By on May 29, 2016

Opel Insignia Sport Tourer, Image: GM

After news broke last week about the death of the Buick Verano, it seems the General’s tri-shield brand is looking to bolster its next-generation D-segment offering by bringing a Regal Wagon to North America.

According to a poster on the GMInsideNews forum, Buick showed the next-generation Regal to dealers, which will include a wagon, during a dealer meeting in Austin, Texas.

The next Regal, which will once again find its roots in the Opel Insignia, is expected to grow, but it may see a downsized, 1.5-liter turbo as its base engine. The larger 2.0-liter turbo will likely continue to provide motivation for the Regal GS. GM didn’t disclose powertrain details at the meeting.

The new Buick is expected to reach dealer lots in 2017 as a 2018 model.

[Image: GM/Opel]

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84 Comments on “CONFIRMED(?): Next-Generation Buick Regal Wagon Coming to U.S....”


  • avatar
    nickoo

    1. Buick USA is DEAD. Kill it already.

    2. The Regal is one of the worst cars in America. A total TWAT. It actually has the highest get rid of rate of any new car in America. It makes zero sense as a performance or luxury car when it is FWD and there are so many better choices available.

    3. Americans don’t buy wagons, and they won’t buy this wagon.

    4. Instead of wasting their time and money bringing a wagon that will sell DOZENS, they should promote the coming chevy cruze hatchback, aka focus hatch competitor, it is a much better fit for GM dealers and more in line with what the public actually buys. Why waste money on a Regal when the new Cruze can be hard for 2/3 the price?

    http://www.chevrolet.com/cruze-hatchback.html

    5. GM needs to get real and build a Chevy cr-v, the equinox isn’t cutting it.

    • 0 avatar

      There is a Cruze hatchback coming. That was already announced.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        Yes, I caught my mistake and fixed it, I was under the impression the coming cruze hatchback was not coming to the US.

        It’s only 15 years after the US focus debuted in sedan, hatch, and wagon…Still see so ZX3 first gen 3 door focus hatches on the road.

        • 0 avatar
          amancuso

          The Chevy Cruze is a Snooze to drive. The RS package is a joke, as the drive does not live up to the look of the car. How about actually making it a competitor?

    • 0 avatar
      Shiv91

      My grandpa has been a diehard Buick lover for decades, and even he’s not thrilled with his ’12 Regal. Says it’s underpowered and the headroom sucks (and he’s a short guy, about 5’5!). I haven’t driven it but I’ve ridden in it and thought the rear headroom was awful, and I’m 5’9.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        The only buick left worth having is the big cross-over.

        My grandparents went from their supercharged Park Avenue Ultra straight into the big cross-over with the forgettable name when it came time to buy again.

        I suppose they will kill the big cross over with the forgettable name by getting rid of the v6 in the next generation, that seems to be typical of GM these days.

        My mom is still in her 2004 LeSabre (which by the way is a terrible car, cost cut to all hell compared to the 90s LeSabres), my dad is still in his old Park Avenue. GM offers NOTHING for them when it comes time to replace them. I recommended to them that they buy late model bench seat W body Imapalas or late model bench seat Panther Platforms and garage them. The only other options on sale today, especially for the old man, is a Chevy bench seat truck or BOF SUV, which doesn’t work so well when your knees are shot. It is ridiculous there are no good options for someone like that for a daily driver anymore.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          nickoo,
          Maybe Holden should be the provider of Buick design.

          Holden do and have designed some good large family cars in the past.

        • 0 avatar
          Shiv91

          Nickoo: or the Chrysler 300.

          At least the current (Epsilon) Lacrosse still has an optional V6….for the time being. Probably the last “traditional” Buick.

      • 0 avatar
        jthorner

        We test drove a Regal a few months ago and found a lot to like about the car, especially at the over $8k off MSRP available thanks to discounts and extra rebates for GM Cardholders.

        One test of the back seat, however, and it was all over. One of our requirements for a sedan is that four US sized adults need to be able to sit in it comfortably for hours on end. We like to take road trips, and sometimes there are four of us in the vehicle.

        Most (not all) sedans in this class easily meet our requirements, but not the regal. A Kia Optima of all things was more appealing.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        I’m excited about this car. I agree that rear headroom from the sloping rear half of the roof kills the sedan as a practical proposition, but the roof over the rear seat of the wagon pretty much has to be higher. Add in all the other virtues of the wagon body style, and the considerable attractions of the Regal with the bigger engine, and you could really have something here.

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      Buick: Opel rebranded for China.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      I’ve adored Enclaves since their introduction (prettier than today’s) but I always forget the model name, too.

    • 0 avatar
      Mackie

      Why are you so quick to smack down the idea? I applaud all efforts to keep the wagon viable.

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      As much as I like wagons (and even more so, European wagons, having grown up in Germany), I have to agree. I just can’t see how a Regal wagon makes any sense here in America. Wagons aren’t high on anybody’s shopping list, unless they are short and on stilts (and called either a CUV or SUV). I’d rather have a Regal (Insignia, whatever) wagon than just about any SUV, but won’t hold my breath that it actually makes it over here…or that it’ll stay long if it does.

    • 0 avatar
      alexndr333

      In addition to your over-loud rant, most of your points are about Chevrolet. Meanwhile, Buick has decided (without consulting you, I’m afraid) that it will go after high-volume SUV’s and CUV’s. If they can include a couple of low-volume specialty cars, then the Cascada and a Regal wagon aren’t bad additions to a line-up of Encores, Enclaves and Envisions.

    • 0 avatar
      Krivka

      It stacks up to the A-4, is less expensive and easier to maintain. It isn’t a full sized car and if you don’t like it, don’t buy it. It is more fun to drive than the Fusion,, Camry, A-4 and it is a relative steal for the money. Especially with the cash on the hood and buyer programs GM offers. As for the Equinox, it sells like crazy as it is.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        In no way does anyone outside of GM think a regal is a legit A4 competitor. The new 2017 A4 is a knock out.

        • 0 avatar
          Krivka

          Of course you may have your personal opinion, but they are close competitors except for two things. The Audi is more expensive and if you keep it for more than four years you will really pay. If you have driven both, then you can add your two cents, if not what is your opinion worth? The Regal has beaten the A4 in comparison tests for several years.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        “As for the Equinox, it sells like crazy as it is.”

        I guess that unlike many Chevy cars, the ‘Nox has gobs of rear legroom/headroom, and the market demo appreciates that.

        I hope the next-gen Equinox still has those qualities, and a hybrid version to boot.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Consumer Reports said skip the Benz, Bimmer, buy the Buick for a reason.

      The “get rid of rate” of the first Regal/Insignia was on 2010 sales of 2011 model year Regals on 2 year conquest leases. That’s why the math looks so bad.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      Old school thinking at its finest. I hope that you don’t work for a major auto company in any kind of marketing capacity.

      Anyway, current new car buyers are overweight, have bad knees, and have plenty of money to spend on overpriced CUVs. Future car buyers are young, in shape, and don’t have a lot of money. So they will gravitate towards small wagons that are not expensive to buy or operate. Maybe even with manual transmissions.

      Automakers would do well to try to get out in front of this because if Trump makes America great again, no one’s going to be bailing you out if you make yet another one of your typical miscalculations.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Claw

      Buick is bringing the Envision.
      That and the Encore will sell enough to keep the brand alive and anchor the few other cars they sell. Dropping the Verano to expand the Regal line isn’t a bad move. Make no mistake: Buick will likely be Encore, Envision, and Enclave in the front, everything else in the back.

      Regarding Chevrolet, I expect them to push the Cruze hatch when it finally lands in the States, same as the Cruze.

      The Equinox may not be cutting it, but the Trax may be enough for many buyers. I don’t see Chevrolet really suffering. Their line up is pretty “safe”. A bunch of crossovers and SUVs, trucks, and a few actual cars. They’re everywhere. People are already riding around in the new Cruze (which looks infinitely better than the one it’s replacing). Nary a day goes by that I don’t see a Sanic or even a Spark… or a Trax. Or ESPECIALLY a Malibu.

  • avatar
    Shiv91

    This’ll sell.

  • avatar
    Joss

    The mood of the photo says it all.

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    Anyone that says “wagons won’t sell” is a narrow minded fool, and has obviously NEVER owned one. I have owned both SUV’s and wagons. Believe me when I say, wagons are FAR better than any SUV/CUV. They sit lower and actually DRIVE like a car. Why? Because they ARE a car. I have a XC70…(Not my first wagon)…it is confortable, roomy, and very versitile. Not to mention crosswinds are not an issue on the highway. Plus, it has AWD.
    Volvo knows their thing when it comes to wagons. I cannot wait for the new V90 to come out.
    As far as GM doing the Regal wagon goes, it’s a trend that needs to continue. Not everyone wants a CR-V, Equinox, or Escape.

    • 0 avatar
      sfvarholy

      Hear! Hear, KMARS!

      I’ve owned SUVs and wagons and for my current lifestyle, wagons are far superior: easier to load, more cargo room, drive better, etc. Particularly when it comes to seat-up cargo room, only a wagon will do. The current SUV/CUVs have less cargo area.

      My current car is a Volvo V70 2.5T. It’s fast as hell and can haul three big dogs and a lot of stuff doing it at 25MPG, to boot.

      I recognize that the current trend is SUV/CUV/Crossovers, but there is a small but viable market for those of us who need a wagon.

      Europe buys sportwagons and with the LHD Insignia wagon already being built, there are just incremental costs to bringing it over to the United States.

      Nikoo, stop being a troll. Buick is an international brand and is successful at it.

      And just for your information, Ford Europe sells both a Focus and Mondeo (Fusion) Wagon.

    • 0 avatar
      sutherland555

      I appreciate the sentiment but the market (current and at least short term) has spoken. CUVs and SUVs sales are spectacularly rising and every other segment is, at best, stagnant. I did my part and got a Mazda3 hatchback. That said, even in Canada (where I live) where hatchbacks/wagons are much more popular that in the US, the CUV is taking over.

      I would love to see more mid-size wagons in North America but there’s very little upside for automakers to do that.

      • 0 avatar
        sfvarholy

        Ford and GM have petitioned NHTSA to make it easier and less costly to bring over bodystyles that are based on models that are already offered here.

        In 2016, there is less risk for an automaker to bring over a wagon they are already manufacturing for the rest of the world and meets EU safety standards, since they would not be building an exclusive North American model/bodystyle.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          sfvarholy,
          I have made noises regarding the differences between UNECE vehicles and the US in past.

          Changes are occurring but rather slowly. The differences are not making US vehicles safer, just different.

          The same goes for emissions harmonisation, it will take time.

          I did read in 2011 it was costing the US consumer an additional $13 billion a year in additional costs for their vehicles because of the differences.

          It’s around $800.00 per vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “They sit lower and actually DRIVE like a car.”

      Like the blood/brain barrier there must be a car guy/real world barrier that prevents certain stark realities from crossing.

      Not only do we lumpen who enable six-figure sales DESPISE sitting lower, we regard driving to be as alluring as pushing a vacuum. Just one more damn thing to get done in order to have nice lives.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      The V90 is almost impossibly handsome. Soooo much better than Volvo’s other efforts.

      This “Buick” looks like a slug in comparison. Actually, this Opel looks a lot like the old regrettable Opel Saturn wagons that didn’t sell.

      Can’t GM hire an Audi designer to reform all these forgettable Opels that get relabeled as Buicks. Worked for KIA.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Keeping my ecu tuned 2004 9-5 SportCombi too!

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Claw

      Agreed. Screw SUVs and CUVs. I want a car with extra storage capacity that isn’t a land barge. Your options for that nowadays? Volvo and VW. Maybe Mercedes-Benz. Buick getting in that game isn’t a bad idea; it’s not like you could sell a Chevrolet or Ford like that (I’m not quite counting the Flex).

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “Anyone that says “wagons won’t sell” is a narrow minded fool, and has obviously NEVER owned one”

      I own one now (an XC70, in fact).

      They still don’t sell, as an *empirical matter* in the current market.

      The only volume seller I can think of is Subaru with the Outback – and even there it doesn’t outsell the Forester.

      They might as well be an afterthought for VW, in terms of volume. BMW and Mercedes sell rounding-error quantities. Audi only has the Allroad at the moment and, likewise, rounding-error quantities.

      They don’t sell. They just don’t.

      They SHOULD, maybe. But they don’t.

      The sales data is what it is.

  • avatar
    redliner

    If I was going to buy a premium wagon, it would be from Volvo, not Buick.

    Who knows, maybe the American public will go full circle, first going to CUVs, realizing that wagons are basically the same thing.

    • 0 avatar
      nickoo

      I think CUVs are the immediate future as they have all the utility and usefulness that American drivers demand without the stigmas or wagons, BOF SUVs, Minivans, etc.

      Once the stigma sets in, then it will be on to the next trendy thing with utility. It does seem to go in cycles, the high body cars of the 30s, 40s and early 50s gave way to low slung and longer/wider cruisers of the 60s and those stuck around until the SUV boom which morphed back to the high body cars of the 30s, 40s and early 50s, only with crossovers.

      I think crossovers will continue to gain ground until electric vehicles become the mainstream big thing, so maybe 10-15 years or so.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        nickoo, I don’t think there is much of an anti-wagon stigma. Instead, there is a buyer preference for higher ride height. The big change over generations is most women now work and therefore have a much stronger vote in family vehicle purchases. Same reason houses are built with a grand entrance, an open floor plan, and an impressive kitchen for her, but no den for him.

        Another change is that lots of suburban parents deliver their children to school instead of making them walk or ride the bus. The swinging doors of the CUV and SUV allow much faster exit and entry of kids than the slow motorized doors of a minivan.

    • 0 avatar
      sfvarholy

      Well, I would, too. Mainly because Volvo engineering and build quality. Even with cars built in the Ford years where some cost-cutting is evident, a properly maintained Volvo will easily go 200k+ miles.

      V70 is now out of production, so your choices are V60 which is smaller or V90 which is larger (and more pricey).

      Other choices are the BMW 3-series wagon, the Audi A4 AWD (whatever they are calling their version of the Cross Country), and the VW Jetta wagon, plus a couple of the Subaru models that are all heading in the crossover/CUV direction. Throw in the Ford Flex, too. It’s a V70 under the skin and was my second choice.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        That’s like saying a Taurus is an S60 under the skin, because they’re both based on the P2 platform.

        The platform connection is so tenuous as to be nonexistent in any practical sense.

        (And I say this as someone who likes the P2 platform just fine – and loves his P3 XC70 – and thinks the Flex is a great vehicle!

        I just don’t think you can say a Flex is a reskinned V70 in any meaningful sense.)

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      redliner,
      Even here in Australia wagons are not a big cash item for the manufacturers.

      Wagons were the big item for families back in the 60s and 70s, but we have moved on then with blinged commercial vehicles (vans).

      Vans really were not as comfortable and the on road dynamics were worse than that of the wagon.

      CUVs are based on car platforms, modern ones at that. So they do offer what the wagons of old offered, with nearly the added height that vans offered.

      Wagons will not become big again as CUVs will remain until something replaces them for versatility, utility, comfort and on road dynamics.

  • avatar
    carguy

    This could sell well but first they need to raise the ride height by 2″, put plastic cladding around the wheel arches and then change the name to “X-Regal Extreme”.

    If they call it a Regal wagon it will bomb.

  • avatar
    Mackie

    I struggle to see the practical advantage of CUVs over traditional hatchbacks and wagons—except for the higher seating position which makes entry/exit easier for those with physical limitations. Other than that, the benefits seem to be debatable. Maybe that extra height and air of ruggedness makes people feel safer or more in control. For whatever reason, CUVs are the new “it” car and manufacturers have no choice but to keep up with the demand—until CUVs become stigmatized like wagons and minivans were.

    I’ve never understood the appeal of these vehicles—but I hear they’re like crack to the people who drive them. I think it’s the ride height that people are addicted to. Everyone I know who drives one just loves being higher up. Whatever…

    • 0 avatar

      It’s the secret hidden pleasure emitters therefore they are indeed like crack to the people who drive them.

    • 0 avatar
      catenoid

      I’ve noticed that people complain a lot about road quality these days. Rural roads have always been rural roads, but urban roads vary intensely as well. I drive a Mazda 3, and I’ve managed to damage the oil pan, perturb the rocker plastics and run into surprise parking lot rebar sticking out of the concrete kerblets, and that’s not even counting semi-routine driveway scrape. Are aero-driven tiny approach angles pushing people to CUVs?

  • avatar
    Alex Mackinnon

    Hopefully they’ll bring the hatchback over. I had a diesel manual hatchback Insignia as a rental in the UK last year and liked it quite a bit.

    That with a Voltec drive train would be a winner.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I have always viewed Buick as the Amereican Holden. The traditional Holden is dead in the water here and will rely on German and Asian vehicles.

    Buick will need to do the same.

    Buick should look at Opel. Opel does provide a different GM experience as Holden would of if GM was able to operate without taxpayer handouts in Australia.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    One issue with sedan-based wagons is you can’t put a 3rd row of seats in the “way back” anymore, so they wind up being strictly 5 passenger vehicles. Some families need that 3rd row for carpools, team sports, and travel in some instances.

  • avatar
    1998redwagon

    it’s clickbait. i know it’s clickbait and still i click on it. sigh.

    i sat as a passenger in a coworkers subaru forester the other day. i found the lack of leg room and the sitting position to be rather annoying even for our short trip to lunch. another coworker generously offered me the front seat because of my height. she did not sit behind me, she stayed behind the driver who was shorter than my 6’3″ (1.9m) height. i kept looking for a way to raise the seatpan but on the passengers side i guess not (that’s not a huge surprise when i think about it).

    same thing the last time i sat in a suburban and a full size chevy truck (although both of those were years ago – my assumption is the space utilization is much better now – i hope).

    what is it about these vehicles? why do folks like them so much? i can never tell if it is just being tired of older designs or a great marketing job. o well, i may never know and i shouldn’t waste any more time on thinking about it. vote with your money.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    If Audi can make a business case for the A4 Allroad in the US, I bet that Buick can figure out how to make this work. If the new Insignia has improved to the same degree as the new Astra, I might even buy one.

    Just make sure it has enough power. The TSX wagon sucked because it was gutless. 2.0T please.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      That TSX wagon is like a unicorn around here. I see them in NY area and that is about it.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      They sold 2818 Allroads last year.

      I cannot imagine how they make *any money at all* doing so.

      (I mean, I love the Allroad, conceptually.

      I just don’t comprehend why they import it, as a practical business matter.)

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Confirmed: Next Generation Buick Regal Wagon Coming to US

    Oh thank god finally a Regal model that will have even greater depreciation than the sedans!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I am curious to see how well this Regal wagon does. I am skeptical because it is likely to be priced too high and it will have to compete with lower priced CUVs especially if this wagon does not offer AWD it might not do as well. I wish Buick success in this endeavor.

  • avatar
    "scarey"

    From its looks, it should be a Chevy, not a Buick. It looks CHEEP-CHEEP-CHEEP ! Should sell a ton @ $24,995 MSRP.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    Can’t wait to have my hopes and dreams of seeing this with a manual transmission be crushed…

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    The V90 will be starting around $44,900. The new XC90 starts around $40,900.
    The last time I checked…Regals were $35,000 to $39,000. Not that far from Volvo’s. Even the V60 is around $38,000. I was just at the Volvo deealer last week.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    I was in the parking lot of a famous French castle and I saw one of these. I stopped in my tracks. It was magnificent. Like, screw the castle, check out this Opel Insignia wagon. Go ahead, honey, I’ll catch up, I want to spend some time with Monika Von Long-Roof over here. The picture does not even remotely do it justice – though I could do without what appears in this picture to be the inevitable refresh-year tarting-up, with the chrome beard that Mercedes has regrettably made trendy.

    The Volvo V60 is a nice car but it doesn’t sell because it’s more compact hatchback than midsize wagon. This, though. This has cargo space. And the Regal is a sharp driver. Those of us who owned and loved a Passat wagon (no matter how much it refused to love us back), before VW ruined it by moving it onto a cheap-ass Jetta chassis, may finally have a worthy replacement for our favorite midsize steed.

    Of course, GM will overprice it by 10 grand, not make the 2-liter turbo standard, not find and target the two small subsets that buy Euro wagons (overeducated tweedy types and tasteful old money) or not bring it over at all.

    • 0 avatar
      "scarey"

      @ HotPotato- I hope that you are right, I HOPE that it doesn’t look cheaply done/isn’t cheaply made. When it comes right down to it, GM, formerly the biggest, best, and my favorite car company has burned me/us too many times with cheap crap. I don’t need to list the many, many examples of this to convince anyone. But suffice it to say that it is not a fluke, it is due to a fundamental philosophy at the executive level.
      GM needs to rebuild its reputation or it will fail again. A solid, high quality Buick (wagon perhaps ? ) COULD BE exactly what is needed for a new start, but it must be followed up with more high-quality/high-value products with no mis-steps or GM is finished in this country. On the other hand, maybe the Chinese will tolerate shoddy cars for the next century (no pun) or so. Then they can move to Africa and sell crap there for the 2100s.

  • avatar
    craiger

    Brown, diesel, manual, etc.

  • avatar
    Johnster

    I was led to believe that the new Buick Regal would be larger, not so heavily based on the Opel Insignia, more heavily based on the Chevy Malibu (which has a surprisingly generous amount of rear leg room), and with completely different sheet metal.

    I like station wagons, but it’s kind of hard to imagine that a Regal wagon will find many buyers or be around for very long. If the Regal wagon is even modestly successful, Ford might consider selling their Mondeo wagon as a Fusion in North America.

  • avatar
    markf

    “My grandpa has been a diehard Buick lover for decades”

    And that is all you need to know about Buick……..

  • avatar
    Spartan

    …and not a single TTAC reader is going to buy a new one.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      Oh, I don’t know about that. I would certainly consider one. And there’s a good chance that, after they’ve been in production for a year or so, there will be some sitting around on dealer lots with big discounts. (Like the way it was for the last of the Acura TSX Sportwagons.)

  • avatar
    65corvair

    The Regal name is so 1970’s. Get a better name… instead of Buick!

    When my Dad was about 85, I asked him if he ever thought buying a Buick. He said Buicks were for old people!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    GM might be more successful stretching the current Impala and offering it as a wagon or offering this as a Malibu wagon in addition to the Regal wagon. Even then it might not get enough takers,

  • avatar
    Mathias

    @Spartan “… and not a single TTAC reader is going to buy a new one.”

    I probably won’t “buy” one but I’d “lease” one if the price is decent, which it likely will be.

    However, this canard has been around before. Check this out
    http://www.leftlanenews.com/photos/buick-regal-wagon-picture-5.html
    It’s from May 10…. six years ago. So I’m not holding my breath, but it would be nice.

    Regarding the whole CUV-vs.-wagon thing:
    I’ve never had an SUV of any kind, but I’ve had hatches. Two Vibes, 88 VW Fox, 89 LeMans. 1982 Horizon.
    Hatches are “ok” but they have the same problem that the smaller SUVs have: The darned things are too short to be useful.

    I own a 2014 Outback. I do not like my Outback. It’s really rough, drives like a tractor, sounds like a tractor, the clutch mechanism is gritty, and the shifter isn’t smooth.

    I’m leasing a Cruze LS 6MT. This is a much smoother car, and even though it’s super plain, it’s more fun to drive than the Outback.

    The reason I’ll be keeping the Subaru for a while is it has that best feature of wagons: A long load area. I could sleep in it if I had to. I just transported 8-foot-long pieces of birch board home from the lumber mill, and 9ft would have been OK, too. Try that in a CRV.

    The roof rack is atrocious, but at least it’s there and has nearly 3 feet of bar spread… I’ve used to to haul drywall, and it was a pain to rig that up. A wagon, properly so called, needs to have rails for a real rack, with 150+ lbs of load lmit, and a bar spread that’s at least half as long as the car. Hardly anybody but the Europeans knows how to make a useful rack.

    I might lease an Equinox, but the “rack” on top of those stupid things allows less than 2 ft of bar spread, making it useless except maybe for bicycles. Speaking of bicycles, none of mine will fit in the back without removing wheels. No problem in my Outback.

    This Buick would do everything my Subaru does, and i doubt I’d miss the AWD much. I’d miss the stick shift, but probably not THAT stick shift ;)

    I’m going to be watching for this Regal. At $200 or so a month, 24 months, low miles, sign-and-drive, this would be sweet. Given the way GM structures their leases and allows GM card credits to be applied, leases can be seriously attractive. BTW, my Cruze is $40/month with tax and nothing down, though that was probably a once-in-a-lifetime event thanks to overlapping incentives. GM can be the way to go for inexpensive leases, but it takes some luck and some digging up incentives. Living in a GM town in Michigan also helps, I guess.

    Best wagon I ever had? ’83 Malibu 305 V8 3sp auto. Great car in its day, super useful, super sturdy. Sold it to get an 87 Audi 4000, which turned out to be a mistake.
    If the Regal wagon does not pan out, i might be force to get the last cheapo Grand Caravan they ever build. General Motors: Don’t say you weren’t warned.

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      ” At $200 or so a month, 24 months, low miles, sign-and-drive, this would be sweet”

      I don’t know how hauling drywall, 4×8 plywood, etc will work into the “normal wear-and-tear” aspect of most leases… :-)

    • 0 avatar
      FAHRVERGNUGEN

      I just hope that by the time my 2005 Legacy GT wagon goes to the Yard in the Sky, someone will have made a wagon worthy of replacing it.

      Thankfully, it’s well-maintained and driven lightly so I don’t have to worry much.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “It’s really rough, drives like a tractor, sounds like a tractor, the clutch mechanism is gritty, and the shifter isn’t smooth.”

      Huh.

      I’ve ridden in my parents’ 2015 3.6R, and it’s *beautiful* and smooth running.

      (Of course, it’s not a manual.

      And presumably yours is the 4cyl.)

  • avatar
    kmars2009

    The next V60 needs to have a more square backend…like Volvo’s should. It would male it far more versitile.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    Consumer Reports thinks highly of the Regal.

    I’m 5′ 10″ and rode in the back of one once, I had room (but not sure if car had sunroof or not).

    If GM offered a manual trans on the base car, I would have considered it.

    I think a wagon is a good idea. Those of us who still prize fuel economy and handling prowess in exchange for a reduction in roominess/versatility can appreciate the benefits of a wagon vs a CUV

  • avatar
    dividebytube

    If I could this in a stick and with the 2.0L engine, then it would be high on my next car purchase list. But I’m probably in the minority.

  • avatar
    WildcatMatt

    Put the colored tri-shield on it and put it in my driveway!

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