By on June 10, 2016

GM Canada Technical Centre

General Motors Canada announced today, along with Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Ontario Premier Kathleen Wynne, that it will bolster engineering and software development efforts in Canada with a 700-job strong hiring initiative.

The work in question will focus on autonomous driving software and controls, connected vehicle tech, active safety and vehicle dynamics technology.

In addition, Mark Reuss, GM’s Executive Vice President of Global Product Development, Purchasing and Supply Chain, announced a new Automotive Software Development Center in Markham, Ontario, as the Oshawa Tech Center is already bursting at the seams.

Today’s announcement shouldn’t be viewed as a General Motors initiative with the support of the Canadian and Ontario governments, but a push by the Liberals to make Canada “the most inviting jurisdiction on the planet for transformative innovation,” starting with General Motors, said Trudeau.

“In choosing Canada to be the home base for its Global Centre for Advanced Vehicle Software development, GM is affirming the skills, the ingenuity and the immense potential of Canada’s workers.”

Canada is a hotbed of tech research and development. Silicon Valley continues to pluck talented people from Ontario, the University of Waterloo is one of the top STEM universities in North America, and Canada has already played host to the incubation of numerous technologies found on the Chevy Bolt.

However, with Oshawa Assembly hanging in limbo and Unifor threatening to strike over a lack of production mandates, the announcement arrives at an interesting time.

Engineers cost good money no matter where you go. Conversely, an army of factory workers do not — and it’s easy to see the manufacturers understand the arithmetic quite well. Eight plants have opened in Mexico over the last eight years while Canada has lost two.

But as Trudeau said in his closing remarks, “today’s announcement is not an endpoint.”

Despite a lack of production mandates beyond 2017, GM Canada won’t abandon manufacturing in Ontario. Based on the language used, it sounds like automotive manufacturing in Ontario will stick around, albeit with a far different face to it.

“It’s absolutely encouraging, this is GM saying that they have a long-term commitment to Canada,” said Jerry Dias, National President of Unifor.

“Obviously our expectation would be that the technology developed is going to be used in their [GM] Canadian manufacturing, which will include and must include Oshawa. I view this [announcement] as an incredible positive.”

On the surface, it seems GM will look to shift its Ontario manufacturing focus towards high dollar, high margin products like connected, autonomous, alternative propulsion cars.

The higher margins and sale prices help mask the higher manufacturing costs, while satisfying the Liberals’ image goals for the Ontario workforce.

“There’s no question that I’m expecting they [GM] have large hopes for their Canadian plants,” Dias continued when asked exactly that.

“I mean, the facilities here in Oshawa do everything right — it has an incredible paint shop, capacity, we win all the quality awards, we’re the most productive plant they have in their chain — so the stars are aligned for us to get a product.”

Manufacturing, which has long been declining in Canada, remains one of Ontario’s key sectors, employing 750,000 workers. It is a sector neither the Federal or Provincial governments are interested in abandoning. However, with pressure from lower cost regions quickly siphoning off capacity, Canada’s auto sector must adapt.

With today’s announcement, GM is effectively choosing Canada to serve as its global homeroom for advanced vehicle development — and that’s a very good thing.

[Image: © 2016 Michael Accardi/GMInsideNews]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

70 Comments on “GM Effectively Names Canada its Global Homeroom for Advanced Vehicle Development...”


  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    This is factually incorrect.

    Anyone who knows anything of substance about GM knows that the massive 330 acre, Warren, Michigan Technical Center (that has 22,000 GM engineers, scientists, and other employees) is not only the nucleus of GLOBAL platform engineering AND powertrain development for Chevrolet, GMC, Buick and Cadillac, but also knows that the Warren Technical Center is where GM’s most proprietary labs and R&D facilities for electric and hydrogen powertrain development exist.

    In fact, GM does highly classified Department of Defense work at the Warren Technical Center, and it’s categorized as a strategic complex by the U.S. Government.

    If anyone is ever in that area, try and get into the facility without a clearance.

    This announcement of a token Canadian facility to placate CAW manufacturing job losses as some sort of “global homeroom” is farcical.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      “GM is effectively choosing Canada to serve as its global homeroom for advanced vehicle development”

      Lolololol

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        On a real estate scouting project, the pension fund behind the commercial real estate proposal flew us by helicopter near the GM Tech Center, but we could not fly over it (or within a certain radius) because of “government restrictions.”

        Even viewing it from the air not remotely directly over it, it’s massive, and there are cranes everywhere but,ding new buildings there (GM announced 1.4 billion in renovations to it).

        They had an explosion there last year at an advanced sodium or hydrogen battery laboratory (a “small” 120 million dollar advanced battery research free standing building according to the Detroit News, one of many such facilities on that complex).

        I’m no fan of GM, but that is one impressive and massive facility.

        They filmed part of the last Transformers movie in the current design center there (and they are building a brand new design center there now; I could see parts of the foundation being put in from the air).

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          It’s a huge and impressive facility. It even dwarfs Warren Tank. I’ve poured a lot of concrete in there.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            On top of that, within a 5 mile radius of the GM Technical Center, there’s the massive TACOM, Navistar (14 mile incubator), BAE’s humongous R&D building and facility and 80 acre armored land vehicle test loop/obstacle course (15 1/2 Van Dyke), General Dynamics Land Systems (16 & Mound), Ford’s Sterling Heights Trim & Stamping (18 & Van Dyke), FCA’s massive factory at 15 & Van Dyke (where RAM & Jeep production will replace 200 production), Faurecia, TRW, etc.

            The section of Van Dyke and Mound Roads between I-696 and 18 Mile Roads probably has among the most highly advanced GM, FCA, Ford, etc., and classified (TACOM, General Dynamics, BAE Land Systems) concentrated area of facilities outside of the Maryland-Virginia-D.C. Beltway.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            DW its just Skynet, ignore it.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “The section of Van Dyke and Mound Roads between I-696 and 18 Mile Roads probably has among the most highly advanced GM, FCA, Ford, etc., and classified (TACOM, General Dynamics, BAE Land Systems) concentrated area of facilities outside of the Maryland-Virginia-D.C. Beltway.”

            Feh, nothing but a bunch of hillbilly flyover country sh*tkickers.

            /s

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Norm’s energy project got the green light apparently.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          GM has world class engineering. Their problems lie in completely dysfunctional marketing and also somewhat in misguided product decisions (which are ultimately tied into poor marketing and business departments that don’t know what vehicles to tell the engineers to build).

        • 0 avatar
          toplessFC3Sman

          Was it the Warren Tech Center that you couldn’t fly over, or the US Army TACOM facility a block to the south that was the reason for the radius and restrictions?

          I agree, its a fantastic campus – I’ve worked there for a few years now. I’m currently being moved to Pontiac – GM’s actions imply that connected, autonomous vehicle tech is more worthy of the nicer campus and investments than engine & transmission research.

        • 0 avatar
          mustang462002

          **eating popcorn**

          Great info.

    • 0 avatar

      “In choosing Canada to be the homebase for its Global Centre for Advanced Vehicle Software development, GM is affirming the skills, the ingenuity and the immense potential of Canada’s workers.” – Justin Trudeau

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        Leaving out “software” from the headline seems like a big deal.

        So they’re basically going to stick a bunch of antisocial software engineers in a building in Ottawa to “make up” for shuttering Oshawa Assembly. Nice.

    • 0 avatar
      Freddie

      But how much engineering is done at Warren vs. Opel or GM Korea? If the window sticker had a “domestic engineering content” percentage, what would it say for a Cruze, an Impala, a Tahoe?

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        A huge % of GM’s engineering for all global platforms is done at the Warren Technical Center.

        There is one building alone (out of nearly 50) that is one million square feet that was completed in 2005 at a cost of 480 million USD where they literally have a satellite linked “engineering war room” where they can talk in real time time with their engineering counterparts in China, South Korea, Europe, India or South or Central America.

        There was a test track we could see from the air where we could also see odd-shaped vehicles running around in slow loops. This was from probably fro. 1 1/2 miles away due east.

        When you’re even 1,000 feet in the air, you can see a long distance.

        There are lakes and ponds all over that campus, as well as what appeared to be 100,000 vehicles parked all over, also.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          All that and their biggest successes are basically 1980’s tech. You just can’t say Gummint Motors enough.

          • 0 avatar
            Joss

            +1. How much is stats and how much is quality engineering? North Korea can pull off impressive “to look ats.”

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            GM has their best engineers, of every race and even nationality, working at the Warren Technical Center.

            They even have research engineers fly in and GM puts them up at the Townsend and other expensive hotels for months at a time.

            There are facilities at Warren Tech Center that are not available anywhere else.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            What do they get out of all that capable of selling even half as well as the Silverado?

            Not snarking, seriously curious. Silverado outsells every Japanese “appliance” car I’ve looked up.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            The Silverado/Sierra, all truck chassis, all SUV platforms, all passenger car (sedan, two door, hatchback) platforms, all electric and hybrid vehicle platforms, as well as all powertrains are developed at the Warren GM Tech Center, no matter where manufacturing of those platforms, motors and transmissions take place.

            Ed Welburn, who is retiring, and who oversaw design of the C7 Vette, 6G Camaro, and some of GM’s best concepts (including the Elmiraj and Avenir) is staying on post retirement just to help with the design of the new, massive design studio now being built at the Tech Center.

            “Before shifting gears to “retirement” on July 1, Welburn plans to travel to the automaker’s global design studios in Australia, South Korea, China, Germany and other countries. He also plans to ship his silver Chevrolet Corvette C7 Z06 to Rome for an epic road trip to “key places” in Europe, including the Le Mans and Goodwood race tracks.”

            “To be able to drive a car of your own design on a trip like that will be really cool,” he said.
            The automaker’s global design footprint is one of the legacies Welburn will leave behind — not to mention decades of car and truck designs that ranged from the Buick Riviera and Park Avenue in the 1970s to concepts like the 2013 Cadillac Elmiraj and 2015 Buick Avenir.”

            http://www.detroitnews.com/story/business/autos/general-motors/2016/04/08/gm-design-head-ed-welburn-draws-busy-plans-retirement/82817294/

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “What do they get out of all that capable of selling even half as well as the Silverado?”

            what does that have to do with anything? Trucks are selling like gangbusters because gas is cheap. How does that in any way impugn their engineering abilities?

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            ” How does that in any way impugn their engineering abilities?”

            Not at all my intent. I don’t know squat about engineering. It just reminds me of the DHS’ big Fusion Center stand-ups of 10-12 years ago.

            How much full-spectrum dominance in global engineering does it take to keep selling pickups and BOF SUVs?

            I’m guessing there’s a rest-of-the-iceberg element to this for military R&D which is awesome and admirable in its own right.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            are you implying that “no engineering” goes into those products? Plus, they *have* to have advanced products, even if they’re slow selling today. Gas ain’t going to be cheap forever, and when it spikes again they’d better have something more desirable to sell this time than the Cobalt.

            “I don’t know squat about engineering.”

            that much is certain. But, Internet People love to talk about what they think is “good engineering” with no grounding in reality. There are people who think Audi’s massively overthought, failure prone timing chain designs on their V6 and V8 engines is “good engineering.” ‘cos they apparently think “engineering” is all about making things as complex as possible.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            I’m just curious as to what civilian product is out there now as the culmination of this massive capability. The Volt?

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “I’m just curious as to what civilian product is out there now as the culmination of this massive capability. The Volt?”

            How about all 41 nameplates they sell? Even with shared resources like platforms and powertrains, that’s a lot of products to design and sell.

            Plus there are large groups working on stuff which is 5-10 years out.

            I seriously can’t understand why you find this so difficult to grasp. It’s like you seem to think they can just have a bunch of interns phoning it in for trucks which have “no engineering” in your mind, while the bulk of those massive resources are just working on stuff like the Volt and Bolt. Which is utter nonsense.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Right, high margin but low resale products, like the ELR, Regal, and ATS. Unless Canada is getting a truck plant, its not gonna succeed in this regard.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Canada ain’t getting the ATS. Lansing has all the Alpha products on lockdown. Oldsmobile City FTW.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Canuckistan dodged a bullet then because ATS has largely been a disaster.

        They either get a truck plant for long term sustainability or this is just GM throwing money at Canada until such time as GM gives Ottawa the finger.

        • 0 avatar
          derekson

          It’s pretty clearly the latter.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          I can’t see them getting trucks though. Flint is getting half ton production to go with their HD production. Ft Wayne is chugging along as well.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            If we are talking high volume product with nice margin to absorb CAW costs, it has to be trucks. Seriously whatever stillborn Cadillac or low volume Opel du jour RenCen has in the offing will not cut it.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          The ATS Lansing facility is pretty advanced (despite the ATS’s numerous issues, its chassis is not one of them) and now produces the new Camaro on the same line (since it’s on the same chassis), which is of tremendous help to those employees as they had shut ATS lines down from 3 to 1 due to poor ATS sales.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It’s ATS, CTS, and Camaro. I’d rather be down the road at the Delta Township plant churning out the Traverse, Acadia, and Enclave.

          • 0 avatar
            derekson

            “Delta Township plant churning out the Traverse, Acadia, and Enclave.”

            Isn’t the Acadia moving to TN along with the XT5?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            You’re right. So Traverse and Enclave. Still, lots of work in Delta.

          • 0 avatar
            derekson

            They’ll probably get the XT7 too, whenever they finally get it to market.

        • 0 avatar
          Joss

          Canjun government & Ontario gave bankruptcy money.

  • avatar
    Lightspeed

    Well, it’s better than hewing more wood and drawing more water. In context, this is pretty good, Canada has less population than California, remember, and is a very small market. But, we also have a cheap dollar, highly skilled people from government supported universities, a free-trade agreement with the U.S., and Ontario and Ottawa bought GM stock as part of the bail-outs. I’d prefer to see the good in it.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Yup. And Jonathan Gruber’s stupid Americans aren’t smart enough to do that work. That’s why GM has to farm it out to Canada.

      Outsource it, if you will.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Lightspeed,
      The overheads for manufacturing in Canada is higher than the US. There is more to manufacturing costs than wages/salaries and exchange rates.

      Australia is worse than Canada for cost of manufacturing.

      Canada also subsidises it’s auto sector more than the US, which is higher than the Germans by around one third.

      Australia moved away from vehicle manufacturing because the government realised that it is stupid to have industry that becomes reliant on handouts/subsidies.

      Some do argue that other nations subsidise and have protection offered to their vehicle manufacturers hidden as technical/regulatory differences to outright import tariffs like the 25% Chicken Tax that the US imposes on imported commercials.

      But I see it this way, just because someone hits their thumb with a hammer doesn’t mean I must do it. The same can be stated for anti progressive and anti competitive business/industry practices.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Every Auto industry on the planet has some form of subsidy. Whether they be incentives to set up a plant in a state or territory, or a specific grant for the industry

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        “The overheads for manufacturing in Canada is higher than the US”

        You say that like it’s a fact, but you are wrong.
        Canada is not Australia. For one thing, it’s one minute from Detroit, not twenty hours.
        The US-Canada border is invisible to anything automotive-related.

        Basically, as seen from Detroit, Canada is a version of the US that’s better educated and has cheaper health care.

        The problem is that you see anything and everything as a metaphor for Australia. Australia is an under-populated market that’s geographically isolated. It grew a small manufacturing sector post-WWII because tariffs were high.

        Canada, on the other hand, has been part of the US auto manufacturing sphere since day 1. Windsor, Oshawa and Oakville are no different from US cities, as far as logistics are concerned.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          heavy handle,
          Where did I state Canada is Australia?

          I stated Australia is WORSE than Canada for manufacturing due to our higher labour costs.

          Really????

          Read this;

          Cut and Paste,
          “Canada has a major drawback, though. Manufacturing in Canada is costly, despite its weaker dollar, and labor costs higher than Mexico, the northern U.S. and the U.S South, The Seattle Times reported. As a result, Canada’s manufacturing industry is dwindling, and by 2020, the nation is expected to produce only 9 percent of vehicles in North America.”

          Link,

          http://offshoregroup.com/2015/08/07/the-pros-and-cons-of-manufacturing-in-mexico-canada-and-the-us/

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Only 9% eh? So a proportion which is significantly higher than its share of the US-Canada-Mexico population.

            Big Al,

            Who are you going to believe, a Seattle daily, or Toyota and Honda who are also manufacturing in Canada?

            I think in your case, you will believe any source that seemingly backs-up any point you were trying to make, even if it backs it up into a corner.

            Canadian manufacturing costs aren’t necessarily higher. Wages are higher than Mexico, but not compared to most of the US. Health care costs are much cheaper than in the US. Raw materials are the same either way (free trade). Transportation costs are the same, using the same rail networks.

            Factors that influence the viability of Canadian auto manufacturing are mostly the same as those that influence Michigan, or Illinois, or any of the traditional US auto manufacturing hubs.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          heavyhandle,
          We are not so much geographically isolated anymore.

          Where is the world now? Is it the “Old World”?

          I’d say Australia is in a prime position for the likes of SE Asia, China and India.

          It’s starting to appear the western hemisphere is becoming isolated.

          Due to our isolation Australia has now had the longest run of growth (no recession) of any nation in history (most likely modern).

          Yes Canada is close to the US, but it appears the influential neighbour has you guys by the balls a little to hard.

          But, Canada does have more socialism in industry than the US, not EU like, but still higher. This also takes away from Canada’s competitiveness.

          One thing about having a free market economy like we do. Any trade deal we do benefits us. We don’t need to barter and beg to retain unviable industry.

          • 0 avatar
            heavy handle

            Everything makes sense now. If you consider Canada to be a socialist state, then you are quite simply living a fantasy. No point following-up, you are busy shooting-down imaginary socialist demons.

          • 0 avatar
            OzSRV

            Big Al, you continue to be an embarrassment to other Australians on this site. Nobody wants to know your inaccurate Australianized view of everthing that gets posted here, which is usually totally irrelevant. Give it a rest.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            So is BAFO stupid, or just trolling us?? Even though the exact opposite is true, BAFO decided long ago, the US was the most “protected” and “isolated” car market on the planet. He’s been shown the facts and proven wrong, repeatedly by many here.

            His rage and his motivation are unclear, but then again, who cares? Just another Bogan disrupting internet sites.

            There’s absolutely not a more “unprotected”, meaningful market, with the biggest representation of foreign cars, past and present, than the US.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            Most developed countries are socialist to some degree, yes, even the United States. If you have a problem with that, then I expect you to refuse any Medicare or Social Security benefits when you become eligible to use them.

            “Even though the exact opposite is true, BAFO decided long ago, the US was the most “protected” and “isolated” car market on the planet. He’s been shown the facts and proven wrong, repeatedly by many here.”

            the only thing I’ve seen him state in support of that is railing about the chicken tax. and there’s been any number of ways to get around that anyway. Build them here, assemble them here from CKD, ship in with features which make them “passenger vehicles” (though the feds seem to be putting a stop to that one.)

            if any car market is protected and “isolated,” it’s China’s. You can’t start an automotive operation over there unless it’s in “partnership” with a Chinese firm.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “Medicare or Social Security benefits”

            Socialist? How is it socialist if you have to pay into it for your entire working life?

            Medicare ain’t free, bub! It costs a massive $115-$195 per month, plus 20% of the billed charges, for second-rate services that take a back seat to those individuals covered by BlueCross/BlueShield and other Health Insurance Plans.

            I suppose all the freeloaders who never worked or paid into anything that they are now getting for free could be considered beneficiaries of this socialist program.

            But a large majority of people over age 65 paid for what they are now getting.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            because the money YOU paid into it for your entire working life has been spent long ago. The money I’M paying into it RIGHT NOW is going to people who are collecting those benefits RIGHT NOW.

            Which- to me- is textbook socialism. It’s money out of my pocket to help support other people.

            Which I don’t have a problem with. But let’s call it for what it is. It’s one thing to be opposed to socialism on principle; it’s quite another to claim to oppose it but pretend that the socialist programs we already have are somehow “not socialism.” It’s rather convenient that the ones who say SS and Medicare “aren’t socialism” are the ones who would be hurt the worst if neither existed.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yours is one way of looking at it. But the people who paid in feel they have a right to the benefits they paid for.

            Money paid into a whole-life insurance policy is also used up long before it is paid out, but that doesn’t stop YOU from wanting to collect for your beneficiaries upon your death, to make their lives better.

            What really sucks is when a beneficiary is handed the dreaded Advanced Beneficiary Notice stating that Medicare will decline their test, treatment or procedure, and they will have to pay it if they want to live.

            What if they don’t have the money?

            Death panels, anyone?

            And speaking of which….. CA’s Jerry Brown plans to ask the feds to let illegal aliens use Obamacare, which will mean illegal aliens on MedicAid – that’s socialist.

            And for many, Obamacare spelled the end of private health insurance previously purchased by them. Such was the case for us.

            We had BlueCross/BlueShield, an excellent insurer. We had to give it up because the monthly premiums went from ~$4800 a month to >$6100 per month for the business, because of all the coverages included for which we had no need.

            So now we suffer with second-rate Medicare. Ask anyone 65 and older how well Medicare is working for them today. This is not your grandfather’s Medicare these days.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Well ,,who knows what this means to the “Shwa” . Agreed , we’re not going to replace Warren. However watching Trudeau ‘s Challenger Jet making it’s approach about 1500 feet over my back patio , made my day . I’m easily amused : ))

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    “Friday’s hiring announcement will have little impact on the company’s manufacturing footprint in Canada, said Mark Reuss, GM’s executive vice-president of global product development, purchasing and supply chain.” -Financial Post, 6-10-16

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Mark Reuss got shafted in a PC-bad way when Mary Barra was named CEO.

      Reuss is a true “car guy” and a saw a whole lot of history go down at GM over a relatively compressed time frame.

      Reuss is probably the next CEO of GM if there’s a huge misstep by Barra, a mutiny or another one of many possible unforseen developments, assuming he’s not poached by a competitor.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        I think he’s probably next in line for CEO regardless; who knows what Kim Dan-Ak’s reasons were for anointing Barra as CEO, it might have been simply that Reuss was not yet seen as “ready.”

        it’s like there was talk how Mark Fields was hopeful for the job before Alan Mulally came on board. If you’re C-level material, keep on keeping on and you’ll get there.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    For the love of all things holy, please include “socialism” in the TTAC spam filter. This is allegedly a car blog, but some posters are intent on making it something else.

    • 0 avatar
      Piston Slap Yo Mama

      THIS. I completely endorse the banishing of political commentary here. Totally why I love reading that one auto blog, you know, ends in -verse (in the off hand chance the political blowhards migrate there).

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        I’d love it if the auto industry could be discussed without politics encroaching, but CAFE, EV mandates, ethanol mandates, subsidies for everything from incompetent management through corrupt labor unions to rich EV buyers, and initiatives to limit car ownership and use mean that trying to discuss the automotive industry without discussing politics is like trying to discuss sailing without talking about weather.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          If you are incapable of discussing the auto industry without using words such as “socialism”, then you are a bigger idiot than I had thought.

          The fact that most of you who are fond of using the word have no idea what it means doesn’t help your case.

          • 0 avatar
            ToddAtlasF1

            I have a degree in knowing what socialism means. It is you that suffers mental defect. Most of what people are talking about here isn’t socialism. It is fascism. I’m sure you’re upset because you want to believe that socialism and fascism have nothing in common, but it must be confusing when you’re carrying water for fascists. The progressiveness of the early 20th century even brings in the ‘right wing’ fascist element of nationalism when it comes to government intervention in the auto industry. Isn’t half of the support for government economic planning in the auto industry predicated on protecting our jerbs from them dang ferriners?

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I didn’t know that they offered degrees in stupid.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Pch101,
      Why do you want a “socialism” filter?

      Is it because the auto industry is highly unionised? And what political paradigms do unions promote and support?

      Socialism.

      It seems the people who believe in socialism are the only ones offended.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Tstag: JLR have built a Defender that is designed to be supreme off-road, but at a price. They aren’t interested in...
  • SuperCarEnthusiast: JLR should built this style for the retro 2021 i stead of their “crazy” no style rounded bland...
  • RHD: Ford, not wanting to appear to be copying someone else’s good idea, is now reconsidering its hush-hush...
  • Varezhka: Toyota already have a battery R&D and manufacturing joint venture with CATL, BYD, and Panasonic. Given...
  • EBFlex: “ I have yet to clip another vehicle or object with my front bumper so is this technology for the sake of...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber