By on September 7, 2015

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Porsche announced on Sunday that when its new 2017 Porsche 911 Carrera and Carrera S go on sale in March 2016 they’ll be force-fed air through twin turbochargers — and not naturally aspirated like nature intended.

Instead of a 3.6-liter flat-six behind its rear wheels, the new 911 Carrera and Carrera S will sport a twin-turbocharged, 3-liter, flat-six engine. (Porsche didn’t directly specify in its statement the engine’s number of cylinders, so if you want to play a fun game today, read how some outlets have written around it.)

As our own Tim Cain points out, the output of the new turbocharged Carrera and Carrera S, which is 370 horsepower and 420 horsepower respectively, is shockingly close to the 415 horsepower produced by the 996 Turbo from 2000.

Unsurprisingly, Porsche boosted the price too — a new Carrera will run $89,400 before delivery and options, which is more than $5,000 dearer than the current generation.

According to Porsche, the Carrera and Carrera S will share virtually identical engines, but the S model will sport a slightly different turbo and exhaust system to achieve the 50 horsepower delta over the Carrera.

By switching to the turbocharged mill, Porsche says that its engines will produce more torque — up 44 pounds-feet in the Carrera and 43 pounds-feet in the Carrera S — and spin up to 7,500 rpm.

The Carrera S’s price will now swell to $103,400, and the cabriolet versions will start at $101,700 and $115,700 for the droptop Carrera and Carrera S cars respectively.

The Carrera S will also sport rear-axle steering as an option for the first time in 2016, adopted from the current Turbo and GT3. Porsche says its active suspension management will be standard for all Carreras and will lower the car by 10 millimeters to improve handling.

The redesigned car also sports slightly new headlights, and a redesigned rear tail with retro-looking rear vents.

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69 Comments on “It’s All Turbos From Here: 2017 Porsche 911 Comes Boosted Out of The Box...”


  • avatar

    While displacement taxes push down engine power in Europe, HELLCATS will rule the Earth.

    After all – once the displaced migrants finish destroying European culture, they’ll be lucky to be able to afford electric vehicles.

    R.I.P – European auto supremacy.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      Step one – add forced induction
      Step two – reduce engine size over the naturally aspirated variant
      Step three – still get more power

      Just, that the formula for the ’17 911, or the HELLCAT?

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      BTSR,

      Hellcats are also forced-induction.

    • 0 avatar
      Vega

      Really doesn’t surprise me that the vast portfolio of your charming character traits also includes xenophobia. Intelligence is also not your strong suit, given you comment the increase of 911 horsepower with a scenario of falling engine power in Europe.

      Despite displacement taxes (which btw. has been active in Europe since WW2) you can buy Golf class cars with almost 400hp nowadays.

      And finally, nobody buys hellcats in the rest of the world. That will also not change.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Actually while Hellcat is not being exported by FCA, it is available in other markets via an unnamed distributor:

        “According to a representative, the 2015 Dodge Charger SRT Hellcat and the 2015 Dodge Challenger SRT Hellcat are available through a specified (but unnamed) distributor in a handful of non-North American markets. Chrysler didn’t give specific locales, but did confirm that the Hellcat cars can be ordered in the Middle East, parts of Western Europe, and select Asia Pacific markets; and buyers in Canada, the US, Mexico, select Latin American markets, and Puerto Rico can get their hands on the Hellcat Challenger and Charger.

        Considering the insane growth of the car culture in Middle Eastern regions like Dubai and the high end car boom in China, those key markets probably have a distributor who can get someone a 707hp Dodge coupe or sedan. A buyer in any of those markets should expect to pay a major markup for the Hellcat Challenger or Charger, and where they are sold through the grey market, those prices are likely to comfortably double the cost of the most powerful Mopar production cars of all time – if not more.”

        http://news.allpar.com/index.php/2015/04/hellcat-challenger-chargers-global-availability-28475

        Also he may be xenophobic but he’s right.

        • 0 avatar
          Vega

          No, he’s not right. We’ve been dealing with immigration at a much larger scale in Germany since the 1960s. As an example, the third biggest Turkish-speaking population in the world (following Istanbul and Ankara) is in Berlin. Not everything is perfect, but I think the last 50 years have shown that we are managing just fine.

          Your country started out as a refuge for everyone hoping for a better life. Wonder when that attitude changed so quickly…

          • 0 avatar
            RideHeight

            Ah, come on, Vega…. it took a US/Soviet makeover to stop Germans from gassing people they didn’t like.

            Your moral high-ground is pretty recent and shaky.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I’m getting lectured by the German on displaced peoples, nice.

          • 0 avatar
            Vega

            @rideheight

            I’m not saying we are better people. I’m also the most transatlantic-friendly person alive in Germany. I’m just trying to say that the horror stories of imminent demise of our culture by the hand of immigrant hordes is a bit of an exaggeration and not very well thought out.

            Sorry if my remarks sounded high-horse, it was not meant to come across that way. Still, a country built on immigration might be able to identify one or two positive aspects of the concept?

            And btw., the whole discussion started with our resident FCA enthusiast providing an unsolicited lecture on European immigration policy and others supporting him.

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            That’s disingenuous. Germany has been generally successful at dealing with a large immigrant population but that leaves out that the large majority of those immigrants are other Westerners. Of course they get along with each other.

            Only around 25% of those in Germany of non-German descent are Islamics at all and Syrian or Eritrean culture is an awfully long way from 21st century Turkey. Those people will be an eye opener.

        • 0 avatar
          Vega

          Also, a few grey imports into Dubai and China are not really the end of European dominance in luxury cars that our friend is hoping for.

          • 0 avatar
            Mandalorian

            How exactly is it Xenophobic for an AMERICAN to say that EUROPE has become overrun with migrants from OTHER CONTINENTS? This was not a biased statement, more like an observation. He didn’t take shots at the migrants, just stated the truth: Europe is saturated with migrants.

          • 0 avatar
            Vega

            You should look up the difference between truth and opinion.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            “Overrun” and “saturated” are value judgments, not statements of fact. A statement of fact would be something like “Germany took 200,000 applications for asylum in 2014 and expects that number to quadruple this year.”

    • 0 avatar
      seth1065

      Good to see you can make light of people suffering little truck. And I am sure a Hell cat is just as good of a car as a 911. Isn’t your hellcat part of a European Auto company??????

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Roles reversed those “suffering people” would not reciprocate I’d say a high percentage of the time. You, me, or anyone else is not going to end “human suffering”. Importing refugees when they are the opposite of your own culture is suicide. Cui bono?

        FWIW after the global economy collapsed the Federal Reserve along with other central banks printed trillions in new currency, how much of it went to their “suffering” citizens? How much of a percentage of your Red Cross donation goes to help people? Your naive worldview is the sort which is paving the way for Western suicide, reality doesn’t look so good without rose colored glasses.

        “In this case, the problem with the number stems from its own tax documents. In recent years, fundraising expenses have been as high as 26 percent compared with what people donated. That doesn’t even include management and overhead. Instead of 91 percent of people’s money going to services, the real number could be in the 70s, or lower.

        There’s no way to know precisely because the Red Cross officials would not say what the new number is and would not provide a breakdown of the charity’s expenses.”

        http://www.npr.org/2014/12/04/368453320/red-cross-misstates-how-donors-dollars-are-spent

        • 0 avatar
          WhiskeyRiver

          I’ll go with Paul Lynde to block.

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Backwards culture? Lol. If these refugees were in line with the backwards cultures of their home countries, why would they be running FROM said cultures instead of deeper INTO said cultures? ISIS is hungry for new members.

          And America is not really in a position to speak about backwards culture. There is still a whole region of the country that celebrates a long dead regime who fought for literally nothing more than human slavery and racial discrimination. Religion is still used as a proxy for oppression and govt enacted bigotry. Etc. etc. So spare us the self-assigned moral superiority… you are glass housing big time.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          “the opposite of your own culture”

          Boy, there’s a lot of value judgment packed into that statement, on very skimpy information.

          The Ethiopian and Eritrean immigrants I know are probably more in line with your idea of what “American culture” should be than many Americans. They mostly own their own businesses, work harder than hell, and avoid trouble.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      “While displacement taxes push down engine power in Europe, HELLCATS will rule the Earth.”

      The Cult of hellcat is clouding your logic. This new Porsche is faster, has more HP, and more torque. There is no reduction in power.

  • avatar
    Equinox

    The article does not mention anything about power going down. All it says is all 911s will have turbos.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    The 930 came out 40 years ago (1975). I’ll wager that most people who complain about this “new” development haven’t been on this earth as long as Porsche has been selling turbocharged cars. They were racing turbocharged 917s in the 1960s, of course.

    Too bad they didn’t seize the opportunity and slim-down the 911’s fat ass.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      You are missing the point

      More power isn’t always better or even necessary/beneficial, especially if it comes at the expense of character, which is pretty much what turbocharging always does. It’s fine for a gutless little 4 banger, but not so much for big bore 8000-9000 RPM sports cars.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        Not sure you are in the majority in accusing the 930 and later 911 Turbos of having no character. If anything, they are usually accused of having too much character.

        A friend has an original 930, but he’s wisely never let me drive it. It’s apparently quite a handful, and it’s now worth as more than a new 911 Turbo (he bought it as a used car in the 1980s).

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          I’m not accusing them of having no character. Though I will say the 930’s boost lag, snap oversteer and 4 speed transmission speak to the same kind of “character” an old muscle car has. Crude engineering pardoned by heavy nostalgia.

          I am saying what I said. Turbocharging blunts engine character, period. If it didn’t, used GT3s wouldn’t be selling for more than same year same condition Turbos across the board. If it didn’t, Porsche would have put a turbo in the GT3 long ago. Etc. etc.

    • 0 avatar
      jdogma

      You are correct about Porsche having done turbo cars for a long time. Only GM was earlier I believe. The early 917s were not turbos. The turbo versions were built for the Can-Am series starting in 1972. I got to see them in 1974 at Road Atlanta. They were stunning!

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      “They were racing turbocharged 917s in the 1960s, of course.”

      Love of turbos rarely seems to be paired with much knowledge.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    Can’t wait to see what breaks on this model .

    Note for parents; Porsche Service Advisor is a job with **very** good job security.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      Porsche is generally more reliable than most brands. Right up near the top. I can also anecdotally attest to that. You do realize that Porsche is not new to turbocharging, right?

  • avatar
    derekson

    “Can’t wait to see what breaks on this model .

    Note for parents; Porsche Service Advisor is a job with **very** good job security.”

    According to True Delta, Porsche reliability only trails Lexus:

    http://www.truedelta.com/car-reliability-by-brand

    But why let facts get in the way of a bad joke?

    edit: I guess they slip all the way down to 4th in you add 2015 data.

    • 0 avatar
      pdl2dmtl

      I guess you cannot believe that they can cook the data….nor influence what goes in those studies.

      Gullible bloggers – a new species has been born.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      I’m a Porsche fan, but the problem with Porsche’s reliability is that when they DO break, it isn’t “the dash squeaks” or “my phone won’t pair”, it’s “My engine grenaded” or “my GT3 burned itself to the ground.” And that it will cost the GDP of Belgium to fix it.

  • avatar
    TW5

    Not feeling it, but I’m willing to let bygones be bygones, if Porsche drop a 2.7L flat-6 into a stripped, bare-bones 911 and call it the 912.

    Then let the Cayman die.

    • 0 avatar
      gasser

      Shades of the short lived 912 of the ’70s when Porsche had a lot of extra 911 bodies, so they put in the 4 cylinder 914 engine and voila…..912…Quickly customized with the 911 badge,

    • 0 avatar
      philipwitak

      then let the cayman die? why?

      theoretically, i would put my 2.7 987 up against ‘your’ new-spec 912 any time.

      but “excellence” magazine saves everyone all the trouble. their june issue of 2007 does an extensive comparison between the standard 2.7 liter cayman and an iconic 1973 2.7 liter carrera rs. spoiler alert: the cayman came out on top.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Cayman is such a better driver’s car though. Even with a little 4 banger.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      “Then let the Cayman die.”

      What? That’s the gem in the entire lineup. I’d put it up there in the top 3 of best drivers cars you can buy right now.

  • avatar

    HELLCAT, what is that, a religion?

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    That view, the car just looks ponderous.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Your comment made me think “Well, sure, all its junk’s in the trunk” which made me wonder how its frunk did in the small overlap test which made me watch a compilation of 2014 test videos….

      Conclusion, don’t buy a Fiat 500L. The only one whose A-pillar actually buckled while suffering the most invasive damage to the passenger compartment.

      Couldn’t find one for the 911.

  • avatar
    pdl2dmtl

    Let’s see: smaller turbocharged engines and maybe not even 6 cylinders?

    What is the next logical step for Porsche?

    Wheezing 2 liters / 4 cylinders engines? And a Lexus ES that can beat them from a stand still….. They should call Subaru and call it a night.

    Uber luxury is not what it used to be…..

    But they’ll gladly charge you more for it. Am I missing something?

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Lol. 911 is not going 4 banger, and given that this is faster than the old one, it won’t be slower than a Lexus ES either. Some people can’t wait to blast down the poop chute of baseless hyperbole.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      Boxster and Cayman will come with the 4-cylinder turbo engines real soon now. However, the 911 will continue with the opposite 6-cylinder since this arrangement is one of the defining characteristics of the 911 family.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      Unlikely. Base 911 power is around 350hp. Yes, some manufacturers are doing it (Ford, Mercedes), but to get that out of a turbo 4-cylinder, you’d have to go with a fairly significantly sized turbo trimmed for high RPM duty. That would negatively impact the linearity of the power curve and drivablity in lower RPM ranges, even with new fast-spooling twin-scroll turbos, and variable vane technology on the turbo(s?) itself.

      What is much more likely is downsizing the powerplant on the base 911 to 3.0 or so and then adding a twin scroll unit. The S will get a larger turbo, and the GTS will get a larger engine (3.4?) with the same turbo as the S. The Turbo will keep its still larger motor and twin turbos to set it apart (3.8TT). At least that’s how I would do it if I was a Porsche product manager.

      And as for 2.0T engines being called wheezing, I don’t recall anyone saying that about the Evo, and I haven’t heard any complaints about the CLA/GLA AMG variants either. It’s all in the turbo sizing and tune.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        EVO and x45 AMG cars are well known for having soggy low end response. Something has to give.

        3L is the sweet spot for turbo engines IMO. As BMW showed you can get ~500HP out of that with good low end response too. Aside from weird displacement tax specials I don’t see Porsche going lower than that in the 911. They will just lop off 2 cylinders for the Boxster/Cayman.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        The 3.0 H6 in the Carrera and Carrera S is also a TT engine. Otherwise this is pretty much on point.

        Supposedly the Cayman/Boxster GTS will make around 340 from a 2.5L turbo boxer 4 though.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Unsurprisingly, Porsche boosted the price too — a new Carrera will run $89,400 before delivery and options…

    Options include a steering wheel, round rims with tires, windshield wiper blades and turn signals.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    Eh, my problem with the 911 isn’t so much that they are going all turbo, it is that these things are the Camry of sports/supercars which is good for Porsche’s bottomline I guess. It just makes it kind of awkward now because how do you promote the 911 Turbo since they are all turbos now?

  • avatar
    DearS

    My least favorite Porsche was the Turbo, and now I just lost of a lot my love for these cars. I am generally ok with turbo’s but NA is just too awesome! I am glad that the fairy tale is over though, because it makes it easier to affirm that owing an exotic does not make you a better person!

  • avatar
    meefer

    Soooooo…….buy regular 911 and wait for the prices to skyrocket as Porschephiles long for the old naturally aspirated days??

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      That’s what I’m hoping.

      The 997.2 is generally a sweet spot right now. Good updates, reliable, clean looks, and NA. Hopign they’ll talk about the 997.2 the way they talk about the 993.

    • 0 avatar
      Jacob

      I understand why people long for the old air-cooled 911s, but what about the NA water cooled 911? Their reputation is plagued with terrible reliability record. They sound worse than any other car in the same class. (Show up to any GT race, and 911 will surely have the most pathetic sound of the grid.) They were always the slowest car for the money, except perhaps for the 911 GT3. I’d say, the demise of the naturally aspirated 911 is a good riddance. I don’t think there will be enough NA 911 fans around to keep the prices up. Just watch the prices of the naturally aspirated Boxsters, Caymans, and 911s plummet in the next few years.

  • avatar
    ccode81

    What will happen to the model they used to call “911 Turbo”?

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    If a turbo is like a CPAP for cars, I’m all for it!

  • avatar
    Jacob

    Porsche has nothing to lose from this move, unlike from the move from water cooled to air-cooled engines. Let’s admit one true thing. The water cooled naturally aspirated Porsche 911s, perhaps with the exception of the exotics like the GT3, have been nothing to rave about. They had the most boring engine sound of the cars in the same class, and they also were the slowest car for the money (except perhaps for the 911 GT3, which seems a great value for a track car). A lot of cars for the same money offered more character and speed, for example the V8 Audi R8 or Corvettes.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    So they’ve separated the tail lamps again, which is sad. 911 tip! The 911’s worth the most money later always have joined tail lamps. Get a 2015 before they’re gone!

  • avatar
    carguy

    Actually, this sounds like a good implementation of forced induction. By choosing a 3.0 engine displacement, two turbos and output no higher than 420 HP this should translate into low pressure boost, low turbo lag and good throttle response even off-boost.

    A gain in power, torque, efficiency and speed is progress – no matter what the so called “purists” and Internet forum dwellers think.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      I agree that this is about as ideal an implementation of turbocharging as one could get (though I would have liked a higher redline), but objective progress is not always subjective progress. The old Carrera was hardly slow or inefficient; this move is being done purely to deal with impending emissions regulations.

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