By on November 3, 2015

MY16 Hyundai Tucson

Reuters reported Tuesday that Hyundai will spin off Genesis as a global premium brand to compete with German automakers such as BMW, Mercedes and Audi. The news agency quoted sources “close” to the company and said an announcement could come as early as Tuesday.

Hyundai didn’t comment on the report.

According to Reuters, Hyundai would launch Genesis with the Genesis sedan — and possibly coupe — and the Equus sedan. Genesis would add a mid-size SUV around 2019.

According to the sources, Genesis would utilize Hyundai’s dealer network and be sold alongside Hyundai models — at least for now.

“A small line of upscale products is going to be sold under the Genesis brand name. It’s not a physically separated brand with its own channel,” the source told Reuters.

Hyundai has toed the waters with spinning off its own luxury brand before. Analysts say that it may take years before a dedicated luxury line would become profitable. According to reports, Toyota spent more than $5 billion to start Lexus, which didn’t make a profit for a decade.

The luxury car market is much bigger than it was in 1989 and more profitable.

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68 Comments on “Report: Hyundai To Spin Off Genesis-branded Luxury Line...”


  • avatar
    krhodes1

    So basically they are just going to leave the Hyundai badges off and carry on as they are now?

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Not really.

      Hyundai will have to do separate advertising and likely only allow those dealerships who meet certain requirements (# of sales, CSI scores, etc.) and willing to invest in a build-out of a separate showroom and waiting lounge (some Hyundai dealerships already have separate waiting lounges for Equus/Genesis sedan owners).

      Hyundai will likely also add service points like loaners to Genesis owners like they already do for Equus owners.

      This was only a matter of time in coming, but probably should wait until the next gen Genesis sedan and the Genesis-based crossover is ready.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This makes sense – a lot of sense.

    Now they can build CUV luxury vehicles as part of the new brand and make fat stacks of profit like everyone else.

    It is basically a no-brainer. It will take decades to build the brand, even if they don’t make a single misstep, but there is more Cheddar to be had selling luxury versions of Hyundai platform CUVs, then gussied up lazy H logo crossovers.

    The key is not to let it languish like Infiniti and relentlessly focus on service.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    I find it funny Hyundai thinks the auto industry needs yet another marque.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      They just want the Japanese luxury marques to stop laughing at them behind their back because when Lexus introduced the original ES and LS, Hyundai was still peddling the Excel.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Doubt the Japanese are laughing as the Genesis sedan outsells the Lexus GS and Infiniti Q70 (and don’t think there’s a need to mention the RLX).

        In terms of laughter – that was the original ES – which was basically a JDM higher trim Camry variant.

        • 0 avatar
          L'avventura

          The Q70 starts around $50k, the GS also around there in price. The Genesis starts at mid-$30k. Totally different market of car.

          In reality, the Genesis is priced closer to the ES, IS, Q50, all of which handily outsells the Hyundai.

          Then if you bring the European luxury brands into this comparison, its not really a competition.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            The Genesis actually starts at around $39k and by the time of its refresh and new moniker (the G80 – ughh), probably will break the $40k barrier.

            The Genesis is still the newest entrant in the RWD midsize lux sedan game and doesn’t offer the luxury brand/dealer network so certainly can’t expect Hyundai to charge for things which they don’t offer on the Genesis.

            And that was exactly the point of launching the Genesis under the Hyundai brand and eschewing the cost of separate brand and dealer network (which would have added about $7k to the price-tag on the Genesis).

            At that price-point, the Japanese have been losing the battle against the Germans (well, BMW and MB) since one might as well get an E Class or a 5 Series for not much more (even if it means going for the smaller engine in the case of the 5 Series).

            Would you say that the LS400 was more of an E Class competitor than an S Class competitor since it was priced in line with the E and not the S Class?

            And that was even with the whole separate luxury brand and dealer network thing.

            That’s the reason why Hyundai sells a lot more V8 Genesis sedans at around $54k to start than does Infiniti with the Q70.

            Even today, the LS460 is closer in price to a mid-range E Class than the S Class (or for that matter, the Equus than the S Class).

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            The original LS was like an S-class for about than the price of an E-class. It competed with BOTH cars.

            The current LS splits the difference almost exactly in entry price – it is $20K more than the cheapest E and $20K less than the cheapest S. But the most expensive LS is MUCH cheaper than the most expensive S-class. And MB sells a lot more optioned up E’s for the price of an LS than Lexus sells LS’s.

            Lexus simply does NOT have the cachet in the luxury market that they do in the premium market, and IMHO they never have. That original LS sold because it was a bargain. Once it got a lot more expensive it stopped selling anything like as well. As I said in a previous posting, Lexus nuked Lincoln and Cadillac, but all they really did to the Germans was make them sweat a little.

            The question is what can Genesis do in the this market? I can’t imagine this move is going to move the needle at all vis-à-vis the Germans. You will still be shopping and getting serviced at the crappy Hyundai dealership, even if the car itself is fantastic (which so far they are not). They will sell a decent number of cars in the US anyway, simply because they are cheap for what you get, and Americans aren’t fussy.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      It’s not about the industry “needing’ anything. Just Hyundai coming around to accept that luxury buyers don’t buy cars as in mechanical transportation devices. Instead, they buy rolling billboards announcing that they spent more than the guy in a Hyundai.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Hyundai would probably like to have a faux luxury division like Honda where every model is a reshaped Honda with a new face and badge for nice margin. Truthfully though I don’t see it happening.

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I really like the Hyundai Genesis. If I needed a sedan, that’s what I’d aim for. But I wouldn’t want to pay $10K more for it just because they changed the logo.

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      Yeah. If business goes well the Genesis is squarely in my sights when the lease on my Sonata is up. But it won’t take much of a price bump before various Volvos start to come into the picture with the content I want, so they need to be careful about asking for too much too soon – at least, if they want my money.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      That’s the thing tho (for those who were arguing that Hyundai should have launched a separate luxury brand/dealer network from the start) – doing so would have added about $7-10k onto the MSRP (depending on the model) which would put them right into the pricing of Infiniti and Lexus and we all know how the Japanese RWD sedans have done.

      By eschewing the build-out of a separate dealer network – Hyundai can continue to undercut the Japanese competiton, albeit not as much as they are doing now (in particular for the Genesis sedan) as a separate showroom and added luxury service costs (such a loaners) adds to the price (the reason why the Equus is more expensive comparatively to its segment is that pricing of loaners, valet-service, etc. is priced into the MSRP).

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        I think they have missed their chance. Lexus BOUGHT their position by eating the cost of that separate dealer network etc. back in the early ’90s. I cannot even begin to imagine that they did not lose a fortune on those original LS400s. But once they had the beginnings of a reputation, they made it back 10X by selling premium Camrys, and then rode the Camry-on-stilts craze to an orgy of profit. It wouldn’t surprise me if they still don’t make any money on the LS, but they can afford to do that.

        At this point the Genesis and Equus are too established as Hyundais for making them into Lincolns to matter. And ultimately that is what they are doing if they are just going to sell them out of the same locations, even with separate showrooms and waiting areas. Though in their favor, at least in theory there will not be a Hyundai badged equivalent for $5-10K less on the other side of the showroom.

        And really, another nonsensical alphanumeric naming convention? Let’s hope it at least makes mostly logical sense like the Germans and not a complete dogs breakfast like Lincoln and Infiniti.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          “And really, another nonsensical alphanumeric naming convention? Let’s hope it at least makes mostly logical sense like the Germans and not a complete dogs breakfast like Lincoln and Infiniti.”

          Dude, I know you’re a bit of a German fanboi, but German naming conventions (outside of Audi) haven’t made sense for 5-6 years now. I can’t keep track of MB CUV naming conventions, and the displacements have lined up with the numbers for about a model generation or so.

          Agree that Infiniti is completely out to lunch with theirs, however.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Hence – “mostly”. MBs convention isn’t great, but the cars mostly still make sense. BMW is just doing what they always have, with only a few exceptions (2-series Active Tourer?). It’s been 40 years since the number had more than coincidental relationship with the displacement.

            But ultimately, the Germans get a pass because they didn’t copy anyone else! The newcomers are all doing alphanumeric simply because the Germans do.

    • 0 avatar
      dougjp

      Getting the current Genesis, which is a very good car at a reasonable price, might be a good move. For those that like big cars of course. I can see upward pricing once the Genesis brand rolls out, and that could help resale.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    MOAR CROSSOVORS!!!!!!!

  • avatar
    Steve_S

    It’s what they should have done from the beginning and it won’t be viable until they have a few more products and their own dealer network.

    The two biggest problems with the Genesis and Eqqus (same for Kia) is the Hyundai badge and dealership experience. A BMW, Benz or Lexus owner expects a particular level of customer service and polish that you won’t see in a mainstream showroom/service center.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I agree but another problem is the reliance or sharing with Hyundai/KIA for additional product. If KIA didn’t exist in this country than say a reshaped Azera or Sonata under a “Genesis” brand wouldn’t be so bad but they’ve already been done as KIAs. Where are the other “Genesis” models going to come from?

      • 0 avatar
        honda1

        I agree. They will just add some plastic to cars they already make and slap a genesis badge on it. There are plenty of silly people that will take the bait.

        • 0 avatar
          SC5door

          No this isn’t Ford with Lincoln where you get the same cluster in the Taurus as you do in the MKS. Or the MFT controls are EXACTLY the same for the MLT controls.

          The Azera and Cadenza are on the same platform but do not share much else if anything, hell even most of the switches between the cars aren’t even the same.

          People tend to forget that Hyundai owns ~34% of KIA and they do compete with each other.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      No – that would have been a mistake (following in the footsteps of the Japanese who have struggled to sell RWD luxury sedans and in the case of Acura, a higher-end FWD/AWD sedan).

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    Who needs that spendy, “separate channel” jazz? GM and Ford have proven the way to luxury sales success is through mainstream, multi-brand dealers.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    Said it before and I’ll say it again, most luxury cars are about conspicuous consumption. Being the value-brand luxury car is a bit of a contradiction.

    And yes, I realize your uncle’s dog catcher’s fiance’s brother is a billionaire and likes to fly under the radar; given that the biggest sellers, BY FAR, in the luxury space are MB and BMW, S/E and 7/5, with a smattering of Audi, most people in this segment are NOT looking to fly under the radar.

    Is there some meat in the $30-50k range? Maybe. Lots of buyers in that segment are looking for substance over fluff, but once you’re over $50k, they want the badge too. Just have to look at Equus sales as proof. Flossing the goofy H off the Equus isn’t going to do much.

    • 0 avatar
      jmo

      They said the same thing about Lexus back in 1989.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        Yawn. Completely different market in 1989. For one thing, Germans were wildly more expensive than Lexus. Like 2x the price. Hyundai is pushing Genesiseses and Equui that are $10-20k less, maybe 25%, than the competition. For another, leasing is the great equalizer, a huge price advantage doesn’t help when you’ve got sterling (or artificial) residuals that allow leases that belie sticker prices. And thirdly, Lexus capitalized on a ton of negative feelings towards the German establishment, which was snooty, expensive, finicky, and unreliable. Lexus dealers kissed butts and sold cars that never broke. Nowadays, everyone has learned (mostly) to kiss butts and cars have achieved near-parity in reliability *for the average lease term*.

        Quite simply, the niche that Lexus exploited largely no longer exists, and therefore, will be difficult to difficult to exploit by a value brand.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Given how few actual luxury cars Lexus sells, I would say it is still absolutely true. Lexus sells a big pile of premium Camrys and Camrys-on-stilts, and very few actual luxury cars. Lexus sold a TON of LS400s when they were pricing them to compete with E-classes. Priced to compete with the S-class, uh, not so much.

        And having rented examples of the past couple generations of Genesis sedans, all I can say is “it look like a Lexus ’til a real Lexus roll up”. Or you touch something inside. A car which will impress an Altima driver, but not a Mercedes/BMW driver.

        • 0 avatar
          S2k Chris

          The worst thing that happened to Lexus (and Acura) is the rise of leasing. Their competitive advantage was in longevity and reliability. No one cares about that anymore when they “own” their car for 3 years/36k miles and then turn it in for a new one.

          • 0 avatar
            jmo

            I disagree. Back in the 50s one of the key metrics of success was the ability to buy a new Cadillac every year. I doubt the master of the universe buying a 1986 560SEL kept it more than three or for years.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          @krhodes1

          Exactly.

          Infiniti failed with the Q45 flagship and M/Q70 sales are on life-support.

          Ghosn seriously thought of doing away with Infiniti as sales would not have come close in recouping the cost of investment.

          Infiniti was basically saved since Nissan saved a big chunk in development costs by pairing up with Daimler and much of their growth will be in cheaper, FWD models.

          Acura has failed miserable with the RL and now the RLX.

          Toyoda had to be talked out of killing the GS. The LS400 sold well since it was reliable (unlike the Germans) and had very aggressive pricing ($35k at launch) which was cheaper than a higher-trim E Class at the time.

          Even today, the LS460 is about $10k cheaper than the S Class but sales have dwindled down to 400-500 a month.

          Without a luxury marque (much less a separate dealer network), the Genesis sedan outsells the GS in NA and right now, Equus/K900 sales are not far off LS sales despite lacking AWD.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I think some of that some back to S2K’s point on conspicuous consumption. The LS460 to me, just looks like every other Lexus, ditto on the RL. The Q45 did fail but it was also problematic at launch, I’m not sure what the deal is on M series Infiniti. If these cars were maybe a bit gaudy or commanding as the S-class, they might fare better.

            Additional:

            Per this source the Kia K900 had 8K on the hood and it starts at 54K for “Premium” per Google. The Lex starts at 72K.

            “big incentives on some vehicles, such as the Kia K900 which had $8,000 slapped on the hood to lure in buyers.”

            http://www.thedetroitbureau.com/2015/07/makers-moved-metal-by-offering-money/

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            No doubt pricing is the biggest factor in being the newest entrants and currently being sold under mainstream brands but that was the recipe of success for the original LS400 being priced at an absurdly low #35k MSRP upon launch.

            The LS has since gone up in price but still undercuts the S Class by over $10k and yet, LS460 sales have been plunged from what it used to be (even taking into account it being at the end of its life-cycle).

            For the month, combined GS and LS sales don’t even match up to sales of the S Class.

            Yes – Lexus has grown sales this year, but it has all been at the entry-level price-point.

            Lexus is becoming more and more irrelevant at the mid-higher end of the luxury market.

            The LS460 replacement will help but I doubt it will see the same sales success as past generations.

            MB and BMW have stepped up their games and Cadillac, Hyundai/Kia and Lincoln with the Conti will add competition at a lower price-point (and there’s still Jaguar with Volvo and Alfa to soon join the competition).

        • 0 avatar

          Altima buyers like everyone else also want to upgrade to something. Genesis would be too steep but as a first step First they can upgrade to Sonata and then eventually, if they behave – to Genesis! America is the land of opportunities.

    • 0 avatar
      PenguinBoy

      “Said it before and I’ll say it again, most luxury cars are about conspicuous consumption.”

      Agreed. And regardless of the merits of the cars themselves, it will take years to be taken seriously as a luxury brand. Some examples:
      -It took Lexus years to establish themselves as a legitimate luxury brand, and so far they are the only Japanese brand to do so, Infiniti and Acura are nice cars for the money when they have a big pile of cash on the hood, but they’re not likely to impress the neighbours.
      -It took Audi years to get taken seriously as an alternative to MB and BMW, and for a while it looked like they might not make it.
      -Cadillac still isn’t considered a first tier luxury brand, despite years of effort on the part of GM, and a rich history of offering premium cars in the past.

      I’m not a marketing guy, but I would suggest competing with the Germans is a bit of over reach for Hyundai at this point. It might be more realistic to aim for the likes of Acura and Buick, make sure the products and ownership experience are first rate, and then very slowly move the brand upmarket over many years.

      • 0 avatar
        JMII

        Yep… this only going to move them into the mid-level or entry-level luxury brands group like Volvo, Buick (sort of), Infiniti, Acura and Audi. The question is will people see thru it and remark “well its just an fancy Hyundai” and thus pass? Hyundai has a done great job digging itself out from under the original Excel. But for some people that cheap-o image still remains. At this point Hyundai is pretty mainstream so a move upmarket with a different brand could work. People don’t laugh at Lexus even though you can load up a Camry to basically the same level. Its all about the “brand experience”. If Hyundai must make people feel like they are getting something special for this to work. The dealership experience will be key, they would be wise to copy the Lexus model as much as possible.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        IMHO, if you have to bring “value for money” into the equation of your product, then it simply is NOT a luxury product.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Tell that to Lexus, circa-late 1980s/early 1990s.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            While Lexus was absolutely beginning to slowly, then with increasing pace & measure, steal sales from BMW, Mercedes (especially Mercedes), Cadillac, Lincoln & Jaguar.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Lexus has proven to be a one shot deal. Nobody can afford to do what they did today to build a market, which is basically sell an S-class, with better than S-class quality (in some ways), for 1/2 price. And as I previously pointed out, their actual luxury products don’t sell very well anymore. Audi is doing it better than Lexus today. Lexus is also an almost uniquely American success story, because only Americans buy cars by the pound, for the most part. We do LOVE a bargain in this country. And thus Lexus does very well selling slightly nicer Buicks, and very poorly selling slightly less good Mercedes and BMWs. And they don’t sell much of anything in the rest of the world. Regardless of how reliable they are. It doesn’t matter when the real thing is reliable enough.

            While Lexus caused the Germans to up their game, they really killed Lincoln and Cadillac (and Mercury, Oldsmobile and Buick too). Remember, Lexus was US-market only for ages. Jaguar was too small to ever matter – the people who ever bought them continued to do so. Audi managed to get from the mid-tier to the top-tier by dogged determination, the marketing magic of AWD, and some really great looking and feeling cars. My biggest issue with Lexus is that even an LS just feels like a really nice Toyota – in much the same way that an Acura just feels like a really nice Honda. There is just nothing special there. No surprise and delight. And now they are ugly too.

            Luxury is about buying “the best”, regardless of cost. Part of that is certainly the name, part of it is the substance (the name largely comes from the substance). Part of it is the experience. None of it is bragging about how you saved a ton of money or how great the rebate deal was, or how much cheaper this was than the alternative.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “Tell that to Lexus, circa-late 1980s/early 1990s.”

            But again, Lexus provided some things that the Germans couldn’t, like a legendary dealership experience and near-flawless reliability. Plus they were offering a near-superior product at about half the cost.

            “Mostly as good for 20% off” is not the same as “Better in almost every way for half the price.”

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I disagree, the game has always been buy the best overall product for the money at the least cost (or greatest depreciation). Generally speaking luxury items fall into the equation.

          What is luxury? Buying a product for a brand name only and watch it depreciate 90%? Serious question…

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Buying the best and not caring about the money is luxury. Or put another way, the product is sufficiently desirable that the price really doesn’t matter. Of course, there can be varying definitions of what is “the best”. In the luxobarge class my first choice would be a VW Phaeton, but I can certainly make an argument for any of them from the Jag XJ to the S-class to even the LS460 (my last choice for sure, as my taste does not run to blingy AND boring).

            Nobody buying a new S-class gives a sh!t if it depreciates 40% or 60% in three years. Ultimately, 90% of those buyers buy the car for the statement it makes. MAYBE 10% actually buy them for the technical merits. But the technical merits are a big part of why they make a statement, and why they cost so much. It is a bit of a circle.

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          MB and BMW do it via good lease deals and BMW does it by offering a 4-banger in the 5 Series.

          But out of the 3 Germans, Audi definitely plays the “value” game the most.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Audi can afford to play the value game. Being part of VAG gives them much better economies of scale than BMW or MB can achieve, even if they don’t sell as many cars.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “Audi can afford to play the value game. Being part of VAG gives them much better economies of scale than BMW or MB can achieve, even if they don’t sell as many cars.”

            That cuts both ways though; more than BMW and MB, Audis are platformed shared with lesser cars, like the Audi TT being a fancy-body Golf R, which itself is an AWD Golf at its core. For a long time, vaunted Quattro was just an extra driveshaft off of an economy FWD platform. Etc etc.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I don’t disagree – but Audi does a better job of making fancy Golfs than, for example, Lincoln does making fancy Fusions. At least as good a job as Lexus does making fancy Camrys. And a MUCH better job of making cheaper Audis than MB has done making cheaper cars.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “I don’t disagree – but Audi does a better job of making fancy Golfs than, for example, Lincoln does making fancy Fusions. At least as good a job as Lexus does making fancy Camrys. And a MUCH better job of making cheaper Audis than MB has done making cheaper cars.”

            Sure, Audi beats the pants off of Lincoln, but as soon as we admit that the vaunted Germans are playing the badge game too, it’s silly to levy that as criticism against Lexus. Lexus using their K-platform is no different than Audi/VW using the MQB platform.

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            Nothing wrong with it in either case. But Audi is a LOT more like Lexus than Audi is like MB. Both companies are heavily and successfully in the premium market, and only marginally in the luxury market, with Audi seeming to be doing a lot better at it than Lexus. Both Audi and Lexus are the premium brands of mainstream companies, while Mercedes and BMW are not. And that is ultimately why neither Lexus nor Audi will ever seriously threaten Mercedes at the top of the heap. Or BMW in the middle-top. Even BMW doesn’t really compete with the S-class. They make the 7 for people in that market who want a BMW (and because it is hugely profitable), but it is always an also-ran compared to the S. Always has been, probably always will be.

            Audi gets lumped in with the other two Germans, but realistically they are a half-step down in brand prestige.

  • avatar
    ajla

    V8 crossover?

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    If they can actually deliver on something like the recent “Vision G” concept, they may be able to do pretty well for themselves. Infiniti is lost in the woods, Acura is a truck brand with some cars that nobody cares about, mostly because they’re all terrible, and Lexus has gone full Cylon.

    That leaves space for somebody else to attack the Germans from below. Cadillac has decided that they DESERVE price parity damnit! despite no track record of success, and no real brand cachet, and that continues to hurt them, and Lincoln still has nothing of real substance, at least until the Continental arrives. Ford’s ABYSMAL quality record as of late can’t be helping either. Judging by True Delta, the MKC appears to be a complete piece of junk.

    The XC90 is a real threat, but the S90 is the real question. Volvo has never before delivered any kind of serious rival to the 5 and E. Can the S90 seriously compete with a super/turbocharged 4 only engine lineup?

    The new Genesis is fine, at least it’s far better than the RLX (low bar) but the interior has absolutely NO style whatsoever. The Vision G has plenty of that, but what can they actually bring to market?

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Its costly to develop a brand identity and establish a full product portfolio.

    If they weren’t so risk adverse, they should have acquired Jaguar-Land Rover before Tata and invested in that (also costly to turn around).

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The biggest cost is in building out a separate dealer network.

      Hyundai is better off eschewing that expense and spending the $$ on developing additional product for its luxury lineup.

      A Genesis-based CUV is supposedly in the works, but they could also use a compact RWD sedan and a compact CUV.

      As for Cadillac – the ATS and CTS are actually priced below the German competition (well, MB and BMW), just not enough esp. when they lag in interior space.

      The CT6 rectifies that – more passenger room/lower price and the ATS and CTS replacements will follow suit.

      It’s not just the Germans with their lease deals (btw, Lexus has been much more aggressive in that area – actually have lead in % of sales being leases) and offering smaller engine options and hence a lower price-point, but a rejuvenated Cadillac, the Korean duo, Volvo undergoing a major revamping and even Lincoln (if the Continental is signs of things to come) that have hurt Lexus at the mid-high end of the luxury market.

  • avatar
    GermanReliabilityMyth

    Waiting for Levorg, the future Subaru luxury marque rollout.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    The current Genesis, which can be had for as little as $34,000 OTD, which finally has a proper suspension setup, and comes with a powerful base V6 & optional, is a better made, better finished, higher quality, more reliable, more comfortable, more durable vehicle than any Cadillac currently produced at any price point.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Maybe true as Hyundai smartly went for something that would appeal to the more typical luxury sedan buyer – but the CTS-V is one of the finest performance sedans today or ever produced; heck it’s one of the finest performance cars ever produced (and we may see a higher performance CTS-V+).

      Sure – Cadillac messed up on the interior room/packaging and could have done better in some other areas, but they will be addressed with the CTS replacement.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Hyundai/Kia have also been building better Lincolns than Lincoln since the Equus came out.

  • avatar
    Silence

    I’ll buy one if they include a Phil Collins stereo system.

  • avatar
    Quentin

    I read that they were calling the current Genesis sedan the G80. So, they’ve basically taken infiniti’s naming system and Spinal Tapped it. The Infiniti naming system was already a spinal tapped Audi naming system. Screams luxury to me!

  • avatar
    jkk6

    This was their original plan from the beginning. Took 11 years to achieve since original conception of the “Genesis” brand which is currently only in sedan and coupe form. The badges are different in their domestic market, we’ll see how this plays.

  • avatar

    It is funny that no one mentions Tesla as an example of luxury bran which came from nowhere and sells well at prices comparable to S class. Apparently all those faux Asian luxury brands cannot measure up against Tesla. The fact that journos talk about Germans are trying hard to come up with “Tesla killer” tells you something, namely that not Tesla tries to emulate Germans but Germans try to ape Tesla.

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  • teddyc73: Why? Because people like them. Or should I say….Because “people” like “them”....

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