car in addition to a spare “fun car” where I don’t feel like I’m settling. I’ll take the $11,930 I save in maintenance and apply that to the depreciation hit and come out ahead.

      But the quirky thing with it all is that every buyers needs are different. I would expect a 4 Cylinder Camaro to best a Stinger GT, because they are two totally different leagues, just like I’d expect a Camaro SS to best a Panamera S. Two different leagues.

      I do expect the Stinger GT to be a LOT MORE FUN to drive than a Cadenza/Sonata/Fusion/Accord/Avalon, for just a few bucks more and a lower maintenance, and I think thats where the market is… not to steal camaro buyers but to shift Sedan buyers to something a bit more fun and sporty, and in that front it should grab me as a buyer….

      As long as I can find a CPO Yellow 2.0T otherwise loaded Stinger on the lots!

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      A loss of less than 1 second to the Camaro… I think the functioning back seat will be of much greater concern to potential Stinger buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      BrunoT

      The Camaro LS is not even close to this car in every other attribute. Refinement, visibility, comfort, space, cargo capacity, etc. It’s a purpose built sports coupe. That this thing is even close is a testament to a great design. It’s softer sprung on purpose. Depreciation will be poor on loaded models, ok on more basic ones.

  • avatar
    qfrog

    Cadenza? I was not even aware that such a model was in the market. I can not remember ever hearing of such a model.

  • avatar
    arach

    the Cadenza is being axed isnt it?

    I mean officially its brother- the Azera- is being axed. I can’t imagine the cadenza staying around unless its just limping along in the short term.

    In short, does anyone expect the Cadenza to be sold alongside the Stinger? I don’t. Might there be some overlap over the next 6-12 months… or even 24 months? sure, but I’d anticipate the Cadenza is good as dead.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      The current Cadenza is a new second generation design fro 2017, not a 5 year old design as stated in the article.

      • 0 avatar
        arach

        Thanks for correcting me.

        This actually boggles my mind. The optima grew internal dimensions to just about match it, and is solid all around, so I can’t help but wonder why someone would buy a cadenza?

        Oh wait they don’t… they are only averaging 458 sales/month for a new model? scary. They are on pace for 5500 on the year.

        Still boggles my mind… its got to be on its last legs, no?

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Maybe – Kia kept the Cadenza around and made it more luxurious than its cousin, the Azera, as it needed more of a “bridge” btwn the K900 than what the Optima could offer (even in SX-L trim), as it did not have something like the Genesis sedan to serve as a bridge to the Equus.

          With the Stinger, makes sense for the Cadenza to go away as the 2 start at around the same price-point, but at the same time, they appeal to different types of buyers/drivers much like the Lexus ES and GS.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Axed in America? Hyundai just released a new Azera in Korea, where it’s the Grandeur. The K7/Cadenza does well over there as well.

      The K7 is a handsome car, but it doesn’t get much exposure over here. There’s one at work that I always stare at.

  • avatar
    Fred

    Let’s hope it drives better than the Forte.

  • avatar
    mike978

    $2200 strikes me as very expensive. For mainstream makes I see a typical $1500 cost for AWD.

    Also the GT2 has limited chance, as an S4 is only $51k.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      There’s a difference btwn the cheaper, basic AWD systems and the more advanced, performance oriented AWD systems.

      For instance, Acura chargers more for its SH-AWD system than it does for its more basic AWD system (found on its crossovers).

    • 0 avatar
      arach

      First off, bd2 is right

      second off, Kia discounts like CRAZY, so I’d expect it to be about $1300 in the real world.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    May be high depreciation is our gold? In 2 years you get one dirt cheap. sorta like Mustang. 25 today, 17 a year later

  • avatar
    caltemus

    “Most car buyers who actually want cars don’t want full-size sedans built by mainstream sedans.”

    I think you accidentally a word there

  • avatar
    aaronista

    I’d be very interested in Stinger GT2. Love the looks. Certainly a better deal than 4 cylinder 430i Grand Coupe.

  • avatar
    nvinen

    If this car had been on the market a few years ago, I might have bought it. Turbo V6 (or V8), AWD, four doors are my ideal recipe. The liftback is fine and it looks pretty good. I don’t mind the price if it delivers the goods. I would probably spring for the GT2 to get the LSD, adaptive cruise and HUD.

    But since it wasn’t on the market and I bought a more powerful RWD car instead.. not really sure I can see myself “downgrading”. Even though the AWD would save me from pants-wetting terror every time it rains. Sorry Kia, you’re a bit late to the party for me.

  • avatar
    bd2

    All that advanced safety tech (that is found on the GT2) is expensive whether it’s on a mainstream branded vehicle or a luxury branded one (where’s it’s even more expensive due to having higher margins).

    For instance, the Focus Titanium has a $6.2k premium over the base Focus and the Titanium doesn’t offer nearly as much advanced tech as the GT2.

    $50k seems like a lot, but try to get a similarly equipped 3 Series, much less a 4 Gran Coupe for that kind of $$.

    Plus, with the discounts (once the intial demand dies down), probably would be able to get it for around $46k.

  • avatar
    Prado

    Even the starting price seems rather high to me. I doubt too many luxury brand buyers would step down to a Kia, so they need to pull up buyers from the sportier midsize mainstream sedans which frequently have heavy discounts. IMO, Transaction prices need start under 30, for any chance of success.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    Actually, the Cadenza was just redesigned this year. I think it’s quite a looker, too, almost a budget S90. But that should just go to show you how little its presence in the market matters.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      I agree the Cadenza is probably the best looking mainstream full size sedan. But still no one buys them. I’ve seen 2 on the road in my entire life, both on trips to the US.

  • avatar
    brenschluss

    The perfect rental?

  • avatar
    nels0300

    “But it’s a Kia,” will be the common refrain, no matter how pleasant it is to look at, no matter how great it is to drive. For goodness’ sake, that’s essentially what the boss of Kia’s Genesis corporate partner already said.”

    Which is a shame. Not sure how much business sense it makes, but it’s cool Kia makes something like this.

    I know more than a few people who would lose their mind if Honda or Toyota, or really almost any other automaker, had a nice looking, sporty driving, somewhat practical RWD hatchback available for ~$30K…..whereas this car will be avoided by many because it’s a Kia.

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    Yeah, $50k is a tough pill to swallow. I had thought the “top” version was going to be around $41-42k. For $50k, the Charger SRT becomes a competitor – and the Kia probably loses in everything except reliability/warranty and MPG. Or if you prefer, Chevy SS. And if “luxury” is more your thing, Lexus GS starts to hit at that price point, and probably the 400 hp Q50. Or even an STI + flex fuel kit.

    Mind you, still looks interesting, but just a bit out of the budget. But yeah, maybe in 2 years, if it’s anything like the K900, $35k with 15k miles would be fun.

  • avatar
    Cactuar

    Please do a comparison between a Stinger and an E39 M5. I’m serious.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I thought from Preliminary reports Kia really had something on their hands, then they reveal its powered by a V6, and even that costs $40k

    Yea right, thanks for making the SS I bought sound like an even better deal.

    I also don’t get the tacked on nav screen, that would look out of place on a Chevy Aveo it’s so cheap looking.
    I really want to like this car but they really half-a**ed it.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      I really don’t get why people crucify Mazda or Kia from having a tablet-style nav screen, but Mercedes and Audi get a free pass for doing the same thing. If you’re going to have these things at eye level, they’re either going to be floating, or you’re going to have to stretch to see over the enormous dashboard that encases the screen.

  • avatar
    sgtjmack

    $50k,… Even $30k for a Kia or anything under the Hyundai umbrella is a ridiculous stretch. They may have some nice looking cars, but their fit and finish, lower end quality materials and poor attention to detail don’t rate a higher price tag. They need to stick to what they do best, making affordable, run of the mill econo boxes.

    They’ll have to go back to their original plan, circa 1989, when they sold their cars at half price and also gave you a free car, as long as you paid the taxes, in order to sell enough of these to get them out there.

    • 0 avatar
      Hydromatic

      $19,999 plus a free Kia Soul and a 10-year 100,000-mile warranty for both?

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Please give us the details on the failures of fit and finish, materials quality and poor attention to detail among H/K’s current premium offerings. Real life experience is sufficient, unless you intend to bring up the ’99 Accent you once owned.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Must not have been in too many Kias lately.

      Kia has been repeatedly praised for its fit and finish in reviews and generally has better quality materials than its competitors, including Hyundai, as Kia sells many of its NA models over in Europe where “dash-stroking” is of more importance,

      In addition, Kia has its SX-L trim which adds a bit of luxury which can’t be found in Toyota, Honda, Nissan or Hyundai (best comparison would be Ford’s Vignale line over in Europe).

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      Yeah, every Hyundai and Kia I’ve been in and driven feels far more solid than any American and most Japanese cars they compete against. They just don’t have any character.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    I like it a lot and think the G70 is even better looking. Don’t compare to BMW 3 or Audi A4. Instead compare to Alfa or Caddy ATS/CTS and this is a winner. The dealer is the worst thing about Kias. I completely avoid Kia and go to Hyundai for that reason alone.

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    While the GT2 is higher than I’d like I really need to see what you get in the GT2 vs the GT1, the HUD and LSD are two things I would have wanted.

    Once you can get them $2-$3k below invoice I might bite.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    Sorry…looks too much like an Optima. The styling is very safe. Unfortunately!

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      I don’t even understand how people are saying it looks like an Optima. It looks more like a Soul.

      It does look very cheap and derivative though, just not of other Kias. I mostly see Jaguar XF, A5, and Charger, but overly slab sided.

  • avatar
    Jerome10

    I predict sales failure on this car. It just has that smell all over it. Again, should have been popular as a good sports sedan (if it drives right) should. BMW has basically become a boat. Who makes a good rear-drive sport sedan these days?

    But…

    1) It says KIA on it. I very much try to overlook brands, but KIA is simply one brand that still might as well say CHEAP. Huge negative right there.

    2) This pricing is insane. See item 1. Nobody gonna pay that kinda money for a Kia. They should talk to Cadillac too. You can have a great car, but just because it drives like the best in the market doesn’t mean you can charge like the big players.

    3) I know this will get poo-pood, and I appreciate the great automatics these days…but I still feel if you really want to push your rep as a sport sedan, a manual must at least be offered. And it isn’t.

    3a) The manual would actually have been a good differentiatior for KIA to attract some people looking for a manual sport sedan. With an automatic like everyone else, why not buy everyone else?

    4) I bet the new Genesis G70 is going to drive awfully similar, probably priced not too different, and at least looks classy, doesn’t say “KIA” on it, and can give at least some feeling of a premium vehicle and dealership experience.

    Sorry kia, unless this thing was like $30-$35k (assuming the drive is all there…) I just don’t see it happening.

    K900 (was that the flagship?) sales numbers coming up here.

  • avatar
    Middle-Aged Miata Man

    Owner of a 2017 Cadenza SXL here, and I just returned from a 2000-mile round trip in it. Saw this article yesterday but didn’t have time to reply from the road.

    A few points:

    –“Cadenza” is a musical term, just like Optima and Forte. I do wish Kia had continued this theme across other model lines.

    –Yes, the 2017 is all-new, with the only appreciable carryover being the 3.3L GDI V6. In addition to additional features (and I loved having the HUD and radar-assisted cruise on my trip) the biggest improvements over my 2015 are the ride quality and noise reduction.

    –Yes… I also owned a 2015 Cadenza before this one!

    –I won’t argue that it still isn’t ridiculous to pay more than $40K for a Kia right now. (And I didn’t.) That perception will never change, though, unless Kia (and Hyundai/Genesis) continue offering products in that space to normalize and justify their existence, and gradually establish a market.

    –The Cadenza is a screaming deal if you have good credit and better negotiating skills, because they ARE unpopular and no dealer wants to still be looking at one still sitting on his lot a year from now. I went in at $10K off MSRP and settled on a final price pretty close to that.

    –No one in their right mind should ever cross-shop a Stinger and a Cadenza, just as few Lexus buyers enter a dealership still having difficultly choosing between an ES and GS.

    –Speaking of Lexus, I did compare the ES and 2015 Cadenza, and the Kia won out based on styling (exterior/interior), features, and price. Materials and fit/finish were a wash, with the notable exception of paint quality – the Lexus wins there. Oh, and I also compared the 2017 Cadenza to a Cadillac CTS for kicks and grins, and found the GM offering woefully lacking, especially for the money.

    Flame away, kiddos.

  • avatar
    BrunoT

    The car sounds great at $40K for a GT. But $10K more for some “nice to have” options? No thanks. Even $4500 for the premium is a poor value compared to Kia’s other offerings that include all these things for less.

    I like the idea of a stealthy lower cost car, if I want to drop $52,000 I’d get the A5 sportback.

  • avatar
    2012JKU

    $50k? No thanks….rather buy one 18 months old with under 20k on the on the clock for just under $30k.

  • avatar
    abayaa

    Brand New I would take a q50 over the Kia without even thinking, and I’m a fan of Kia in general.

    They are definitely smoking something or they don’t really intend on selling much.


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