By on July 27, 2016

Ford Transit Courier, Image: Ford of Europe

Have you ever sat in a Ford Transit Connect and said to yourself, “Gosh, I like this, but it’s just so darn big!“? Well, if Ford’s latest trademark filings are any indication, the Blue Oval might soon have exactly what you’re looking for.

According to the United States Patent and Trademark Office, Ford filed trademark applications for two names — “Transit Courier” and “Courier” — on July 22, 2016, hinting at possible Fiesta-based, B-segment vans for North America.

Ford Transit Courier USPTO

In Europe, the Transit Courier exists in multiple guises: as a panel van called Transit Courier, as a commercial passenger vehicle called Transit Courier Kombi, and as a non-commercial passenger van called Tourneo Courier. Additionally, Ford of Europe markets a three-door Fiesta without rear glass, simply named Fiesta Van.

Ford Courier USPTO

Courier, without a Transit prefix, was a Fiesta-based pickup sold in South America until 2013. Before that, Ford used the Courier name domestically when rebadging Mazda pickups. That Ford Courier was replaced by the Ford Ranger in 1983, but the name lived on in other markets.

According to Ford’s North American product communications manager, Mike Levine, the automaker does not “speculate about future products” and trademark filings are “part of our normal course of business.”

“The best-selling Transit Connect small van is available in a choice of short and long wheelbases to help customers find the best size to meet their needs,” Levine said. “There are no current plans to offer a smaller van below Transit Connect.”

Ford has taken the commercial van market by the horns since releasing an onslaught of new product in the segment over the last few years.

It began with Ford importing the first-generation Transit Connect from Turkey, with all vehicles fitted with rear seats when they came through U.S. Customs to avoid the 25-percent “chicken tax” applied to commercial vehicles. U.S. Customs slapped Ford on the wrist for the practice and the automaker moved production to Spain for the second-generation van.

Ford didn’t stop there. The automaker began selling larger Transits domestically, a common sight in Europe, to replace the aging E-Series/Econoline van range. The E-Series is now built solely as a chassis cab model.

[Image: Ford of Europe]

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44 Comments on “Ford Files Trademark Applications for ‘Transit Courier’ and ‘Courier’ in U.S....”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    It’s ironic that Ford couldn’t build a decent minivan to save their life, yet they own the commercial small van market.

    ‘Courier’ was – and is – a good name. VW could learn a lesson here.

    • 0 avatar
      Higheriq

      They couldn’t build a decent minivan (Freestar) so it was discontinued – but now they do.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      SCE to AUX,
      Even outside of the US Ford wasn’t reknown for vans other than the Transit.

      Ford outside of the US has always had the Transit since the name changes from the Thames. The Thames was a small van.

      Ford has always made relatively popular small vans outside of the US, but not people movers.

      Ford did sell Mazda based E Series, ie, E2000 (petrol) and E2200 (a Mazda built Perkins diesel) People Mover as we call them to compete against the Tarago in the 80s.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    The larger Transit isn’t imported into the US. It’s made here.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    OK Ford, you were doing well in the van market – but this is a bridge too far. I highly doubt that the local small businesses with short wheelbase Transit Connects are thinking that they’re too damn big.

    • 0 avatar
      Roberto Esponja

      +1

      • 0 avatar
        SlowMyke

        I think Ford is aiming for businesses that want a utility minded company vehicle but don’t necessarily need a big van or truck. This strikes me as a business, non-hybrid cmax. It’ll be pretty cheap, pretty efficient, and able to carry a decent amount of stuff.

        I like it and would like to check out the non-commercial version due to a couple upcoming family additions. If only the wife could see past the stigma of sliding doors.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      “Transit” Courier equals PT Cruiser????????????

      Or perhaps a Vulpine specific Transit Connect based pickup trucklet?

    • 0 avatar
      Stevo

      We have Transits for our engineers (commercial prop management), and even some old Astros. This would be small enough to allow a ladder rack on the vehicle and not be too tall for garages. In urban management that matters. Can’t wait to see one if they come here.

    • 0 avatar
      Ltd1983

      Plenty of local companies (office supply, home health providers, surveyors, etc) around here use Toyota Matrixes, Chevrolet HHRs, or PT Cruisers with logo wrapped back windows as tiny work “vans”.

      One of the biggest HVAC companies in town uses an almost exclusively Ford fleet, with dozens of C-Maxes for inspections/sales, and Transit Connects for hauling/work. I guarantee they’d buy some Couriers for light duty work and save $8k off a C-Max.

  • avatar

    The Fiesta Van would be an awesome vehicle for delivering pizzas.

  • avatar
    Troggie42

    I wonder… What if they were considering building the Courier as a ute, but not Fiesta based as in the past, but on the Transit Connect platform? I mean, I’d find one of those pretty neato, myself. Probably won’t happen, though. America doesn’t get utes. Last time they tried, an entire brand vaporized. :(

  • avatar
    ajla

    I’m a huge fan of the Transit Connect Wagon, but it really needs to offer the 2.0T.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Now all we need is the mid-size Transit Custom and the lineup will be complete. Oh, and Ram’s full-size van should’ve been the Iveco Daily, not the Fiat Ducato.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I actually saw a brand new RV made from a RAM Ducato City Sprint XL, and that looked pretty good.

      http://liveimages.editorial.carsales.com.au/caravancamping/general/editorial/ge5523396064674642326.jpg

      Looked just like that, in silver.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Drzhivago138 – agreed. I’ve seen a few Iveco Daily 4×4 camper vans passing through town with EU plates. They are definitely an addition to my fantasy garage.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Not that the Ducato-based ProMaster is a bad vehicle, but in the rest of the world, the FWD Ducato competes with the FWD Transit Custom and the RWD Daily competes with the RWD Transit.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Drzhivago138 – I’m puzzled by the fact that FCA brought the Ducato to North America and not the Daily. I rarely ever see ProMaster vans on the road. Commercial buyers tend to be conservative. I see plenty of Transits and to a lesser degree Mercedes Sprinters. The Nissan vans have a greater presence than the ProMaster.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            I see a lot of ProMasters. This year in the US, FCA has sold more ProMasters than Mercedes has Sprinters and Metrises combined.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Lou,

            Your local dealer must be lazy. I see lots of them on the other coast. It’s second to the Transit, about as common as the Sprinter (which has been around much longer).

            A couple of local dealers have gone all-in on them, which explains their local popularity.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            The US Postal Service is using them around here.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Selling more than last place Mercedes isn’t really a big feat. Fact is Ford owns the van market with near 55% of the segment, GM is in a distant second place with a little more than ~20% and Chrysler even further out at ~11% while Nissan and Mercedes doing 8% and 7% respectively.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            I don’t think my local dealer is lazy. It is more likely a case of distrust for large commercial front drive vans holding up on logging roads. They sell quite a few 4500 – 5500 commercial HD trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      CoreyDL,
      We have lots of those Fiat Ducato and Iveco RVs here in Australia. They do look okay. I see them on a daily basis. I seen a few with tandem rear axles as well.

      What I like is the Iveco 4×4 truck. Its around the size of a HD, but seems more capable off road. They cost roughly the same as a Toyota Landcruiser.

      My gripe will be the engine is only a 3 litre diesel. This will work off road, but on road I think a few more ftlbs of torque would make it a nicer vehicle.

      http://motoring.li.csnstatic.com/motoring/general/editorial/ge5312300281735457825.jpg

  • avatar
    tylanner

    Fiesta XLT….sign me up…..as long as they’ve sharpened their pencil on the notoriously problematic PowerShift transmission.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Looks like a good fit for Center City, which has many old, narrow streets with limited parking (which means lots of double parking).

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Frend–

      Whenever I proceed into the Centre of City in my Country, I do see lot’s of cars parked to and fro, amongst them are double parking and also parallels (I know Americans like this kind, ha ha!).

      It seems like many times there is a Center City which was not contemplation of such a high volume of Ford, Dacia, and also Lada vehicles all in one locale. But we have to remind us, “Hey Grango – this City is many more decade old than such a modern car with airbag and mobile Bluetooths. There were traveling with pony and little wooden cart, like Cinderella’s time.”

      Anyway, this type of situation where you do remind me of above is for one where you might find a good use for an extra smaller type of Transit Curry like in a photo there.

      Between Fiesta and Currier, it seems like Ford’s theme might be headed toward an international food market, ha ! They even have that King’s Ranch (dressing) for more typical American flavours.

      Maybe though it is a better idea than some word which has no meaning of food or flavor like the Citroen Berlingo. That’s another van-utilize with capacity and a shape, a shape like a melty Lava Lamp I think.

      Best Regarding’ King Ranch Patnah’ (like Johnathan Wayne)

      -Grango Relago

  • avatar
    strafer

    possible replacement for old Elements…

  • avatar
    Joss

    Fleet operators and a Fiesta Courier with DCT. Wonder how well that will work out?


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