By on August 10, 2017

2017 Volvo XC90 Excellence - Image: VolvoIn anticipation of a welcoming party for 2018 models, non-Volvo luxury car owners are currently eligible for a discount valued at $23,500 on a handful of remaining copies of the 2017 Volvo XC90 T8 Excellence.

There’s only one problem. The Volvo XC90 T8 Excellence is not exactly the most affordable member of the second-generation XC90 lineup. In fact, the T8 Excellence is the most expensive XC90 in America — by a wide margin. While the XC90 range opens at $46,745 for a five-seat front-wheel-drive variant, the T8 Hybrid turns on the lights with 400-horsepower for $69,895. Bump up another couple of trim levels and you’ll find yourself at the — let me clear my throat — $105,895 XC90 T8 Excellence.

Yet the $20,000 bonus Volvo is paying to dealers for XC90s in T8 Excellence trim means the laughably high $105,895 price — $1,005 more than a Land Rover Range Rover Supercharged — and a $3,500 conquest bonus drops the $105,895 XC90 T8 Excellence way down to $82,395.

It also means you lay hold on what CarsDirect’s Alex Bernstein says is, “the single largest discount on any vehicle at the moment.”

Cars.com lists 45 copies of the T8 Excellence in dealer inventory at the moment, leaving little opportunity for prospective customers to get their hands on a Volvo flagship that’s discounted by 22 percent. Those customers will truly have a hankering for high-end content, as the powertrain is not just available in the $69,895 T8 R-Design but the identically priced T8 Inscription, the latter of which is the highest trim level for non-hybrid 316-horsepower XC90s.

The Excellence features reclining second row captain’s chairs (and no third row) accompanied by a refrigerator, standard 19-speaker Bowers & Wilkins audio, North American walnut inlays, nubuck textile headliner, and the Orrefors crystal gear shifter that made headlines before the XC90 was even on sale.2017 Volvo XC90 Excellence - Image: VolvoVolvo’s conquest bonus won’t work if you daily drive a ’97 Cavalier. If you don’t drive an Acura, Audi, BMW, Cadillac, Infiniti, Jeep, Lexus, Lincoln, or Mercedes-Benz, the $3,500 conquest bonus is not for you. If you do own a vehicle from one such brand, you don’t need to trade it in. Ownership is enough.

In the past, Volvo told TTAC that huge discounts on the XC90 T8 Excellence were of little relevance to the overall XC90 picture, with the Excellence trim accounting for less than 1 percent of U.S. XC90 sales volume. With some reported supply issues due to unexpectedly strong global demand, Volvo expected to see XC90 sales recover in the latter portion of 2017. Sales through the first seven months of 2017 are down 23 percent — a sharp drop for a model that brought the Volvo brand back to a nine-year sales high in 2016.

Added to the $23,500 discount on the XC90 T8 Excellence is a $4,585 federal tax credit. Lesser 2017 XC90s also benefit from significant discounts at the moment, but nothing that compares with the Excellence’s massive rebate. Look for at least $5,000 off T6 models, conquest bonus included, and some very attractive lease offers.

[Images: Volvo Cars]

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

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44 Comments on “The Biggest New Vehicle Discount Available Right Now? $23,500 Off a Volvo XC90...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Garbage Chinese vehicles that literally define the meaning if planned obsolescence, with obscenely, laughably high prices.

    I sometimes come close to feeling sorry for people who buy these vehicles and hold on to them post-warranty, but then remember the old adage that life is but a series of choices.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      Agreed DW. Even at 82k the buyer has a serious lack of financial understanding of depreciation curves. This is a 20k car in 5 years and 60k miles.

      • 0 avatar
        dmoan

        I commute regularly thru areas where the houses are 2 mill + and I see few XC90. I doubt when you are pulling in that kinda of money you are worried about depreciation curves.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          A neighbor around the block (or else someone who visits said neighbor) scooped up one of these XC90s a month ago or so. A very fetching looking car, but the definition of disposable European lease fodder in terms of depreciation and long term running costs/issues. Would love to see a modernized variant of the Yamaha V8 making 400ish hp or at least a T6 (with turbocharged transverse inline 6) crammed in there. The currently powerplant is simply unbecoming IMO. As it stands, the motor alone would drive me from this into a final-year LR4 or even a Grand Cherokee Overland/Hemi or something.

          • 0 avatar
            saturnotaku

            Never going to happen. Volvo is committed to I4 engines because the XC90’s platform, which will serve as the basis for vehicles going forward, was designed only to accommodate those.

            It’s not going to matter for them too much in the long term because they’re all in on autonomous vehicles, but that’s a rant for another time.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            You’re definitely right, and that’s been the story for a number of platforms now: engineered with only enough width/space for a 4cyl. Fine in an mainstream midsize sedan, although even there my favorite is the V6 Camry and Accord.

          • 0 avatar

            That V8 had such poor economy!

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            They may be committed, but they’re really shooting themselves in the foot with the North American market. It’s not exactly a small vehicle, only being able to accommodate such a small engine is a design flaw.

            Maybe they can get away with this in Europe/Asia, but not in here the land of King V8.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @Corey, yeah but that V8 made nice noises…

            A teacher down the street from me had an XC90 V8 and even at low speed it had a lovey burble as it passed in the morning.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Yeah I think the innate feel, sound, etc of a higher-cylinder count engine even non-enthusiast people can pick up on and sense. Then again if everyone goes to the turbo-4s then cross-shopping won’t discourage a buyer since they’re all the same vacuum-sucking things.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Wasn’t the XC90’s V-8 Yamaha-sourced?

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            Yes it was a Yamaha V8 engine. She looked like the sort of old lady that should be buying a Subaru (just her and her dog) but she faithfully kept to that Volvo.

            @gtemnykh – I knew at least one gentleman who bought a Trailblazer with the Atlas 6 because he loved the noises the engine made. He was not an enthusiast by any sense of the imagination.

            Eventually replaced it with a first gen Rogue but talked about missing the sound of the I-6.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Pretty much this – the S Class (and even more so for the S600) has a huge depreciation curve.

          Have also seen a few XC90s in very tony neighborhoods (where also have seen the Bentayga), but doubt any of the XC90 owners opted for the T8 Excellence unless they got a massive discount.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      DW’s right, but this is nothing new. Volvos haven’t been long-term durable since the Clinton administration (first term).

      My ’92 740 was one of the last of the dying Tractor Engine Volvo breed.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      DW, and yet you like the Escalade? Do they not depreciate?

      Come on man, are you so daft?

      I used to support your commentary, but as of late it has become more and abstract and disjointed.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I never once said I “liked” the Escalade.

        I have said that it, despite having unacceptable ride quality and infamous GM reliability issues, is the one remaining Cadillac that represents the “macro” visage of what Cadillac once successfully represented and projected, when its sales and reputation were far more robust (thanks to bold looks, a proper V8 -‘especially with the 6.2, an acceptable amount of leather at least decent interior trim and material quality, and at least passable interior room for a family of four along with their things).

        In other words, the Escalade is the closest remaining descendant of a proper Cadillac not because it’s a good or great luxury vehicle, but merely by process of default elimination.

    • 0 avatar
      RaudLuke

      Planned obsolescence I’ll agree. But that’s been the game since the era of a workplace with ashtrays and a curly blond secretary that answers an ass-slap with “yes sir”.

      But Chinese? Who cares? Your iPhone’s built in the People’s Republic, and your fan’s built in the United States. If I were a betting man, death comes at the hands of a Lasko long before your phone puts 120 straight into your head.

      It’s not the country. It’s the people. And there’s no greater motivation, no greater drive than a steady paycheck at a safe factory. If Geely provides that, the XC90 will be as good as any.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I’m going to partly agree with you.

        As many who are intimately more familiar with the procurement and engineering processes than I, Chinese Corps and their employees have the capacity to build many things, now, to a high degree of quality and precision (they even lead the way in certain segments of certain industries, particularly where a state owned enterprise is building a product that the central government has deemed crucial – imagine that, Japanese and Korean-style mixed state planning at work in China).

        I’ll disagree inasmuch as that these new Volvos will stand the test of time in terms of reliability, however, no matter how bottomless Geely’s state-subsidized pockets, though.

  • avatar
    dmoan

    Jaguar Fpace is eating into xc90 sales interesting how they are competing with each other in terms of customer base rather than with X5.

  • avatar
    thelaine

    Jeep?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      laney,
      My sister has a Grand Cherokee and I think she’s been lucky to buy the only one in Australia that has only been in the shop for a couple of months over the past 2 years she’s had it. It hasn’t been a long term warranty plagued sh!tter like many Grands.

      But, from a quality perspective I do think FCA could improve the Grand and turn it into a prestige vehicle from it’s current cheap and cheerful Korean beater. Read the article on the Ssyangyong Rexton, the Grand competes with the likes of that with bling, but has a ways to go in the quality department.

      The Grand chassis is well put together and I’ve driven the Hemi Grand here and my sisters VM Grand, but not the SRT, which I would love to take for a spin.

      I don’t know why FCA didn’t use the Grand as a prestige Volvo, BMW, MB, LR competitor. It has the potential to be a great vehicle. But, like many things FCA/Chrysler produce it is subpar, which is a pity as I do like the philosophy for Chrysler vehicles, slightly outrageous and over done.

    • 0 avatar

      I thought that was interesting too. Obviously targeting GC buyers. If you drive into the upper middle class/wealthy neighborhoods Grand Cherokees, are likley the most common american made car you will see. At least here in New England.

  • avatar
    Stanley Steamer

    What? Brand new? And without the scarlet lemon buyback letter ubiquitous with these models?? A steal! NOT!

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    I wonder if I could fit a 3.7 Acura engine in this bad boy. And tailpipes coming out under the rocker panels. And big BFGoodrich tires. And maybe a Mustang rear drive axle. Excellente

  • avatar
    slavuta

    ” let me clear my throat — $105,895 XC90 T8 Excellence.”

    Call the ambulance! No, this is not heart attack. Call ambulance to Volvo corporate office, because these people are crazy

  • avatar

    You know those things they advertise on TV, where it’s normally $129.95 but there’s a special Today Only price of $15.99?

    There’s a reason those things are worth (usually less than) the Today Only price.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Looney Tunes pricing…but man, that interior is gorgeous. Wow.

    Volvo’s interior design department has gone all Aaron Judge lately.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “$105,895 XC90 T8 Excellence.”

    I’m so happy there is nearly no inflation in the Great Economic Leap Forward we’ve been experiencing since 2008.

    • 0 avatar
      bikegoesbaa

      Are you making an economic point using the pre-discount MSRP of a low-production extra-zoot top-of-the-line version of what is already premium priced luxury vehicle?

      The MSRP that is more than 2x the price of a base model of the same vehicle?

      Top-spec Euro luxury cars have always been irrationally expensive. That’s not a problem, it’s the system working as intended.

      Please either explain how this is relevant or acknowledge the fundamental ridiculousness of your contention.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    My cousin who lived (used to) on Ile de Oleron had a 2013 XC90. I only drove it for around 40km when we went out for lunch. He gave his partner his 7 Series, which was a great drive for a diesel.

    I know it was an older Volvo, but it was quite nice and expensive. One thing I did notice, was the rear door trims appeared to be not as I would of expected for quality of material.

    As a comparison I thought his 7 Series, even though a few years older was of better quality, due to the materials/finish inside.

    Maybe the newer XC90s are better. But it drove well and had enough power for day to day driving.

  • avatar
    EspritdeFacelVega

    They have been an immense hit here in North Texas and I see them everywhere, with at least 2 or 3 in my office parking garage. My local Volvo has quite a few late-model Benz GLEs, BMW X5s and older Lexus GXs on their used lot, which may comprise at least some of the initial wave trade-in volume. The pricing on the lesser models is in the competitive ballpark and there’s much to like about these; I hugely enjoyed an S90 rental I drove in California a couple of months ago and I think many remain well disposed to Volvo, so I suspect they’ll be just fine, especially with several new products coming out. And Geely has deep pockets.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “older Lexus GXs on their used lot”

      These happy new XC90 owners will be in for a world of hurt if they intend to hang on to these XC90s as long as they did their gussied up Land Cruiser Prados.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        You kinda sorta could hold on to the non-V8 post MY07/08 P2 XC90s.

        • 0 avatar

          Well as long as you were OK with rebuilding the front end every 60-80k miles. Of course for certain types of euro car buyer that won’t raise an eyebrow.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Ehh I think the final year XC90s were kind of sort of a mixed bag. Mopar is right, the suspension is simply under-spec’d the weight it’s carrying and premature wear is the result. Throw in a smattering of electrical issues and it’s not looking too rosy (although not E70 X5 bad). I’m speaking to these new gen XC90s, which likely haven’t had the kinks worked out yet, have a twin-charged 4cyl engine (instead of the gear-driven I6). I anticipate a full on horror show in the hands of the post-lease owners.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Before this XC90 arrived, Volvo was bordering on irrelevancy in the US market. This car has changed that. We’ll see if they can channel its success and grow across the entire lineup. To do this they are going to have to address real quality concerns. Still, this is not a $100,000 vehicle and I think Volvo knows it. There’s just so much that you can offer to raise the base MSRP by more than $50,000. Maybe they’ll roll out the 2018s with a cheaper top end and they need to get these off the lots first.

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