By on July 9, 2015

2017 Audi A4 Sedan

The ninth-generation 2017 Audi A4 will sport a diesel engine for the first time in the U.S., Motor Authority is reporting.

When the sedan launches next March, the 2.0-liter turbocharged oil burner will make 190 horsepower and 236 pound-feet of twist. That’s on top of the 2.0-liter turbocharged gasoline engine that’ll make 252 hp and 273 lb-ft.

But that may not be the best part.

According to Motor Authority, the diesel sedan may make it stateside with a manual transmission, which are definitely not dead, or a 7-speed dual-clutch transmission if you’re not into fun things. An S4 will certainly follow, an RS4 may be in the works and an A4 Avant will definitely not be stateside — that’s what we have the Allroad for, apparently.

Initially, the A4 will be married to Audi’s Quattro all-wheel drive system with front-wheel drive variants arriving later in the year.

There’s been no word on fuel economy figures, but Audi engineers say they expect the car will improve by more than 20 percent even with the horsepower bump. Pricing for the A4 hasn’t been announced.

Like the A3, the new A4 will be seriously tech heavy and options-laden. Along with Audi’s compartmentalized MMI system with Google Maps, the A4 can sport Apple’s Car Play, a 7- or 8.3-inch infotainment screen, handwriting recognition system and a 12.3-inch instrument display screen.

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28 Comments on “Audi Confirms 2017 A4 Diesel for US...”


  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    I can’t even call this car ugly. It’s just too boring looking to insult.

    Still can’t believe Audi/VW won’t let go of the diesel. It’s like a dog with a rotten bone. Here’s a new hybrid electric bone. It’s better!

    (VAG dog buries diesel bone between the couch cushions while suspiciously looking back at owner)

    • 0 avatar
      Frownsworth

      Highways, high altitudes and hilly terrain favor diesels while urban environments favor electric-hybrids. The Germans (and many others) prefer high-speed commute over stop and go traffic that is common in North America. I guess it depends on your region and immediate driving environment.

    • 0 avatar
      Jimal

      This car looks different enough from the current A4 for people coming off lease to be willing to consider it. This isn’t a segment that appreciates dramatic styling.

      And look at how many hybrids VAG has sold compared to Diesels.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        I saw a new Hybrid Accord Touring this morning. That’s like a unicorn, right?

        • 0 avatar
          bumpy ii

          The PHEV is super rare, but the regular hybrid sells in respectable numbers.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Oh THAT’S what it was, I forgot from that article the other day. I’ll have to note some more styling cues on the Hybrid and see if I notice them more.

            They’re already doing dual exhaust on the 4-cyl Sport, which I am against. Purity dictates only a V6 gets you duals.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            Pah! Each cylinder should have its own direct exhaust hole in the bumper.

    • 0 avatar
      gamegenie

      This fall, Audi is going to release the A3 E-Tron Sportback, there’s your hybrid.

      Since it’s an A3 it will be just stylish as the A4 if not better.

  • avatar
    whynot

    I’m kind of surprised it took this long to be honest.

  • avatar
    7402

    I’m accustomed to diesel engines producing more torque than gasoline engines, usually much, much more. Here the figures are the other way around, and for engines of the same displacement. What gives?

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      The rpms will be higher for the gas engine than the diesel.

    • 0 avatar
      Frownsworth

      I think this is a current trend in passenger diesels – refinement. They have lowered compression ratios which lowers their peak torque, but, they also have lower internal friction and lighter components which enables them to rev higher and keep the torque band wider, which results in higher power, but not increased torque.

      VAG diesels currently lead this aspect and I suspect Mazda’s unicorn in the sky diesels are in many ways similar.

      • 0 avatar
        johnny ro

        OK but on the light parts angle but I thought it was flame front speed in diesels which limits RPM. Gotta go slow enough for the burn to complete before exhaust valve opens.

        • 0 avatar
          Frownsworth

          The RPMs does not change a great deal in newer diesels, if you lower compression and/or adjust the stroke/bore, you can reduce the effective maximum distance for flame travel in the cylinder to get a tiny bit more RPM out of it (I think the Skyactiv does some of these tricks). This isn’t the case with newer diesels as far as I am aware.

          The torque band is simply a bit broader than previously, especially at the top end and that generates more power as a result. Combined with newer turbo chargers which respond quicker and lower, you can recover a bit of that lost low-end, but the off-idle torque will be weaker.

          I am no expert on engines, just my thoughts.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      “I’m accustomed to diesel engines producing more torque than gasoline engines”

      That’s traditionally the case with non-turbo gasoline engines, but not with turbocharged ones. People call diesels “torquy” because they run out of power at higher revs. It’s perception rather than reality.

      Example: ’05 VW 1.9 tdi: 185 foot-pounds of torque. ’05 2.0T Saab: 195 or 221 foot-pounds, depending on version.

      • 0 avatar
        Frownsworth

        That 05 VW 1.9 PD TDI has several grades out of the factory. The highest grade produced 160 Hp (ps) and 243 lb-ft of torque.

        There is no exact apt comparison between gasoline and diesel engines because you can not compare absolute numbers without stipulating some kind of a criteria as per some normalized unit of consumption or other factor, for example:

        1) power/unit fuel consumed – fuel efficiency
        3) power/amount of energy used – thermodynamic efficiency
        2) power/unit weight
        3) torque at given RPM in certain gears
        …………… the list goes on………….

        There is no theoretical reason why gasolines or diesels can not be built to have more torque over each other for a similar displacement, but I think the “accustomed” in my interpretation implies two things – off-idle torque that you can launch a car without throttle in a manual diesel, which is useful; and prior to the popularization of direct-injected AND turbo-charged gasoline engines recently, most of the gasoline engines in the smaller displacement categories were not turbo-charged and thus were shorter on torque.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Those numbers are wrong. The 190 HP/236 TQ is the “ultra” version of the TFSI 2.0 that using some weird altered Otto cycle. The 190 HP version of the 2.0 TDI generates 295 lb-ft of torque, not 236.

  • avatar
    sproc

    Agree the torque output seems really low. Isn’t this the same engine as the Volkswagen GTD? I’ve seen that quoted at 184hp and 280 lb-ft. 190hp sounds right but the torque number seems way off.

    • 0 avatar
      derekson

      Yes the newest version of this engine is 190 HP / 295 lb-ft. It is an updated version of the TDI engine found in the GTD and plenty of other Euro Audi and VW models (along with Skodas and Seats in fact).

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Man. If only they had made the exterior updates as comprehensive and exciting as those under its skin…….

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    It’s really very plain looking, and Audi’s current styling direction is more downmarket to my eyes. Without the model differentiation in looks, I’m only interested in the sexy A7.

    The last A4 I cared about was the 2003 model.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    I thought the 1.8T was already a diesel engine. ;-)

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Bring back the not on stilts version of the Avant and I would consider it. I’ve always like the way Audis look, but prefer how BMWs drive. But the Audis are driving better with each generation.

  • avatar
    hreardon

    A4 (and Audi in general) has never been about ‘dynamic’ styling, it’s one of the aesthetic traits that a lot of people (myself included) appreciate about the car. My ’06 A3 fits in just as well today as it did ten years ago when I purchased it. That said, styling is subjective – I tend to err on the side of conservative.

    Audi, BMW and Merc recognized a while ago that you cannot venture too far outside of tradition for your bread and butter models, but you can add some flair with some filler models like the A7, which is essentially an A6 with a bit more personality.

    Apparently, the MLB-EVO architecture upon which the A4/Q7 and all future Audis will be built is designed for more modularity and upgradability throughout the service life. Case in point is the rumored “e-quattro” drivetrain, speculated to appear in the next 18-24 months: driving the front wheels with a gasoline engine and the rear with electric, the shift to a different system voltage which is still another year or two off, continual upgrades to the infotainment, etc.

  • avatar
    wmba

    So the Atkinson cycle 2.0t announced just two months ago with great fanfare for the A4 has magically disappeared?

    http://blog.caranddriver.com/next-audi-a4-to-revive-an-old-engine-technology-to-achieve-near-diesel-economy/

    • 0 avatar
      johnny ro

      I uh think that is how they get 20% more MPG on the gas version described above.

      • 0 avatar
        wmba

        But it’s 188 horse and 236 lb-ft of torque for the new gas turbo in the article I linked to, not 252 hp here announced which is halfway between the regular 220 and 290 hp in the A3 and S3 respectively.

        Typical VW. This newly announced Atkinson turbo gas engine is not actually available, but the new diesel has identical power/torque figures anyway, with the torque figure making no sense as discussed above. Which means there has been a screwup somewhere. My guess, nobody at Audi knows what’s happening either.

        Still, would have been a nice trip to Germany to hear these non-revelations for the Motor Authority crew. And I really don’t much care. Remote Start is too complicated for the Germans, so a bit of a futz-up at announcement time is just standard fare.

        Remember, we were going to get the dual port/direct injection on the 2.0t, but that didn’t happen, just some silly explanation that EU emission regs needed it, which is pure misdirection.

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