By on July 14, 2016

2005 Nissan Frontier & 2016 Nissan Frontier

The recent introduction of a thoroughly re-engineered Toyota Tacoma is propelling sales of the segment’s top seller to all-time highs. After an elongated hiatus, there are new options from General Motors, and they’re selling more frequently than GM anticipated. Just last month, Honda began selling an all new, second-generation Ridgeline, a pickup at the opposite end of the spectrum from the rough and tumble Frontier. That Ridgeline, we told you yesterday, is selling like it’s 2008.

Moreover, demand for small/midsize pickup trucks is roughly 30-percent smaller than it was a decade ago.

At Nissan, there are plenty of factors, internal and external, working against the Frontier. The current-generation pickup is more than a decade old. Yet Nissan USA is on track to sell more Frontiers in 2016 than at any point since the current truck debuted on the Titan’s F-Alpha platform in January 2004 at Detroit’s North American International Auto Show.

WHY?
As you would expect, Nissan credits its own midsize truck for the company’s 2016 midsize truck sales improvements. Asked by TTAC yesterday, “What’s driving the sales?”, Nissan’s senior manager of product communications, Dan Passe, noted the Frontier’s value quotient and the degree to which Nissan believes the truck is competitive in the marketplace.

But Passe also mentioned the changing circumstances. No longer is the Frontier essentially battling the Toyota Tacoma one-on-one as it was for much of 2013 and 2014. “Attention has been brought upon it by the new and revised entrants in the segment,” Passe told TTAC.

Fast food restaurants set up shop across the street from other fast food restaurants, not on the outskirts of town where they have the market to themselves, because the market is too small there. Car dealerships traditionally prefer to be among car dealerships — that’s where the customers are.

2016 Nissan Frontier, Image: Nissan

For the Nissan Frontier, a revamped Toyota Tacoma, a new Chevrolet Colorado, a new GMC Canyon, and perhaps even a new Honda Ridgeline, apparently does more good than harm. Those trucks ignite interest in the midsize pickup truck category that the old Frontier cannot ignite on its own. In fact, the newer trucks ignite enough interest to not only produce Frontier-besting volume at Toyota and General Motors, but also enough interest to rub off on the senior citizen in their ranks.

2005
The Frontier is far from the most modern piece of equipment now, but this is the truck about which Car And Driver said, “The Frontier was remarkably frisky,” and, “During a run down a curvy mountain road, the Frontier was composed, communicative, and even a little fun.”

Granted, this was in a June 2005 comparison test of midsize pickups won by Honda Ridgeline, a test in which the Frontier finished second, but it clearly shows the current Frontier wasn’t always an also-ran.

But also-ran is what it’s become. The very same publication called the Frontier the ‘I’m Still Here!’ Truck last October. Auto writers prone to forgetting about the Nissan Frontier’s existence aren’t representative of the general midsize truck-buying public: Frontier volume rose to an eight-year high in 2014, dipped 15 percent in the face of a competitive onslaught last year, and is now on pace for its best year since 2001.

The Nissan Frontier won’t match the calendar year 2000’s 108,738-unit record pace this year, and exceeding the 89,434-unit mark from 2001 appears just as unlikely. But Nissan is on track to sell more than 80,000 Frontiers in 2016, making this year potentially the best year in the history of the current model, a pickup which debuted when Steph Curry was still in high school, when Subaru was still selling the Baja, when Donald Trump was only just beginning to air The Apprentice.

TITANLESS
Times have changed, not only for Donald Trump, but for the Nissan pickup truck lineup. Nissan is benefiting from improved midsize pickup truck demand, to be sure, but the Frontier is also reaping the rewards of being the lone light-duty truck in Nissan’s showrooms.

“The half-ton Titan will not be on sale until early fall, and all previous-generation models have been out of production for several months,” says Nissan’s Dan Passe. “As a consequence, dealerships are selling a good amount of Frontiers.”

A good amount, indeed. With few deeply discounted Titans in Nissan showrooms to challenge the Frontier, first-half Frontier volume jumped 29 percent to 45,011 units, equal to 21 percent market share in the small/midsize category. That’s up two points from last year as year-over-year Frontier growth exceeds that of any rival.

Of course, low prices help, too. The MSRP of a basic crew cab, four-wheel-drive, V6-engined Nissan Frontier is $28,150, $4,880 less than the price of an equal Toyota Tacoma.

[Image Source/Image: Nissan]

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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71 Comments on “It’s Still The Same Truck, But Nissan Is Selling Frontiers Like It’s 2006...”


  • avatar
    JimZ

    “Nissan’s senior manager of product communications, Dan Passe, noted the Frontier’s value quotient ”

    Translation: “The tooling was paid for years ago, and we basically give them away now.”

    Just like the Ranger up until the end.

    • 0 avatar

      I suspect the death of the Ranger was a big help to Frontier sales. I was actually considering buying one in 2012 to replace my Ranger – but ended up buying a Pathfinder instead, since with the giant pile of cash Nissan was putting on the hood, it was only a couple grand more than a fully-loaded Frontier.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Plus a King Cab Frontier is almost exactly the size of a SuperCab Ranger.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        perish the thought. I sat in the rear jump seat of my Ranger once.

        Once.

        • 0 avatar

          I had a couple friends ride in the back of my Ranger and not even notice that it had jump seats. They just leaned against the side. (I had an extended cab, but it didn’t have the rear doors, so the jump seats were against the side. They were on the back on models with the doors).

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      JimZ,
      I’d agree with you regarding the Frontier selling on price. We had a similar situation here with the Nissan Navara (Frontier) it was selling on price.

      The new Navara is a couple of generations in front in vehicle refinement, except the pricing is slotted in between the Ranger and Colorado. This has cost the Navara sales.

      Mitsubishi also came out with a new pickup around the same time as the Navara, except Mitsubishi kept a lid on it’s pricing and had not lost sales like the new Navara had.

      • 0 avatar
        formula m

        Is Mercedes still coming out with a pickup truck based off the Navara?.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          fromula m,
          Yes, there is supposed to be an AMG version as well which will sell in Australia for AUD$80 000 or around USD$55 000 – $60 000.

          Here’s a link.

          http://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/mercedesbenz-ute-to-be-the-most-powerful-in-its-class-20150723-gij4kq.html

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @ Formula m to add to Big Al from Oz’s comments,there is a Renault version,called the Alaskan, to be sold mainly in Latin America, where Renault is strong. PSA, is getting into the Pickup business using a derivative of the Toyota Hilux

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I test drove a ’16 SV Crewcab (Auto, 4wd) at a local dealer this spring, and really liked it. Has a bit of a rugged old school feel to it, but with the latest updates to the HVAC/center stack it is very usable and decent to look at IMO. Very functional interior overall. Rear legroom was bit bit lacking in terms of fitting car seats, but they work for adults in a pinch, even for several hour trips I think. In SV guise with regular non-AT tires and suspension, it rode very well, much better than a Pro-4X Xterra I tested out the previous fall. Xterra was pitching around and bottoming out on its soft rear leaf springs. Frontier benefits from a stiffer leaf pack and longer wheelbase, and the SV probably had different shock valving, and more compliant tires. Awesome power from the 4.0L, transmission shifted predictably and well. 6spd manual is a riot in these things (judging by the Xterra unit). Sure MPG probably stinks but there’s something to be said about a well sorted, unapologetically torquey V6 hooked up to a simple 5 speed automatic that isn’t shifting every second. Refreshing in the age of Atkinson cycle Tacomas and 3.6L Colorados.

    I didn’t end up haggling seriously so I’m not exactly sure of what kind of deal you could get on one, but my overall impression of the vehicle itself was very positive.

    • 0 avatar
      cgjeep

      Funny, I likes the ride/handling of the Tacoma over the 4 Runner as well. I’ll have to go check a Frontier out. They don’t hold their value nearly as well as a Toyota so should be a good used buy.

      • 0 avatar
        Ltd1983

        I came really close to buying a Frontier/Tacoma last month, but way too strong resale on all pickups right now (cheap gas, short memory…), it was a no go. Frontiers with well over 100k mi are still in the mid teens, even moderately optioned ones that weren’t too much over 20 new.

        The Tacoma is just so damn appealing as a rock solid package, but I do think the Frontier has a much better interior/driving experience. Seating position, dash design, packaging, etc, is all in the Frontier’s favor IMO.

      • 0 avatar
        dukeisduke

        When I bought my ’13 Tacoma, I didn’t even really consider a Frontier. I’d ridden in a Frontier, and wasn’t impressed with the cramped rear seat (the back doors are like vertical mail slots) and the ride. With the Tacoma (1GR-FE V6), I get 16-17mpg, and it has decent rear seat room, even for adults.

        My roofing contractor just bought a Titan XD with the Cummins diesel, and loves it. He gets 16 around town, and 21 or more on the highway. He lives out in the country (new house on 35 acres), and commutes 50 miles each way to his office, plus driving to jobsites to supervise work, and to bid on jobs.

        Interestingly, he said that the Titan XD gets the same mileage around town as his previous truck, a four-cylinder Frontier.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I do not like that 4.0. It’s rough and loud, and seriously nets you V8 Suburban mileage (Source: my mom’s former Pathfinder). And you win without AT tires, because it rides like a damn tractor if it has them.

      The good thing about this, is nobody can tell how old your Frontier is, so find a tidy old one and boom – brand new car.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Didn’t realize the Xterra was so valuable these days.

      https://cincinnati.craigslist.org/cto/5624975453.html

      LOL

  • avatar
    TDIGuy

    Ugh, these video ads. Why would I care how much money Trump spent on his campaign? I’m not even American. How does that generate revenue, anyways? Worse yet, the video reactivated and started playing with the volume on when I passed over it, even though another application was open over top.

    The latest trick is I’ve noticed the controls to stop the playback are sometimes not even there.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    A colleague ditched his early 80s Toyota pickup (4×4, manual everything, owned since new) for a brand new crew cab 4×4 low option Frontier.

    It was a little bit of a surprise to me because of how much he loved his Toyota. Apparently “value” spoke louder than anything else to him.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Hardly surprising, since your colleague probably paid an inflation adjusted high-teens low-$20k for the Toyota back in the day rather than the $30k they want for a Crewcab Tacoma 4wd these days. $21-22k is about what you can buy a ‘S’ trim Frontier Crewcab 4wd for if you shop around. Of course the Frontier will have a 260+hp V6, automatic transmission, air conditioning, and be much more rust-proof :p

  • avatar
    Fred

    First Honda, now Nissan…maybe it’s the price of full size trucks that have folks looking else where. Especially those who only want a truck as a hardware store runner second vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Why do you suspect full size trucks are losing to these? Ford’s F-150 showed impressive gains last month, for example. Its trucks in general that are on the rise. Maybe the buyer’s other choice was a car or CUV/SUV, not another pickup, but due to low gas prices, bought a Frontier over an Altima or something.

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        We are not talking big numbers here. I know in my case I bought a full size truck because the price differential wasn’t that much. Then when I went to replace it the differences was quite a bit more.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Well for everyone who says trucks have gotten to pricey , too fancy, to big this is your truck, brand new and just like you remember when a honest pickup truck was just a truck.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      The S trim doesn’t even have standard A/C, which is something special these days. It reminds me of the old ’91 Dodge RAM 50 I drove when I was going to school. It really is a no-frills truck in the base trim with the 5 speed.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Are you sure? All of the ’16 S trim trucks I’m seeing for sale have A/C. Likewise the Versa S sedan got standard AC when it was moved off of the Renault-shared flatform in ’12. A win for cheapskates everywhere!

        • 0 avatar
          brettc

          Yep, just built one on Nissan’s site and actually found some A/C-less 2016s on autotrader. A/C and a radio with Bluetooth is a $1200 option (preferred package). It looks like without getting the preferred package, it might not even have a radio.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      I wanted a midsize crew cab, but the extra cab, fullsize pickups were about the same price, before rebates, but included a V8. You gotta be dead set on a midsize pickup for one to make sense.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        If you play in coastal cities and their parking structures, fullsizers are often clumsily large, unless you need the space. Even with the SUV/CUV craze contributing to raising the “press to take ticket and open gate” button, you’re still falling out of your full sizers window to reach somewhere down there. Then find that only the “compact” parking spots are left not taken, so you need to back in, etc….

        It still mostly works, although I have a friend who was turned away by a San Francisco parking structure attendant in his extened cab Tundra, because of “No crewcabs.” But you never get the impression the hammer you brought, is really the right tool for the current job at hand.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          It’s unclear what beef a parking garage would have with “crew cabs”. What’s “legroom” got to do with anything?

          There’s 6 inches added width, vs midsize offerings. So you take up the entire width of the space and fold the mirrors. So what?
          It’s the same thing with Tahoes, Expeditions and such. Coastal communities and parking structures may not love them, but there’s room for them, along with fullsize pickups.

          • 0 avatar
            stuki

            I thought the whole “crew cab” thingy was crazy as well. Especially on a Toyota, where the actual outside dimensions of crew, extended and regular are all the same. I’m sure it’s some sort of backhanded way of saying “no personal use pickups,” but tradesmen (in reg cabs) are OK. Funny thing, my friend was very much a tradesman, bringing a lighting setup to shoot a video for one of the companies in the building……. But hey, it’s San Francisco 2016. The added costs that stem from harassing some chump who have to work for a living, is pretty insignificant next to the billions a week of IPO windfalls, that keep raining from the sky like men in the Castro.

            Full sizers, aside from the very rare reg cab 6.5 bed ones, are a bit of a pain in tight cities, though. Like you say, you CAN work around it. Parking lots are technically sized to accommodate a 230 by 80 by 78 vehicle with a 48″ turning radius, as it’s been the standard workman’s vehicle size in America for basically ever. But in tight spaces, it’s much simpler, quicker and often less stressful, to drive something smaller, unless you need the space the larger envelope provides much of the time.

  • avatar
    brettc

    With this wonderful news, is it time to bring back Suzuki and the Equator from the dead? Ridgeline looks like a nice truck, but $38k for an optioned up unit (as found at the local $1000 in add-on fees Honda dealer) is nuts.

    Looks like the Frontier starts at $18290. That’s not bad at all for the capability to haul things, which is what trucks are supposed to do primarily. All the air-hauling posers can just buy a Frontier and be done with it and save money in the process. Win-win.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      For another truly obscure truck, how about a Mitsubishi Raider pickup (2005-2009) Dakota based with available V8.

      • 0 avatar
        gearhead77

        They could barely give them away when they were discontinued, even at fire-sale prices. I haven’t seen on in a long time and in cheapo Pittsburgh, there were a few examples floating around. Suzuki Equator too.

    • 0 avatar
      TDIGuy

      “is it time to bring back Suzuki and the Equator from the dead?”

      Don’t know if you were intending it this way, but for a while the Equator was a rebadged Nissan. In its last year of sales, it was something like the second worst selling vehicle in Canada, mainly because it was more expensive than the Nissan.

      (For the curious, the worst selling vehicle that year was the Kia Borrego, which sold 11, IIRC)

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    While easily the better value, pound for pound, the current generation Frontier never offered a regular cab. Now that all its competition either dropped or never offered a regular cab. it’s an even, or evener playing field, at least in that respect.

  • avatar
    Macca

    Elongated Hiatus is the name of my Pearl Jam cover band.

    The cab on these is surprisingly airy and open – thanks to the pillars that are thinner than most econo cars today.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Having owned a 2011 Frontier CC 6MT for 17 months….I can say there is a reason they have the lowest price. They are awful.

    Worst front seat I have ever owned. 100 miles is all I could stand or sit in it. 19 mpg city or highway. I can go on but won’t.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      It doesn’t look comfortable at all, but it’s definitely cheap. You get what you pay for, most of the time.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      “19 mpg city or highway. I can go on but won’t.”

      Reminds me of my ’93 Toy extra-cab PU. 4WD/V6-5sp. Didn’t matter city or highway. Got the same mileage (19-20). Only vehicle I’ve ever owned where your mileage wasn’t any better on a road trip than driving around town.

    • 0 avatar
      Goatshadow

      I would offer to trade, as that is exactly the model Frontier I want, but I doubt you would want my Jeep. 13mpg, uncomfortable, poor visibility, roof is leaking right now while it rains… I can go on but won’t.

  • avatar
    gearhead77

    Not everyone needs or wants an F-150, Silverado or Ram for everyday living. Even the Colorado/Canyon twins are really large. A crew cab short-box 4×4 Canyon was parked next to a 2010-ish Tahoe Hybrid in a parking lot and they damn well had the same footprint.

    I’m not a hauler, off roader and I don’t tow. But to have a truck to go to the big box store, put bikes in,etc. is very appealing. But not at the price and size of today’s trucks. Part of the reason Ranger died was because Ford put all its efforts into F-150. By the end, the Ranger was still largely the same since the mid 90’s refresh, but had the V6 had the fuel economy of a V8. And they were almost as expensive as an F-150 in top trims(before discounts), so why not buy an F-150?

    I love the simple 2wd Toyotas before they became Tacomas. And we had two Rangers in our family, an 88 V6 2wd supercab which I learned to drive a manual transmission and a 94 regular cab. Before the 88. my Dad had a ’78 Toyota Hilux he used for years. A local Dodge dealer recently had an 89 Dakota longbed 2wd with a stick and no air, with only 90k. 3k they wanted, truck was clean for living in western PA. And if I had the room and extra cash, I’d have it.

    The Ridgeline is appealing, but I’m not totally loving the way our ’14 Odyssey has aged or the way the V6/6spd does business. And 35k means it would need to be an Odyssey replacement, not the occasional toy/ fourth car. I had a Frontier briefly as a rental 6 years ago and it was rather crude, but amusing. The torque of the V6 was great. Not for me, the whole package, but I can see the appeal.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      This is me too, which is why I hang onto my 2002 Dakota Quad Cab, short bed with the 4.7 V8. It tows great and fits in my garage, can’t do that with the current crop of full sized or mid-sized trucks.

      Now what if Nissan put a supercharger back into the Frontier like they did years ago? It could also use a 6 speed auto as the current model only has a 5 speed.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Why can’t you fit a current midsizer in your garage? The Colorado is 212.7″ long and the Tacoma 212.3″ to the Dakota’s 218″.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          He put in a work bench or washer/dryer set, the house wasn’t designed for.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            When the house was designed also has a big impact on the size of the garage, as does the general size and cost of the house.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s the 1st thing I look at. Chicks can have their kitchen and baths, I want the perfect garage.

          • 0 avatar
            ptschett

            There are a lot of tiny garages out there. When I moved to Fargo I passed up several townhomes and apartments because their alleged 2-car garages were too small for my normal-sized car (’96 Thunderbird) and midsize pickup (’05 Dakota) to simultaneously occupy. Even the place that I chose to go with has garages that will fit some but not all typical extended/crew-cab short-box full-size pickups (new Ram 1500s will fit if the owner doesn’t expect to put anything between the pickup & the wall, but Chevys and Fords are a little bit too long to be able to close the garage door.)

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Town houses and apartments seem to have no minimum requirements. They probably allow it if they don’t call it a “garage” at all. Like a tool shed.

            But for most homes, they’ll fit, but really tight. Almost not worth doing unless the pickup has the 2-car garage to itself.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    My Sister has one that is approaching 100k and has been bulletproof. When it comes to an occasionally used work truck, newer and maybe better doesn’t justify the extra cost to accomplish the same thing.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    I had a 2103 Crew Cab “S” trim 2WD Frontier up until last November when it gave way to the F150. I paid like 23k out the door but the last time I looked most of the incentives that had made it so cheap were gone. It was a good honest truck BUT it had some annoyances. First if you crawled on your knees in the bed the floor would flex and in a couple cases it dented. No BS…it dented from my knees but a bedliner took care of that. Next, mine was a base “S” model 2WD. Like 23k out the door for a crew cab. Problem is Nissan wanted you to remember you cheaped out. There were ugly switch blanks EVERYWHERE. I actually went so far as getting some of the trim bits from an early model to get rid of them which made me wonder why Nissan didn’t except to be like old school Porsche and remind you that you cheaped out in the ugliest way possible. Then there was the 17 MPG I averaged over ownership. My F150 does better than that. Then there was the interior would scratch or gouge if you looked at it funny. Lastly the front Fascia was a different shade of red then the rest of the truck. It had never been wrecked and I saw it come off the truck…had 3 miles at delivery but it wasn’t even close…I mean it looked like a Delorean it was so far off the rest of the body. Still at the price I forgave it. Problem is most of those flaws were there on the 23k base truck or the pushes 40k Pro 4X models. Pre 2k10 models also had some transmission issues from the transcooler cracking ant antifreeze getting in to the transmission. All in all though I liked it and I felt like it was mechanically solid…like it was going to be one of those 80’s style trucks where the body looked like crap and the interior was utterly shot but still going strong at 300k.

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    Bring back the Hardbody! *ducks out of room*

  • avatar
    TOTitan

    I picked up a low mileage 2011 Pro4x CC for my daughter a year and a half ago for just 24K. She lives on a farm and does herding on the weekends. For her needs it is perfect. With the locking diff and skid plates she takes it through steep rough terrain all the time and has never even come close to getting stuck. The QC is not bad and getting a Pro4X so cheap has been a good move.

  • avatar
    Oberkanone

    Where is the D23? In 2015 sales began of new design of Nissan Frontier / Navarra. I drove one last week in Aruba. Why is Nissan still selling the old version here in USA?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Oberkanone,
      The US could have the new Navara/Frontier as it’s being made in several factories outside of the US.

      The drawback for these entering the US market is the Chicken Tax which is a 25% tax on all imported pickups into the US making the imported pickups less competitive. What’s has occurred in the US vs the global market is the US market is a smaller market, so Nissan US has less money to spend overall investing to build the new pickup. The money went in the direction of the Titan, which is quite restricted due to only the V8 Cummins diesel coming on line so far. Poor choice by Nissan. Maybe Nissan would of been better off introducing the new Navara/Frontier first.

      But, hey, who’s at the helm of Nissan US pickup division? A full size fan. Well he got it wrong. Maybe this decision to run with the XD diesel Titan first is why Diaz has been moved from running Nissan’s US pickup operation.

      The D23 Navara is light years in front of the old D40.

      It is more refined than the current US Colorado/Canyon, even with the Navara’s 2 400lb payload and coil sprung assend. Nice vehicle with massive potential, even Mercedes Benz is going to use the new Navara’s chassis for it’s up and coming pickup.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Ummmmm, or you can wait a year…this New Navarra you speak of IS the 2018 Frontier. So much for your chicken tax chicken crap.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAFO – The “payload” you quote isn’t compatible. Our payload figures include an extra cab and an actual bed, not a regular cab, stripper *cab-n-chassis*.

        In case you didn’t know, the heavier the truck is (optioned), the less “payload” you’ll have.

        Further, OZ regulators or as close as you can get to a US DOT *equivalent*, simply leave it up to the sense of humour of the pickup maker’s marketing arm, for OZ, SE Asia and Africa markets.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    If we’re really, really quiet, we won’t awaken the Australian chapter of SPaM, the Small Pickup Mafia.

  • avatar
    DownUnder2014

    I must say, I wouldn’t mind a base Crew Cab V6 w/ Manual for 23k or so. That actually sounds like decent value, even if the current-gen D40 Frontier is a bit long in the tooth.

    The current-gen D23 doesn’t come with a V6 of any kind at all in Australia. The old-gen D40s had both a Petrol and Diesel V6 (along with 4-Cylinder Diesels) available here.

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