By on June 8, 2017

2017 Chevrolet Malibu - Image: GMThe U.S. auto industry is shrinking. But only by a little bit.

Auto sales through the first five months of 2017 are down just 2 percent, a drop of roughly 140,000 sales across the entire industry. Aside from high inventories and rising incentives, it’s not all doom and gloom. 2016 was the highest-volume year in the history of the American auto industry — a 2-percent drop is hardly catastrophic.

This is therefore not 2009, when virtually every new vehicle suffered decreased volume. Many new vehicles are surging, selling significantly more often this year than last.

But in a declining market, many other nameplates are in fact losing sales. Many sales. We’ve compiled a list of the 10 volume nameplates losing U.S. sales most rapidly.

We drew some guidelines. “Volume” in this instance equals a 30,000-annual sales rate. That’s a total achieved by slightly less than half of all new vehicle nameplates in the 2016 calendar year. Pro-rated, that’s 12,500 sales through the end of May 2017.

By looking at “volume” vehicles, we’ll be able to see where America’s new vehicle sales are truly disappearing. Naturally, demand is supposed to dry up for discontinued models, so we’ve removed from contention, for example, the Jeep Patriot. We also excluded commercial-oriented vans.
2017 Jeep® Compass - Image: JeepEach of the vehicles listed below have their own reasons for losing sales. They all deserve asterisks and explanations. Some reasons are more obvious than others.

For the Chevrolet Impala and Toyota Avalon, declining interest in large cars generally caused declines of 35 percent and 29 percent, respectively. The Chevrolet Malibu climbed to new heights just last year, but General Motors has not been able to sustain that pace as the midsize sedan segment contracts. Similarly, the Hyundai Sonata and Ford Fusion made their way into the top 10.

The third-ranked Honda Odyssey is in a replacement phase. The fifth-generation Odyssey is just going on sale now, and that transition phase severely curtailed sales. As for Kia’s Odyssey-challenging Sedona, which is down 29 percent year-to-date, sales are crumbling in concert with much of the minivan category: minivan sales have also decreased at Toyota and Chrysler, albeit modestly. The Nissan Quest and Mazda 5 have been killed.2017 Ford Mustang blue - Image: FordThe eighth-ranked Ford Mustang has lost 28 percent of its five-month output from 2016, a loss of 14,767 sales for America’s leading sporting car. Competitors from Chevrolet and Dodge, the Camaro and Challenger, are flat, year-over-year. The Mustang reached an eight-year high when it was new in 2015 and was expected, like most two-doors, to tail off after that, particularly with a new Camaro launched the following year. Now, Mustang sales may also be affected by customers who prefer to wait for the upcoming launch of a refreshed 2018 model.

At the top of the heap sits the Jeep Compass. We could say bad things about the Compass. We could critique the failing Jeep. It is, after all, a favorite whipping boy at TTAC.

But the real reason Compass sales are down 58 percent this year relates to a massive changeover at the Jeep brand. Its sibling, the Patriot, is disappearing. The Compass structure, somewhat oddly, includes 2017 versions of both the first-generation Compass and the second.

Rank Vehicle May 2017 YTD Sales May 2016 YTD Sales % Change
#1 Jeep Compass 17,435 41,608 -58.1%
#2 Chevrolet Impala 28,504 44,055 -35.3%
#3 Chevrolet Malibu 73,087 104,187 -29.9%
#4 Honda Odyssey 37,010 52,698 -29.8%
#5 Toyota Avalon 14,215 20,013 -29.0%
#6 Kia Sedona 12,998 18,297 -29.0%
#7 Hyundai Sonata 66,768 92,547 -27.9%
#8 Ford Mustang 38,422 53,189 -27.8%
#9 Ford Fusion 89,086 120,313 -26.0%
#10 Kia Soul 43,623 58,299 -25.2%

Regardless, it’s not at all surprising to see Compass sales crumble. Nor will it be surprising to see Compass sales rapidly elevate as the new model comes on stream.

For now, these 10 models combined for a 30-percent downturn in 2017’s first five months; more lost sales than the market overall. The Lexus ES, Hyundai Accent, BMW 5 Series, Buick Enclave, and Mazda 3 all declined by at least 20 percent compared with early 2016. 24 other continuing nameplates reported double-digit percentage losses, from Ford Focus to the Infiniti QX60.

Meanwhile, some of the most popular vehicles in America — passenger cars, mostly — are also in decline. The Honda Civic, Toyota Corolla, and transitioning Toyota Camry combined to lose 46,220 sales already this year.

Thankfully, pickup trucks and SUVs/crossovers have added 225,000 extra sales.

* A previous edition of this ten-car list included only nine cars. It’s been updated to include the tenth-ranked Kia Soul. The rankings have been updated as a result.

Timothy Cain is a contributing analyst at The Truth About Cars and Autofocus.ca and the founder and former editor of GoodCarBadCar.net. Follow on Twitter @timcaincars.

[Images: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Ford Motor Company]

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68 Comments on “Vanishing Act: America’s 10 Most Rapidly Declining New Vehicles in 2017...”


  • avatar
    zip89123

    I own a 2016 Fusion & I am surprised at the 2017 downturn. I’d buy a 2017 in a heartbeat if I needed a replacement for my 2016.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      My brother absolutely loves his recently purchased 2016 Fusion. He said its the first time he can remember that he’s been this excited by a car, and not a (GM) pickup.

      He hated the 2001 Altima GLE that was his commuter before. He really is enjoying the Fusion. He drove a Fusion Titanium (as well as a Malibu and I believe an Impala), but said he was perfectly happy with the base model Fusion and its price tag. He said its more comfortable and drives better than the Chevys, and given its purpose in life (drive 1.5 hours to work and 1.5 hours home), the equipment it has is just fine.

      The previous owner put some 18″ alloys from a higher trim Fuaion on this S trim car, they look sharp.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        Maybe it’s just me waxing poetic about my first car (96 Altima 5-speed), but I was always a fan of that generation before they super-sized the Altima. I almost bought a 99 as a beater/commuter a couple years ago.

      • 0 avatar

        Fords want to ditch the next generation Fusion. Ford does not even realize that they have a decent car. With Hackett the hatchet-man in charge there is little hope for Ford.

        • 0 avatar
          el scotto

          You do realize that the Ford family controls Ford? The trick is to be a Mullaly and not an Iacocca (sic on both names). Ponder the fact that the Agnellis, through their controlling company control FCA. I’m sure both families are cutting and pasting your opions.

  • avatar
    threeer

    More SUV!! Seems to (almost) be the answer to everybody’s sales question…

  • avatar
    Zackman

    A new Malibu would most likely be my choice if I were in the market, it being a very competitive vehicle in the mid-size class.

    I wonder if the reason for its decline is the start/stop system coupled to a 4 cylinder engine? To me, that is its weakest link. That, and lack of V6 availability.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      What about rubber buttons?

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I just got back from a trip to Iowa for a few days, spent 4.5 hours each way driving a rental Malibu LT with the 1.5T motor (21k miles on it, looked like it had been driven through a field).

      On the whole it is a competent car, but there are any number of other midsizers I prefer.

      Pluses:
      Exterior styling I think is quite sharp
      1.5T motor is more refined than the Ford 1.6T I drove back in 2015 in a Fusion, with strong and smooth low end pull, stays smooth as you climb the rev-range.
      Metal trim on dash looks decent and feels like real metal

      Minuses:
      Smaller than average fuel tank (cutting curb weight). I did a similar but much longer highway trip in a Passat 1.8TSI and it had more power, and got a bit over 40mpg indicated with similar driving dynamics, and I never had to fill up on 8 hour drive. I was below half a tank after 200 or so miles in the ‘bu
      Typical crappy cloth that afflicts the midsizers across the board it seems (exception:Legacy)
      Boomy interior: weight cutting takes its toll
      Stupid interior ergonomics: start stop button position at a weird angle away from the driver facing into the steering column
      Weird fabric trim on upper dash.
      Start-stop system: decently smoothly implemented, but I’d still prefer not to have that stress of timing a quick entry into traffic and worrying if the engine will fire up quick enough (largely a mental thing, I know).

      So no huge pitfalls, Seat comfort was okay, not the best, not the worst. 33mpg in all highway driving (A/C, cruise set to 75-77mph driving on fairly flat I-74). That’s is okay but falls behind the two 2.4L NA Koreans (36mpg in a Sonata, Optima) I’ve rented this year, and is wholly blown out of the water by the 1.8TSI in the Passat.

      For a lease or sub-7 year ownership period, it’s gotta be the Passat SE for me as the best overall driving/comfort/features/value out there. For long term ownership, the Camry is still my pick. Unless I could find a really cheap ex-fleet car as a commuter, the Malibu doesn’t make much of a case for itself.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        As a fellow renter don’t forget the Malibu’s tiny trunk opening. By contrast, the Passat has both a large opening and a generous trunk.

        • 0 avatar
          Whatnext

          Indeed, with their fast rooflines and tiny trunk openings manufacturers seem hellbent on pushing any buyer who wants a shred of practicality into a CUV.

          Am I the only one who hates Chevy’s two-tier grille? Blecch so ugly yet anonymous.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You’ve nailed it.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Yes, I hate it too. The Impala front end was okay, but the Malibu and Cruze look like they have a severe mental disorder.

            I happen to think the refreshed Sonic looks decent, though. The new ‘Nox isn’t offensive.

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        +1, gtemnykh. I, for one, enjoy these insights from frequent renters.

        2010s cloth makes me sad. It won’t happen because of the interest in keeping the parts bin as small as possible, but it’d be nice if someone offered good-quality cloth as an affordable option. Or offered base cloth that wasn’t terrible.

        I’d be curious to see what the inflation-adjusted cost difference is between ’80s and ’90s cloth and present-day cloth. I hope for their sakes that the manufacturers are saving a bundle; they ought to be.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Glad to be of service! When I was little I thought it was the coolest thing when my dad got a rental car (he traveled fairly infrequently so it was a great novelty to poke around a new Sunfire or Stratus etc). Now I get to rent them and still geek out over it.

    • 0 avatar
      Zackman

      I forgot to mention that I did get a chance to drive one about a year and a half ago, and really liked the car, hence my opinion. I will admit the start/stop system was much better than the earlier models.

      I believe it was either base trim or lowest LT trim.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “Ford Mustang” – interesting. May be they simply don’t make enough of them? I looked at dealer inventory in 5 nearest dealers. No one Mustang EcoBoost available. I want to test drive it. I stopped by one place – they have 4 V8s and this is it. How can people buy something that they don’t have?

    Chevy Malibu? – I knew, this is fiasco.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Soon, 90% of vehicles plying U.S. roads will be square pickup trucks and pug-nosed or ginormous front plasti-chrome fascia laden (of different variations) CUVs and SUVs (CUVs in varying blob shapes and SUVs in rectangular shapes).

    New malaise era, indeed!

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “Soon, 90% of vehicles plying U.S. roads will be square pickup trucks”

      Even in my part of the woods there are a lot of pickups that are just large sedans with open trunks. I was at my local Ford dealer getting some service work done and the Service Adviser made the comment, “it is nice to see a non-commercial pickup come in here that looks like it gets used as a truck.”

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    The Compass is at the top of the list? Big deal. How about a top ten list that doesn’t include models where there’s a new version on the horizon?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      A good reason WHY the sales are tanking doesn’t mean the sales aren’t tanking. Compass isn’t the only one on there being replaced by an all-new model.

      The reasons were given in the article. They don’t justify dismissing vehicles based on this reason or that reason.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Minivans down? – overpriced, may be? People used to be able to buy one for $20K. Now, Oddy starts over 30. If I have to maintain 3-4 kids, I may not have $$ to buy it. If I don’t have $$, I don’t make so many children. Honda made minivan a transportation for rich. Here is a hint – rich don’t need it. They can get huge SUV

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Mostly true, but you’d be surprised how many Odyssey Touring Elites and Sienna Limited AWDs there are in the driveways of the wealthy suburbs around much of the US. You can even observe said phenomenon here in the land of the Suburban/Yukon XL.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        More like “upscale” rather than “wealthy.”

        The affluent, for whatever reason (at least from what I’ve seen), seem to eschew minivans for the Range Rover, Cayenne, GLS, G-Wagon, Bentayga, X5 and Yukon XL Denali/Escalade.

    • 0 avatar
      zoomzoomfan

      This. Minivans are absurdly expensive for what they are. I see a lot more Grand Caravans around than I do Odysseys and Siennas despite the Grand Caravan’s lame duck status and aged design. Why? Price matters.

    • 0 avatar
      punkybrewstershubby aka Troy D.

      With the end of the Quest being imported to the US, we are scrambling to find a new 2016. Our 2011 at 175,000 miles is still going strong but we need another one soon.

    • 0 avatar
      LeMansteve

      10 years ago, the MSRP of a base Odyssey was $25k. When were they $20k?

      I’ll bet you a base Odyssey today is better equipped than a trimmed-out Odyssey of 2007.

      Inflation + size + power + features is the reason why they cost into the 30s now. They are not the basic 3-row hauling vehicles they used to be.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        Right. 10 years ago minivans started to decline. Because they used to be 20K and then became 25K. And now they are disappearing. They are not affordable to those who really needs them

      • 0 avatar
        redmondjp

        It goes back even farther than that. My sister bought a 1999 Odyssey EX brand new and I think it was close to $28K. My brother has a 2004 that was also close to $30K, and I have a 2001 that I bought used for $6700. Odysseys have never been cheap, unless you buy a poverty-spec LX one, which you rarely ever see in the wild (no roof rack, wheel covers, and non-body-colored door handles are the giveaways of an LX model).

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      You can still get a base Caravan around $22k with the close to $5k cash on the hood if you’re leasing. It still has around $3k for buyers too.

      An SXT with the driver convenience package is actually a pretty nice place to spend time for less than $30k. There really aren’t any other options for lower income folks with large families though.

      Edit: Holy crap just looked through their incentives – Dodge has $1500 in sub-prime bonus cash for buyers with a sub-620 credit score.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I will say this about the Malibu. Every one I see has been an LT. Almost no one seems to be buying a Premiere (which I’m sure GMs profit is much higher on.)

    OTOH every Cruze I see with rental bar-codes on the window is a Premiere.

    I don’t know what it means but I seems like an odd production mix for two vehicles that are fairly early in the cycle of this generation.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      The only Malibu at my job is fully loaded. I don’t know what trim it is but it’s definitely a 2.0T with big wheels. Good looking car.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        What I do think is interesting (because I’ve played with the configuration tools online) is that there’s a dealer installed option of a “sport lowering suspension kit”.

        I’m sure with the lack of paved roads around here it’s a terrible idea but it’s an interesting option for $695. I’m sure that very very few will be sold that way.

        • 0 avatar
          bikegoesbaa

          It’s hard to imagine that it’s even worth GM’s time to develop that and provide the parts.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            At least if the current Malibu was going to be sharing lots of parts with the soon to be released Regal this might make some sense but the Regal is based on a new Opel design.

            ¯_(ツ)_/¯

  • avatar
    CobraJet

    I am suddenly and unexpectedly in the market for a new vehicle. I’m seriously considering the Impala or Lacrosse. I am undecided if I should go to an SUV such as a Traverse or Acadia. A brief internet research seems to indicate that there are some good deals out there on the Lacrosse.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Dare to be different! Get a sedan.

      An elderly couple at our church drives a very nice Traverse but given that they never had children (and don’t have grandchildren therefore) ride height and hip point are really the only reason for them to be driving a 7 passenger vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        “Dare to be different!” There are a couple of wagons out there, drives like a sedan, storage like a SUV.

      • 0 avatar
        FuzzyPlushroom

        Dan, that’s why my grandfather has a Forester these days. He’s always liked station wagons, but found his ’10ish Outback much easier to get into than his ’03 Sable LS (the ‘Small Furry Mammal’, as I called it while I was driving it for a bit) and eventually decided he didn’t need a wagon’s worth of space, since they only have one frequently-visiting sprog for now.

        I just hope that my generation’s still allowed to steer our own compact AWD boxes in a few decades. For now, I’m holding out with RWD and three pedals, but I know that can’t last forever.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    …The Compass structure, somewhat oddly, includes 2017 versions of both the first-generation Compass and the second…

    GM did this in 2005 with the Pontiac Montana. With the Gen 1.5 U-Body (as I call it) Pontiac Montana being sold side-by-side to the Gen 2 U-Body Montana SV6.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    Mustang has nothing to worry about. Most people are just waiting for new model. Ten speed automatic transmission, more powerful engine, interior instrument gauge that’s gone all reconfigurable digital, dynamic suspension same as Corvette, and performance exhaust. One has to be crazy to spend money on the current Mustang with all the improvements in the pipeline for 2018.

  • avatar
    Lichtronamo

    That the Fusion makes the list is not a big surprise. The current car came out in the fall of 2012 and just received a mid-cycle update for 2017. Compare that to Honda, which was just ending production of the 9th generation Accord in 2012, launching the 10th generation for 2013 and will be debuting the 11th generation in Fall 2017 as a 2018 model. Automotive News doesn’t list an all-new generation Fusion until 2019 as a 2020 model. That product cadence leaves Ford in a bad position relative to the segment leader Honda (and Toyota).

    On the other hand, GM should be alarmed by the decline in the Malibu. I looked at one at the Chicago Auto Show and thought it at least comparable to the Fusion, Accord, and/or Camry. Whereas, the Impala may have expected to see decline due to contraction of the large sedan market, less fleet sales, and internal sales conquests by the new, larger, and less expensive Malibu, such a steep decline in the second year for this generation Malibu is NOT GOOD. The Malibu’s sales decline, if it continues, gives more credence to TTAC’s mid-size sedan deathwatch that the segment will contract to a few key entries (like minivans).

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    My sister is looking at Toyota Camry.

    She started with used — and learned with the $2750 cash on the hood from Toyota and further discounts, she can by a new LE for $17K.

    I poked fun at her appliance grade choice, but she was quick to remind me she flies jet airplanes for a living.

    Touche sis, touche.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I’m surprised the Maxima is on that last, but also glad. It’s a great car that deserves to win. Truthfully though if they give the Murano its extra 40HP it won’t have much reason to exist.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The Maxima is a piece of rolling garbage.

      Honestly, I think that your opinions about what are and are not decent vehicles is warped by the fact that you drive a Honda Accord that somehow think is a sports sedan, and Honda’s quality and “goodness” has been on a precipitous downhill slide for some years now.

      • 0 avatar
        zip89123

        I’d wager a bet an Accord is sporty, especially when compared to some Camry’s I’ve been in. While loud with road noise, every Accord I’ve been in handles admirably, better than my Fusion.

        As for the Maxima, I almost bought the new model when it was released, but new owners reviews were problematic at the time, so I bought a Fusion. My only regret is I should have opted for leather seating. I got such a good deal I still can’t believe it.

      • 0 avatar
        VW4motion

        DW,
        You do make some good points.

      • 0 avatar
        caljn

        Maxima not a piece of garbage. The 2016 is fast, quiet, comfortable, rather luxurious and well screwed together. Not at all like an Altima that many keep saying.
        And C+D picked it as top full sizer ahead of Impala and others.

        I know Nissan takes a good deal of hits around here but things do change.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          I had a 2017 Maxima SV as a rental in February this year and walked away from it thinking to myself, “what the Hell is all the hatred about for this car?”

          For the sticker price it seemed like a solid value, rode well, nice ergonomics, and a damn nice interior. I enjoyed driving it.

          I wouldn’t buy a new one because they depreciate faster than a GM W-Body rental car did, but in the used market what a screaming bargain.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            I really loved the SV rental I had. The CVT was excellent- dare I say the best mainstream auto I’ve experienced. With the 3.5L it was quick, and its programming was prescient. The interior was as good as my G37, and the infotainment was significantly better. It wasn’t too bad dynamically either, but my G has it licked there. I was seriously impressed. I had 2 4th gen Maximas in the past and I was really happy to see that the excellence streak continued.

      • 0 avatar
        johnds

        @deadweight

        Do you drive a fusion or Malibu and think it’s the best? I always hear replies like yours from trailer park boys with their rusty 2003 Malibu.

        The Accord happens to be a competent car even in it’s last year. It also has a V6 that would leave most cars you drive in the dust.

        People like to bitch that the newer accords don’t drive like an 82 accord, but fail to realize how much more reliable, safe, etc they’ve become. My 2003 sits at 261,000 miles and my 07 is near 200k. I have barely had to replace anything other than maintenance. They have been 10x as reliable as my 90s accords.

        • 0 avatar
          brenschluss

          I believe he drives a leased ATS, actually.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I drive a 2012 Mercedes E350, picked up in like-new condition from a friend’s dealership in Grand Blanc, Michigan.

          He owed me a true solid for helping get him in the resolution on a major problem regarding one of his other dealerships (big $$$ problem that he was getting home-towned on before I got the right people involved).

          I could have gotten a great deal from him on almost any new (except the more rare AMG versions that are in limited production and special orders) or used vehicle, but this was a true gem.

          It was a one-owner, low-mileage (18,000 miles) cream puff that his dealership took on trade, and he threw in a Factory Extended 7 Year/100,000 mile $0 deductible warranty (bumper-to-bumper parts and labor covered).

          It literally did not have a scratch on it and his top mechanic (who is actually a real German who is some sort of Mercedes certified master tech personally spent an entire day inspecting it and subjecting it to all sorts of diagnostics and tests.

          I only bought it as a temporary measure to look for my next vehicle (at the time I was trying to find a Mercedes C63), but have liked it so much that I still have it.

          If I told you what I paid for it as a % of the original sticker, you’d throw up and get enraged due to insane jealously. I could sell it right now and make money on it (but I don’t plan on it).

          It’s worlds better than any Maxima. The difference is quite dramatic. The Maxima feels like wet paper mache compared to the Benz, especially at speeds above 80 or 110.

          It’s a stress-free driving machine that has a definite premium feel in details large and small.

          • 0 avatar
            AoLetsGo

            Sounds like a nice car. Also thanks, I learned something after I looked up “home-towned”

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            The Benz also costs 2x new, so it SHOULD be nicer. And you bought it used, which ALWAYS puts the new car at a disadvantage.

            For the same money, the Maxima takes a hot hearty dump on any NEW German car that isn’t GTI related.

            Dead weight indeed.™

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        You must really enjoy making a fool of yourself. I haven’t owned an Accord in over 10 years. I’m currently driving a 2012 G37S sedan and riding a streetfighter’d Ninja 650R.

        I don’t know why I’m bothering to ask, but have you even driven a new Maxima?

        Dead weight indeed.™

  • avatar
    Joss

    Water rushing under the bridge. Its a race now to bring EV production costs down and battery range up.

    A point will come when EV and ICE converge in consumer cost and practicality. Then EV will be the future with drastically lower maintenance costs. There will be a glut of used combustion with no market value nobody wants. Few see it coming set in the old ways.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Even when that happens, there are still infrastructure issues, and the slow phasing in of EV cars. 15M cars a year for the ~300M cars on US roads is 20 years, and that’s not factoring in the increasing average age of cars on the road, and increasingly difficult economic and credit conditions that will keep a large swath of the population from buying any new car at all. The changeover won’t be that fast or simple….

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        It will be a difficult, but not impossible, lift. Way back when unleaded fuel needed to be available countrywide for the roll out of the ’75 models with cats, it created all sorts of logistical issues. And that did not require all new infrastructure.

  • avatar
    TomHend

    If unemployment is 4.3% why is GDP only 1.2%? (1.3% GDP average over the last ten years)

    Maybe something else is going on.

    • 0 avatar
      punkybrewstershubby aka Troy D.

      Yes, there are too many millions of Americans not working and contributing to the economy.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Growth following a recession/depression arising from financial “hijinks” (rather than a normal business cycle recession) tends to be much slower (look how long the economy dragged on following the Great Depression – which basically didn’t get out of its doldrums until the greatest injection of public spending up to that time jump-started the economy).

      Also, the disparity in income/wealth btwn workers and those at the top isn’t conducive towards growth based on retail sales.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Much of the loss in sales of midsize sedans is not that they are bad, but that they lost much of their functionality. Much harder to get in and out of, less roomy, less trunk space and many with the coupe like styling have so little headroom in the rear that an average sized person with average height hits their head on the rear glass. The sedans look nice with their sleek roof lines but they are not as comfortable and roomy so people are buying crossovers instead. I myself have no desire to buy another sedan due to what I mentioned above. Small turbo charged 4s do not help either but then many of the crossovers are going to those as well.

  • avatar

    It looks as if Ford is cancelling one of the top selling cars in the nation. Jim Hackett must be a real moron.

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