By on November 28, 2016

2017 Ford Escape Titanium EcoBoost - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About Cars

Hop out of your 1992 Toyota Camry Wagon in the Costco parking lot and tell me what you see. Plenty of Accords and Altimas and Camrys, I’m assuming. Large numbers of F-150s and Silverados and Rams, maybe even the odd Tacoma here and there. Some minivans and big SUVs.

And legions of small crossovers.

Many of those small crossovers — call them SUVs if you want, it matters not — are downright affordable. Some are powerful. Few are both.

Fewer still are affordable, powerful, and a real joy to drive. The 2017 Ford Escape EcoBoost 2.0 is affordable and powerful. It’s also the best small, affordable, and powerful crossover to drive.

That fact surely matters to at least 12, maybe even 13, of the 26,000 Americans who purchase or lease a Ford Escape every month, and it surely matters not one whit to the nearly 29,000 Americans who acquire Toyota RAV4 every month.

Admittedly, it’s a nugget of truth that does not negate other truths. Fun, yes, but the Ford Escape could stand to be more spacious inside, particularly aft of the rear seats. There are chintzy bits strewn about the interior, from the sunglasses holder and shift paddles to the main circular audio control button that depresses with a scrunch. Our CAD $44,689 tester, loaned to GoodCarBadCar by Ford Canada, was most certainly not affordable. (Equipped similarly, this 2017 Escape would retail at $39,330 in the United States.)

2017 Ford Escape audio controls - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About Cars

But EcoBoosted 2.0-liter Escapes don’t need to be expensive. A 2017 Ford Escape SE with a 2.0-liter and all-wheel drive is currently discounted to $27,290 on Ford.com. Affordable box: checked.

Small box: checked automatically – the Escape is 14 inches shorter, bumper to bumper, than a Fusion.

Powerful? Most definitely. The 2.0-liter turbo four-cylinder now produces 245 horsepower. 275 lb-ft of torque come on stream at 3,000 rpm. Expect a 0-60 miles per hour time of roughly seven seconds; a 50-70 mph time of around five seconds.

Objectively, we can say the 2017 Ford Escape EcoBoost 2.0 is small, affordable, and powerful. Yet making the case for the Escape as the best compact crossover to drive isn’t so difficult, either.

Relative to most rivals, turn-in is immediate. Grip from this Escape’s 235/45R19 Continental ContiProContacts is confidence-inspiring. Mid-corner composure is maintained despite a sudden, unexpected onslaught of poor pavement. Steering offers feedback, a characteristic so rare in modern vehicles that some prospective customers will think there’s something wrong with the Ford’s rack and pinion. The Escape even rides well on rougher roads, although the optional 19s, confronted with expansion joints, reveal a measure of sharpness I could live without.

The verdict after driving the facelifted 2017 Escape in the city, on the highway, and on serpentine rural roads: Ford’s compact SUV manifests the same Blue Oval ride/handling tendencies that make the Fiesta, Focus, Fusion, and Mustang exceptional on-road companions, as well.

2017 Ford Escape EcoBoost Titanium - Image: © Timothy Cain/The Truth About Cars

The Mazda CX-5 is a surprisingly sweet corner carver, a livelier compact crossover that puts fun first. But don’t expect an abundance of power. Mazda doesn’t do abundant power.

Subaru’s turbocharged Forester XT is downright swift and undeniably pleasant to pilot, but there’s a hint of softness that exists in the Subaru, less interactivity, and a CVT. Forester XTs also start at $30,170.

Volkswagen Tiguan? It’s nimble, but also showing signs of age. Many others — the top-selling Honda CR-V, most notably — focus on desirable attributes such as ride quality: less sharpness, less tactility, more isolation

But the Escape is the driver’s compact crossover, the small and affordable and powerful utility vehicle for the wannabe Mustang buyer who lives in a snow belt with kids and a dog.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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105 Comments on “The 2017 Ford Escape Titanium EcoBoost 2.0 is Still the Best-driving Small Crossover You Can Buy...”


  • avatar
    Jerome10

    Doesn’t surprise me. Every Focus or Mondeo / Fusion I’ve driven I always forget how well Ford balances the feel of the car. Planted, points straight on the highway. Corners well. Absorbs bumps. Brakes feel very good. Steering feel is very good.

    They drive more expensive than they are. Very satisfying.

    • 0 avatar
      kosmo

      Agree 100%. Backed up by my recent (and first) rental of the new generation Mustang. Astounding in pretty much every regard. Well, except that it needs two more doors and a hatchback — for me.

      I would order an Escape ST tomorrow.

  • avatar
    threeer

    I currently own the older (and less civilized) brother of this, a 2014 S model Escape. Can’t comment on the power, as I’m puttering around with the old 2.5 lump. However, even in the “basement dweller” option (lack of?) package, it’s a decently fun drive…for what it is. Looking back, however, I wish I had gone a bit bigger as my adopted daughter’s primary extracurricular activity of choice is participating in dog shows, and you’d be surprised at how much stuff I wind up carrying (I swear our Corgi has more hair product than many a movie star!), and the Escape is down on interior volume once you load a dog, the stuff and three people’s worth of overnight/weekend gear. That, and my little Escape can only haul 2,000 lbs and since we’re thinking of picking up a used camper to defray some of the huge hotel bills, that won’t suffice. But that’s not a reflection on the Escape, rather a poor choice in purchasing on my part (the dog shows and such came after the purchase, so there is that). But for a compact SUV, it really is one of the better ones, as long as buyers are sure it will meet their specific needs.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Hop out of your 1992 Toyota Camry Wagon in the Costco parking lot and tell me what you see.”

    You see a gtem that just fell over with delight at seeing you?

  • avatar
    ajla

    “the Best-driving Small Crossover You Can Buy”

    So, does that make the QX50 mid-size? It is 6 inches longer than a RAV4, but it is a tick narrower and has 3 less inches of height.

    Is there really an official dividing line on the CUV size classes?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Yeah, I think it’s a bit too long. It’s even a bit bigger (though narrower) than the Macan.

      And now I think the QX50 is too narrow, leading to cramped environs.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      The Infiniti QX50 and the previous BMW X1 are definitely compact, borderline sub-compact. Those two vehicles are only long because of their RWD proportions and exaggerated hood lengths.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    How does the Edge compare dynamically?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Better ride quality. But everything that results in the Escape feeling nimble is gone in the Edge, at least the 3.5L V6-engined version I drove. The Edge is pleasant, no doubt, but the Escape’s athleticism departs in favour of a planted, substantial feel.

      • 0 avatar
        VW4motion

        Sounds like someone needs to test drive 2017 Forester XT before claiming the Escape is the best driving small-suv. Escape does drive great. Not so sure it’s better than the 2017 Forester XT. Resale value is a slam dunk for thr Forester.

        • 0 avatar
          legacygt

          They do reference the Forester XT which would be fast but probably a little less dynamic. But if they’re going to favor steering and handling over power/speed, I’m not sure how they say the Escape bests the CX-5.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          VW4motion, the infamous car for sale websites have both the XT Premium and Escape Titanium advertised between $28,000-31,000. Sorry to burst your Japanese car bubble but used 2012 models are going for a similar price of $19,000.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Last time I drove an Edge, it made the Toyota Sienna seem light-footed and engaging.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        My parents test drove the Mazda CX-5, Ford Escape and Honda CR-V about 2 years ago. They rated the CX-5 the best driving but bought the Escape because of the power memory seats. They claimed the CX-5 was the most car like as it compared well to the Sonata turbo they had at the time in terms of handling. The Escape must be pretty easy to live with because my mother (who struggles with concept of right-click) was able to pair her iPhone, play music off a USB drive and work the Nav system.

  • avatar
    make_light

    My mom has a 2015 Escape 2.0 liter. I’m not too impressed with how it’s held up. Door tops are soft, but press the material and the seams squeak loudly. The interior door grab handles feel unsubstantial and cheap. The whole thing just feels more “loose” than I would expect to at this point in its life. Also the back seat is unbelievably cramped. My Forester XT doesn’t look as stylish inside, but feels more durable. Front seat comfort and quietness are better in the Escape, but Subaru has fixed the latter for 2017.

  • avatar
    Edsel Maserati

    I had a week in its kissing cousin, the Lincoln MKC, and really liked it. Generally I am not a fan of the SUV genre, unless I’m hauling a lot of folks for a long way. But the MKC was a terrific runabout. A little luxurious and kinda scrappy. It was a hoot take over a twisty backroad. I could see having something like this as your gadfly errand car, just because it was just so larky to drive, but the accommodations do pose a question. While folks in front feel OK, the rear seat are stiff and rudimentary and the trunk is no vast stronghold. So it’s limited.

    But it is fun to drive, I’ll give it that. Better sound and various other things better than an Escape. I have no idea how Lincoln dealers are pricing them now.

  • avatar
    MatadorX

    So, (when it’s brand new) the Ford is great to drive, powerful, and manageable cost wise.

    That’s cool. I’ll still take the Rav4 because let’s see…no turbo to begin spewing oil in the intake tract at the 5 year mark, incredible resale at the 5 year mark, still excellent fit and finish at the 5 year mark…

    ….and the ability to still buy EVERY. SINGLE. PART. directly from Toyota at the 5 year 10 year, 15 year, and likely 20 year mark. I am that 1992 Camry type driver. Any guess what, Yota still fully supports their incredible 1992 Camry. Ford? Well by the 5 year mark they will have discontinued most of the body/interior trim catalog, by the 10 year mark 3/4 of mechanical parts will be discontinued, and 15 year? Are there even still any 2017 Escapes left guys? Let’s do a Craigslist search of 2000 Rav4’S to seem how many of those lil buggers are running around. Heck lets do a Toyota Trademotion website search to see what all you can still buy for the aforementioned ’00 Rav…..

    Also, I’d love to see parts content sticker for both side by side. Guarantee the FoMexicoCo uses more Hecho components than the Yota, which likely relies almost entirely on QUALITY Canadian, USA, and Japanese components.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      I helped my friend buy an old CR-V a couple weeks ago. Since then, I’ve noticed that I rarely go anywhere without seeing at least a couple first generation CR-Vs. I was oblivious to them before, but they’re everywhere. How many other ’90s daily drivers do you see multiples of in the Whole Foods parking lot? The interiors even look great after a quarter million miles.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      MatadorX – You raise some valid points but most buyers only care about what happens during the lease/loan period.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      Every RAV-4 I’ve been in had numerous buzzes and rattles inside any time I played music with any (and I mean *any*) bass in it. Didn’t scream “good fit & finish” to me.

    • 0 avatar
      kam327

      And you’re one of the thousands to whom the fun-to-drive factor “matters not one whit”. Have “fun” with your mobile appliance.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      I’ve owned an Escape and I’ve ridden in a couple of RAV4s. Both RAV4s were loud and offered nothing special about the ride (granted, I have not driven a RAV4). RAV4s (and CRVs) have always looked fragile to me, while Escapes seem more substantial in both look and feel. I’ll but one Escape before anyone gives me ten RAV4s.

    • 0 avatar
      AK

      Yeah, Ford quality is sub par. I’m having a Ford bought back by the manufacturer as I type this

      But my parents had a 2006 Rav4 that was an absolute nightmare. Multiple steering and suspension woes and recalls, horrendous paint quality and alloy wheels that rotted in 3 years, a failed stereo head unit and finally an ECU that shit the bed just out of warranty was the final straw.

      Oh and then there’s the fact that it was loud, it rode horribly and the non defeatable traction control made the car legitimately dangerous in the winter.

      Ford quality blows, but Toyota is not the Toyota of old anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Oh you’re right, no way would you find a 2000’s Ford still driving around. Yep, all gone. Unlike those awesome bullet-proof Rav4s, the ones recalled for the third time last month to repair the same defective (rust-prone) steering components. Yes, the Escape is a recall queen too, but I don’t see anyone walking around saying its God’s gift to mankind as your rant implies Toyota is.

      And I didn’t know all those suppliers that are located around American Ford plants are actually in Mexico. Weird!

      Actually, Ford and Toyota use a lot of the same suppliers in the US. But, its just crazy Ford that does business in Mexico, huh?

      Thank God Toyota doesn’t build anything in Mexico, yep that shows just how smart they are to avoid Mexico when they’re selling Tacomas and Yaris iA’s that are built there. And it’s so awesome that they have never used Turbos because they’re so unreliable, as proven by the millions of them out there driving around right now.

      I was replacing the power window unit on my 1995 Ford, you know, the ones built 5 years before all of them died at 36,250 miles/3.1 years old. Anyway, the motor wasn’t the problem, it was the winding mechanism that stripped out. Cheap plastic teeth all crunched up like peanut brittle that had been in a food processor. STUPID CHEAP MEXICAN-AMERICAN FORD!

      Except it has “Denso” stamped into the casting on the part that failed, separate from the motor, although they probably built it as well.

      Correct me if I’m wrong, but isn’t Denso a Japanese company? And, furthermore, a subsidiary of all-mighty Toyota? What sort of alternate universe is this? QUALITY Japanese components, failed?

      Some US transplant suppliers that build parts for both U.S. automakers and transplants like Toyota and Honda have admitted that they purposely deliver a higher quality part to a Japanese company than they do to American companies. Surely to GOD these esteemed Japanese businesses wouldn’t be guilty of that? Just like they weren’t reemed for price fixing not long ago? Such a wonderful, trustworthiness feeling I get from them. Clearly they don’t hold us in contempt at all, and certainly don’t laugh all the way to the bank as sheeple like you pay more for their 10 year old “refreshed” (read:cheaper now) all-new Camry because you think you’re buying into something that will last !SO! long and be SO dependable until you trade it in on another one in 3 years when they throw the 14th set of all-new, BOLD bumpers and lights on it because you’ll be dammed if the Smiths have a newer car than you.
      *But it was so reliable! *
      Unlike those 18 Fusions you see a day broken down on the shoulder, their owners walking along the freeways in the rain everywhere! I think I see one now.

      No wonder Ford outsells Toyota in this country. Oh, but it’s FLEETS, because nobody would actually *buy* one, unless they really did need 25 reliable, capable and affordable work vans/trucks for their company to do its job. Yep, all those utility/construction/etc companies buying F-Series trucks by the dozens sure are worse than those rental companies propping up the Camry. Clearly it is Ford at fault again, because I see old Toyotas and I don’t notice Fords ergo all Toyota is superior.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “But, its just crazy Ford that does business in Mexico, huh?

        Thank God Toyota doesn’t build anything in Mexico”

        What’s funny is Toyota can somehow afford to compete with Ford on price despite spending more per unit in assembly costs and yet still deliver a superior product.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        “Some US transplant suppliers that build parts for both U.S. automakers and transplants like Toyota and Honda have admitted that they purposely deliver a higher quality part to a Japanese company than they do to American companies.”

        Care to provide some evidence and or data on that?

        Also, I work for a US based supplier that provides products to everyone, globally. Some of our US plants make products that ship to Honda, Toyota, and over Ford, Chrysler and GM. At the end of the day we seriously have ZERO amount of time to figure out how to make a crappier part to ship to Ford than over to Honda out of the same batches of materials.

        Ford, GM and Chrysler do have general specs and tolerances for specific parts as well as appearance standards on cosmetic parts (with AAR surface approvals signed off on– Color, Grain, Finish..ect).

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        These rambling screeds are getting a bit old. I’m starting to treat JohnTaurus posts in the way I treat ponchoman49 posts: just scroll right past and avoid the delusion. I can at least understand ponchoman’s motivation, GMs are his livelihood. The motivation behind John’s bizarre anti-Toyota rants is harder to pinpoint.

        • 0 avatar
          OldManPants

          What I don’t get about Mr. Taurus’ anti-Jcar polemics is that I think he’s a good generation or more younger than My Own People who lived through and in many cases personally suffered from the general abandonment of American manufacturing employment, much of it triggered by the J-invasion. And a lot of us nonetheless think Toyondas are just the cat’s ass.

          As you say, at least ponchoman’s clownish and iron-clad bias is understandable in a venal sense. But what kind of back-woods, Dueling Banjos impoverishment and trauma led to John’s?

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            If anything, one can point to Toyota’s commitment to localizing manufacturing here in the States and denounce Ford’s continued outsourcing. Camry: assembled in USA using 78% domestically produced parts. Fusion: starting this year exclusively Hermosillo Mexico produced using 49% domestic content. At least the F150 is still one of the most American-made vehicles for sale (less so than Camry however), with the Texas-made Tundra nipping its heels for % domestic content. Single cab Rams, all crew cab GM fullsizers, hencho in Mexico with a lot of Mexican and even Chinese components. When I bought a new rear hub assembly for the better half’s Camry after she curbed the rear wheel, I got a quality Aisin part made right here in Indiana (Seymour).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Seymour is laaaame. Don’t go there. :D

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            Amen. I’d rather we were colonized by today’s Japan than left abandoned by today’s Detroit.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      You can’t buy a 2000 era Toyota today, they don’t make them like that any more.

  • avatar
    White Shadow

    But wait….ecoboost has been very problematic, no? Or am I not up to date with the current turbrocharged 2-liter Ford engines? Last I heard, they were something to avoid.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “.ecoboost has been very problematic, no?”

      are you asking us, or telling us?

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Frend–

        Sometimes there is a person or two who you will come across during the Days Of Your Lives (its daytime for soap, ah ha!) where there is a different special speech language. Perhaps they are a different regional to you, or there is some little affectionate they are trying to show.

        All in a days’ working, as they say. It’s fun to come here and see other people using their special turnkey phrases like you saw of it above.

        I make sure to keep my Grango-eyes peed for new phrases to use like that one, no/yes?

        Regarde.,

        Grango R.

    • 0 avatar
      kam327

      Consumer reports rates the engines as excellent over the past 3 model years, so no the ecoboost does not appear to be a problem.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      White Shadow,
      Have you noticed the HUGE Ford advertising spread on this site? Money makes the world go round and reality getting pissed on.
      Yes, EB has no issues and the Escape is the best driving small suv. Stop looking at statistical data and think big picture.
      Hey, the Escape does drive great and is quick. Best, suv. Well, as I stated above.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    The handling prowess is due, in no small part, to those nineteen-inch tires.

    The idea, though, of spending a thousand dollars on tires does not thrill me, and if you want to avoid that, you’re looking at the NA 2.5L. At that point, you’re also looking at something that’s as much fun to drive as the CR/V.

    • 0 avatar
      OldManPants

      “The handling prowess is due, in no small part, to those nineteen-inch tires.”

      It’s absolutely criminally negligent that those are put on a vehicle some unsuspecting normal person might buy after test driving on only nice roads.

      “I love this car otherwise but it rides worse than a f*cking hay wagon!”

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I wish that Tire Rack would include “-1 sizing” as an option with their +1 and +2. At least us plebes would know whether we could drop down a size on some of the more ridiculous tire specs.

        • 0 avatar
          sproc

          Tire Rack absolutely lets you see -1 (and even -2) sizes. I just bought a full set of steelies and Blizzaks from them for my wife’s car (17″->16″).

          I have to give them even more credit for warning me that while 49 other states couldn’t care less, Pennsylvania has started dinging people on annual inspections if you can’t prove that your installed wheel size was offered by the manufacturer on that vehicle, even for minus sizing. WTF? Fortunately, the inspection comes up in July when the factory wheels are mounted.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          Dan-

          sproc is correct. Make sure you go under the “Winter/Snow Tire & Wheels Packages” section or select “Tire and Wheel Packages” once you put your vehicle info in. My C-Max can have wheels from 15″-20″+. Time to go pick out some 22s for the Hybrid.

      • 0 avatar

        To be fair, I’ve driven a Titanium through the wilds of Montreal (singularly atrocious roads) and even with the large tires, it rode pretty well. But your comment stands for RAV4 limited drivers, who’ve realized too late that their SUV rides like its on wagon wheels.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        It’s not so much the ride as it is the expense. It’s worse anywhere that snow tires are required: you’re basically adding $1000-1500 (Canadian) to the price of the car.

        And while it would be nice to -1 or -2 the size, the brake diameter makes that a challenge, especially on crossovers.

        • 0 avatar

          Nah, almost anyone who puts winters on their cars buys cheap steelies and sizes down the rubber by -2, which is no more difficult on CUVs than on a midsize sedan in most cases. I expect you could stick 17″ winters on this without issue.

          Besides, everyone looks at winter tires incorrectly. Beyond the cost of the steel rims and the wheel change, winter tires don’t actually add that much cost. It just means you’re putting a year’s worth of mileage on two sets of tires instead of one.

          Finally, recall that this styling trend is consumer-driven. People are choosing to buy vehicles with big rims over their smaller-rimmed counterparts because they like the look.

  • avatar
    Edgy36-39

    Sign me up for a little Ford love. My wife is extremely happy with her 2016 Edge Sport. Of course she needed the six cylinder turbo. The thing moves and has all the gizmos she wanted.

  • avatar
    thunderjet

    I have not driven an Escape with a 2.0 Ecoboost but I have driven a Fusion equipped with that engine. It accelerated well but I wouldn’t call it powerful. Of course the issue may have been that I drove the 2.0 Ecoboost Fusion after driving a Fusion Sport with the 2.7 Ecoboost, which I really liked. The 2.0T has a lot of torque right away but seems to bleed energy as you get close to redline. It seems like Ford calibrated the engine to make a bunch of power down low, as most people don’t like to rev out their car’s engines. I, on the other hand, have no problem revving the engine in my car to red line. I like power to build as the revs climb, not plateau.

  • avatar
    EMedPA

    I’ve owned a ’13 Escape Titanium from new, and have put 69,000 miles on it. There were a couple early issues with noise from the suspension, but they were fixed under warranty, and it’s been pretty trouble-free since then.

    I find the 2.0 EcoBoost plenty fast enough. Keep in mind, as the cliché goes, you can have Eco, or you can have Boost, but you can’t have both at the same time. My driving style is fairly sedate most of the time, and I’m averaging about 25 mpg these days.

    The handling is definitely better than the competition’s: I drove pretty much everything in the class except for a CX-5 and I like the Ford’s handling the best. Your mileage may vary.

    The back seat is small, but I don’t have to sit in it. My kids are all short and skinny, so they fit. The cargo space is adequate, but could be better. I had a Focus wagon before I bought this car, and I don’t think there’s much (if any) more cargo space.

    Tim doesn’t mention this, but the 2.0 EcoBoost can tow 3500 lbs. I’m pretty sure that’s best in class, and I haven’t had any issues pulling the family ski boat short distances with the car. It pulls my small utility trailer without any problems at all.

  • avatar
    Trucky McTruckface

    “But the Escape is the driver’s compact crossover, the small and affordable and powerful utility vehicle for the wannabe Mustang buyer who lives in a snow belt with kids and a dog.”

    That statement is so ridiculous it made my head hurt. As a Mustang owner that’s looking to replace my other car with a crossover, try as I might, I just can’t make myself like the Escape. No amount of peppy performance and crisp handling can compensate for the fussy, feminine (and newly cheaped out for ’17) exterior and overly van like seating position. It’s competitors don’t particular impress me, especially the Rav4 and Forrester, but nevertheless it’s quickly falling behind the pack.

    $39k MSRP for this thing? Yikes. Even the $27k SE that Mr. Cain thinks is such a screaming bargain is, in my view, a sucker buy. Why? Because Carmax is littered with 1-2 year old AWD Titaniums with every bell and whistle for well under $24k. Even less if you don’t care about AWD. ’16 SEs can be had for under 20k. And Carmax isn’t exactly known for the lowest prices either. You’d be nuts to buy one of these new.

    Frankly, this review read like a “sponsored content” post.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “That statement is so ridiculous it made my head hurt.”

      I too feel pain.

    • 0 avatar
      VW4motion

      Trucky,

      +100

      Totally Ford bought content and I actually don’t hate the Escape. It was on my short list a few months ago.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        it’s sad how many of you seem to think a site called “The Truth About Cars” should just say “All Cars Are Sh!t.”

        • 0 avatar
          VW4motion

          Jimz,
          Very true. The site just deleted one of my statements because I pointed out that Ford is one the biggest advertisers on this site. And some how EB has not issues and they build the best small SUV. This site has become one of the weakest auto sites on the net.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            VW4Motion,

            you haven’t the faintest clue how web advertising works. For the most part, a site like TTAC (or its parent VerticalScope) will contract with one or more ad NETWORKS who will decide what ads to show you based on numerous factors. Things like the previous site you were viewing, keywords in your browsing history, and so forth. Or, lacking access to that, keywords on the page you’re viewing right now. Which happens to be about a Ford vehicle. TTAC often has little control over which ads you see, and they are certainly not cramming Ford ads down your throat.

            Heck, as I write this comment I’m seeing ads for Nissan and a Toyota. But I’m sure you wouldn’t be complaining if you were seeing VW ads here.

          • 0 avatar
            VW4motion

            JimZ,
            You overdosed on the kool-aid. Thinking that money does not sway results is like believing Hillary is not a liar and or the Russian government didn’t hack the DNC servers. I actually like the Escape. Yet I have the ability to see biased opinions.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Y’all just NOW noticing the total, raging, boner-thon for all things Ford on TTAC?

      TTAC is so biased towards Ford that its acronym should be TTACEF (The Truth About Cars Except for Ford).

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Ford has a wide product portfolio but with some of the stuff they sell I’m surprised they are as financially successful. Must be that F-series as usual.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        p.s. – There are rarely honest reviews of Ford vehicles, here, to be more precise.

        From Karesh (when he was here) to Dykes (though he never met a vehicle he didn’t love)…

        …I don’t even need to mention Bark, or even Jack (who is also a Ford Fan-Boy through & through).

        I’ve driven many recent Fords & they’re middling vehicles, generally speaking.

        The Escape is rough around the edges and has awful build quality as does its Lincoln Think the MCS.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    I just looked at the ads on this page and it’s totally obvious that TTAC is in the thrall of the manufacturers of SketchUp and Babies R Us. Have you no shame, gentlemen?!

  • avatar
    kosmo

    I’m getting ads for skis.

    Is this something to do with TTAC’s Canadian connections?!

    Also, an ad for Prius. Kilt ads would have a higher likelihood of success for me than Prius ads.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    If you truly need AWD, go for it. My MIL liked her AWD 2.0T Escape, though its MPG was dreadful even in gentle use.

    But if you don’t need AWD, a C-Max Hybrid gives you the same acceleration and handling, a better ride with less head toss, a more comfortable back seat, and double the MPG, for the same money. God bless the European microvan concept. You give up a little cargo space with the shorter rear overhang, but that’s it.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    “The 2017 Ford Escape Titanium EcoBoost 2.0 is Still the Best-driving Small Crossover You Can Buy”

    How much is TTAC getting paid by Ford for all of the fanboy articles like this one?

    Best driving? It drives like a shoe. It rides like you’re constantly on a washboard road.

    Add to that the fact that it’s noisy, has an interior that was designed by a blind person, one of Ford’s lowest quality vehicles, is cramped, gets relatively poor fuel economy, and is hideous.

    By all accounts, the Escape is an awful vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      steveua

      Exactly. I was in the market a year ago, and drove almost all of the cuvs. I distinctly remember the escape, the short wheelbase, trembly shenanigan of a ride, the cheap hard plastics, the weird dash design (must have been 50% off giant recessed infotainment binnacles at the supplier) and the questionable ergonomics. Plus Sync. Yuck.

  • avatar
    nr9taik

    I test drove about 20 small crossovers and ended up with the escape. The only non luxury crossover that might have driven as good or better was a Kia Sportage sx turbo but it was not as fast and too small. Cx5 had good steering but very low cornering limits. The escape’s lateral grip seemed to be on par with the gla and X1(which had good body control but seemingly low grip tires). Most of the dealers used the same driving route so it was easy to test the dynamic behavior on the same on ramps.

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