By on September 8, 2015

2016 Cadillac ELR red

As the U.S. auto industry technically lost a small amount of new vehicle sales volume in August 2015, sales of the unappealing Cadillac ELR plunged 77 percent to the car’s lowest monthly total yet.

In fact, August 2015’s collapse of the Volt-based ELR’s sales comes precisely one year after the ELR reached its best-ever monthly volume.

196 ELRs were sold in America in August 2014, a figure which decreased by 85 units the very next month and by 151 units a year later.

Over the course of the last nine months in which Cadillac has reported year-over-year change for the ELR — the range-extended electric went on sale at the end of December 2013 — sales have never fallen this sharply. Indeed, over the first five months of 2015, ELR sales were far healthier, relatively speaking, than during the same period one year earlier. ELR volume more than doubled in January, February, and May and jumped 81 percent through the end of May.

Over the last three months, however, U.S. sales of the ELR tumbled 64 percent, a loss of 308 units. August’s plunge to 45 units comes after Cadillac reported 62 ELR sales in June; 66 in July. Cadillac averaged more than 100 ELR sales per month in the first five months of this year; 153 per month in the second-half of last year.

ELR inventory certainly isn’t as healthy now as it was a number of months ago. At the beginning of May, for example, Automotive News reported that Cadillac had a 75-day supply of ELRs. At the beginning of August, that figure had fallen to just 39 days in an industry that had approximately two months worth of stock.

2014 Cadillac ELR

The ELR’s worst full month — only six were sold in December 2013, but the car only began falling into customer hands at the tail end of the month — comes as Cadillac’s 2016 ELR makes great gains in terms of performance.

Yet based on the ELR’s first two years of marketplace performance, we can’t truly suggest that consumers didn’t buy ELRs in August 2015 because they’re waiting on the eagerly anticipated 2016 model. The ELR simply doesn’t have the cachet to be eagerly anticipated, and the size of the ELR’s potential clientele is barely large enough to refer to “buyers” in the plural.

Taken purely from an inventory perspective, a buyer who truly did want an ELR could find an ELR on sale. Fewer in number on dealer lots though they were, ELRs were there for the taking.

Nevertheless, the performance credentials of the MY2016 ELR are greatly enhanced. Horsepower rises by 7 percent, torque increases by 26 percent, and the nought to 60 time drops by more than a second. Suspension changes are intended to make the ELR stiffer. Brakes, GM says, are new, with “improved application feel.” There’s even a new Performance Package with 20-inch summer tires, Brembo brakes, uniquely calibrated Continuous Damping Control, and a sport steering wheel. Which sport the steering wheel plays, I can’t tell you. It simply is sport.

Yet the change that attracts attention in the automotive flop-judging world is the 2016 ELR’s $10,000 price cut. The ELR is no longer a $75,000 car. It costs $10,000 less than that now. Which is $65,000.

The ELR, of course, was never really a $75,000 car, not in the minds of Cadillac dealership sales managers who are currently displaying 19 different ELRs on Cars.com with prices below $50,000.

Unfortunately, the ELR isn’t simply an anomaly within the Cadillac realm, little more than a flop in a lineup full of home-run-hitting cars. Despite an increase in Escalade, Escalade ESV, and SRX sales — the SUV line is up 18 percent this year and rose 24 percent in August — Cadillac’s car quartet is down 23 percent this year and tumbled 33 percent in August.

ATS volume tumbled 18.5 percent, or 3,752 units, through the first eight months of 2015. CTS volume is down 37 percent, a loss of 7,705 sales already this year. Sales of the XTS declined 12 percent through the end of August, a loss of 1,984 sales. The ELR’s 9-percent, 70-unit decline is, while embarrassing, statistically meaningless in Cadillac’s grand scheme.

Although stylish in the eyes of many, the ELR is far more reminiscent of the GM which attempted to turn a Chevrolet Cavalier into a Cadillac Cimarron than the GM which, in August, successfully sold 26,511 copies of the company’s three easily distinguishable, nine-year-old, full-size crossovers: Enclave, Traverse, Acadia. Just as buyers spurned the Cimarron, buyers are now snubbing the ELR. Hopefully, for Cadillac’s sake, the ELR’s link to the Chevrolet Volt won’t be nearly as harmful to Cadillac’s image as the Cimarron was, and continues to be.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures. Follow on Twitter @goodcarbadcar and on Facebook.

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92 Comments on “Cadillac ELR Flop Flopped Even Harder In Floppy August...”


  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    We already know the Electric Cimmaron is a failure and symbolic of the decline and fall of the overall brand. The question is why does it continue to be offered and thus generate more bad PR?

    Here’s an idea, since the money spent is never being recouped as it is why not donate the things to a highly visible charity? Don’t like that? How about give them away in a contest but force the winners to give video feedback?

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      There’s no comparison to the Cimarron. The ELR was intended to be a low-volume car from the start. The Cimarron was supposed to be Cadillac’s 3-series (and obviously wasn’t even close.)

    • 0 avatar

      IT FAILED BECAUSE I DON’T WORK AT GM.

      The ELR is a BETTER CAR than every Model S trim besides the P85D.

      I would have NEVER let them build a Coupe without a 4-door sedan optional. We’d have basically made a PHEV CTS-V sport to justify the $80,000+ price tag.

      TESLA would say “oh but their car is not “green” enough”.

      INSTANT REPLY: “YEAH, BUT I DON’T HAVE TO WAIT HOURS TO CHARGE IT CAUSE I’VE GOT GAS ELON YOU TURKEY”…

      Advertise the hell out of it.

      I’d have every rich celebrity all over it.

      Rapper put em in rap videos to make the drug dealers want one.

      PROFIT.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I’ve seen a blue Volt around here with white ELR wheels.

    Certainly looks cooler than an actual ELR.

  • avatar
    qfrog

    This article is the first time I can remember reading about this car.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Sir, I know you’d like size 11s but here’s a really nice size 8 and it’s a Cadillac!

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    “ATS volume tumbled 18.5 percent, or 3,752 units, through the first eight months of 2015. CTS volume is down 37 percent, a loss of 7,705 sales already this year. Sales of the XTS declined 12 percent through the end of August, a loss of 1,984 sales. The ELR’s 9-percent, 70-unit decline is, while embarrassing, statistically meaningless in Cadillac’s grand scheme.”

    Danm Skippy. And even the sales of the Cash Cow Escalade (now effectively subsidizing all of Cadillac) were down MoM and YoY.

    But Johan de Nysschen is a “visionary” with another “5 Year Plan,” who has conned Mary-should-be-buggin’-Barra & Mark Reuss out of 12 billion USD of GM/U.S. Taxpayer Monies (such figure representing over 1/3 of GM’s total platform development for the next 5 years, despite Cadillac selling just 1 out every 20 vehicles the GM Company, LLC does in total), and Johan is coming with length with the new CT1, CT2, CT3, CT4, CT5, CT6, CT7, CT8, CT9, etc.

    Prediction: The upcoming CT6 will sell less than 1,000 units per month, and probably fewer than 9,000 in its debut year, grinding lower from thereon in, flopping harder than an equally cheesy Bret Michaels at the 2009 Tony awards.

    “Dare Greatly” with $249 to $349 leases, Cadillac, if you want to keep the lines running, let alone sell 500,000 Cadillac at Mercedes prices by 2020 per Johan.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      An interesting comment I heard (on Autoline, IIRC) on alpha-numeric names said that people acknowledge the first digit and progressively tune-out with each subsequent digit. BMW’s method of 3xx/5xx/7xx works because the first digit is all that’s really noticed, but it gets the message across. The same is true for Mercedes’ Cxxx/Exxx/Sxxx. Audi is OK with Xy. Lincoln flubbed up with MKwhocaresanymore. Cadillac was OK with Ayy/Cyy/Xyy but have now chosen to replicate Lincoln’s mistake.

    • 0 avatar
      Austin Greene

      I hate to say it, but as a seven-year Cadillac owner and a big car kind of guy, I think DeadWeight is correct on CT6.

      I’ve poured through the order guide and with the exception of Panaray sound I can’t find any reason to buy it over a CTS.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Cadillac needs to decide if it wants to be a high volume brand with moderate pricing or a low volume ultra luxury brand with high pricing. Currently it attempts both but fails and ends up pricing things much lower through incentives. A rational thinker would accept this, price things lower, and focus on the product. The CT6 is essentially the new Sigma Seville, Americans like bigger cars and would select it over CTS if the price premium were reasonable (say 20-25%). No Cadillac in production is worth $80K. None of them. Accept it RenCen, you built a dealer network designed for volume production. Give it volume models at reasonable prices and watch sales climb.

        • 0 avatar

          Word.

          It isn’t 1961 and they’re not The Standard of the World. That kind of grandiosity just doesn’t work with their quality, marketing or distribution.

          I hope JdN will get real, and soon.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Don’t bet on it.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            I give Johan another year to 2, max, until he is either dismissed, or more likely, resigns allegedly of his own accord to “pursue” other opportunities.

            JdN is a corporate tornado, and loves to spend huge baskets of money on the least lucrative (or loss-inducing) vanity/pet projects.

            He’s run an eminence front at Infinity, and now, Cadillac. He’s literally a confidence man running a thinly veiled confidence game.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            In fairness, Cadillac was already a disaster before he arrived.

    • 0 avatar

      Honestly, Cadillac was supposed to have had a venerable flagship by now. What I suspect happened was that the CT6 was intended to be that flagship, and then GM took a look at what the competition was bringing (chiefly the W222 S-Class), realized the CT6 couldn’t compete and said, “We told you this new one would be our flagship, but…psych! Just kidding! Our real flagship is coming later; don’t you worry.” Honestly, that’s the only logical explanation I can come up with. There’s really no room in the market for a “tweener product” between a mid-sized luxury sedan and a full-sized luxury one…unless the tweener product is something that’s extremely stylish and can immediately be seen as worth a premium. That would be where the A7, CLS-Class and 5-Series Gran Coupe reside, and a category in which the CT6 certainly does not belong. And even *if* the CT6 was a competitive flagship, Cadillac couldn’t seriously charge $80K or $90K for it…not with the brand’s lingering reputation and the taste of the DTS still in our mouths.

      Also, who the *hell* would want a four-cylinder at that price level?

      The move to New York, the nomenclature change…I think Cadillac is just throwing things at the wall and seeing what sticks. I still take issue with some of Lincoln’s new practices, like uninspired-looking center stacks, but Lincoln knows what it is and where it stands and has realistic goals, and a much better chance of being a relevant luxury brand, at least here in the U.S.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I agree with your general assessment.

        Trying to out-BMW BMW, even at a time when BMW is softening their vehicles, is a path to disaster, and a fool’s errand given what facts and purchasers’ monies state about what’s desire in and from a premium vehicle today.

        I also thing 28 is correct in that Cadillac was in a very bad way before JdN arrived, but believe JdN created a new set of what are Cadillac’s current problems, when Cadillac could have been remade to be better, with better vehicles, and most importantly, to be profitable.

      • 0 avatar
        MrGreenMan

        They should have just taken the unsold Chevy SS cars sitting around, replace the sheet metal to make them look like a straight razor forged from one lump of metal and a hand saw for Art&Science, gutted the interior from the SS, installed the right American-market controls, and covered the seats with whale foreskin or unsustainably-harvested buffalo leather. They could have called it the Sedan de Ville.

    • 0 avatar
      tresmonos

      As time marches on, your original message is further exonerated. The ridiculousness of the rants start to normalize in the absurdness that is Cadillac.

  • avatar
    cartunez

    Deadweight you and BigTruck need your own youtube channel with video commentary. lol

  • avatar
    BobinPgh

    The car needed an actual name, Electra or even Ampera would have worked better. ELR? Looks like an abbreviation for Electric Eel.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Or at least go with an acronym that would instantly resonate with the demo who buys luxos: ELO.

      Maybe some of the cadavers from that band are still around for ads.

      • 0 avatar

        Jeff Lynne is alive. I’m sure his Traveling Wilbury buddy Bob Dylan said the Cadillac people are nice to work for and pay very well.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Jeff Lynne is also far from a cadaver. He has produced some hit songs/albums in his day.

          Although I do like many of the albums Jeff Lynne produced, I am still mad at him for allowing George Harrison to record “I Got My Mind Set On You”. The only post-Beatles song by one of the Beatles that I loathe more is Paul McCartney’s horrible Christmas song.

          • 0 avatar

            Blame George. He had free will.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Jeff Lynne has an uncanny ability to make everyone else sound like Jeff Lynne. Which is unfortunate.

            (Kudos to Regina Spektor for being the one exception to the rule.)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Full Moon Fever was a heck of an album, even if it removed some Heartbreakers sound.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            He did OK with the Beatles records, but even those ended up sounding like Jeff Lynne.

            Believe it or not, I’ve actually reviewed most of the ELO catalogue. (Don’t ask.) Have a look if you’re interested:

            http://www.sputnikmusic.com/user_reviews.php?memberid=1063790

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Discovery did suck.

            Did you only review ELO albums on that site? It’s going to be hard not to ask any further questions.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I had a case of writer’s block and I needed to break it for the sake of another project. I know that catalog well, so those were easy to write.

            (I meant to do just one, but they like to do discographies over there, so there you go.)

            I’ll write some others when I have time, if only to prove that I do have other albums in my possession.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        You made a fool of me. But them broken dreams have got to end!

        (Incidentally, one of the earlier members died in an oddball car crash — a hay overdose: http://www.theguardian.com/music/2012/nov/20/farmers-cleared-death-elo-cellist)

  • avatar
    Spartan

    Cadillac should have stayed the course with the ATS, CTS, DTS, LTS(Yes, it should have been named the LTS),SRX and the Escalade/ESV. At least then, the sales weren’t in the toilet and people were buying their cars. This chasing the Germans and ELR business isn’t the way to go. I don’t want a canyon carving hard riding Cadillac. I want a N/A V8, RWD and a smooth ride. The CTS would be perfect if it had a bigger backseat and a N/A V8. If it did, I’d buy one tomorrow, brand new and keep it for years to come.

    There was so much potential in Cadillac just last decade and I hate to see how they’ve pissed it all away. The bankruptcy derailed them and they haven’t been the same since. JdN is going to piss away billions and once Cadillac finally rights the ship 25 years from now, he’ll be old and decrepit yelling from the rooftops about how he saved Cadillac.

    • 0 avatar

      In general, I agree. If you want that kind of car, Hyundai has a nice Genesis to show you. I’m encouraged that the Lincoln Continental will supposedly be tuned as a smooth rider.

      Another thing those sales numbers show that Cadillac is wasting its time with 4 sedans over the next few years. That’s nuts.

      They should write off the ATS as a grand experiment. They could can the XTS and let it be the next Buick LaCrosse. An improved/renamed CTS with competitive pricing and a legit back seat can be flavored in the “classic American” vein. Add whatever CT6 ends up being, in both livery and sport trim, and that’s all they need.

      Aside from the rich CUV market, I’d hope the Cadillac SoHo crowd is sniffing out trends to develop a segment-buster that has BMW/M-B/Audi playing catch up. NB DeadWeight — I know, I know, I’ve been reading too much Alexander Pope.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    Imagine that, buyers aren’t interested in a Cadillac that looks like a modern-version Acura RSX. Whodathunk…

  • avatar

    For all the management shuffles, GM never changes in how it squanders opportunity. Just like Fiero, Allante and others before, they finally introduce a truly better model right before they cancel it.

    ELR might have worked with a great lease and a $10K premium over a Volt. It would have made a great long-term play to bring eco-conscious consumers wanting something more stylish than a Prius to the Cadillac fold.

    Instead, they started with that insane price tag, obnoxious Super Bowl ad, and overly-boastful PR from previous management. This thing was spoiled goods from Day One.

    The upside? Collectors who get ELRs off-lease for $15K will be selling them as “classics” in 30 years.

  • avatar

    That they can still milk such sales from the Enclave/Traverse/Acadia platform after all this time (admittedly a bunch to fleet) shows that GM does still have some good pimping skills.

    I’ll agree with Buickman and say it sure ain’t the marketing. I suspect money on the hood, aggressive dealers and buyers who want big-but-not-too-big are doing the trick.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Is this really a story? “Car based on old Volt tanks after new Volt comes out” is hardly a surprise.

    If you want to embarrass Cadillac, write something on the ATS and CTS numbers like DeadWeight does above.

    • 0 avatar

      Yes, but it was pronounced as a traffic-building “halo” for Cadillac’s new direction. When the halo turns into a rain cloud, you dump it.

      They haven’t. I’d admire Cadillac more if they just said “we tried” and moved on. Software/electronics makers, clothing companies, and television networks do it every day.

      Besides the detriments of ATS/CTS/XTS in the marketplace, I truly think ELR has added to Cadillac’s “distressed merchandise” image. To me at least, its continued existence makes Cadillac a bit of a joke.

      Along with quality problems and the lingering old man image, isn’t that part of their current problem?

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The ELR is a non-story. This is the sort of stuff that transfixes some folks in the TTAC comments section, but that no one else cares about.

        • 0 avatar

          Yes. And this is a comments section for car geeks. Your point?

          I’m fascinated by the ELR’s failure not because of its volume. To me, it says lots about GM and its abilities to read the marketplace. There’s a greater problem at work here with Cadillac, and I think that’s where this conversation is heading.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The point is that you’re making a mountain range out of a molehill. The “geeks” are the proverbial hammers in search of nails, which means that everything ends up looking like a nail.

            I prefer cogent analysis to hype. And the fixation on this car is hype. It’s not a success, but its failure to inspire as a halo car doesn’t really hurt, either.

            (Personally, I would have made it a roadster if the platform was up to the job, but even that would have been a low-volume car. Cars of this size from luxury marques never sell in large volumes, and those cars that they do sell in this size class need to be high performance or topless. But whatever.)

          • 0 avatar

            “Personally, I would have made it a roadster if the platform was up to the job”

            The Cadillac ELR is on the basic Delta II platform, which has spawned the Opel Cascada cabriolet (which should come to the U.S. as a Buick), so presumably the ELR could at least have been a cabriolet.

            But I agree with you that the ELR car is too often an object of ridicule. Cadillac didn’t expect to sell very many, it didn’t try very hard to sell any, and—surprise, surprise—few have been sold. However, Cadillac’s consistent misdirection is an interesting subject to study.

        • 0 avatar
          jkross22

          Yet you’re here spending time commenting on a non-story. Peculiar.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Your idea of a profound point isn’t.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Nothing profound about it. It’s common sense. Maybe that’s why you missed it.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I’m not really commenting about the car, so much as I am about your inability to see the forest from the trees.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Forest for the trees.

            Strange that you’re in a huff about either the story or the car. For such a non-story, you sure are worked up.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Your definition of “worked up” could use a little work. OK, a lot of work.

            You’ve been getting stuff wrong here for years, so it’s not as if I have high expectations for you.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            As difficult as it must have been, you’ve gone well past your usual level of self-absorption with this exchange. Tip of that hat to you for lowering the bar. You persevered.

            I look forward to reading more comments from you whining about articles that are non-issues and commenting on them.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            It’s par for the course for you to miss the point, but you really shouldn’t brag about it.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Keep digging. You’ll hit the bottom eventually.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      The car tanked as soon as it was released. See price tag for the main reason.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        The ELR’s price is not the problem; its performance is.

        $75k for a Cadillac is not outrageous today, but people expect it to perform. The Model S is outselling it 20:1, and it’s just as expensive.

        If this car had started out at $49k (placing it somewhat above the Volt), it would certainly have earned the Cimarron title even more than it already has.

        Ironically, I doubt many of these have sold near MSRP; they’ve all sold at significant discounts, and GM dropped its price substantially. So it’s surely a money loser for GM no matter what, without even serving its halo purpose.

        I’d have some respect for JdN if he killed it, but he won’t.

  • avatar
    rickkop

    What a bullshit article this is.The ELR was never supposed to be a huge seller. It was an overpriced 2door hybrid coupe. Not a big segment. They only made 2000 and that’s all the expected to sell. Of all the people that own one I only heard of one crybaby complain about an he was upset with the iPod interface. Most people that see it love the design and look.get over it already

  • avatar

    – Only 2 doors – no optional 4 door Sedan.

    – looks just like a CTS coupe.

    – Gas prices have been knocked down thanks to Saudi overproduction.

    – Nothing to brag about. The P85D is $135,000 but it’s a spacious 4-door that’s FAST AS F***.

    – Price Tag over $80,000.

    A Perfect Storm of GM STUPIDITY.

    Let that be a lesson.

    BIGGER CARS + A HELL OF SPEED = INSTANT SALES

    Example: HELLCAT

    Example: SRT anything

    Example: Tesla Model S is better than Volt and Leaf. You know why? CAUSE THEY ARE HUUUUUUUGE.

    Ignore those advocates for small cars with manuals that go “just fast enough” who seek refuge in Toyota 86 clones because they obviously don’t know what they’re taking about.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Why was there no analysis of August manufacturer deliveries?

    Some makers had an incredibly ugly month and not a peep from TTAC about any of the numbers.

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    “Why was there no analysis of August manufacturer deliveries?”

    Traditionally, August is the ‘clean-up’ month to get all the leftover unsold crappola out the door and off the dealer lots.

    No one tracked August, at least not when I was playing. No one cared. It was out with the old, in with the new.

    It is also the month the next-year models start arriving at the dealerships once production has resumed after the UAW’s summer vacation and plant closings.

    In September the new models go on sale and that’s when Ford, GM and now Fiatsler start the BB-stacking and marble counting all over again.

    In my area there is a dealer who is making a big deal of selling left-over 2014 models! Yeah, you read that right: 2014 models. The damn things are more than two model years old and they still can’t turn them.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      There are new 2014 and even 2013 year vehicles on some Cadillac dealer lots (more than most would probably believe at first glance).

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        And I’m not talking about ELRs, but ATSs & CTSs, too.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        Wow. 11/76 ‘new’ cars listed at the Cadillac dealer closest to my home are 2014 model cars.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I don’t want to name the Metro Detroit Dealer out of respect for the tech I know who works there (and who has helped out my uncle 3x now, going above and beyond what he had to do in helping resolve the 3 serious issues he’s already had with his CTS that replaced a relatively reliable DTS), but the tech has told me that essentially every manager and their wife/husband are driving leftover new 2013 and 2014 ATSs, CTSs, and XTSs that basically couldn’t be sold despite massive incentives –

          – and this is in GM Country, mind you.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            You don’t have to name names. Most Cadillac dealers in Metro Detroit have some new 2014s on their lot. I think Suburban Cadillac Troy is the exception, but they could have moved those units to another Suburban store.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Suburban is very aggressive at getting rid of leftovers.

            Their family is up to something like 78 dealerships in Michigan & Florida now, and they picked up some gems in the 2008-2010 fire sale (i.e. Suburban Ford, formerly Jerome Duncan, now 2nd largest by volume Ford Dealership in nation).

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            They also got the basically brand new Fresard Buick GMC in Ferndale along with Ed Schmid Ford down the street.

            My company poured the concrete for Fresard when they moved from Royal Oak. We also did the addition to Suburban Ford with the used car area and Quicklane facility.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Concrete prices NEVER go down, ever.

            WTF.

            4″ and 6″ with mesh is up 20% to 30% compared to last year this time.

            If we don’t have another RE crash, expect the now insane cost of construction to really punch through as pass through inflation on housing costs/rents and commercial rents in upcoming year.

            Our REIT has looked at pricing of many materials and we’ve assumed there’s inevitably some collusion by some big players in the material space because the prices are rising 10%-20% YoY across the board despite plunging commodity prices.

          • 0 avatar
            Internet Commenter

            Piqued my interest too – there are 27 “new” ’13/’14 vehicles on lots within 75 miles of my zip code.

            Two raised an eyebrow:

            Exhibit 1 – 2013 CTS with $13,000 discount: I’m not sure if it’s the lighting, but the center stack looks incredibly cheap and outdated to my eye and that’s not even mentioning the nav graphics. I’m absolutely amazed they’re still asking $46k, considering what $46k can buy in the actual new car market. I think $28 out the door might get rid of it. At least it doesn’t have CUE.

            Exhibit 2 – 2014 ATS with a $9,500 discount: I forgot Cadillac had the audacity to ask $40k for an ATS with the 2.5 from the Malibu. Unreal, and no surprise that it continues to sit even at this price. $22k out the door might get someone to bite.

            I wonder if these dealers would be better donating these cars to the Salvation Army and taking the tax deduction. Tough pitch for a salesperson.

            http://www.autotrader.com/cars-for-sale/vehicledetails.xhtml?zip=43235&endYear=2014&listingType=new&listingTypes=new&sellerType=d&sellerTypes=d&showcaseListingId=407850990&pricesOnly=true&mmt=%5BCAD%5B%5D%5B%5D%5D&photosOnlyActual=true&sortBy=derivedpriceASC&showcaseOwnerId=580298&makeCode1=CAD&startYear=2013&numRecords=100&searchRadius=75&listingId=339280946&Log=0

            http://www.autotrader.com/cars-for-sale/vehicledetails.xhtml?zip=43235&endYear=2014&listingType=new&listingTypes=new&sellerType=d&sellerTypes=d&showcaseListingId=407850990&pricesOnly=true&mmt=%5BCAD%5B%5D%5B%5D%5D&photosOnlyActual=true&sortBy=derivedpriceASC&showcaseOwnerId=580298&makeCode1=CAD&startYear=2013&numRecords=100&searchRadius=75&listingId=369693898&Log=0

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        Interestingly, at least in my area, the leftovers are all base or base-ish trims (including a few sorry-looking ’13 CTSes, one a wagon, and several XTSes with Livery Package). The VSports, ATS 3.6es, etc. all seem to sell reasonably quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        DevilsRotary86

        You got my curiosity, so I looked up the big 3 Caddy dealers in the Dallas area where I live (Sewell, Massey, and Crest). There are only 4 2014’s left, no 2013’s. A few (about a dozen) 2014’s peeking in the used inventory that look like they might have been used as company cars. And in Autotrader, of 1,600 “new” Caddys sold in the DFW area, only 56 are 2013/2014 models. And of those 56, there are only 2 lonely 2013 ATS’s.

        I don’t know if Cadillacs are more popular in Dallas than I though or the dealers are good at picking inventory. Possibly a little of both. Sewell definitely has an excellent reputation as a well run dealership.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Cadillac ordering to metro Detroit Dealers is what Subaru ordering is to Washington Dealers or Ford F250 ordering is to Texas Dealers.

          They order waaay more Cadillacs here, because of all the GM employees and their family members, as well as the sentiment about foreign vehicle badges.

          That said, there was a big reduction in inventory due to the huge incentives GM slapped on laggard Cadillacs back in May to July (people were getting 12k to 15k off of ATSs and 14k to 20k off of CTSs, including PEP V-Sports).

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            “(people were getting 12k to 15k off of ATSs and 14k to 20k off of CTSs, including PEP V-Sports).”

            I remember. But even with all that cash on the hood there weren’t that many takers.

            If I was in the market for something in that class and price category, I’d want the real thing; a BMW, Mercedes or Audi.

  • avatar

    I dunno….40-50k here. There is one 2014 CTS AWD 3.6 low mileage for 41k. No 25k ATS to be found.

    I’ve seen two ELR in the wild. One in Westchester, NY and one in LA. Tesla is almost a common brand around here, too. Kinda like how the SRX is MIA here in the land of 60k Mommy Trux.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Why does the 2016 ELR, with 373 ft/lbs torque, take 6.4 seconds to do 0-60? A Pentastar Challenger does that with 268 ft/lbs while only weighing 100 lbs less.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    Because horsepower over the rev range dictated by gearing, not peak torque at one rpm level, determines acceleration. Electric motors have very high peak torque at low rpm but peter off as rpm gets higher.

  • avatar
    Phil Ressler

    Isn’t it plain that the ELR is a credibility endeavor? I drive one in Los Angeles, and the reaction to the car is consistently, boldly, enthusiastically positive. It’s just that very few people know what it is; but when they see it they love it, and if they experience it in motion, their regard rises. Cadillac doesn’t get enough people in seats of ELRs.

    Then there is the prevailing fact that the coupe market is small, at regular prices, and even smaller at $80K. Or $65K in a month or so. Cadillac never intended for the ELR to be a volume car. It was built on Voltec underpinnings already capitalized. And they priced it to be profitable. I don’t mind that.

    But anyone who thinks that the ELR is just a Volt in better leather and racier skin hasn’t driven both. I *own* both. The ELR is drastically upgraded in every way from Volt, which is not to disparage the Volt — it’s testament to how good the ELR is for its intended mission. The 2016 adds power and dynamic precision, along with options for better stopping power, at a lower price, to make the point again. Plug-in range-extended electric cars are still not well understood by the buying public. ELR is a way to get more people asking questions. If my experience is duplicated elsewhere, an ELR on the road generates 3x – 5X the questions that the Volt does, and before I added the ELR, the Volt was in the top rank of automotive curiosity-attractors I’ve ever driven.

    Dynamically, even the v1.0 ELR is leagues ahead of gen 1 Volt. The Hi-per front suspension doesn’t dive and tracks with more stability. The 20″ rubber makes a big difference in road feel and radius grip. The adaptive suspension is much more controlled. The ELR is quieter, has more shove and is almost infinitely more luxurious to travel in. Hundreds of miles at a time, even all-gasoline-fueled electricity generation, are generally serene.

    But a fully optioned 2014 ELR listing at $82,500 doesn’t match a performance car’s performance. That’s right, it doesn’t. So what.?. I live in a huge metropolitan area. The 0-40 mph performance is excellent and beats most cars at any cost to the next light. It’s 40 – 80mph performance is genuinely surprising, given the 0-60 specs. I say this as someone who has owned several 5 and 4 seconds cars in the past. The interior matches the quality and comfort of cars in the $130,000+ range, and the overall visual design still drives home the impression you are driving the future. Point is,

    The Volt, by comparison, is a most excellent everyday car, with all the easily-discovered advantages of battery-stored electric power for 70 – 85% of your driving. Both cars are built on strong platforms further improved by the strengthening engineering necessary to support a low-center-of-gravity battery.

    If you drive an ELR, you will begin to understand it. If you haven’t even driven a Volt, you are hopelessly unaware (and unqualified) for opining. If you drive both, you will grasp that having two cars, one accessible and affordable and 5 doors, and one a luxury coupe, built both on the Voltec platform, is nothing at all like the distant past platform sharing that wrought Cimarron. The ELR is a Cadillac. It’s just not a V.

    Phil

    • 0 avatar
      shaker

      It’s unfortunate that (even heavily discounted) it’s priced hopelessly out of reach of the many people who probably would love to drive it.

      Edit: I fondly remember my ’69 Grand Prix, and this car reminds me of it.

    • 0 avatar
      SamS

      Ditto Phil. I love my ELR. This is the most misunderstood vehicle. I piss on Tesla’s, especially having seen 2 cars on the side of the road in the past 3 months and one on a flatbed too. People are pure idiots when they join the bandwagon of “the misinformed.” Thanks for your Truth about cars

  • avatar
    TMA1

    Are Brembos going to become the Bose of brake systems? Appearing everywhere, in a watered down format? What is the point of having Brembos on this car?

  • avatar
    SamS

    If the folks at Cadillac were “marketing smart”, they should have had testimonials from ELR owners and or an ELR spokesman discussing the enormous attributes of the car. II especially enjoy the “hold” feature, saving the electric mode for traffic and city use and also the regen paddles.

  • avatar
    yellowstang

    I hadn’t driven a GM for many years when I went to visit my father and used his CTS for a week. I was blown away at what a nice car it was. My sister also owns one and loves hers.
    When it came time to buy a car I tested many. BMW, Lexus and because of the time spent in my dads I went and test drove the Caddy. They made me an awesome deal and I drove home with it. I am a car guy and always have been. I can tell you that this is a great car. And it doesn’t hurt that is gorgeous.
    This car has been trouble free and with the free service I always leave mine for a day and my dealer always puts me in any new caddy I want to drive.
    Doing a local search no new none currents sitting on lots.
    Haters hate but sorry if you can’t afford a caddy so you bash what you can’t have

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