By on June 8, 2015

2015-Hyundai-Genesis-21

Late to the party, Hyundai is working on a large SUV based on the luxury Genesis sedan, reports Reuters.

It’s part of a plan to turn around the Korean automaker’s misfortunes as its sales have slipped in contrast to record industry growth.

According to four separate sources familiar with the matter, Reuters reports there’s “no certainty Hyundai will bring the new vehicle to market,” even as it and sister brand Kia continue to hock passenger cars on a low gas price fuelled market hungry for larger crossovers, SUVs and trucks.

The Tucson, positioned well to leverage the currently hot segment, is old compared to competitors and its sales have been constrained due to a lack of capacity. A next-generation Tucson, revealed in New York and scheduled to go on sale later this year, is expected to help alleviate those problems

Kia has faltered before when it comes to large SUVs. The Borrego (Mohave outside of North America) came to market on the very tail end of the last SUV craze, only lasting a single generation before being killed off in North America by 2011. The model is still on sale today in oil-rich nations.

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39 Comments on “Hyundai Genesis-Based Large SUV In The Works...”


  • avatar

    One generation? More like one model year. 2009-only. How exclusive!

    • 0 avatar

      It was on sale in Canada up until 2011.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Wasn’t it just a rebodied Veracruz, which got more years here (And looked better and had better interiors)?

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        Nope, the Borrego was actually a body-on-frame truck; the Veracruz is a unibody crossover.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Interesting then, they chose that route with it. Probably would have sold better as a better-equipped Hyundai. As well, the Veracruz was the KDM replacement for the Terracan which was a BOF Pajero anyway. Terracan replaced Galloper, which was the older generation Pajero.

          I think they messed up. But maybe Mitsubishi wouldn’t let them bring the Terracan to the US and compete with their already small Montero Limited share.

          Fun to consider – which had more brand prestige in 2001, Hyundai or Mitsu?

  • avatar
    Hummer

    The fullsize crossover segment doesn’t even exist, so I assume large to mean Traverse sized. Seems like a strange spot to enter at, maybe they should fix their pricing that’s competing in the Japanese price range.

    • 0 avatar
      Megaqwerty

      I thought the Traverse/Enclave were literally the only full size crossovers on the market: the only other comparably sized vehicles are SUVs.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        The Flex is bigger (on the inside), as is any minivan.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        The Explorer is about the same size on the outside, but more cramped on the inside (from my experience); only the Flex is comparable in terms of interior space. The Durango, I would still call an SUV, since despite its low stance and unibody construction, it’s still RWD with a longitudinal engine.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Borrego. What a horrible name. Bo-REEEE-go. Sounds like an animal noise. That’s why it failed. “We have a 7 passenger SUV. It’s our Bo-REEE-go. Bo-REEE-go *walks like chicken, eats seeds off floor with no hands*”

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      It was more like Bor-EGG-oh. It’s Spanish for lamb (and pronounced differently), but more likely was named after the California town of Borrego Springs. This was also the time when we had the Santa Fe (NM), Tucson (AZ), Sedona (AZ), Veracruz (Mex.), and Sorento (misspelling of Sorrento, Italy) introduced from Kia/Hyundai.

      Also, “has anyone in this family ever even seen a chicken?”

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Oh Michael and women?!

        A toodle-oodle-ooh, a toodle-oodle-ooh.
        Chaw-che chaw chee.
        Koo koo ka-cha! Koo koo ka-cha!

        Lol, one of my favorite scenes from that entire show.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    And how exactly is that gonna help the brand? They need a subcompact CUV to take on HRV and the likes (Mazda CX3)

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Well, the Sportage certainly *feels* crampy and subcompact inside. But it’s a good start and just needs a Hyundai badge, shorter wheelbase and taller roof to jump into the Encore/HR-V wars.

    • 0 avatar

      Kia already has the hot-selling Soul, and there’s talks of adding AWD to it…so that works.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        They need to do it. Nothing bad can come from adding AWD to the Soul. Lose the LED lights under the running board area though, they look super cheapo.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Hyundai is working on a subcompact CUV (not the ix25/Creta) for the US and other mature markets.

      Should have been working on a Genesis-based CUV so it could have been launched a year or so after the sedan (Hyundai has really fumbled when it has come to expanding its CUV lineup, as well as increasing production capacity).

      Like the new Tucson, the next Sportage will get a bit larger to better compete with the other compact CUVs.

      Kia is at the testing stage for a hybrid-only CUV (a little smaller than the Sportage) and might be developing another subcompact CUV (different from the one for the BRIC markets) as well as possibly adding an AWD Soul variant (the AWD system may be limited to an 4AWD system).

      Tucson and Sportage sales have been capped to around 40-45k in the US due to supply issues with Hyundai managing to increase capacity to 90k for the new Tucson (by switching production from small cars in Korea) and Sportage supply should increase when Kia’s Mexico plant goes online.

      But still need to expand Santa Fe Sport/SF and Sorento production which won’t happen until Hyundai gives the greenlight for a new NA plant.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    FWIW, the first-gen Sorento, despite its curvy crossover looks, was a BOF 4WD SUV.

    • 0 avatar

      …and the first decent Hyundai/Kia product.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        I see the man praising them has an MY06 on their front line. Coincidence?

        • 0 avatar

          Ask the man who floors one…

          FuN fAcT!!! – The driveshaft is apparently a jointed two-piece unit that can also be used in Rangers that are lifted as mud trucks. At least that’s what someone told me back in Pasco when we had one robbed of its driveshaft right off the front line…

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You can’t make this stuff up.

          • 0 avatar

            You really can’t. And the guy who told it to me worked at “Shade Tree Dependable Driveshafts.” I forgot his name, but I do recall he spit a large amount of chaw into a Home Depot Homer bucket as he relayed the info to me…

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        Hey, the first-gen Sportage was alright if you were looking for a FWD cute-ute for less money than a first-gen CR-V or RAV4.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          *2nd gen.

          1st gen was a mini-BOF trucklet ala Tracker/Sidekick. Live rear axle, a honest to god part time transfer case. Cool little rigs actually.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            TIL the first-gen Sportage was RWD. So yeah, not a CR-V/RAV4 competitor, but a Tracker/Sidekick competitor.
            The second-gen…it’s a good winter car. And my sister likes hers (she calls it the blueberry). But I can’t drive it because there’s nowhere to rest my right arm.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            They all looked so dreadfully cheap, and were always boring grey or lame purple metallic. Yuck.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        The ingredients were certainly all there with the Sorento. Body on Frame midsize SUV with a decent V6 option, a real part time 4wd system, and even a manual option! I think the sad state of repair that these are commonly seen in is more so a function of their owners and how they perceive their own vehicle rather than any fault of the truck itself. I’d consider picking up a clean 5spd V6 model, if any clean ones still exist.

        • 0 avatar

          Sorentos unfortunately end up as subprime finance fodder, which hastens their departure from this earthly realm, although they can take more than their fair share of abuse before biting it. Beyond typical used car problems, oil leaks are an issue…and that’s about it.

          I’ve sold over a dozen of these things over the years. Never had a complaint. Even found a home for the elusive 2004 133k-mile 5-speed LX I bought once.

          Of early-00 SUVs, I highly recommend TrailBlazers and Sorentos for robustness and value. Best of the cheap 2-row toy-hauler (boat/trailer) SUVs ~$3-5k can buy.

          • 0 avatar
            jkk6

            Sorrento MY03-04 had Japanese Aisin 4sp auto transmissions. One of the brighter sides my dad and i reminded ourselves during the purchase.

            Really one of the only properly spec’d Korean cars at the time.

            Unfortunately fellow owners had to pay $700 for an engine swap when they eventually do blow up at the 120~150k mi mark. Which is really not bad at all for an engine swap. $ 21k for an fake RX300 that had 4×4 was good. 27k or a 4cyl now? Uhm… idk

    • 0 avatar

      We had a 2003 Kia Sorento EX 4WD, fully loaded. Mom totaled it in a rollover accident in 2009.

      And wasn’t the original Sportage a BOF RWD SUV?

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “The Tucson, positioned well to leverage the currently hot segment, is old compared to competitors and its sales have been constrained due to a lack of capacity. A next-generation Tucson, revealed in New York and scheduled to go on sale later this year, is expected to help alleviate those problems.”

    These statements don’t go together. Lack of production capacity is a chronic problem at H/K. Having an old model you can’t produce enough of is testament to that models strength, not its weakness.
    And if the new Tucson is made on the old production line, it too will suffer from limited capacity.

    All this aside, I thought the Santa Fe was Hyundai’s large SUV, and it’s doing quite well.

    • 0 avatar

      The ‘positioned well’ comment is in reference to its existence in a space with rapid growth, not so much the quality of that position (age, features, value, etc). As for capacity, an additional line at Ulsan will take up production of the 2016 model. Currently, the Tucson is only produced on a single line at that facility.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    They could always use a variant of the Soul, change the styling to fit with the Hyundai “look” and people will buy them.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Hock? What have pawnbrokers got to do with it?

  • avatar

    They should make an Equius-based SUV to compete with Range Rover.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    They should just buy FCA.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Generally I don’t view a vehicle a SUV unless;
    1. It has high and low range, and

    2. full chassis.

    Anything else is a CUV.

    Hyundai/Kia need to invest money in not large/full size SUVs, but a competitive midsize SUV. This makes sense as it will appeal to the global market.

    Hyundai and Kia used to have two quite good midsize SUVs on a full chassis with hi/lo. The Sorento and Terracan. These were actually relatively competent off road.

    Hyundai/Kia also need to enter into the pickup market with a reasonable full chassis midsize pickup. I do believe they could produce very competitive SUVs and pickups.

    This is a hole in their vehicle lineup, especially if they want to become a larger global player.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Hyundai made real, large SUVs a couple other times too. Once in the early-mid 90’s, and once from 01-07.

    We had the Galloper -coughcough Montero-:
    http://static.cargurus.com/images/site/2008/04/20/18/07/1991_hyundai_galloper-pic-29603.jpeg

    And we had the Terracan, my favorite -also Montero-:
    http://image.autowini.com/AUTOWINI3/UploadImage/Thumb/20121203/CI201212030000365433/CI201212030000365433000800.jpg

    Even had a very different interior than the Montero:
    http://preview.netcarshow.com/Hyundai-Terracan-2005-1024-0f.jpg

    Available with an I4 diesel, or the 3.5 Sigma V6 from their XG350 et al.

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