CONFIRMED?: Is This a Four-Cylinder Turbo Inside a 2018 Jeep Wrangler?

Steph Willems
by Steph Willems

Two weeks ago, we told you of a potent four-cylinder engine under development by Fiat Chrysler Automobiles. Now there’s physical proof of the so-called “Hurricane” mill.

Spy photos obtained by TTAC show a cloaked Jeep Wrangler test mule with the hood up and a pile of evidence underneath. The positioning of the oil fill cap points to an inline engine, and air intake ducting routed over the cam cover points to a turbocharger — in this case, a high-mounted one.

Now, will the Hurricane make the nearly 300 horsepower as has been claimed? That’s a wait-and-see thing.

Going by earlier reports, FCA will produce the 2.0-liter turbo four, which features direct injection, alongside the 3.6-liter Pentastar V6 at its Trenton Engine Complex. Given its high output, the engine will likely appear in vehicles across FCA’s portfolio.

FCA needs a fuel-sipping but powerful engine to please environmental regulators when the next-generation Wrangler bows as a 2018 model. The automaker also plans to lighten the Wrangler with some aluminum parts and add a ZF eight-speed automatic as an option, with a possible plug-in hybrid available for electric off-roading.

Recent spy shots of camo-clad test vehicles show subtle styling tweaks, pointing to better aerodynamics.

Expect a diesel engine to show up before the hybrid. Jeep also plans to fling a long-awaited pickup variant into America’s outstretched arms.

[Images: © Spiedbilde/The Truth About Cars]



Steph Willems
Steph Willems

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  • Haze3 EV median weight is in the range of 4500-5500lbs, similar to the low end of full size pickup trucks and SUV's or typical mid-size PU's and SUV's. Obviously, EV Hummers and PU's are heavier but, on average, EV=PU or mid/full SUV is about right. EV's currently account for ~1% of the cars on the road. PU's account for 17% and SUV's count for over 40%. If we take out light SUV's, then call it 30% SUV or so. So, large-ish PU's and SUV's, together, account for ~50% of the US fleet vs 1% for EV's. As such, the fleet is ALREADY heavy. The problem is that EV's will be making the currently lighter 50% heavier, not that PU/SUV haven't already done most of the damage on avg mass.Sure, the issue is real but EV responsibility is not. If you want to get after heavies, that means getting after PU/SUV's (the current problem by 40-50x) first and foremost.
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  • Detlump A lot of people buy SUVs because they're easier to get in and out of. After decades of longer, lower, wider it was refreshing to have easier ingress/egress offered by an SUV.Ironically, the ease of getting in and out of my Highlander is very similar to my 56 Cadillac.
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