By on September 1, 2016

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

2017 Cadillac XT5 Luxury AWD

3.6-litre V6 (310 horsepower @ 6,600 rpm, 271 lbs-ft @ 5,000 rpm

Eight-speed automatic transmission w/ all-wheel drive (front-wheel drive available)

Fuel Economy (Rated, MPG): 18 city / 26 highway/ 21 combined

Fuel economy (Observed, MPG): 19.1

Base Price (FWD): $39,990 (U.S.) / $47,150 (Canada)

As Tested (AWD): $52,150 (U.S) / $58,480 (Canada)

All U.S prices include a $995 destination fee. All Canadian prices include $2,050 freight and A/C tax.

When the original Cadillac SRX appeared for the 2004 model year, it rode atop a rear-wheel-drive unibody platform, offered three rows of seats, and asked a question rarely asked today: “V8 with that?”

Six years later, General Motors saw fit to yank the SRX out of that class and plunge it into the murderously competitive front-wheel drive, two-row luxury crossover field, shoving it in direct competition with the segment’s dominant sales king, the Lexus RX. Hand-wringing ensued, yet that iteration of the SRX sold nearly 100,000 copies globally in 2015. Not bad for a five-year-old model on the outs.

For 2017, Cadillac — drunk on the New York City skyline and “image spaces” in SoHo — introduced its CT6 sedan before turning its attention to updating its best seller.

Will Cadillac’s new utility, now christened XT5 and built in Saturn’s old Spring Hill digs in Tennessee, follow the brand’s relentless path to Audi-ization?

The XT5’s sole available powerplant is a 310 horsepower, naturally aspirated, 3.6-liter V6 matched up to an eight-speed automatic. A stable of that many horses is on par with its competitors, but the XT5 could use more than its 271 pounds-feet of torque, particularly when you’re goosing this 4257-pound all-wheel-drive tester in highway passing maneuvers. China gets a turbocharged 2.0-liter four in its XT5, which provides more low-end grunt. GM’s parts bin also contains a 404-horsepower twin-turbo V6. Either of these powerplants would make for a snappier driving experience.

The 3.6 in the XT5’s engine bay features cylinder deactivation and start-stop tech. While the former is imperceptible, the latter most certainly is not. The V6 restarts itself with a harumph, like a stern school principal addressing a roomful of miscreants.

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

The interior is well designed, with a beautiful swath of perforated leather on the dash punctuated by a large infotainment screen. Many journos have already complained bitterly about Cadillac’s CUE system, prompting me to not waste space on it here. Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are present and accounted for. An electronic shifter, of the same design found in Buick’s new LaCrosse, frees up space below the console for a vast and rubber-lined pass-through bin, though drivers must be double-jointed to access it with any sort of ease.

GM’s new electronic shifter fits well here, even if it still takes some mental calisthenics to use properly, especially when trying to execute a three-point turn (push it forward to go backward). Weird mouse fur lines a cubby at the base of the centre stack while a nifty vertical cellphone holder wirelessly charges select phones and easily accepts my unnecessarily large and uncouth iPhone 6+. The sliver of a twin-vent atop the dash appears useless at first glance, but actually provides excellent airflow.

Buttons for the heated seats look capacitively activated, but actually have a physical detent when pressed. Volume control for the infotainment, though? Not so much. Volume is exceedingly tough to modulate unless one has cocktail sticks for fingers, a evolution not yet known to mankind. Precision is required when mashing the non-tactile surface masquerading as the XT5’s centre stack volume buttons. The driver has their own set of controls mounted to the wheel, but this helps the passenger not one whit — unless you’re Mark Stevenson’s girlfriend, who enjoys the dangerous activity of reaching across the car to press steering wheel-mounted buttons. At least temperature controls and fan speed receive dedicated real estate in the form of pleasingly shaped bi-directional chrome switches. Cadillac would do well to replicate these for volume duty.

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

This 6-foot-6 author had plenty of legroom in the back seat and sufficient headroom when taking advantage of the rear seat’s ability to recline a few inches. Straight up, my bald pate rubbed rudely against the sunroof’s brim, causing me to duck my head as if dodging seagulls on the government wharf. A flat floor frees up space for a centre rider while outboard guests enjoy plenty of toe room under the front seats. A convenient USB port adorns the rear of the centre console, making one wonder why another team in the bowels of GM deemed a 12V receptacle to be sufficient.

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

At the lower end of XT5’s price scale, our tester was shod with 18-inch rubber rather than the 20-inch dubs available on higher trims. The tires are shockingly plump 65-series hoops, a refreshing deviation from the newly accepted norm of shipping cars with extremely low profile tires that emulate tar brushed around a gigantic rim. The XT5’s ride is all the better for it, soaking up bumps like a slice of bread swished through a nearly empty soup bowl. Sport mode, activated by toggling through a tactile button near the shifter, changed the transmission shift points but altered the ride not one iota over the cratered roads near my rural home.

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

It’s fortunate the ride wasn’t firmed up to any degree, given I was being driven mad by an infuriating and grating high-pitched squeak emanating from somewhere under the rear seat on the passenger side. I recorded this video (with both hands firmly on the wheel, naturally) in an attempt to articulate my complaint.

See what I mean? The mouse-eats-cheese squeak appeared the moment I started driving and didn’t abate for the duration of the test. Moving the 40/20/40-split rear seat through its folding cycle between drives helped some, but the offending noise quickly returned each time. And it was here I began to worry about quality.

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

Plush leather was making an excellent effort to extract itself from its home on the steering wheel, aided by stitching more frayed than a cat’s nerves at the dog pound. The leather on the driver’s seat was badly creased, leading me to doubt its long-term durability. Make all the jokes you want about the seat being inhabited by a stream of shrimp-laden journalists; leather should not be crinkled to this degree on a luxury vehicle with 2,200 miles.

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

This is the stuff that separates the winners from the also-rans. It’s highly doubtful one would find these (admittedly, non-life threatening) problems on a new Q5 or GLE. Future owners might, but not the ones who just shelled out big bucks to have the newest model sitting in front of their McMansion. I will, however, posit that the XT5 will still be on the road, piloted by its fourth or fifth owner, long after an expensive mechanical malady has relegated its German competition to the dustbin, which supports my long-held belief that GM cars tend to run bad longer than most cars run at all. But when they’re brand new, that’s not the point.

Years ago, I remember Pat Bedard writing about the then-new Oldsmobile Aurora. If you’re too young to recall that model, here you go. Look up Pat himself while you’re at it, along with his crash at Indy in 1984. For the rest of us old timers in the room, Mr. Bedard wrote about how he took three friends to dinner in the Aurora, friends who owned BMWs and Mercedes. To his dismay, the climate control system was displaying, in bright green numerals as was GM’s style at the time, an interior temperature one-hundred degrees higher than its actual setting, evoking guffaws from his foreign-driving friends and cementing their decision not to buy from the General. This is the same thing, 20 years later. You gotta get this stuff right, GM. The rest of the XT5 is too good to be let down by it.

Styling is a very subjective area, but I’m still not sold on the new Running MascaraTM look, which first debuted on the CT6 and now appears on this XT5. It’s like a neutering of the brashness defined by the Art and Science era. Worryingly, the XT5s flanks were adorned with monochromatic versions of the Cadillac logo. This badge also appeared on the nose of the concept in Pebble Beach and I sincerely hope this is not a harbinger of future design choices. Consider that Cadillac has been paring down its logo for years: first, they removed the ducks, then the wreath disappeared. Now, the colour is disappearing. Audi’s badge is also monochromatic. Oh dear.

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

I’m going to let you in on a little social experiment I performed last week. Whenever friends and relations asked me what I was driving, I simply responded: “A Cadillac.” Invariably, their eyes would light up like a carnival ride and they’d blurt out: “Escalade?” When I explained what I was actually driving, they’d let out a noise resembling a deflating balloon. Then when I told them what it cost — and how expensive it could get — they’d reliably bray like a sunburned donkey, exclaiming, “I could get a [insert German marque here] for that!” then proceed to ask for advice on selecting their Fall fantasy hockey team.

Are you listening to them, Mr. de Nysschen? Cadillac’s image was founded and built upon making the biggest and brashest cars (and later, trucks) in the world. I’m not suggesting Cadillac needs to start building the 1976 Fleetwood Sixty Special Talisman again, and I do recognize the financial stability provided by crossovers like this XT5, but Cadillac does need to start building some of the bombastic show cars it has flung around with élan at Pebble Beach for the last five years. They’ve been big. They’ve been brash. And they fit, to a tee, the general public’s perception of Cadillac. Take the advice of your fourth grade teacher and be yourself. Emulating Audi is not a guaranteed path to success.

On the heels of debuting the angular Escalade concept, a car with presence — and, it must be said, an A7-esque rear profile — de Nysschen disclosed that the next Caddy flagship will not (emphasis his) be a four-door sedan. Huh? If that’s the case, forget the XT and CT naming schemes. They might as well call it the Cadillac WTF.

Pricing for the 2017 XT5 starts at $39,990 for a front-wheel-drive entry-level model, but good luck finding one of those on a dealer’s lot unless the Regional Allocation Manager is in a bad mood. An extra $6,000 will net buyers the Luxury model as tested here, which adds an expansive sunroof, a heated wheel and front seats, a raft of driving assists, and real leather seating surfaces instead of proletariat “leatherette” seats in the base model.

Customers who seek a few more driving aids, extra exterior bling, and standard 20-inch rims will need to take another $7,000 walk to the almost-top-of-the-line-but-can’t-quite-swing-the-payments Premium Luxury trim. That’s a big wad of cash. All-wheel drive is a $2,495 option on the Luxury and Premium Luxury trims.

But Cadillac saved its truly gonzo pricing for the top rung Platinum model, available solely in all-wheel drive, where a check-all-the-boxes example can breeze past $70,000. The same model in Canada is only two grand shy of eighty large. That, friends, is uncomfortably close to Escalade money.

Our more down-to-earth AWD tester rang the bell at $52,150 (USD) after adding $770 for Driver Awareness nannies, a $1,025 nav and 14-speaker Bose audio package, $900 LED headlights that lit up the dark side of the moon, and $495 Stellar Black Metallic paint to its $47,390 (+$995 destination) base price. Still, it lacked some features such as ventilated seats, around-view cameras, and tri-zone climate control found on similarly priced competitors. These goodies are available either as stand alone extras or included on the XT5’s more expensive trims.

Is it petty to complain about the relative lack of content? Yes, but Cadillac’s marketing department is asking us to Dare Greatly. As equipped here, drivers can only Dare Tepidly.

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

Selling Points: lovely interior, unobtrusive ride, taillights look like fins.
Deal Breakers: quality concerns, delusional pricing on top trims, could use more power.
The Bottom Line: it would be a better Cadillac if it wasn’t trying to be an Audi.

GM Canada provided the test vehicle and insurance for this review.

[Images: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

71 Comments on “2017 Cadillac XT5 AWD Review – Tennessee Flat Top Box...”


  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    “Six years later, General Motors saw fit to yank the SRX out of that class and plunge it into the murderously competitive front-wheel drive, two-row luxury crossover field, shoving it in direct competition with the segment’s dominant sales king, the Lexus RX.”

    It was probably due in part to the most well-known bumper sticker on the original Cadillac SRX: Ask me why this Cadillac sucks.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      I’ve got a 2004 (V6 AWD 3 seat) and have never seen that bumper sticker.
      It’s a fine machine in my book.
      The driving dynamics are excellent, it’s an absolute beast in the winter with 4 Blizzaks, and the reliability has been good.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      My only problem with the first gen is it looked more like a station wagon than most modern station wagons.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Being one of the earlier three-row crossovers, it more or less *was* a wagon on stilts. It was basically an STS wagon.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Gen 1 SRX had one of the worst modern “luxury” car interiors I’ve ever seen.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Yes, it did. Despite it being, like I said, an STS wagon on stilts, the interior was closer to the entry-level CTS. Prior to the refresh, wood trim wasn’t even standard, but you got acres and acres of hard textured plastic and an instrument cluster remarkably similar to the one in the contemporary Vue (also a vehicle that looked and felt cheap).

            In 2007, upon its refresh, the SRX got a heavily-revised interior that was at least passably luxurious, but certainly nothing like what Lexus would have offered.

            I see not much has changed.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Those interiors didn’t have longevity, either. Occasionally I will be online here or there and see a gen 1 for sale.

            Even if the miles aren’t high, the mix of Chevrolet, Olds, and probably Saab parts in there look like crap. Worn finishes and missing bits of trim far as the eye can see.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            Yeah, they sucked. What was really interesting was seeing a steering column with manual tilt and powered telescoping motions.

            Lexus had been using power tilt-telescoping columns since 1990, with the debut of the LS, although one was not offered on the RX until its second generation, in 2004.

            But it wouldn’t have killed Cadillac to go ahead and put a full electronically-adjustable column in, especially since the STS had one.

            http://www.velocityjournal.com/images/full/2003/s2003010901/cd2004srx6004.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Gross! Now I feel ill and can’t enjoy my coffee.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        I use it to haul my legion of grandkids. I realize it’s not as cool as a Roadmaster wagon with a 6 liter LSX.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I know de Nysschen takes guidance from online comment boards so I’m gonna keep repeating myself- make a full lineup of Escalade mini mes (a la Range Rover) and make one big bad daddy PHEV sedan off the Epsilon II platform. Give it a hatchback, optional 22″ wheels, and replace goofy ass CUE with the big chrome chunky toggles you had in Cadillacs from your glory era. Your fight is not with German sedans- those are largely falling out of vogue. It’s with the crossovers, and more importantly it’s with TESLA.

    • 0 avatar
      Mandalorian

      +1 on the Escalades. There needs to be a 2500HD based Escalade as well as a dually.

      I wouldn’t worry much about Tesla, they may have a big internet fanboy presence, but they’re small, boutique, expensive, and unusable to 95% of the population.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        A dually axle under a Suburban body would be … interesting, but I’m not sure what you’d ever use it for.

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        A 2500 HD based-Escalade? Seriously? Have you ever driven a 2500 HD, even without duallies? I have, with both the diesel and gas engines. The sheer mass of these trucks, even compared to a 1500-series pickup, is stunning. If memory serves, 2500 weighs between 1200-1500 lbs more than the equivalent 1500-series truck, depending upon whether you choose the gas or diesel engine.

        The driving experience is definitely “truck,” and there’s no way to fix that, with a chassis that’s rated to carry about 2500 lbs. of passengers and stuff.

        Not gonna happen.

  • avatar
    threeer

    While I’m thrilled that production is back in the USA, and I’m sure the XT5 (Geez, the naming these days at Cadillac) is a decent enough vehicle, it was stated eloquently here that this thing just doesn’t scream “I’m a Cadillac!” Actually, I think it doesn’t scream much of anything, other than being another also-ran wannabe luxury SUV. Maybe that’s enough for a certain number of buyers, but nothing about this vehicle seems to stand out and make it truly unique or inspiring.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      XT5.

      Not that it matters, really…

      I agree, though. It doesn’t seem like GM tried too hard to make the XT5 competitive; its main draw is that it’s a better car than its predecessor.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        Kyree,

        Corrected. Dad-gum happy fingers this morning!

        That somehow seems to sum up GM at times “we’re better than the last car we made!”

      • 0 avatar

        Hey, that’s an improvement over the Roger Smith 1980-1990 era, where everything was worse that its predecessor.

        Of course,they started that era with 48% of the market in 6 divisions (including GMC). Today it’s barely 15% with 3 1/2 divisions, and Cadillac is going to rapidly churn thru $12B in cash
        .

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Cadillac did not want to rock the boat considerably on by far their best-selling model. The author does not point out anything the XT5 does WORSE than the SRX it replaces, so I think it’s mission accomplished.

      Despite the ‘braying’ of Mr. Guy’s Canadanian peers, the XT5 will sell quite well, simply because it’s such a big luxury CUV pie out there. The entire segment full of uninspiring tall wagons. Nothing stands out as more unique than the others.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        That’s just it, though. It’s almost insulting that Cadillac seems to be resting on its laurels and relying on the momentum of the segment.

        At least with the RX, which would sell even if it was literally cardboard on wheels, Lexus made clear, competitive improvements with each generation.

        • 0 avatar
          Featherston

          It hasn’t been uniform improvement for the RX. Styling and interior materials have gotten worse, not better. I have a fair amount of seat time in the AL10 (parents used to have one, and two close friends still do) and its predecessor, the XU30 (two friends have one, and a third used to). Things are still good in the AL10, but if you’re picky and examine things closely, you realize that the older model is nicer.

          It’s a calculated risk by Lexus. Things are close enough that most customers may not notice, and I imagine they’re saving a few dollars here and a few dollars there.

          Power and geegaw counts are both up, and assembly quality remains great.

          I haven’t ridden in the AL20, so I can’t comment other than to say it’s by far the ugliest of the lineage.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      People buying in this segment generally don’t want something unique or inspiring. If they did, the RX would not be the top seller. That’s not to say it’s a bad car; just that it’s very by the book and low key, even with its new predator face.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    Jesus, the interior rattle sounds worse then an E46 M3 with a cracked rear subframe.

    My F-car doesn’t even do that crap, and it’s 14 years old.At $56,000 dollars this car is worse then a bad joke. If someone held a gun to my head to buy a luxury crossover , I’d be running to the Lexus dealer .

    • 0 avatar
      True_Blue

      I spent a whole week in a relative’s first generation RX, and I was amazed at how well that car was holding up at the fat end of 100K. I used to silently ridicule these vehicles, but as I age, I “get it.”

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        My folks’ ’09 RX350 is an awesome car for what it is. Gobbles up highway miles in serenity and comfort, with fantastic interior quality that the next gen lost IMO.

    • 0 avatar
      Featherston

      @ True_Blue & gtemnykh, agreed wholeheartedly. I didn’t get the RX until my parents loaned me their 2010 for a road trip. Its market segment may not be one’s cup of tea but, as gtemnykh says, for what it is it’s awesome.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    CUE’s sliding volume actually responds to changes quicker than modern day CANBUS knobs!

    Past $50’s the XT5 needs to offer 400+ horsepower 3.0/3.6TT and I’d be interested.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      Right. Lincoln offers the 2.7TT as an upgrade on the MKX (and also the Edge, if you opt for the Sport trim), and that engine makes the car a lot more driver-oriented.

      I suppose Cadillac is using the XT5 to continue gunning directly for the XT5, who’ve put up with relatively-pedestrian V6 engines for nearly two decades; however, by offering only the ubiquitous 3.6-liter, they’ve really left room for Lincoln to beat them on merit, if not necessarily in sales and lease rates. The MKX, in my experience, feels like a nice compromise between a soft FWD-based luxury SUV and something truly athletic, like an X5.

      And, if you’re not scared off by the predator styling, the new RX looks like it’s on a whole other level in terms of build quality than either the XT5 or the latest MKX.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        One other point in favor of the MKS:

        1) You can get a *much* better sound system. Even the base system sounds better than the awful Bose systems Cadillac has been using for decades.

        This is becoming an important issue as many modern cars (and almost all luxury models) have non-upgradable sound systems. It really sucks when you’re stuck with the base (or even optional) “premium” crap in luxury cars using bespoke speaker designs and DSP processing while, at the same time, a lowly vehicle like my Tacoma can be easily fitted with, say, Focal speakers and an amp with little difficulty or cost.

        I get so sick of manufacturers touting “142 speaker sound” when 4 better-quality speakers would sound *so* much better.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    In a little cabaret in a South Texas border town
    Sat a boy and his guitar
    And people came from miles around…

    follow the brand’s relentless path to Audi-ization?

    Silly me, I thought Cadillacs were BMWs for people who drank Budwiser instead of Heineken.

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    Patrick Bedard was one of the reasons I still have an automatically-renewing subscription to Car and Driver in the first place; between Brock Yates’ politically charged columns (plus local flavor) and John Phillips’ “what-did-I-just-read” scripts.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Work boorishly intrudes, barely can skim, but wtf does “Tennessee Flat Top Box” have to do with this wheeled whale?

    Got my flatpicker on for nothin’.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Then one day he was gone
      And no one ever saw him ’round
      He vanished like the breeze
      They forgot him in the little town

      Maybe its a symbolic commentary on the Cadillac that many of us knew and loved that disappeared so long ago.

  • avatar
    spyked

    I think I’d take a loaded Ford Edge over this. In fact, I know I would. Why can’t Caddy get their gauge act together? I’m glad they appear to be physical dials, but why did they come from a 90’s Cavalier or Malibu? The quality issues are troublesome as well. Give the press a ringer if you have to, GM!

  • avatar

    It is amazing how meaningless those transaction prices are.

    The only thing in the XT5’s favor will be those desperate COMING SOON! 42-month lease deals of, say $290/month. That is their best hope to keep current SRX drivers in the fold. Look for Cadillac to do this in 9….OK, make it 6 months.

    Thank you for telling us The Truth About Cars.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    I do like this simplified design language. The 2nd-gen SRX was kind of fussy in terms of design, downright dowdy in certain places. This is a lot cleaner.

    Still, I don’t think it quite holds up to the RX, and its crosstown rival (the MKX) seems to be better value for the money, especially once you get the 2.7TT.

  • avatar
    whynot

    I spent more time following the Olds Aurora link and reminiscing about that car then actually caring about the XT5. GM should make a new one of those.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “…could use more than its 271 pounds-feet of torque, particularly when you’re goosing this 4257-pound all-wheel-drive tester in highway passing maneuvers”

    I think this is a gearing and transmission issue, not a power and torque one. My car is AWD, weighs the same, and has almost identical power and torque figures and I haven’t had this issue with a 5AT.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Wait wait.

    The badges on the sides of the car do not match those on the front/back/interior? No.

    Also, the pricing is just absurd. I’d have the RX over this every day of the week, since I don’t like how either looks.

  • avatar
    s_a_p

    This review outlines exactly what the problem is with Lincoln and Caddy. Caddy is slightly better than Lincoln, but they still miss the mark in a lot of areas. The biggest area the american lux brands screw up in is

    Dont badge engineer a vehicle that isnt world class. The XT5 is at best Buick worthy. It isnt a world class crossover, and it doesnt even fit in Cadillacs branding. If the top brass at Caddy doesnt have a competitive vehicle, they should sell nothing instead of half ass. Until they do that, they wont have the cache of other brands.

  • avatar
    Junebug

    This is probably an apples to bananas comparison, but, my wife has a Toyota Highlander Limited and it’s got heated/cooled seats and very nice leather too. I use to detail cars on the weekends to help pay the bills (pre back surgery) and I know good quality interiors when I see them.

  • avatar
    ltcmgm78

    They’ve discussed this Cadillac pricing issue on the AutoExtremist site. They just charge too much for these cars. Maybe they don’t want to be entry-level luxury but it’s clear from the pictures/videos that they aren’t ready to play in the big leagues yet where one wrinkle or blemish can kill the entire deal before you ever get close to the Finance Guy.

  • avatar
    pmirp1

    I thought they had done away with those gauges in SRX, but I see it is still there. What is it with Caddy? Both in CTS and now this BASE version, they put in a cheap looking instrument cluster that is probably not even a good look for some cheap Korean cars. This is the part of car one has to look at every day. Its these types of small details, that they just don’t get.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    The driver’s footwell just looks bizarrely shaped. I feel like I’d have to sit with half sideways to get in there. Otherwise, my right knee is going to be jammed against the center console.

    LED headlights aren’t standard. What a joke. What kind of message are you trying to send, Cadillac? Do you really want your top-selling model looking so cheap?

    • 0 avatar

      Another thing learned from ze chermans. The base is missing things you’d expect, like a real stereo, or HID lamps on a 50k car. You need to option that puppy up.

      I saw an XT5 Platinum at the Caddy Haus in NYC. Lovely car, but I didn’t see the sticker.

      The level of perfection you need at this price level is silly, almost, but to ask for 2-3x the cost of transportation you need to make jewelery.

  • avatar
    zipper69

    With a start price of $72k the Maserati Levante exudes luxury and style and seems the only SUV (after the horrors of Porsche and Jaguar)to pass the visual test.
    Could it cream off the top buyers in this field?

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Where can you even buy a Maserati? I can think of at least 3 each of Cadillac/Lexus/Audi/BMW/Mercedes dealers in my area off the top of my head.

      I had to Google Maserati. One dealership in the DC area, in Arlington. Too much of a hassle to deal with for most people. And it’s shared with a Fiat store. Classy.

      Even Jaguars are easier to find.

    • 0 avatar

      In the better burbs of Westchester, Bergen, Fairfield and Nassau, you’d bet ! The Maser will sell on name…it could be an oxcart.

      Bentley sells in these areas because you can’t break the glaze with just a BMW or Benz, even with an M or AMG on the lid.

      The Escalade wins too, cause it is HUGE… but that is unique-euros can’t do that like Muricans

  • avatar
    SC5door

    That door sticker annoys me–it’s large and draws attention that it was “Manufactured by GM”. How about one with a Cadillac logo? “Crafted with Pride”–where you pretended to give a sh** about the product going out your door instead of slapping product together.

  • avatar
    jimble

    The shifter looks like a lawsuit waiting to happen. Why on earth do they think they need to “improve” on the PRND pattern everybody already knows?

  • avatar
    Wodehouse

    This, for me, is the whole 2013 Malibu thing once again. It took six years to come up with this unfinished project? It probably is improved over its predecessor (SRX), but, it doesn’t “appear” to be improved. Great big, oddly proportioned face (like that Malibu). Boring, generic sheetmetal and curious detailing. Not necessarily ugly, just, wrong…and boring.

    Why is this not a “midsize” Escalade design on the outside? Why make it look like an Audi when you can just go and purchase a real Audi? Is it like buying a “fake Rolex”?

    I was hoping to someday replace my CTS coupe with a new Cadillac, but, not if this klutzy, imitative design language is the future. Disappointing.

  • avatar
    RedRocket

    From the title and throughout the text, this review reads like an excuse just to trash Cadillac/GM/domestic manufacturers (take your pick) by making big issues over any little thing – things that ANY car from any manufacturer would have.

    Not much Truth About Cars in this.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    I know that BigTrucks got banned, did Deadweight get booted also?

  • avatar
    Higheriq

    Love it, hate it, but give Cadillac credit for keeping tailfins alive.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Par for the course from Stantard of the World.

    Overall a nice review, and I especially appreciate the extra circled pics and video showing quality issues. The inclusion of the additional media making your QC point is brilliant. Screenshot it or it didn’t happen.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • legacygt: So for the same money you get a Mini Countryman All4. For about $3K more you get the Minis Cooper...
  • Corey Lewis: Thanks! Just had to find the right one for me. The black interior restriction was a serious issue.
  • 28-Cars-Later: “effectively means electrification kills jobs” This is an interesting point. “were...
  • Blackcloud_9: Good one, Dave. Corey, Congrats on your purchase. I’m sure you’ll be very happy with it. I...
  • JMII: I bought my 2014 C7 Z51 3LT Corvette in NJ and drove it home to FL last summer. Total was 1,207 miles in 2...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States