By on October 27, 2016

2017 Hyundai Elantra Limited, Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars

Feeling burned by your former suitor? Want to get even with the German who caused you so much trouble and heartache?

Hyundai wants disenfranchised Volkswagen diesel owners to run into the warm arms of their caring South Korean friend and has a tailor-made deal ready to rope them in.

Commence operation “V-Plan.”

According to Alex Bernstein, senior pricing analyst at online retailer CarsDirect, the automaker didn’t waste any time swinging the bait in front of VW owners. On the heels of Tuesday’s historic settlement deal, which includes buybacks of 475,000 Volkswagen and Audi vehicles, Hyundai pounced. Never let an opportunity pass by, and all that.

Calling it “a fairly generous offer,” Bernstein says Hyundai is offering a special rate plus a list of incentives starting today. The discounts apply to current or previous owners, or lessees, of certain TDI models bought before September 18 of last year. Just show up with your Class Settlement letter.

What can owners expect? The Hyundai Circle V-Plan requires a calculator, but it adds up to significant savings. Under the plan, applicable buyers will see a new Hyundai’s dealer invoice price drop by 3 percent of MSRP, plus $1,250 V-Plan cash and all current incentives. Hyundai has confirmed the numbers. Those incentives could chop several thousand dollars off of the post-discount price.

Hyundai claims the program launched in all regions on the same day as Volkswagen’s $14.7 billion settlement. The offer isn’t open-ended, though. To be eligible, owners need to show up in Hyundai dealers before January 3 of next year. Those buyers will presumably arrive by bus, as their former “clean diesels” will be on its way to the great recycling plant in the sky.

[Image: © 2016 Steph Willems/The Truth About Cars]

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57 Comments on “Hyundai Makes Volkswagen TDI Owners a Deal They Hopefully Can’t Refuse...”


  • avatar
    notwhoithink

    ” To be eligible, owners need to show up in Hyundai dealers before January 3 of next year.”

    I wonder how many of us will actually have buyback dates or even offer letters before January 3? At the rate that they’re going, probably not many.

    Hopefully some more desirable manufacturers decide to make similar offers. Volvo’s offer of a free scheduled maintenance plan didn’t do much to pique my interest.

    • 0 avatar
      5280thinair

      Might happen sooner than you think. VW’s been sitting on my paperwork for weeks (in the “verifying documents” stage) but I just checked again this morning and it’s changed to the following:

      “We have reviewed all of your documents. Currently, your application contains all the necessary documentation to determine your eligibility. We are now determining your eligibility and will inform you whether you are eligible to participate in the Settlement Claims Program and, if applicable, will provide you with a final offer, within ten business days.”

      • 0 avatar
        Blackcloud_9

        Wow! That’s a lot of words for “We’re still checking on it.”

      • 0 avatar
        notwhoithink

        So basically, “Yup! Those are documents. Now we’ve actually got to read them and think about them for a bit”. Once they’ve determined your eligibility they’ll send you a settlement package that you will need to sign and get notarized and mail back to them. Then they’ll have to review those documents, and once they are accepted they’ll let you schedule a buyback date.

        • 0 avatar
          Von

          Hard to be ze German efficiency.

          Off topic, the only German airport I’ve been through, Frankfort Intl, took me 2 hours and 3 passport check points to get on my connecting flight. Never took so long anywhere else.

    • 0 avatar
      tekdemon

      And how many people actually want an early buyback date? You can keep the TDI until the end of 2018 and still get a generous mileage budget per month, and if you drive under that mileage budget you end up with a higher buyback offer at the end. Unless your TDI was also otherwise an unreliable pile of crap, a lot of people will still be driving their TDIs for another year or two. The only risk is that you might completely total the car, then you’d lose the buyback. But any repairable fender benders don’t prevent it from being eligible so short of a catastrophic high speed crash you can keep driving the car for two more years.

      It’d make more sense if this wasn’t a super time limited offer from Hyundai, not sure how many people are really going to have a buyback by January.

  • avatar
    5280thinair

    Woo-hoo, now I can replace my Jetta with a, er, um, what involving driving car does Hyundai make again? :-) Unfortunately , unless they’ve improved a lot over the past few years, probably nothing.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Commence operation “V-Plan.”

    http://tinyurl.com/zv9l5at

    All Hail the V.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    I don’t see VW diesel types buying Hyundais. More the Prius.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Or Subaru…

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I vote Subaru as well. And maybe just a few to Volvo.

        • 0 avatar
          JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

          Subarus have standard AWD (except the BRZ) and arent exactly known for their stellar MPG.

          But, at least you could still refer to your car as an “oil burner” since they seem to enjoy so much of it that Subaru thinks its normal.

        • 0 avatar
          mshenzi

          I’m one of those TDI folks, (Golf). My shopping list is all hatchbacks: the about-to-be released Subaru Impreza, Mazda 3, Chevy Cruze, Kia Niro (and maybe the 2017 Soul if it comes out reasonably soon), maybe the Mini Countryman (which is almost the exact same length as the Golf, but costlier than all my other options).

          Prius and Volt are bigger than my target size. Focus is too dated at this point and the powershift transmission woes are a red flag (and the household needs an automatic). If the Volvo 40 series were here, I’d look at that.

          Oh, and I’m not planning to buy another VW. I haven’t heard a peep about VW offering incentives to stay with the brand, (say, something like what Hyundai’s doing), but if it were generous, I’d at least listen.

          • 0 avatar
            mshenzi

            Oops, two mistakes. I meant the Clubman not the Countryman, and the Civic hatchback is on my list, too!

          • 0 avatar
            jb1016

            “Oh, and I’m not planning to buy another VW. I haven’t heard a peep about VW offering incentives to stay with the brand, (say, something like what Hyundai’s doing), but if it were generous, I’d at least listen.”

            Give it a few days, mshenzi…we all suspect it’s coming.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Lots of people bought a VW/Audi TDI because of the decent driving experience being combined with superior fuel economy. I don’t see those people going to a dishwasher on wheels Prius.

      I bet most will get something that is also fun to drive, but offers great MPG. Honda Fit/Civic, Ford Fiesta (esp. the 1.0L EcoBoost) and Focus, stuff like that. Some may choose another diesel (Chevy Cruze) or a completely different type of vehicle totally unlike their Jetta or whatever (crossover/SUV, sports car, pickup- perhaps a diesel Colorado).

      Hyundai offers nothing that drives/handles particularly well, and they were dinged a few years ago for falsifying mpg numbers for several of their vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      This TDI owners is looking at the following:

      New: Mazda6, Fusion Titanium or Sport, MKZ, and if VW offers a couple extra grand in incentives and it somehow comes out on top of everything else, a Passat V6.

      Used: Genesis sedan, Lexus GS, maybe an ES if it’s not the spongy old man nightmare that people make it out to be.

    • 0 avatar
      KevinC

      My girl is likely moving from a ’15 Golf TDI to a new Mazda3. It’s the only car that checks all of her boxes – hatchback, stick, and available at the top trim level with 3 pedals. And a ton of car at $27k fully loaded.

      We will really miss her TDI. It’s somewhat of a unicorn, being a ’15 and thus the only year on the excellent MQB platform. It also has the highly desirable lighting package. It’s been a superb car in every respect for 2 years. Meanwhile, I soldier on with a Golf R, so still one left in the family.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      As a former TDI owner I wouldn’t go near a Prius. If I still had the car and that was my only choice, I’d keep it and wait for the fix if it ever comes. Too bad Kia isn’t included in the program.

      I have to wonder why VW isn’t running some make-friends-again program. Are they afraid to be seen as trying to take advantage of the situation?

      • 0 avatar
        JohnnyK

        Don’t quote me on this, and I don’t remember where I read this, but VW isn’t allowed (under the deal) to offer special incentives just to TDI owners. Something about the govt wanting to make sure they don’t profit over the scandal. The only incentives they’re allowed to offer are ones that are avl to everyone, or at least ALL current VW owners.

        • 0 avatar
          notwhoithink

          “but VW isn’t allowed (under the deal) to offer special incentives just to TDI owners. Something about the govt wanting to make sure they don’t profit over the scandal.”

          Absolutely incorrect. There’s nothing in the settlement agreement that prevents them from doing exactly that. In fact, it specifically states that the settlement doesn’t preclude them from offering additional incentives to TDI owners. I’m not sure where people are seeing that particular claim, but it is completely wrong and they keep posting it as if it’s fact. The exact phrasing is:

          “No Prohibition on Other Incentives. Nothing in this Class Action Agreement is intended to prohibit Volkswagen from offering any consumer any further incentives or trade-in options in addition to those provided herein; however, Volkswagen may not offer consumers other incentives or trade-in options in lieu of the options contained herein, in whole or in part, or any incentive not to participate in the Class Action Settlement Program. Likewise, Volkswagen shall request that Volkswagen Dealers not offer any incentive not to participate in the Settlement Program. “

    • 0 avatar
      peterjford

      I would never drive a prius. I would rather drive my 12 MPG Jeep than a prius.

    • 0 avatar
      TDIandThen....

      Not the Prius for me though I appreciate them for what they are. My shopping list to replace my Golf is:
      * Focus ST
      * 996, 997 or 928 (I never said I was smart)
      * kia Niro mayyyyyyybe – let me test it.
      * Volvo V-40 if it arrives in the US next year and is even a little fun to drive or fuel efficient. I lust after Volvo.
      * Nothing – just take cash and go car-free for a year or two until something comes out that I really like and want.

      What’s interesting to me about Hyundai is the warranty, the panoramic sunroof and the mileage in the hybrid Sonata. Still, the Sonata is too big for me in the city.

      All of this is still somewhat irrelevant as the settlement isn’t announced here in Canada yet.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    Naivete. If a person from the beginning wants to pay more for a similar car and goes to a bad reputation car company [reliability-wise], it really means to me, they want; either VW, or “something German”, something that drives good. Whatever, but they don’t want Hyundai.

    Now, consider this. This deal is nothing. PR. Not more than that. VW is a small segment of US sales and diesel is just a segment of VW in US. It is very small group that is targeted. 500K cars? Ok. So may be Hyundai will get 1000 reduced profit sales. This is nothing.

  • avatar
    dwford

    I just love that 500,000 smug TDI owners have 2 terrible choices, go crawling back to VW/Audi to buy a gas engined model from a company that just lied to them, OR, possibly worse, crawl over to a competing brand that for years these owners have probably publicly or privately disparaged. At least the Audi owners have the means to buy another German luxury car. The poor VW owners really have it rough.

    What ever shall they do?

  • avatar
    manny_c44

    Ehhh no thanks Hyundai…

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I’m curious…where are the returned vehicles going? On ships to China and then to various 3rd world owners?

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      China won’t take cars that don’t meet their standards, that are similar to Euro, and there aren’t enough people in the third world with the money to absorb that many cars – and rich third world dictators don’t ride in Volkswagens.

      If VW were smart, they’d set up a salvage operation for parts common to the gas models and crush the rest. Or just remove the diesel engine and let salvage yards do it. Keeping them on the roads anywhere just reduces demand for new VWs in the distant future, when this all blows over.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The settlement says that they can not export non-compliant vehicles. The most likely fate for the vast majority of the cars will be to have their engine water glassed, the ECU removed and destroyed and then sent to the wrecking yard.

      • 0 avatar
        Sceptic

        The process of disposing of and replacing all of those “non-compliant” VW cars will do much more damage to the environment then if they just stayed on the road until completely junked. The wisdom of government…

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      http://jalopnik.com/heres-what-will-happen-to-the-thousands-of-diesels-volk-1782815084

    • 0 avatar
      jb1016

      As per the settlement, VW is not allowed to export them. They will sit and await approval of the as-yet-nonexistent fix, and when (if) they get “fixed,” dealers will have the chance to buy them back for resale.

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      VW will be permitted to fix them and resell them IF they can get the EPA to approve the fix. If not then they have to drill a hole in the ECU and engine block, scrap the emissions system, and they’ll be allowed to part out the rest. I’m pretty sure there have been articles about it here.

      The feds will not let them export them.

  • avatar
    Wheatridger

    Try what I did after my Mk IV TDI passed 200,000 miles. Do your research, do your math on the meager financial impact of 30 mpg vs 40 mpg… and then buy a GTI. Four years later, I have no regrets.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Definitely not swaying me. Hi-oon-day doesn’t offer anything particularly exciting at the moment. However, if they start selling the i30 N (aka Elantra GT) then maybe I’ll look at them.

    My potential replacement list as of today:

    C-Max
    Focus ST
    Transit Connect SWB wagon
    Kia Niro
    Rogue Hybrid
    Buick Tourx (or whatever it’s called assuming it appears)

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Of your potential replacement list the only thing I see that is exciting is the Focus ST and maybe the Niro.

    • 0 avatar
      peterjford

      I’m looking at the Mazda3, or faking a mid-life crisis and buying a 2018 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited Rubicon Pickup with the diesel and 6 speed manual (if they will sell them that way).

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The Elantra Sport should be hitting the lots soon.

      Doubt we’ll be getting the i30N or an N version of the Elantra anytime soon.

      Hyundai is doing this b/c they are too car reliant; they really need to increase production of the crossovers they do have and bring the new crossover models (and the pick-up) to market ASAP.

      But yeah, would definitely look at the Mazda3 or even the CX-5 (“sporty” for a crossover) – that is, if you don’t mind missing out on some “ooomf.”

  • avatar
    gozar

    Why isn’t Volkswagen making Volkswagen TDI Owners a “Deal They Can’t Refuse?”

    Where are the rocking incentives to use your buyback money on a gasoline engine VW?

    • 0 avatar
      notwhoithink

      Well, on the TDI forums there are two schools of thought on this.

      1. Theory #1: VW can’t afford to offer us additional incentives, at least not anything substantial enough to move the needle. In addition to the $15 billion in this settlement, they’re taking another $10 billion charge worldwide (at a minimum) to do the recalls there, then the dealers’ lawsuits were another $2 billion, and there’s still 80,000 3.0L TDIs out there that may well have to be bought back, which could easily run another $4 billion. That’s a $30 billion hit before you even get to the criminal cases, so people think that VW needs to save their pennies.

      2. Theory #2: VW didn’t want to commit to anything until they had final approval on the settlement, in case the judge required modifications to the settlement that ended up raising the costs significantly.

      If you talk to dealers you get all sorts of answers. I’ve heard:

      “The current incentives on our vehicles are already very high, and they’re available to everybody.”

      “There are no publicly announced incentives, but there will be secret incentives for TDI owners that we’ll give you if you ask for them.”

      and my personal favorite,

      “The terms of the buyback are already overly generous, you should be happy you’re getting that much. Why do you think you’re entitled to a penny more?”

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Yes former VW TDI owners, you can TRUST Hyundai – an automaker that was busted for overstating fuel economy numbers on over a million vehicles between 2011 and 2013!

  • avatar

    People who bought these newer TDIs that are part of the recall bought them for various reasons: fuel economy on the highway, longevity (of the engine), fun to drive, relatively nice interior for the price point, the notion of low emissions.

    When considering what Hyundai has to offer in these categories, I come up scratching my head.

    Low emissions: Sonata hybrid, I guess? But did anyone REALLY buy a TDI only on this selling point?

    Nice interior: They’re class competitive, but definitely a few steps down from VW, even as VW’s interiors have gotten cheaper over the years.

    Fun to drive: HA.

    Longevity: I’m sure everything in a Hyundai is more reliable than a VW, probably cheaper to fix, too. But I doubt anyone bought a TDI solely on this metric.

    Highway fuel economy: Only in a penalty box Elantra, I suspect.

    The Mazda lineup really is the only thing that comes close, at least in my mind. The Diesel Cruze is an interesting and welcome addition, but it’s GM… so-so interiors, questionable reliability, no fun to drive at all.

    It just seems there’s truly nothing that’s an ideal replacement, except another TDI. Preferably one that isn’t killing babies and clubbing seals when the EPA isn’t looking.

  • avatar
    Irvingklaws

    I traded my 99 Golf GLS in 2010 on a Golf TDI because it was the only upscale Golf to be had outside a GTI. The TDI was billed as having GTI underpinnings with a diesel engine. After 6 years and over 100k miles gotta admit I still love driving it. I’ve owned dozens of cars and trucks and I frequently tire of them after a couple years. Not this one. I’d maybe replace it with a new Golf SEL (I hate the silver dash trim in the new Golfs) but VW doesn’t make them anymore. I’ve actually been struggling to find something else I’d want instead. Almost certainly not a Hyundai though…

  • avatar
    daviel

    Hyundai’s a better car. I’d consider a GTI if it had Hyundai’s warranty.

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