By on July 5, 2016

2015 Ford F-150

We’ve reached the halfway marker. After new vehicle sales soared to record levels in calendar year 2015, the volume produced by automakers competing for market share in the United States continued to expand through the first six months of 2016.

Between January and June, the 30 most popular new vehicle nameplates in the United States generated half of all auto sales, leaving more than 250 other vehicles to fight over half the market. Many of those popular vehicles own a far greater chunk of the market than entire manufacturers. The top-selling Ford F-Series line of pickup trucks, for instance, outsells every auto brand aside from Toyota, Chevrolet, Nissan, Honda, Jeep, and Ford itself. The 30th-ranked vehicle, Subaru’s Outback, outsells whole mid-tier premium brands such as Cadillac, Infiniti, Lincoln, and Jaguar-Land Rover.

In other words, popular vehicles are very popular indeed.

These are the most popular of the popular, the podium finishers in five broad categories through the first half of 2016.

USA best selling autos chartPICKUP TRUCKS
#1: Ford F-Series | +11% | 395,244
At the current pace, Ford will sell more than 800,000 pickup trucks in America in 2016, a figure not matched by any vehicle since Ford sold 901,463 F-Series’ in 2005.

#2: Chevrolet Silverado | -1% | 273,652
Although U.S. sales of pickup trucks grew 7 percent in the first-half of 2016, the Silverado is heading in the wrong direction. Combined, the Chevrolet and its GMC Sierra twin produced 380,118 first-half sales.

#3: Ram P/U | +9% | 231,405
The Ram’s hold on third place, not just among pickups but in terms of overall vehicles, appears secure. If the three trucks hold the three top spots for another six months, 2016 will be the third consecutive year in which a pickup truck trio owned the overall sales podium.

2015 Toyota Camry

CARS
#1: Toyota Camry | -7% | 199,760
The Camry’s 7.4-percent year-over-year decline, valued at 16,056 lost sales compared with the first six months of 2015, is essentially on par with the passenger car market’s 7.9-percent drop.

#2: Honda Civic | +20% | 189,840
Launched at the tail end of 2015 in all-new, tenth-generation form, the Honda Civic predictably exploded with an increase of 31,539 sales in the first six months of 2016. The 20-percent year-over-year leap is bettered among best-selling cars only by the eighth-ranked Chevrolet Malibu’s 25-percent improvement.

#3: Toyota Corolla | -4% | 182,193
Overshadowed by the new Civic in early 2016, the Corolla remains a hugely popular car, outselling the Nissan Altima, Honda Accord, and Ford Fusion by 9,498, 12,839, and 35,360 units, respectively.

2016 Toyota RAV4, Image: Toyota

SUVs & CROSSOVERS
#1: Toyota RAV4 | +16% | 165,900
Since 2007, only two vehicles have ever managed to claim top spot in America’s SUV/crossover sector: the Ford Escape, and the current holder of the crown, Honda’s CR-V. Rapid RAV4 sales growth could alter the traditional pecking order in 2016, particularly if the CR-V continues to decline.

#2: Honda CR-V | -2% | 159,075
To be fair, the CR-V is only 6,825 sales behind the top-ranked RAV4. It’s far too early to count out the CR-V, America’s top-selling utility vehicle in the last four years. After seven consecutive months atop the leaderboard, the RAV4 fell into fourth spot in June and the CR-V was top dog.

#3: Ford Escape | +6% | 155,378
The Escape is two spots out of the number one position, but the 10,522-unit deficit is not insurmountable if Escape sales continue to elevate as they have in the last couple of months. With the revamped 2017 model coming on strong, Escape sales jumped 12 percent in May and June.

2015 Ford Transit

VANS
#1: Ford Transit | +36% | 78,480
The best-selling van in America is very much a true-blue (or more likely, white) van. The Transit generates four out of every ten U.S. full-size commercial van sales. Together, the Transit, along with its E-Series and Transit Connect cohorts, own more than half the commercial van category.

#2: Dodge Grand Caravan | +94% | 71,523
A dreadful first-half of 2015 caused by a plant shutdown (to retool for the new Chrysler Pacifica) skews the Grand Caravan’s year-over-year gain. But there’s no denying that the FCA minivan family’s market share is on the mend. In June, the Grand Caravan, Pacifica, and departing Chrysler Town & Country owned 47 percent of the minivan market.

#3: Toyota Sienna | -4% | 68,225
The Grand Caravan/Town & Country slowdown in 2015 opened up an avenue for huge Toyota Sienna van success last year. Matching that pace in 2016 has not proven possible, though the Sienna is still on pace for its second-best year since 2007.

2016 Lexus RX450h

PREMIUM BRAND AUTOS
#1: Lexus RX | +12% | 49,412
The global auto market’s turn toward SUVs and crossovers is emphasized in the luxury sector, and it’s further emphasized in Lexus showrooms in the United States. Lexus car sales are down by a fifth already this year. The RX and its smaller NX sibling have fortunately added nearly 8,400 sales through six months.

#2: Mercedes-Benz C-Class | -14% | 37,305
America’s top-selling premium car earns its place with help from BMW’s relatively recent nomenclature change. Combined, the 3 Series and its 4 Series offshoot outsold the C-Class by nearly 15,000 units in 2016’s first-half.

#3: BMW 3 Series | -23% | 32,976
The 3 Series’ huge 23-percent year-over-year decline was distinct in its severity in 2016’s first-half, but not entirely out of keeping with the premium car market. Car sales at Acura, Audi, Bentley, Cadillac, Infiniti, Lexus, Lincoln, Mercedes-Benz, Porsche, and Volvo declined as well.

[Images courtesy of automakers; graph by Timothy Cain]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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73 Comments on “Winning! These Are America’s Best-Selling Cars, Trucks, SUVs, Vans, and Luxury Autos In 2016’s First Half...”


  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Good for GM for showing such strong gains with the Malibu. I do seem to be seeing them populate the streets much faster than the previous generation did when the switchover between generations happened.

    I understand why you lumped SUVs and Crossovers together but it would be interesting to see the BOF SUVs broken down separately just to see who is doing the best in that category with its small number of choices.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      This might interest you, Principal Dan. http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2016/02/body-on-frame-suv-production-2016-model-year-north-america.html

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Interesting that the Suburban, Tahoe, and Expedition are down year to date in a market that gained 16% and when their platform mates are up anywhere from 3% to 30%.

        Although I also see that Ford doesn’t break down sales by long wheelbase and short wheelbase like GM does.

        I had forgotten that the Wrangler was still BOF, I had guessed that the 4Runner was going to have the sales crown but there’s the Wrangler selling 200,000 plus. It is a little mind blowing to think how many they might sell if sales weren’t production constrained.

        • 0 avatar
          Timothy Cain

          Should’ve included this, every SUV and crossover in one YTD list through June. http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2016/07/usa-suv-crossover-sales-by-model-june-2016-ytd.html

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          I think the slow down in the large GM SUV line up was expected. There was a ton of pent up demand for the new versions last year and they left the lot as fast as they came in.

          I have mentioned before that they seem to be the new ‘panther’ of choice for the Uber/airport livery set.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            But Yukon (regular and XL) and Escalade are up – especially the long wheelbase Escalade. They were all redesigned at the same time.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Demand for the Tahoe and such is strong, at $35,000 where they should be, $50,000 the demand just isn’t there. GM has abandoned this segment and left it to rot.
            In the luxury versions the demand exists simply because they’re priced more in line with reality.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Ford considers the Expedition EL to be a submodel of the SWB Expedition, because it’s only been around since 2007. GM, in comparison, considers the Suburban and Tahoe to be seperate models, since the Suburban had been around for 8 generations (60 years) when the Tahoe was introduced in 1995.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            @Drzhivago, I was actually referring to GM listing Yukon and Yukon XL sales separately along with Escalade and Escalade ESV sales separately. To me (but obviously not to GM) those are just as much sub models as the Expedition EL and the Navigator L.

        • 0 avatar
          SSJeep

          I think the downturn in the Tahoeyukoburbpedition market is due to pricing more than anything. Id love to buy a new Tahoe today. I am not going to pay $60k for the privilege. They are just too expensive for what they are. GM is padding theirs with 12k-15k profit each. Which is fine, but certainly shows in overall sales numbers.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            More like $25-30k profit per Tahoe, they aren’t losing any money selling Tahoes to police departments at $25k a pop.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Damn, Ford, awesome!

    Now merge with Toyota and rule ze verlt! Fordota!

  • avatar

    GM should build a “Farmtruck” edition of the Silverado. Red, camper shell, 632ci, 4L80E, drag radials, 1000HP, Azn Dung Beetle key fob. Does Ford have that? No. Does Ram offer that? No.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Allahu Akbar! The veiled have the fat yankee binged on oil guzzlers.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Kudos to Ford on the F150. They are really pouring it on.

  • avatar

    The new E-class is going to be a volume killer when it hits.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Tim,
    You only mentioned the full size pickups.

    Can you break down the numbers into actual pickup classes, ie, F-150, 1500s?

    Also the same should be done for the vans.

    This way it will be easier to differentiate between the car/SUV/CUV pickups and the HDs which generally are more favoured as a working vehicle.

    Also, break it down into GM vs Ford vs Ram. This will paint a more accurate picture of how each manufacturer is really performing.

    Not including the Sierra with the Silverado is not correct. Because I believe mechanically the Raptor difference to a “normal” F-150 is greater than a Silverado to a Sierra.

    If you are including all pickups you should also include the midsizers in the numbers as well. Are any less a pickup than a fulls size?

    I think if you combined all of GMs pickups you’ll see that GM has outsold Ford.

    Ford is playing second fiddle in real terms.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      If you read down in the article you will see combined Silverado and Sierra sales combined at 380000 or so, still 15,000 behind the F series. But yes, if you throw in those Colorado and Canyon sales GM would squeak past Ford so maybe they were smart in bringing the midsize truck in for those 10000 or so sales a month. Or maybe instead of chasing those 10000 sales GM should have followed Fords lead and built a freaking Van. GM isn’t even playing second fiddle in that market, more like second kazoo.

      Plus you aren’t fooling anyone. You proclaimed the F150 a dud last year now…not so much. And the problem for GM is that the market as a whole is up yet GM’s truck sales are down. I know you despise all things Ford, but proclaiming GM as winners of anything in this story is a real stretch.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        just saw that they only have that one showing (Silverado) in the whole article.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        GM is playing second fiddle in the Van market, they do manage to get near 25% of the market share. It is the other vans on the market that divide the remaining 25% between 6 models.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          Upfitter support is what is keeping the GM vans (and some variants of the Econoline) alive. there’s a lot of companies out there who have spent decades making equipment like boxes, ambulance bodies, etc. for these vans and they can’t be expected to throw all that away overnight.

          Transit eases the pain for buyers who don’t need a specialty body; it offers multiple roof heights from the factory instead of needing to be butchered by an upfitter to stick on a turtle-top roof extension.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          I didn’t know it was that high. Honestly the only new GM vans I have seen on the road in years are parked in Army motor pools. I wish we would buy some Transits…They are so much better to drive but I imagine those old GM vans go for well below what Ford gets for the Transit.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Big Al From ‘Murica – the “other Al” wants to see F150 sales split from total Ford sales because his theory is that the aluminum F150 sales s^ck but sales of the Ford HD are up because no one wants the aluminum F150 and impending aluminum HD.
        (Oh and according to HDC, no one wants squirrel engines).
        BUT

        BUT

        The Titan XD somehow has not been able to hurt Ford HD sales. That was another theory postulated by your down-under doppelgänger.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Lou,
          WTF??

          If you must direct a comment at me, then offer one that is tangible and worthy of debate. Your comment illustrates you total lack of maturity.

          My views regarding pickup numbers have been known since I started commenting on these sites……. now measured in years.

          So, why do cars not just be grouped ie, Toyota cars. This would include,Prius, Corolla, Camry, Avalon, 84, etc?

          If car companies grouped all numbers of cars similar to how pickups do, then I do believe that maybe the F Series is actually not the biggest selling vehicle.

          Also, a 1/2 ton and a midsizers are most commonly used as a car/SUV alternative. If pickups are going to be group loosely then why not create segments that more accurately reflects what is going on in the market.

          So, for the massive majority (75%) of daily driving, car/SUV pickups I would think my logic is a better measure.

          Vans are measured as a total group, why not pickups?

          Or, better still break the numbers down into 150/1500, 250/2500, 350/3500, etc. A 3500 Ram is a far different beast than the 1500 V6 Pentastar powered Ram.

          So, sit down and think about your comments. You tend jump to conclusions. This tendency of yours really is like one of those low IQ comments from a few others here on TTAC.

          Do some real research and then you might be able to have a constructive and rewarding debate with me.

          Dealing with you is on par with dealing with school children.

          Maturity??

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @down-under doppelgänger – I wasn’t talking to you.
            I was replying to @Big Al From ‘Murica in response to this,”Plus you aren’t fooling anyone. You proclaimed the F150 a dud last year now…not so much. And the problem for GM is that the market as a whole is up yet GM’s truck sales are down. I know you despise all things Ford, but proclaiming GM as winners of anything in this story is a real stretch.”

            Since you fired off the ad hominem attack you could explain the accuracy of your theory that the aluminum F150 sales s^ck but sales of the Ford HD are up because no one wants the aluminum F150 and impending aluminum HD.
            You also stated here and elsewhere that the Titan XD would cut into Ford HD sales.

            Please explain yourself?

            Statistics show a decidedly different picture.

            Your little hissy fit confirms that one of us is incorrect.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      But it isn’t including all pickups only the top 3 sellers in every category. The thing is Ford is more concerned with profits and they are rolling in them from the F series because they have a significantly higher transaction price than the pickups from GM and Ram.

      • 0 avatar
        Carlson Fan

        “The thing is Ford is more concerned with profits and they are rolling in them from the F series because they have a significantly higher transaction price than the pickups from GM and Ram.”

        FALSE! Unless you’ve seen costed BOM’s (proprietary info) on all those trucks you can’t make a statement like that. Without it transaction price is completely meaningless when talking profits.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          It’s not that “proprietary”. F-series is handily more profitable than Chevy and GMC fullsize pickup profits, combined. Compounding that, GM spends the absolute minimum on their pickups.

          autoguide.com/auto-news/2011/11/top-12-most-profitable-vehicles.html/12

          • 0 avatar
            Carlson Fan

            First show me where that article reveals Ford’s actual costs for building any F150.

            Secondly, tell me the 3 components of a costed BOM and what they include.

            And yes product costs are proprietary. I’ve seen people fired on the spot for divulging costs to a customer.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I’ve just got respected research teams and industry analysts backing me up. You’ve got what? Hot air??

            Besides, Derek Kreindler’s articles are well respected around here.

            50 billion in profits ’95 to 2011. No other car can touch that.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Here’s another article with the same. Enjoy.

            money.cnn.com/galleries/2011/autos/1111/gallery.most_profitable_cars/

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @BAFO – Instead of throwing the Silverado, Sierra, Colorado and Canyon into one neat, juiced up figure, how about just admitting you were dead wrong about the aluminum F-150, stating ad nauseam: “Ford is hurting”, “F-150 sales are way down”, “It cost 30 billion”, “It’ll be too expensive”, etc, etc,

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        You shouldn’t have bet your balls, the aluminum F-150 was gonna be a loser for Ford, BAFO. Slicing up “sales figures” in a stupid, unheard of way, won’t save your balls. Speaking of *slicing*…

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Right, if you ignore the actual facts, you’re 100% correct! Good job!

      Because 380,118 is obviously greater than 395,244.

      When they say “Down Under” are they referring to putting larger numbers “down under” smaller numbers to make themselves feel better?

      “I worked 56 hours this week! Sweet, sweet overtime!”

      “Oh yeah? Well I worked 38 hours! Beat that, Mr. Overtime!”

      “Oh man, not worthy, not worthy.” (cries softly)

  • avatar
    gasser

    Isn’t the BMW 4 series really just 3 series with a bit different body? Shouldn’t 3/4 sales be tallied together to evaluate the competition (C class, A4)?
    Here in L.A. there are a lot of dealer specials on the 320, but you have to want to drive the bottom rung of the ladder to go for it. The C class seems to be outselling it locally, by my unofficial valet parking at restaurants survey.
    I am surprised that the LEXUS RX 350 is selling so well. I find the front grill horrible and did not trade my third in a row RX350 for a fourth one. I see there are lots of other buyers to replace me.

    • 0 avatar
      Wodehouse

      Interesting point.

      I spoke with a friend that is a BMW salesperson about this. He says he was specifically told to flog them as 2 separate models. I got the same response from other regional BMW dealerships. He said it was a ploy to charge more for the 4 series!

      I have another friend that knows very little about cars. He went shopping for a replacement for his 2004 3 series convertible and was given the schlock about the 4 being a special and limited production model lineup that is separate from the 3, with a more handcrafted build! Naturally, transaction prices were higher for the same kit. My buddy wanted to argue with me when I told him they are the same basic car. It bothered me, but, I let him be. He ended getting fleeced on rattletrap of a (yet another) black painted, low end coupe, with a bad paint job, clunking suspension and plasticky interior bits. He wanted something other than black, but, was told that only black, silver, grey and white was available until the fall production schedule!

      Unbelievable! Oh, well!

  • avatar
    ttacgreg

    GM’s silly publicity pot shots at Ford make more sense to me now.

    I for one, would never go buy groceries in a truck that can’t take large bricks dropped from 4-5 feet above the bed without suffering damage.

    • 0 avatar
      JustPassinThru

      Silly? Only if you planned to actually use the truck as a truck is purportedly designed to be used.

      That, apparently, is the market GM is trying to attract. And not so-much by toughening their trucks; but by demonstrating how FLIMSY the COMPETITION has become.

      But…if you’re looking for a Bro-Dozer to pose in while you go get groceries…I guess the Ford is the better truck. It’s got Peak Grille.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        JustPassinThru – I have not seen a work pickup truck (other than a beater) without a headache rack, rail guards and/or some sort of bed protection.

        • 0 avatar
          JustPassinThru

          I have; but I suppose a lot depends on the region. Where I’m at there are ranchers with diesel tanks in back, to fuel tractors; or stakes in the bed pockets to haul hay; or just trucks loaded with firewood.

          Remember, all trucks start out shiny and new and almost all eventually become beaters. And some of them are purchased, new or nearly-new, to work/beat on.

          So the poser doesn’t want to drop a ton of bricks into his truck bed…when new. If he’s not working his truck, he’ll sell it when it’s no longer new or no longer fits the image. What it’s worth on the USED market is going to depend on how sturdy the model is judged.

          Subaru BRATs or VW caddies didn’t bring as much in the used market as F-150s of years past. Or Chevy C/K models. Those were judged tougher.

          And when it’s found, in thousands of real-world applications, that a misplaced rock or even a stump dropped into the bed can rip it open…that will reflect in used prices. There may even come to be an aftermarket real-steel bed replacement for these beer-can wonders.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @justpassinthru – fleet trucks don’t tend to exert much downward pressure on used prices since they tend to be extremely worn out when sold.
            There are a lot of ranches in my region especially south and west of my town. They set up their trucks no different than loggers. Many are one and the same.

            There has always been aftermarket boxes and decks to replace pickup boxes. 1/2 tons don’t tend to get upfitted with heavy steel decks/boxes because they don’t have the payload to absorb the extra weight.

            OH, BTW, TTACGreg was being sarcastic.

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            Fleet trucks are a different animal than Peak Grille experiences that’re pushing the sale of $55,000 pickups.

            I don’t know the market right now, very well; but I’m given to understand it’s why the Ford 350 heavy-duty trucks for some years had a far-different body and frame than the 150/250 models. The latter were for the Bro-Dozer buyer; and the H/D models were intended as focused work vehicles.

            I expect cab/chassis orders are still available through dealers’ Fleet Sales corners; and you can send one to a truck-body department for a flatbed with low stake sides and a header rack. Sure.

            That’s not what I see in my town, which has a LOT of State and USFS employees…mostly very-well paid. What I see are a lot of lifted diesels…with RAM on the back or the Ford wall-size grilles. With diesels, of course…chipped to allow Rolling Coal. Often with sewer-pipe stacks cut through what was supposed to be the load bed.

            THAT is the buyer I have no regard for; who IMHO is pushing the sale of these crunchy aluminum wonders.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            Try just passin through some research. The F-250 has been a Super Duty (just like F-350, etc) since 1999, the “light duty (F-150 like) model was phased out at that time, having only existed for a couple of years, replaced for a short time by “F-150 7700”).

            I mean, 17 years is a long time to not notice “F-250” on the sides of trucks with the exact same body style as those that say “F-350” (dual rear wheels notwithstanding).

  • avatar
    dal20402

    So, between Ford’s EcoBoost experience and its aluminum experience, now we know how the pickup market works.

    Pickup buyers howl and moan about any post-1960s technology before introduction, predicting it means The End for the manufacturer that introduces it. Then they avoid the first year of production while continuing to howl and moan. But when there are a few hundred thousand of the new-technology trucks in service, benefiting from the new technology, it starts seeming “normal” and the buyers come back.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Exactly. Where are all those luddites now who were predicting Ford’s demise for embracing aluminum and turbos? I have yet to read a single post admitting how wrong they were.

      Will they learn from their errors, or proceed with predicting that Ford will destroy the F150 with 10 speed transmissions?

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Ford had no problem with the first year sales of the EcoBoost F150’s, in fact they sold far better than Ford predicted and left them scrambling to meet the demand. If sales were left on the table or went elsewhere it was because the Ford someone wanted wasn’t in stock and wouldn’t be for some time.

      The Aluminum thing did cause a bit of a drop but again a lot of that was due to limited availability due to the slow down in production caused by the lengthy shut downs for the change over and a slow ramp up of production.

      So no the majority of people who actually buy new pickups have not stayed away because of new technology, they have actually embraced it from the start to the point where Ford couldn’t keep up.

    • 0 avatar

      To be fair, 2015 was a rough year for F-150 production, which translated to a rough year for sales. Now that Ford has turned up the wick on production, we are back to the status quo.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        There were incentives, sometimes large, on the 2015 F-150 at various points during the year. If the drop in sales were entirely because of the production issues, I wouldn’t have expected that.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          “There were incentives, sometimes large, on the 2015 F-150 at various points during the year.”

          Not just the F150 which had incentives in my area exceeding $10K. But also the F250 and F350.

          That’s how my son was able to purchase a left-over 2015 F350 XLT SuperCrew DRW 4×4 LongBed for less than $70K, out the door.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Less than $70K? I tried making an F-350 4×4 DRW SuperCrew on the website with everything added to an XLT; it came out to not quite $50K.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yup, it was a bit less than $70K. It wasn’t anything fancy, but it can seat six and carry 4×8 sheets of construction material in the bed.

            He bought it at Don Chalmers in Albuquerque, last year. The only place to go for a nice selection.

            What may have cost extra was the towing gear for fifth-wheel, and gooseneck, and Class IV self-leveling with Kelsey-Hayes controller.

            Hell of a truck!

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            My $48K price included a fifth-wheel and gooseneck underneath, but no self-leveler. Is it really $22K extra for that?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Where do you live? Prices tend to be higher in the Rockies, and often West of the Mississippi.

            Getting an F350 for $48K, not possible in my area. Many F150s top $50K with a lot less capability, in my area.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I did it online with the ZIP code 12345, like always.

            Don Chalmers seems to have a lot of Lariat F-350s (albeit SRW) for just under $60K (MSRP around $67K). The one DRW XLT was priced at $54K (MSRP $60K).

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Water under the bridge now. Seemed like a great deal to him and his business partner, when he bought the truck.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I’d like to think your son didn’t get fleeced, so I’ll say it might have been a different economic climate last year. You know the situation better than I do.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Actually, I don’t. After he bought my 2011 Tundra for his own use, he still needed a heavier duty truck (a la F350) for the hauling and towing for the cattle business.

            His former father-in-law and business partner already had an old F350 DRW and it was perfect for what they needed to do with it.

            I don’t think he got ripped off. He’s no fool.

            Don Chalmers and Shamaley in El Paso are stand-up dealers with stellar reputations for sales&service, and cater to the professionals while also trying to please the hordes of light-duty buyers that come to their premises.

            Of course, the pricing you found is one thing. Actually being able to buy a real truck with those specs for the money could be very different.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Give Ford credit, they continue to push new technologies in the 1/2 ton PU arena versus resting on their laurels and it’s paying off. Good for them. Now it sounds like buyers will have even another engine choice with the new diesel coming out. GM needs to step up their game quickly or they are going to find themselves fighting for the #2 spot in sales, forget #1.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      dal20402 – so true.

      Human behaviour 101.

      People feel safer hanging out at the fur bearing end of the human genome.

  • avatar

    Why bicycles are not included in article? It is now the preferred type of transportation in our area. You guys talk only about trucks. Whats so hot about them? I cannot get it.

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  • zerofoo: “and the lack of bullet trains and other public transportation alternatives is causing our freeways to...
  • sgeffe: As well as give you a static shock that could mess up your heart rhythm if you touched a metal piece of the...
  • ajla: How much furniture and appliances do you buy? I don’t think I’ve bought a big ticket item in the...

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  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber