By on September 8, 2015

Nissan in China - Picture courtesy businessweek.com

Slate has a story about hit-and-run crashes in China that proves that truth is usually stranger than fiction.

Geoffrey Sant, who teaches law at Fordham and is on the board of the New York Chinese Cultural Center, details a trend among Chinese drivers to kill the people they hit with their cars to keep from paying millions in medical costs over their lifetimes. Often, the drivers plead ignorance — that they thought it was a bag of trash, or a box — and rarely serve significant jail sentences.

Incidents captured on video show drivers sometimes backing over their victims several times to insure that they’ve been killed, according to the report.

The story details a disparity between restitution for people killed and injured in accidents, and often lax jail sentences for drivers convicted of hit-and-run fatal crashes. (In May, Indian actor Salman Khan was sentenced to only five years in jail for running over five people — killing one — while he was drunk. In 2012, a teen in Thailand was convicted of killing nine people and didn’t serve any jail time.)

Hitting and killing someone may only run $30,000-$50,000 in China, Sant writes. Paying that person’s medical bills for life could add up to millions.

“‘Double-hit cases’ have been around for decades. I first heard of the ‘hit-to-kill’ phenomenon in Taiwan in the mid-1990s when I was working there as an English teacher. A fellow teacher would drive us to classes. After one near-miss of a motorcyclist, he said, ‘If I hit someone, I’ll hit him again and make sure he’s dead.'”

The most chilling account recalls the case where a man struck a 3-year-old boy with the rear of his BMW X6, rolling over his head. The man pulls forward, over the boy again, and then gets out of the car to guide the car over the young boy again. The man pulled away from the scene — running over the boy for the fourth time — and was only charged with accidentally killing the boy.

In 2012, a 2-year-old girl named Wang Yue was struck by two vans in China and lay dying on the street for 7 minutes while 18 passersby walked past the mortally wounded girl. The driver of the van was only sentenced to 3 1/2 years in jail for his role in the killing.

Sant points out that not all drivers who hit people escape without penalties. A man who struck a woman on a bicycle, then returned to stab her to make sure she was dead, was convicted and executed. But those cases appear to be the exception and not the rule.

Yet even when a driver hits a victim multiple times, it can be hard to prove intent and causation — at least to the satisfaction of China’s courts. Judges, police, and media often seem to accept rather unbelievable claims that the drivers hit the victims multiple times accidentally, or that the drivers confused the victims with inanimate objects.

(Photo courtesy Nissan)

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62 Comments on “In China, It’s Cheaper To Kill Than It Is To Maim...”


  • avatar
    sirwired

    “And then he ran into my knife; he ran into my knife ten times!”
    – “He had it coming” – Chicago

    And that’s about as believable as accidentally running over a “box” four+ times.

    For all the many flaws in our justice system, I’d like to think getting off for such an intentional murder, when there’s obvious video evidence to convict, would range from extremely-rare to nearly-impossible, even for the rich and powerful.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      Ladies and gentlemen of the jury, you will hear testimony clearly placing my client elsewhere at the time of the accident. We will also show that it was impossible for my client to see the victim given how dark the alley was, and finally, that my client ran him over multiple times in self-defense.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Michael Clayton: “Cops like hit-and-runs. They work ’em hard, they clear ’em fast. Right now there’s a BCI unit picking paint chips off a guard rail. Tomorrow they’re gonna be looking for the owner of a custom painted, hand rubbed Jaguar XJ12. The guy you hit? If he got a look at the plates, it won’t even take that long. There’s no play here. There’s no angle, there’s no champagne room. I’m not a miracle worker, I’m a janitor. The math on this is simple; the smaller the mess, the easier it is for me to clean up.”

      [Phone rings]

      Client: “That’s the police, isn’t it?”

      Michael Clayton: “No. They don’t call.”

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Well, when you’ve got a billion and a half people, what the hey?

    I can’t even imagine that many BBs.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Incidents captured on video show drivers sometimes backing over their victims several times to insure that they’ve been killed, according to the report.”

    Hence the slogan Land Rover uses over there!

    “Land Rover. Job done, the first time.”

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    This doesn’t surprise in the least, having traveled to China a dozen times now, sometimes for as long as nearly three weeks at a time.

    Much of China is populated by a people with an almost ruthless character, with a dismissive attitude, if not outright disdain, for “petty” sentiments such as the significance of human life & liberty.

    They also have the worst manners, by far, of any ethnic/racial general population I’ve ever experienced, farting, belching, picking their noses elbow deep, and honking up monster loogies & expelling them in spectacular fashion, all in public spaces, including dining establishments, with absolutely zero concern for the people around them.

    I’m sure that I’ll be chastised for my actual observations, and that I’ll be labeled a “racist” and anti-Chinese, and told that I fail to appreciate the unique experience and history of the Chinese people, and the role their political systems and demographics have in shaping their behavior and seeming lack of appreciation for human dignity, but I call them as I see them.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      “all in public spaces, including dining establishments, with absolutely zero concern for the people around them.”

      Saw this in South Korea and it was appalling. Now, undoubtedly the people doing it there were not of pristine social standing as I was in a semi-junky apartment building lobby and elevator. But still.

      A kid hocked a loogie in the school building where I worked, right in the lobby with the elevators (he was probably 10-12). I made him go get some paper towels to clean it up. He said, “Teacher, it’s dirty!” I said “I KNOW, YOU DID IT!” and sufficiently embarrassed him in front of all his friends.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I have only been to South Korea once, but with that caveat, did not see behavior remotely as disgusting as in China.

        Did you teach in South Korea?

        Did you like it there, generally speaking?

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          South Korea? I think Corey was working for Kim Jong Il before his untimely demise. Corey didn’t you tell me you stole one of those 76 Town Cars and drove it straight to Vladivostok?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Yep, I did teach there. I liked it for a time, but the constant crowded nature and bowing to the whims of the school for scheduling and teaching methods got tiring.

          The school was a private, chain one (hagwon) which I chose because it was in a nice part of the city I wanted to live in (Busan), and had a decent reputation from what I gathered. I lived in a suburban area (Hwamyeong-dong) on the newer side of town, far away from the downtown area. Suburban to a Korean means the buildings are 12-25 stories tall, and there is no Lotte department store selling Louis Vuitton handy.

          Doing the same thing over and over, teaching the same over-simplified and poorly written books got tiring. So did working in a school which was profit-driven, and chastised me when I gave a student a failing grade, get this, for failing a test. That was around month 9 of 12, and they made me change the students grade to passing (a C) else “She might leave the school.” I was pretty much done with it after that.

          The litter got on my nerves as well. There are few public trash bins, because you’re supposed to leave your trash on the streets. Gives the old 80-years plus aged men something to do (their job) when they go out each morning at 5:00 and pick trash on the street, pulling their little carts behind them.

          But the scenic beauty of the country is amazing, and for the most part Koreans are very friendly, if a bit cautious and curious about you. I could look out my window down the main drag of my part of town, and look at a mountain. Mass transportation is clean, efficient, and cheap. You get treated with celebrity service everywhere you go because you’re white, and it’s very easy to save money there because you make so much compared to the average Korean. And you work 35-38 hours a week.

          I also purchased in early 09 a 1997 Daewoo Lanos sedan for $1,100 with 65K miles. But it wasn’t very good, ha.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            What did you teach there?

            I taught a class on awesomeness for several semesters at the University of Antarctica.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh, probably should have mentioned that. English! (Engrishie)

            You don’t have to have a teaching degree to teach there, just a BA or BS. The pay is better than Japan because there’s more demand, and the costs of living are considerably lower. China is also an option, but ehhhh. It does require a certification, and I dunno if I’d feel comfortable living in China.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            That’s a really good experience that few Americans will ever get to appreciate, and makes for a much richer life, IMO.

            Where I used to work, many seasoned employees b!tched & moaned whenever a trip to China, South Korea or India was on deck for them, because the novelty had worn off (and due to too many really bad experiences, from unimaginable pollution to serious stomach ailments), and the concrete consensus was that even with all of our national and state-level problems, Americans can’t possibly appreciate how much better life is in the U.S. unless one spent significant time abroad in emerging nations (especially emerging ones).

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            Did you ever see a Daewoo Veritas?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I met a lot of interesting and liberal Americans and Canadians there, and will always remember my experiences with them. It’s interesting that you’re all there for the same reason, you all have the same job and hours (albeit different locations) and same work troubles. It means you almost instantly have a friend group to hang out with and spend your money. Everybody has a 1-year contract, so it seems like every two weeks there’s a going away party for someone. And you’ll never see that person again in life, as their time doing the same thing as you is over.

            I also saw two suicides, but we don’t have to cover that today.

            Life in SK could be about equivalent to life in the US (but with more self-imposed societal pressure) if you have enough money and the correct education.

            @ajla

            I saw a Daewoo Statesman just once, same thing I think.

            I also saw a Daewoo Equinox version, labeled as a Vauxhall.

            And also a Maybach 62, parked right up on the sidewalk.

            One mid 90’s Park Avenue, in spotless condition.

            Few JDM Skylines.

            One D3 A8.

            Many, many Porsche’s and Lambos.

          • 0 avatar
            NN

            I did a year-long teaching (English) gig in Guangdong back in 2002-2003. I can agree with many of DW’s cultural assessments, but people are creatures of their environment, and older Chinese grew up in much harsher times and conditions than any Americans can imagine. Even in the past 12 years (I was back there this past February), the general manners of modern Chinese have improved greatly since 2002. Less loogies on restaurant floors! That said, life, in general, is still cheap in China. I remember I spoke about 9/11 to my class, and they remarked that they thought it was amazing that we cared for the few thousand people who died. They’ll have an earthquake and lose 50k people, shrug it off and move on.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            @NN

            Funny, in S. Korea it’s the opposite RE: caring for others. Everyone is a “family member” and all lives matter!

            I was in SK at the time Michael Jackson died, and I can’t tell you how many random people/students/workers I had come up to me and say “Oh Michael Jackson, so sorry.” (etc). Their assumption was that I really REALLY cared.

            Was there also during Obama’s election, and that confused the heck out of them as well.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      I’m Chinese, but not from the Mainland.

      Much of your experience is probably pretty accurate. Growing up in Hong Kong, it was just as much of a culture shock to visit the Mainland on holidays (the public spitting, urinating, etc. which mostly died out by the 80s in Hong Kong is still prevalent today in the Mainland). And these days with the massive influx of immigrants and tourists from the Mainland coming to Hong Kong, there are daily news reports of Mainlanders who just unload their bowels in the middle of the otherwise-pristine subway car, or parents who just let their young children go potty in the potted plants in upscale shopping malls. There is quite a bit of animosity towards Mainlanders at the moment (which partially contributed to the culmination of the Occupy Central movement last year).

      I remember visiting Xihu (West Lake) in Hangzhou – arguably one of the top tourist attractions in China akin to going to the Grand Canyon – and there was a large permanent sign that told people to toss their garbage into the lake. Granted this was back in the early-90s, so they’ve probably gotten rid of that sign now that international travel to China has exploded exponentially. It’s like that scene on Mad Men where they just waved their picnic cloth and let all their rubbish fly into the wind in the park (and we go haha look what they did back in the 60s).

      The thing to remember is that there are a lot of uneducated and uncultured people there (blame the One Child Policy, Cultural Revolution, the “To Get Rich Is To Be Glorious” policy among many others). And now many of these nouveau riche middle class are travelling en masse to the West as unruly tourists – even the Chinese president had to go on national TV telling these people to stop embarrassing the country.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Good post, gives us a unique perspective.

      • 0 avatar
        Chan

        Same for me.

        Because China had basically an educational vacuum after the Cultural Revolution (it really, thoroughly twisted the values of the children then), it is only now that people in the larger cities are realising the need to class-up to stop embarrassing their “strong country.”

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Yes, unique and genuinely insightful input from onyx & chan.

        Much of the cultural differences I observed are no doubt due to much more than something as simple as innate ethnic/racial differences.

        At one time, it is credibly established that Germans’ & English ancestors were incredibly savage & brutish by the conventional standards of their Roman Empire peers at the time.

        • 0 avatar
          Zelgadis

          Oh my… Reading all of this makes me very happy that I chose Japan to live for three years of my life. I worked for the government in the public school system there and I never encountered anything like what some of you are describing about China and SK.

    • 0 avatar
      SoCalMikester

      they also let their kids piss and defecate wherever seems handy, and sometimes they do it too.

    • 0 avatar
      dantes_inferno

      > Much of China is populated by a people with an almost ruthless character, with a dismissive attitude, if not outright disdain, for “petty” sentiments such as the significance of human life & liberty.

      In China, Americans are worth 50 points on the Death Race 2000 scale. So watch out.

    • 0 avatar
      Superdessucke

      I don’t think that’s bad manners. They’re probably just trying to get the coal dust out of their nose and lungs.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I read about this last week and it is really disturbing. However without strong mandatory insurance laws in place we would be in the same spot here in the “civilized” world.

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      Well, actually, most liability policies would not cover taking care of a a disabled accident victim for life, so that’s not the reason. (Few people have the large umbrella policy this would require.)

      However, I don’t think China has the concept of debts being discharged in bankruptcy. If you, not-rich person, have a multi-$M judgement against you, you’ll simply declare BK and the debt will go away. Often your house and car will be protected in BK, as will Social Security, Pension, and 401(k). That covers the entirety of most people’s assets.

      Also, in the US, even the very rich would have great difficulty getting an acquittal for such an act, when backed by so much evidence. So even if you have substantial assets to attach, it’ll still be cheaper than your inevitable life sentence and/or execution for intentionally running over somebody you hit to make sure they are dead.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      It is estimated that 50% of drivers (or more) in Detroit, MI, Pontiac, MI, Flint, MI, and Benton Harbor, MI, have no auto insurance at any given time (not even basic PL/PD).

      • 0 avatar
        Mr. Orange

        Isn’t that so true in many cities across America. I’ve been hit three times in Tennessee and two didn’t have insurance.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        DW, the number of uninsured drivers in the Great State of New Mexico, The Land of Enchantment, is even greater than in MI.

        But in the case of New Mexico, it could be the sheer number of illegal aliens passing through New Mexico, on their way East to MI and beyond, that skew the numbers.

        The rates in NM for comprehensive coverage for insured drivers are mind-boggling, especially when you consider the chances of getting in an accident in these wide-open spaces.

        So, ever since I quit financing my vehicles in 1992, I have kept my auto insurance costs to the absolute minimum by going only Liability, whatever the minimum is that my state requires. Saves tons of money.

        How about a 2015 Sequoia, $57.64 for six months. A 2011 Tundra, $53.21 for six months. And, best of all, a 1989 Camry V6, $46.18 for six months.

        • 0 avatar
          Toad

          Re: HDC, you have no comprehensive insurance on a $50k Sequoia? You are definitely a gambler. I don’t think I could drive a vehicle knowing that if an uninsured motorist hit me I might lose that much money.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Toad, it’s not unusual for people who buy their cars outright not to carry comprehensive coverage.

            Comprehensive and “full” coverage with a small deductible is something that lenders mandate in order to protect the value of their loan to the borrower.

            In most of New Mexico traffic is very light. In the three big cities (Albuquerque, Santa Fe and Las Cruces) that’s where the insurance rates in New Mexico have gone through the roof.

            Really not much of a gamble.

      • 0 avatar
        WildcatMatt

        The easiest way to judge this is to compare the breakouts of your Bodily Injury (BI) coverage to your Uninsured Motorist Bodily Injury (UMBI or just UM).

        If you carry equal coverage (and why wouldn’t you?) and the UM charge is close to or even higher than your BI charge, you live in an area where the uninsured rate is high.

        From my 8 years doing policy service, the worst place I saw for UM was Miami.

  • avatar

    When I lived in China, you could just sit back, relax and watch the busy streets devolve into bike accidents.

    That is, if you can breathe their polluted air.

    AIR POLLUTION = Limiting factor. After all: 1 Billion plus impoverished people would multiply like rabbits without passive eugenics.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Lol, just noticed that’s a Nissan-provided image. Really? A dirty looking Versa parked near a chubby woman on a bike, as a VW Santana rolls by.

    Yes quite an ideal photo op.

    • 0 avatar
      dantes_inferno

      > Lol, just noticed that’s a Nissan-provided image. Really? A dirty looking Versa parked near a chubby woman on a bike, as a VW Santana rolls by.

      In a collision, I’ll put my money on the chubby woman on the bike.

  • avatar
    doublechili

    A modern day take on the “Bring out yer dead” scene from The Holy Grail….

  • avatar
    Mr. Orange

    Is it that much different than in America where its “better” to kill someone with a vehicle than by any other form of homicide? That is if your intent is to get away with it or serve the smallest possible punishment.

    Most likely sentence for first degree murder: 20+ years to life or death sentence

    Second degree: 8 to 40+ years

    Vehicular homicide: No jail, 1 year, $200 fine, 15+ years, 30 years or whatever the prosecutor feels like, can justify or plea bargin.

    • 0 avatar
      onyxtape

      Not long after arriving in this country, my father took a self-defense class at a shooting range. (Not because we lived in a place where it was entirely necessary, but just it was a fresh novel thing to try out in the States). He distinctly remembered the instructor telling him to always aim to kill, for the same legal liability reasons cited in this article.

      • 0 avatar
        SaulTigh

        Dead men tell no tales.

      • 0 avatar
        carrya1911

        I know a thing or two about self defense instruction. There is a ton of bad information out there pushed by clueless idiots, police officers, and “instructors” who have no actual certifications or experience in the legal aftermath of self defense.

        A firearm is a lethal weapon. It is not really possible to use a lethal weapon to a non-lethal purpose absent some truly extraordinary circumstances. (Like a police sniper shooting a revolver out of a guy’s hand) Any time you pull the trigger on another human being in a defensive act, you are using lethal force.

        Lethal force is justified in a particular exigency, namely that it is the force necessary to stop the violent assault of a criminal actor against you or an innocent third party. When that exigency expires, so does the justification for the use of lethal force absent some extraordinary circumstances. (Like shooting a fleeing terrorist who is wearing a bomb vest, or serial murderer, etc)

        Potential civil liability is often a reality of police shootings regardless of whether the subject is deceased or injured because police departments have the resources of the government they work for backing them. Where there is a wallet, there is an attorney who will try to get into it. In most states, however, it’s difficult for civil liability to be attached to a legitimate act of self defense against a criminal assault. In many states specific legal protections have been enacted to prevent any civil liability from a justified use of force for private citizens.

        Police officers are a somewhat different entity because they act under color of authority and as such their use of force actions can be argued as a constitutional rights issue or a government taking action.

        In short, there’s really no such thing as using a lethal weapon like a firearm in a less lethal capacity, and there’s no reliable legal benefit to a dead criminal assailant as opposed to a wounded criminal assailant. The most that can be argued is that a dead man can’t tell his side of the story…but his dead body and the forensic evidence it contains can certainly tell the story if you use lethal force to ensure the death of your assailant rather than to protect your own life or the life of an innocent third party. (Have to consider alter ego self defense requirements in some states) Just ask Jerome Ersland about that…if you can arrange to visit him in prison.

        • 0 avatar
          Dan

          The dead body didn’t send Jerome Ersland to jail, the surveillance video of him calmly walking back 15 seconds later to deliver the coup de grace did. Without that recording I believe he could have claimed that the vibrant youth was still reaching for a gun, there would have been no evidence that the play had been blown dead so to speak, and he almost certainly would have walked.

          Always act as if you’re on camera. You probably are.

          • 0 avatar
            carrya1911

            The nature of the bullet wound, lividity, and blood on the scene would have certainly told the difference between a bullet wound inflicted when the dead robber was on his feet and one delivered while the dead robber was laying unconscious on the ground.

            The fact that it was dealt by a different weapon would have also been a clue, too.

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            A second weapon and that the thug was supine when shot again would be obvious.

            The timeline of re-engagement would not be clear. It wouldn’t be obvious that Ersland walked away to retrieve a second gun. He could have had it the whole time and changed guns for a multitude of non 1st degree murderous reasons.

            Wounds to an unconscious person don’t look any different than wounds to a barely conscious person reaching for his gun. Lividity is for people who are already dead.

            Most importantly, your victim is an obvious bad actor in a non politically charged case so failing something as blatant as entry wounds in the back, or contact distance powder burns, or a surveillance video of the shooter calmly standing over the robber … would a forensic examiner really try that hard?

            “I immediately returned to see if he was alive and if so make sure that he could breathe and he reached for his gun.” would have been the end of it.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Multiculturalism is brilliant.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    It reminds me of what my cop friend said. If you catch an intruder in your home, shoot but unload the whole clip on him, making sure he’s dead-dead. Just so he can’t sue you. Tell them you just ‘lost it’ and he kept coming at you.

    If you’re in Texas you may not need to, but what the heck

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      ATFOTRAF.

    • 0 avatar
      carrya1911

      See my reply above. There are a bunch of “cop friends” out there who say all kinds of ignorant nonsense because they have no clue what they are talking about. There’s no olly-olly oxen free when it comes to a homicide investigation, ladies and gentlemen.

      If you finish dumping a magazine into even a violent criminal who no longer poses a threat to you, you are highly likely to end up in prison.

      A defensive use of force has to be reasonable. The number of shots you fire plays a part in whether or not your actions are viewed as reasonable to a jury or a judge.

      Insisting that a man who took several shots while he was laying on the ground was shot while “he kept coming at you” is likely to end badly for you.

      The best advice on self defense is to shoot until the lethal threat has stopped, make sure to follow orders from uniformed police who arrive on scene, and then to say next to nothing without competent legal counsel.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The intruder just picked the wrong house is all. A real shame I say. I like to panic and overreact in life or death situations. Remember I’m not seeking out him, or anybody.

        When my truck starts to go sideways on ice, my right leg immediately starts pumping the sh!t out of the brakes before I can sort out the situation. That’s just me. It’s actually saved the rig more than once.

        If the court system has a problem with my finishing him, that’s what’s so fukked about the whole thing. And that’s exactly why you don’t want to get sued by the intruder in court for pain/suffering and support his maimed A$$ for the rest of his sorry life.

        • 0 avatar
          carrya1911

          The court system does indeed have a problem with “finishing him”…and doing so is a good way to turn a perfectly legitimate use of force into a murder or manslaughter charge.

          Using lethal force within appropriate boundaries is the best defense to criminal and civil liability after the fact.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            What I think I hear you suggesting is:

            MORTAL KOMBAT

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            I hope it never comes down to it, but I see it totally different that the court. An intruders life means very little to me. What it comes down to is the courts are a business like any other, and if I “finished”‘one of their favorite customers, they’d want me as his replacement.

            And I’ll put my dogs life above anyone I don’t know. If anyone so much as points a gun at my dog, she/he’s as good as dead. I don’t care if it’s a cop. And what jury could convict a man for defending his innocent dog’s life?

          • 0 avatar
            sgeffe

            I thought police SOP is two shots at a time..a “double tap.” Does that apply to self-defense, or could that get you sent away?

  • avatar
    carlisimo

    In Taiwan it would happen during the late ’80s and early/mid ’90s (shortly before Taiwan became democratic), but most of assumed that they were political hits.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Interesting to see the various Cultural takes on all this .

    My Son went to High School with a smart young Man who later became an exchange College Student in China , once he discovered he could make obscene cash money teaching English to Chinese , that was the end of his formal education ~ he’s now making middle six figure income and making TV commercials and educational videos along with teaching English and having more fun than he ever imagined .

    Agreed , I seriously think all Americans need to live elsewhere for a while , it rounds one out and teaches cultural awareness .

    Travel is fatal to hatred and bigotry .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Bill Wade

    When I was in the Navy we went to Hong Kong in 1973. They told us if we hit somebody while driving make absolutely sure we killed them.

    Seems the policy hasn’t changed.

  • avatar
    Joss

    What if it’s somebody in another car? How do they solve the problem then?

  • avatar
    swaghole

    Just lost faith in humanity after reading the Slate article.

  • avatar
    jkk6

    Darn it! Got road kill on my shoes again.

  • avatar
    1998redwagon

    interesting take on a number of different ideas in the threads above.

    what is not mentioned (getting back to the original post) is that in some countries outside the us/canada etc, if you injure someone you are culturally expected to care for them. what an interesting idea. there is no insurance to save you as either the injured or injuring party. perhaps the ultimate in libertarian thinking.

    in grad school a filipino woman in our lab was injured by an undergraduate student riding his bike on the sidewalk entirely too fast. she required hospitalization for about 5 days until she was stabilized. to his credit the biker stayed until the police arrived and got her in an ambulance and took his story. i am sure he received a ticket and not much else. one of the other grad students in the lab (from south korea) asked me when he was going to come by and see her and make restitution. he was in disbelief when i told him never. that’s why the university requires all grad students to have adequate insurance.

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