By on October 14, 2016

2016 Ram 1500 Rebel

2016 Ram 1500 Rebel

5.7-litre V8 (395 horsepower @ 5,600 rpm, 410 lb-ft @ 3,950 rpm

Eight-speed automatic transmission w/selectable four-wheel drive

Fuel economy (rated, MPG): 15 city / 21 highway / 17 combined

Fuel economy (observed, MPG):

Base Price: $46,395 (U.S.) / $56,290 (Canada)

As Tested: $56,195 (U.S.) / $67,700 (Canada)

All U.S. prices include a $1,195 destination fee. All Canadian prices include $1,895 freight and A/C tax. No rebates are applied to these prices.

FCA, and Ram in particular, is not exactly known for its subtlety. Witness the Rebel TRX Concept unveiled at the State Fair of Texas, yet another salvo in the continuing effort by the mad scientists in Auburn Hills to Hellcat all the things.

This pleased me greatly, as my own outspoken personality gives the thumbs-up to any machine exhibiting the raw utility of a woodsman’s axe. A hint of smoky-burnout lairiness and jump-the-creek attitude doesn’t hurt either. The Ram 1500 Rebel, decked out with 33-inch Toyos and a handlebar moustache grille, has more than enough lead in its pencil to make Crocodile Dundee look like Liberace. It comes standard with a case of fireworks and is equipped with a beard in the glovebox.

Okay, not really. But it could. The 2016 Ram 1500 Rebel shown here is not a Texas exclusive — that honor is bestowed upon Ram’s Lone Star Silver trim — but it easily fits in with the other urban cowboys headed to their ranches, cattle auctions, and downtown Dallas offices. The Rebel often appears in FCA literature slathered with Flame Red Clear Coat but the Bright White Clear Coat on this tester looks far superior in this author’s jaundiced eye. Real trucks need presence, and a gleaming white Ram Rebel with contrasting black trim commands attention. Compliments were hurled in the Rebel’s general direction from random passersby and parking attendants alike. This is not a truck for introverts.

Not everyone loved the polarizing grille but it did a good job of parting the sea on the construction-ridden I-35E around Dallas. The trick was to load their rearview mirrors with a full five yards of chrome Ram badging, flanked as it is by bright LED lights and flaring hood nostrils, and watch them give way. The bark of Ram’s 5.7-liter Hemi V8 didn’t hurt either.

2016 Ram 1500 Rebel

The Hemi is non-negotiable in my opinion. That this brashly styled, aggressively treaded with 285/70/17 Toyo Open Country meats is even offered with a V6 is borderline unpatriotic and an affront to the American flag. All right, maybe that’s taking it to the extreme, but I do think the $1,150 Hemi, with its brawny rumble and prodigious towing capacity, fits the personality of this machine to a T. Its city EPA rating of 15 miles per gallon might cause heart palpitations, but equipped with a bladder-busting 32-gallon fuel tank, range shouldn’t be a problem.

I continue to be enraged that any manufacturer has the gall to charge $280 for an integrated trailer brake controller on a vehicle capable of towing in excess of 10,000 pounds. Ram is not alone in this nickel-and-diming frippery; other manufacturers do it too. While I’m riled up and frothing, I will point out here that Ram will happily charge buyers $95 to “upgrade” their Rebel with a 3.21 rear-end gear, an option undoubtedly pressed into service by oblivious focus groups in an effort to reduce the number of revs being turned by the Hemi at highway speeds and marginally increase fuel economy. The higher (numerically lower) gear will achieve these goals at the expense of towing capability which, with the 3.21’s, is reduced to a comparatively featherweight 8,000 lbs. Do not choose this option; stick with the standard 3.91 gear ratio. The trade-off in reduced towing capacity is simply not worth it. If you want fuel economy, buy a Prius.

Other gripes? This iteration of the Ram 1500 was introduced as a 2009 model at the 2008 North American Auto Show in Detroit, when private investment company Cerberus Capital Management still ran the joint and bankruptcy was seventeen months hence. In terms of the automotive industry, that was a lifetime ago, and flashes of age show through in the Ram despite its revision in 2013. The tailgate doesn’t have a dampening feature for example, slamming open with the grace of my grandfather’s 1986 GMC while owners of the new F-150 access their payload with the push of a keyfob button.

2016 Ram 1500 Rebel

Make no mistake, though — Ram has done its job in keeping the 1500 competitive, issuing a myriad of iterations and trim packages, not to mention the integration of Chrysler’s uConnect, one of the better infotainment systems to currently grace a half-ton truck. The navigation system reads instructions with crystal clarity, repeating instructions on demand and displaying large visual indicators for upcoming turns in the 7-inch screen placed dead in front of the driver, between the tach and speedometer. The optional $345 Alpine stereo system does a great job of playing Sirius Prime Country though nine-speakers and a subwoofer.

The RamBox system remains distinct from its competitors, yet has a lot of value for its intended customer. Hailing from a place in the world where moose handily outnumber all other forms of wild game, I understand that safely hauling around guns and ammo is a tricky matter. I can’t say I’ve even been in a clapped-out Sunfire with shotgun shells rolling around on the floor. No, sir. Never. With the Ram, its storage solution mounted in the sides of the bed are an ideal spot for rifles and cartridges (all properly stored, natch).

Years after its introduction, I’m still not sold on the crease created on the side of the box by these compartments, but they are weather-sealed and lock securely via the central locking system. From previous experience — not with this Ram, it must be said — I know that a trio of two-fours of beer easily fits in each RamBox, and that’s with a good amount of ice packed in there to keep them cold. Space for your guns and tools aside, that fact alone is worth the $1,295 price of admission.

2016 Ram 1500 Rebel

Our tester was equipped with Ram’s trick air suspension, standard on the Rebel, which levels out the truck when burdened with a heavy payload or lowers the truck for better fuel efficiency at highway speeds. My favourite part? Punch the suspension button (and you had better punch it, for this is not a truck in which to “touch” or “depress” buttons) and the whole party gets jacked up like Charlie Sheen on a bender, affording additional off-road clearance and making its stance even more aggro. The glovebox was devoid of an owner’s manual and I can only assume it’s because FCA instead carves it into your face with a hunting knife.

2017 Ram 1500 Rebel

A vast 40.3 inches of legroom in the back seat and 125.3 cubic feet of total interior volume ensure the driver and four of their closest spur-wearing friends can relax in all-day comfort. Ample toe room under the front seats allow rear-seat riders to stretch their boots while the tire-tread patterns integrated into the seat fabric reminds everyone of the Rebel’s off-road intentions.

The ride on pavement is surprisingly cushy, thanks to the aforementioned air suspension and Bilstein shocks controlling the movement of Rebel’s fat sidewalled Toyos inflated to a sky-high 55 psi in the front and 45 psi in the rear. Those are the factory recommendations.

2016 Ram 1500 Rebel

At the State Fair of Texas, I chatted with Dave Elshoff, head of Ram Truck media, about the depth of product offering currently on tap for customers of the Ram 1500. There are, count ‘em, eleven different models of Ram 1500. He explained the strategy of having vastly different trucks based upon similar architecture makes for broad appeal, and I think he’s right.

Attentive readers will know I own a six-year old Hemi-powered Ram 1500 Sport, holding special appeal to me with its monochrome paint scheme and let-them-eat-cake leather bucket seats. Others, including Dave himself, prefer their Ram to blind its enemies with acres of chrome while seating six people on two cloth benches. Two trucks from the same manufacturer, costing about the same, couldn’t look more different. I think that’s Ram’s current M.O: keep the diehards coming back with for new iterations while, at this late stage of its product cycle, win a few conquests who are leery of Ford’s jump to aluminium or don’t like all the LED mascara currently applied to the GM twins.

2016 Ram 1500 Rebel

Me? My own Ram, burdened as it is with its prehistoric infotainment (to wit: “Call Home”… “Calling four-two-six-three-star. Is this correct?”… *pounds fist on vehicle wheel*) will continue to live in my care until I see the styling of the next generation Ram, likely to be shown at the North American Auto Show in January.

Unlike many owners, I actually use my truck’s capability, regularly hauling 9,000 lb of crosswind-susceptible travel trailer, so I’ll be keeping a close eye on the specs. In the here and now, the 2016 Ram 1500 Rebel holds a lot of appeal. It is equally rich in content and capability and its testosterone-soaked styling will please the extroverts among us.

On the outskirts of Dallas, I noticed roadside billboards for strip clubs making the lewd joke that “Unlicensed Therapists” were on duty. Foolishness. A few days rolling through city streets or jumping dirt in a Ram 1500 Rebel is all the therapy needed to brush the cobwebs from one’s head. Just don’t expect the Rebel to be subtle about it.

Selling Points: Wonderfully brash style, shockingly comfortable ride, very capable hauler.

Deal Breakers: Showing its age in a few areas, some optional features should be standard equipment.

The Bottom Line: Everyone will find it bold but not all will find it beautiful.

FCA provided the vehicle, insurance, and fuel for this review.

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65 Comments on “2016 Ram 1500 Rebel Review – Subtle, Like a Frying Pan to the Face...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    GM, pay attention – this truck has round wheel wells. Novel concept I know.

    Prime Country – damn straight. Glad you weren’t listening to any of that current country-pop, bro-country, bull. If you really had cajones you’d have been listening to Willie’s Roadhouse like a Texan would.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “GM, pay attention – this truck has round wheel wells.”

      Bless you!

      Stupid Soviet tin-snipped square GM wheel wells!

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        What, you no like square vheel vell comrade Kenmore?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Frend;’

          Funny you mention a square wheel area cut-out with also the word camarade like the Russians’ use frequent. Whenever I take an international bon voyage over to Moscow or other Rissia’s City Centre, I will see many of the “upper crusty” Russian people in a flashy Land Cruising or perhaps a Lexus XG350 (maybe that isn’t a name for it, I cannot remind !).

          So I see them driving around in the City, and I think “Hey wow Grango! These Russian’s have well funding inside a wallet and look at what they are choose!” because none of the choices they make there have a squarre wheel cut-out like Kenmort and you are discussed above herewith in American offering style.

          They must say to themself, ‘what is the best rationality for appearance of culture and luxurious international accomodations of a market where its a possibility to reveal money…’ and their final concluding remark is a Japan-or-England SUVs’ ( because also don’t forget about the Range-Rover-Vogues).

          For Grango and other people like me from my Country, I think we could all be a United Way in thinking that the choices of a Russian “comrade car of Capitalism )!” is too much Bling 182, like your newly re-energized band I hear.

          Best Frend,

          Grango Relago.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      If the country musician hasn’t served time, then you might as well be listening to show tunes.

    • 0 avatar
      Willyam

      When in eastern-Dallas area, 95.3, The Range. Outlaw country focusing on Texas musicians.

  • avatar
    syncro87

    I got the vague feeling that something was “off”.

    I studied the pics of this truck for a while before it occurred to me what is wrong.

    There need to be more RAM badges. As it stands, it’s almost impossible to tell who makes this truck.

    Solution: In addition to the badges on the front doors, the rear cab doors and bedside cargo compartment doors need to feature RAM 1500 badges as well. The opening in the front lower bumper or skid plate, the grey part, needs a separate RAM emblem to duplicate the one in the main grille. Lastly, a large vinyl RAM decal should be placed across the entire width of the rear window.

  • avatar
    energetik9

    Every time I read these reviews, I realize more and more I am not a truck guy. Probably not a Texas guy either. :)

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Nice review. I’m not a truck guy, but I like this one – just not the price.

  • avatar
    jeanbaptiste

    White is the worst color for this truck. The lot at work has two of these, a white one and a charcoal one. The Charcoal one looks 11venty!! times better than the white. Take a peek at RAM’s site and you’ll see.

    I believe these trucks are selling for alot less than MSRP too.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      jeanbaptiste – Most of the one’s I’ve seen are red. Black would be the next common colour. I do like the charcoal colour. In Canada the Rebel currently has 10,500 on the hood.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    If life demands one own a pickup truck, do it to the max.

    Jack that thing up to the stratosphere. If ATC doesn’t call you with transponder directions, it’s too low.

    Badges. And stickers. And dot matrix American flag banners in the rear window. The Chinese have satellites too, and it’s only proper we give them -and the NSA -something to look at.

    LEDs. Has your truck been mistaken for a UFO? If not, go back and do it again. The truck aftermarket won’t sustain itself you know.

    Lastly: V12 engine.V8s are soooo 1920s. They don’t make one from the factory, but they should. Because Murrica.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    In white in particular, those box cutouts are going to look really bad all winter in areas with snow/salt/slush, because they’ll hold dirt and create more drippy areas.

    AND

    The pink trim around the dash is chintzy and looks quite cheap, like it might belong on a Fiat. Put wood trim or metal or carbon fiber if you’re feeling European. Not pink plastic.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Check your monitor calibration. That trim’s pretty Murican blood red.

      But I hate colored plastic trim wherever it appears. It doesn’t look any better in blue on M Performance BMWs.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Fair point – I’m on two 24″ LCD monitors, run through a VGA cable with splitter thing. There’s no high quality color available.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          VGA?! LCD monitors?!?!

          You gotta get out of 2006, dude! Get some LED DVI/HDMI monitors!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You think I PICKED this?! They’re Viewsonic VA2451 models, btw. Probably crap.

            *They are LED, apparently.
            *Also DVI, as the connectors are white.

            So why is the resolution still crap? You can tell I know a lot about monitors.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            ViewSonic stuff is pretty good.

            If you’re having resolution problems, it sounds to me that the graphics hardware in your computer is the bottleneck.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            Yeah, you need some graphics help, stat. Those monitors are just fine but running them through a splitter is a disaster.

            Also go to Control Panel -> Display (assuming you’re on Win7 like the entire corporate world) and make sure that you are at least using the highest resolution available.

            My work 2013 Thinkpad is driving two cheap TN crap 1680×1050 Dell monitors, one through DVI and one through VGA, and even with that setup the color is at least good enough not to make that trim look pink.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Yep, I’m on 1920×1080, highest available. 32 bit color, 60p refresh rate.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Which model Thinkpad?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            One of the first T440s. It’s been a fantastic machine when docked, except for its tendency to hard freeze about every month. When not docked, I have a couple of complaints. The trackpad is just awful in the usual tradition of Windows machines (now hopefully to improve with Precision Trackpad). Every time I go back to my aging 2011 MacBook Pro I feel spoiled by the trackpad. The built-in screen has good enough resolution for a cheap business machine but has execrable color. It’s super-super-blue and well beyond the range of correction with Windows’ built-in calibration.

      • 0 avatar
        SP

        I would say it’s more of a “garnet” color, not quite “blood red”. Then again, your blood may vary.

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    The headlights on this look like one of those eBay “FITS ALL MODELS OF DODGE RAM 2009-2016” kits.

    I really like the sharknose and proportions of the current Ram but this version hands all the clean lines to a 4-year old’s crayon hand.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      One of these drove by me on the street a couple days ago, front end facing me, while I was standing on the sidewalk. It was signaling to turn right. The LED front blinkers were absolutely blinding with glare — the brightest I think I’ve ever seen from a stock vehicle. I had to stop and blink a few times because I was seeing spots instead of the sidewalk in front of me.

      Definitely eBay-level engineering.

  • avatar
    cgjeep

    What the hell is AC tax in Canada?

    • 0 avatar
      Jagboi

      It was started in 1976 to encourage fuel efficiency by applying a $100 tax to all cars with AC. Back then AC was considered a luxury, so they taxed it. Of course, it’s still with us.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Good luck attaching a 8,000 to 10,000 lb (9,950 exactly) trailer on a Ram Rebel. Max payload is 1,350 depending on options. 10-15% tongue weight is standard. 8k trailer means 550lbs left over. You can bring your family but better have an empty pickup box. 10k or 9,950 = 995 lbs. The average weight of an “American” couple means you better not have kids and your dog is a chihuahua.

    I’m betting that if you look at the tag on the driver’s B pillar, this truck is going to be around 1,000 lbs payload.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Ram half-ton trucks with the coil/air rear suspensions have always done very poorly on payload, affecting towing as well for the reasons you describe. Functionally they’re just big family sedans.

      If you want to tow a big trailer with a half-ton, an F-150 is going to make your life a lot more comfortable. Or if you’re a RAM MAN step up to the HD version.

    • 0 avatar
      MrIcky

      Your numbers are off, that’s like the minimum basic 4×2 capacity v6.

      Here’s the SAE compliant stats:

      https://issuu.com/davesmithmotors/docs/2016_ram_1500_towing_charts/3.

      The lowest v8s are in the 1480 range and they go up into the 1800s.

      But yes, the air suspension and coil springs does hurt it compared to their competitors in bed capacity. But not really “just a sedan”. The v8 will tow the hell out of your standard 26-30foot trailer which is appropriate for a half ton.

      • 0 avatar
        MrIcky

        Wanted to add, max on a class IV hitch is 1100 lbs tongue weight anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        MrIcky – I got my numbers right off of Ram’s web site. They list max payload and tow ratings depending on configuration.

        http://www.ramtrucks.com/en/towing_guide/

        RAM 1500
        REBEL
        5.7-LITER V8 HEMI® MDS VVT
        CREW | 5’7″ | AUTO | 4X4
        AXLE RATIO
        3.92
        MAX PAYLOAD
        1,350lbs
        MAX TOWING
        9,950lbs
        STARTING MSRP*
        $46,850
        One always needs to look at the tag on the B-pillar. The only thing more accurate is to weigh your truck and subtract that number from its listed GVWR and/or GCWR.

        • 0 avatar
          MrIcky

          You say look at the pillar but then you’re going off of the website. The spreadsheet I posted is the actual tow ratings by spec with gcwr, axle ratings, etc.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @MrIcky – I said the B pillar sticker is more accurate but the most accurate is to weight the truck as you plan to use it.

            Your spreadsheet is also going off of their website!

            The spreadsheet you posted doesn’t factor in accessories tied to different trim packages. I suspect that is where the differences come from.

            Your table does not differentiate trim levels.
            The base level Ram 4×4 crew 4×4’s are close to your posted table:
            Crew 4×4 5.7 box 5.7 Hemi, 3.92 rear = 1,520 payload and 10,160 tow rating.

            Ram 1500
            OUTDOORSMAN
            5.7-Liter V8 HEMI® MDS VVT
            crew | 5’7″ | auto | 4×4 | axle ratio 3.92

            Max Payload 1,520lbs
            Max Towing 10,200lbs

            Starting MSRP* $43,630

            If we go to the highest trim level this is what we get:
            Ram 1500 LIMITED
            5.7-Liter V8 HEMI® MDS VVT
            crew | 5’7″ | auto | 4×4 | axle ratio 3.92

            Max Payload 1,240lbs
            Max Towing 9,800lbs
            Starting MSRP* $55,995

            That tells me that the Limited’s extra options adds 280 lbs of to the truck. That reduces payload to 1,240 lbs.

            You can keep arguing your point all you want. The GVWR of the truck doesn’t change. That is why accessories add weight to the truck which reduces payload.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      This. I spent nearly a year searching for a pickup to tow a 7600 lb. GVWR Airstream and got deeper into these calculations than I ever wanted to. Wife did not appreciate the riding characteristics of a 3/4 ton, much less the diesel engines that power many of them. Even without the trick air suspension, the Ram 1500 (which uses coil springs) was sufficiently inadequate in the payload category that I ruled it out early in my shopping. If you’re going for the more high-end trucks and not the “work truck” model, Ford and Chevy/GMC are your choices for payloads above 1700 lbs.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        DC Bruce – agreed. Both Ford and GM have max tow packages. GM’s max tow comes with a heavier duty rear axle along with other mods. I do think that ford also goes to a larger gear set with max haul or tow.
        GM’s crewcab 4×4’s with max tow have 1,800lb payload.
        Ford crew 4×4 with max payload is 2,655lbs with 5.0 and 2,544 lbs with EB3.5.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          The F150s HD payload package, which is required for those lofty ratings, are pretty much a work truck only option.

          I believe they occasionally sell them through retail channels in XLT trim, for those who insist on carrying a hardside camper with their halfton.

          But in practice it’s a fleet/commercial option. And for good reason, as unloaded, almost all wheel articulation is frame twist, in all it’s undampened, mount point abusing glory. Acceptable in a reg cab work truck, but creek inducing in the longer cabs and wheelbases; not at all what the buyer of a Texas Limo bargained for.

          Sane people who have paid their dues, rolling in the mud putting a spare on a camper loaded truck, while being eaten alive by about 100 million mosquitoes (twice… grrr) way up on the Dempster, will suck it up and get a HD for camper use. Since rough gravel roads and heavy loads indicate 10-ply rated tires anyway, and once you put those on a halfton, the ride deteriorates to no better than tuned for 10-ply 3/4 tons anyway anyway….

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            The F-150 has more than twice the Ram’s payload in some configurations *before* you add the (rare) heavy payload package. With that package it’s closer to 3x.

            Ram decided that other things (cheap price and soft ride) were more important. For many buyers, they were probably right.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I’ve seen more HDPP F-150s in XLT than in XL trim, and starting in 2015 they added it to the Lariat trim. It’s the replacement for the F-250 light duty in ’97-99, which was as much a consumer as a commercial vehicle. It helps that since 2013, it’s been available on SuperCrew/6.5′ bed models as well as regular and SuperCab/8′.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @stuki – you can get the heavy payload package in the Lariat. Max tow is available in virtually all of Ford’s trim levels. GM lumps max cargo with max tow.

            I’d advocate getting a HD if one spent most of their time on gravel roads or carrying heavier loads. The max payload or max tow package makes sense for those who use their trucks intermittently for heavy use.

            I run 10 ply tires on my current F150. Ride is a bit worse than stock but still much better than a 3/4 ton.

            I’ve never been on the Demster. I’ve been to Dawson and Fairbanks. I’ve spend the majority of my life in Northern BC. I’ve fed my share of mosquitoes.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “10-15% tongue weight is standard.”

      For travel trailers. With a boat your only looking at 5-7%.

      • 0 avatar
        Jagboi

        10% tongue weight is a good rule of thumb for stability, no matter what kind of trailer. Too little tongue weight is a recipe for uncontrollable oscillation. See a demonstration video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SXQt-8SZYT8

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Carlson Fan – Thanks. I have heard that before. Boats are inherently light in the bow. I use the 10-15% number because campers tend to put more weight on the tongue.

        @Jagboi – great video.

        • 0 avatar
          Carlson Fan

          The lighter tongue weight of a boat trailer is evident in the frame design at the tongue. WD hitches are common (necessary)with tandem axle travel trailers but not with boat trailers.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Will a Ram 1500’s payload work with a 6500lb travel trailer and two 125lb unlicensed therapists?

    • 0 avatar

      Ford payload numbers do not include the weight of the hitch, the weight of the bumper or spare tire. You need to add 150-200 lbs to all their payload ratings for a true comparison. But yes even then the rams averages are lower.

  • avatar
    John

    Might want to hold out for the Tom of Finland edition.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I was secretly shopping for these after doing some test drives and seriously thinking about consolidating my two cars into one newer half-ton. Really liked how the Ram Hemi+8spd drove and handled, and loved the offroad chops of the Titan Pro-4X (but hated everything else about it). Can’t stand how low the bumper on the GMs (plus the crewcabs being made in Mexico makes them a no-go for me on ideological grounds when there’s a perfectly good GM truck plant right nearby in Ft Wayne). Fords are a good option as well with the proliferation of the selectable rear locker on many XLT trim trucks, but I really didn’t care much for the Ecoboost. Tundras are great, but pricey. So a Ram with the offroad-ability ramped up was massively appealing. Air suspension on a Chrysler product makes me involuntarily shudder. Plus the absence of a rear locking diff stinks (Tundra gets dinged for this too).

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      So get a ford with the 5.0…great real world mpg or the ram with a lifetime bumper to bumper warranty it’s $2300 through a ram dealer online or $4000 at the local dealer

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Did you drive the 2.7 EB? The 3.5 is utilitarian and dull and “serious” unloaded, as befits a 6 ton tow capacity half ton. The 2.7 is a whole ‘nuther world…. It’s what the FiST engineers drive when they need to haul more than a pair of skinny jeans in their Recaros :)

      But still, if you’ve got the space, just for kicks, check out a megacab 2500 with the coils and the ramboxes. Cummins/manual, of course. Screw “need.” Manual trumps practical any day. Unless composure above 85 is important, it’s just a rolling permagrin. With a cab the size of Obama’s limo’s, and the tow rating to hook GMs entire Mexican crew cab plant to the back, and drag it back up to Indiana, should you be so inclined.

  • avatar
    Willyam

    In the spirit of all things Texas…

    BOBBY: I love this truck!
    HANK: Yeah, me too. But when we get back to the dealership, pretend you hate it.

  • avatar
    pb35

    Oh man, I would so park this in one of the “charging spaces” at my local Austin Whole Foods. Maybe even take up both of them if I could. ;)

  • avatar
    A4kev

    Pb35 you’re an evil dude ! These RAMS are serious machines.Recently drove a 2500 with a Cummins and I’ve got to admit that’s a well sorted out machine.I’ve owned F150’s and they’re good vehicles especially with a 5.0L but Dodge are making a good truck these days made in N.A.not something to be discounted these days.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    That lede photo is from a truly weird angle – I’ve driven by Southfork a zillion times (I live less than ten minutes away), and I’ve been there several times, for company picnics, parties, etc., and that arch is definitely not overgrown with live oaks.

    A bit of trivia: a couple of years ago, when Hogge Road, which goes past Southfork, was being widened from a two-lane blacktop to a six-lane divided concrete road, new brick bases and wing walls for the entrances and gates were built set further back, and the steel and wrought arch was taken down off the olds ones, and then set on the new ones.


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  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States