By on July 27, 2015

2015 Ford Edge Exterior Front-002

The large two-row crossover is a rare breed. With compact crossovers getting less compact and folks defecting to supersized three rows, Toyota and Honda chose to kill the Venza and Accord Crosstour while Ford pressed on with a redesign of the Edge. You can think of the Edge as a “tweener” crossover slotting between the Escape and the Explorer while at the same time being the spiritual successor (in modern form) to the Bronco and two-row Explorers of yesteryear. Although Ford says the Edge is a complete redesign, you could be forgiven for thinking this is more of a refresh, and that’s not a bad thing since the Edge was already one the most appealing options in this phone-booth-sized segment.

Exterior
Although the 2015 Edge looks more like a lightly massaged 2014 than an all-new model, it actually rides on a different platform with two all-new engines under the hood and shares surprisingly little with its predecessor in terms of parts. The last-generation Edge was designed around Ford’s “CD3” parts bin which was co-designed with Mazda and from those building blocks came the last-generation Fusion, Mazda6, MKZ and even the CX-9. For 2015 Ford pulls from the new CD4 parts bin which serves as the basis for the current Fusion and will underpin the new Taurus and Flex among others. Although weight reduction is all the rage these days, the platform swap sheds less than 100 pounds from the Edge’s curb weight.

This change under the sheetmetal explains the Edge’s growth which is up four inches overall with a one-inch wheelbase stretch. The increase gives the Edge a sleeker and less boxy profile than before while offering more interior room. Meanwhile, Ford tacked on a new grille that strikes me as the merger of Hyundai and Ford’s styling cues. Since the Venza and Crosstour are leaving us this year (production has supposedly already stopped) this means the Edge’s direct competition comes in the form of the Hyundai Santa Fe Sport, Nissan Murano and certain versions of the Kia Sorento which comes as either a two- or three-row crossover for 2016. If you want to expand the pool, the Grand Cherokee and Lexus RX are also plausible cross-shops, although the Jeep is far more off-road focused and the RX truly competes with the Edge’s ritzy brother: the Lincoln MKX.

2015 Ford Edge Interior Dashboard

Interior
Having not sat inside an Edge in about a year, I had to hunt one down to figure out what changed. The short answer is: everything. The long answer is: the design is similar enough to the outgoing model that current Edge shoppers will feel right at home, but different enough to give them a reason to lease another. Ford merged the squarish style of the 2014 interior with design cues from the latest Focus and Fusion. Instead of continuing Ford’s button minimalism strategy, 2015 adds buttons to make the infotainment system and climate control easier to use.

Front-seat comfort is excellent, although you’ll find that the new Murano’s seats are a hair softer and the 2016 Sorento (in top end trims) offers a wider range of seat adjustments. Rear-seat comfort is excellent and I found the rear cabin more comfortable than the competition, especially the Jeep which has strangely stiff seat cushions. Seat comfort is, in general, a reason to upgrade from a compact crossover to this midsized category. Much of the increased comfort comes from increased legroom and headroom. For 2015, the Edge gains three inches of combined room vs the outgoing model. The way legroom is measured seems to be a matter of constant debate, highlighted by the similar legroom numbers you get in the Honda CR-V. However, in the real world, the Edge not only feels larger, but it’s larger in practical terms as well. In the Edge I was able to properly install a rear-facing child seat behind a 6’2″ passenger, something I could not do in the CR-V. In the way-back you’ll find 25 to 40 percent more cargo room than most compact crossovers, but less than the average 3-row crossover with the 3rd row folded.

2015 Ford Edge MyFord Touch

Infotainment
Ford’s touchscreen infotainment system is not long for this world. Starting in the 2016 calendar year, we will see the highly-anticipated SYNC3 system start to roll into Ford models. Until the software refresh hits however, the Edge will soldier on with the base 4.2-inch SYNC system or the optional 8-inch MyFord Touch (optional in SEL and standard in Titanium and Sport). Since LCD love is all the rage, SEL models can be equipped with Ford’s ubiquitous partial LCD instrument cluster (standard in Titanium and Sport) where twin 4.2-inch displays flank a large central speedometer. Base models get a 6-speaker unbranded audio system and shoppers can option up a 9-speaker premium option or a 12-speaker Sony audio system as our tester was equipped. The twin-LCD system is starting to look dated compared to the LCD clusters that are optional in high end trims of the Grand Cherokee and Sorento but on par with what’s in the Murano.

MyFord Touch is one of the most maligned infotainment systems on the market, but it is also one of the most fully featured. Even in 2015 there are still mainline brands that don’t offer voice command of your USB-connected music library. At this point Ford has addressed most of the major issues that plagues the MFT system launch, except for the speed. Interacting with the touchscreen requires patience as screen changes are considerably slower than the Kia, Chrysler, GM and Toyota alternatives.

Integrated telematics systems that email you vehicle health reports, allow you to call a concierge, request emergency assistance and know when your airbags have gone off are seeing a renaissance. This generation of Ford’s infotainment system includes SYNC Services which offers OnStar-like telematics without the integrated modem. On the downside, if you’ve forgotten your phone and you get in an accident, the car can’t dial for help.

2015 Ford Edge 2.0L Ecoboost Turbo Engine-001

Drivetrain
Last time we looked at the Edge, Ford made the 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder a $995 option over the 3.5-liter V6. In an interesting reversal, the V6 is now a $425 optional engine and the 2.0-liter is standard. Despite the identical displacement, the 2.0-liter is almost a new engine. Ford increased the compression, fiddled with the fuel and oiling systems and tacked on a new twin-scroll turbocharger for improved efficiency and a broader torque curve. Power is up 5 horsepower and 5 lb-ft over last year to 245 and 275 respectively with a beefier power band. That’s 35 fewer ponies than the optional V6, but 25 lb-ft more. Also different from last year, you can finally get the small Ecoboost engine with all-wheel drive.

Making the Edge Sport sportier than before is another new engine: the 2.7-liter twin-turbo V6 from Ford’s F-150. Inserted sideways under the Edge’s hood, the turbo-six loses a little power but still trumps the outgoing 3.7-liter V6 by 10 ponies and 70 lb-ft (315 hp 350 lb-ft). More impressively, that torque comes to a boil 1,250 RPM sooner. In perhaps the most interesting twist, the Edge Sport doesn’t come with AWD standard. That’s right, all 350 lb-ft of twist are routed to the front wheels only by default. Torque steer? You betcha.

2015 Ford Edge Exterior-001
Drive
Torque steer isn’t just what classifies the 2.7-liter turbo. The 2.0-liter turbo has plenty of that particular demon under the hood as well. (Although I find the act of controlling torque steer amusing, I also willingly bought a new Chrysler LHS at age 18, so take that into consideration.) Put the pedal to the metal and the small turbo engine whirs to life with a hair of lag that’s very similar to BMW’s 2.0-liter turbo. After 7.5 seconds the Edge will hit 60 mph, followed by the 1/4 mile in 15.8 seconds. That’s almost half a second slower than the Murano and V6 Grand Cherokee but only a hair behind the Santa Fe Sport and Sorento with the 2.0-liter turbo. Shoppers should know that a dealer provided 3.5-liter V6 model was just 2/10ths faster to 60 and posted essentially identical 1/4 mile numbers while drinking more fuel. Why is it a $425 option? Because some folks just want six cylinders. (In case you were wondering, a brief test in an AWD Edge Sport (dealer provided) ran to 60 in a scant 5.8 seconds.)

Curb weight ranges from 3,912 pounds in the FWD 2.0-liter Ecoboost base model to a maximum of 4,236 pounds in the FWD Sport model. If you want AWD, it adds around 165 pounds, bringing the AWD Sport to a fairly hefty 4,400 pounds when fully equipped. Despite the weight, the Edge handles surprisingly well. You can thank a few things for that: the wide 64.8 inch track, standard 245-width rubber and a suspension design that’s related to Ford’s global portfolio including the current European Mondeo. Somewhat surprisingly, jumping from the base SE to the Titanium or Sport trims doesn’t buy you wider rubber but the aspect ratio falls from 245/60R18s in the SE to 245/55R19s in the Titanium and 245/50R20s in the Sport. While the aspect ratio and spring rates obviously play a role in lateral grip, the SE and Sport are closer together than you think. (As a late 2015 option Ford will offer an optional 265/40R21 wheel and tire package with summer rubber which we were not able to test.)

2015 Ford Edge Interior Dashboard-004

The hefty curb weight, moderately soft springs and 55-series tires combine to give the Edge a compliant highway ride that wafted over potholed and rough pavement without batting an eye. While not as soft as the new Murano, the Edge has a more pleasing balance because the Nissan often feels too soft on your favorite winding mountain road. Hyundai’s Santa Fe Sport actually deserves its name because it feels the most nimble and athletic in the corners. The Hyundai weighs around 500 pounds less which certainly doesn’t hurt, but the suspension is also tuned on the firmer side of this segment. On the other side is the Grand Cherokee which, thanks to its off-road mission, weighs more, is higher off the ground and feels more ponderous. Meanwhile the Sorento straddles the middle of the segment thanks to a light curb weight and moderately firm springs. Steering feel is numb but accurate and I had no problems understanding what the front wheels were up to.

Priced between $28,100 for a FWD SE model and $48,100 for the AWD Sport trim, the Edge starts more expensive and scales higher than the Korean options. However, shoppers need to look beyond the low starting price with the Kia and Hyundai because base Santa Fe and Sorento models come with a naturally aspirated 2.4-liter four-cylinder engine that is considerably less powerful than the Edge’s base engine and the Koreans have fewer features standard as well. Equip the Hyundai and Kia with a 2.0-liter turbo engine so they compare more directly with the Edge and they ring in at $31,250 and $31,100 respectively, giving Ford the upper hand in MSRP. The value pricing continues against Nissan and Jeep with the Edge undercutting the Murano by around $1,000 across the line and the Jeep by $1,500-2,000 depending on the options.

Nissan’s Murano wins the award for being the best highway cruiser in the bunch. The Jeep is the off-road alternative and the Edge is the value leader. The Kia, however, is my top choice. The Sorento has a fresher look, it’s slightly bigger with a nicer interior and a 0-60 time that’s a bit faster as well. The Sorento handles surprisingly well in its latest generation and top-end trims are better equipped than the Edge. While the Sorento EX is more expensive than a base Edge, you do get more feature content in the Kia and by the time you compare top-end trims the Sorento is less expensive. The only trouble with the Sorento is that Kia attempts to compete with the Edge, Escape and Explorer with one vehicle. Get the base Sorento and it’s Escape priced with 2 rows and a weak 2.4-liter engine. The 2.0-liter turbo Sorento is a 2-row luxury-leaning crossover with optional Nappa leather and HID headlamps. Check the box for the V6 and you get a small third row for your mother-in-law as a smaller alternative to the Explorer. This means that V6 Edge competition gets whittled down to just the Nissan and the Jeep.

After a week with the 2.0-liter Ecoboost Edge I have come to a few conclusions. First up, skip the V6 as it really makes no sense. The fuel economy in the 2.0-liter turbo is better and the performance is nearly identical. Second, get AWD even if you live below the snow belt, unless you really love torque steer. Third, the front-wheel peel in a FWD 2.7-liter twin-turbo Edge Sport made me giggle. If you’re shopping for the best 2.0-liter turbo crossover in this segment, stop by your Kia dealer. However, if you want something this size that will put a smile on your face without braking the bank, the Edge Sport is the CUV you’re looking for. The Edge Sport AWD bridges the gap between the fire-breathing Grand Cherokee SRT and a mainstream crossover like the Sorento and Santa Fe Sport. Think of the Edge Sport as the gravel-road version of the Taurus SHO. I’ll take a red one.

Ford provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review

Specifications as tested

0-30: 2.65

0-60: 7.5

1/4 Mile: 15.80 Seconds @ 86 MPH

Average Economy: 24.6 MPG

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50 Comments on “2015 Ford Edge Ecoboost Review with Video...”


  • avatar

    Get the V6.

    My uncle just purchased one of these for his wife and his new infant so he could keep them from messing up his re-leased 2016 MKS Ecoboost Ultimate.

    The V-6 performs “well enough” for the vehicle and you really don’t need the eco-boost V6 unless you want to listen to it and whir like a blender.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Buttons are back! Hooray!

    The capactive touch buttons on the high end Edges made me angry. The worst was the placement of the hazard button on the 2011 Edge/Explorer – right below where you hand rests on the MFT screen. Want to change the radio station? Oh, your hazards are coming on too. Good luck getting them to go off.

  • avatar
    Fred

    As a new smartphone user (Moto E) I can now sympathize with touch screen slowness and un-responsive controls. Would be very distracting to me while driving. My nephew has an older model Edge for his single child family. It’s roomy, comfortable, reliable, but I don’t remember the infotainment system. Just about all you can expect from a family hauler. He says he got a good deal on it used, with low miles, that first year depreciation is tough.

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    Nice review, but one question. Is there a rear seat 12V power outlet? It looks like it might have one under the rear vents in the pictures but I can’t tell.

  • avatar
    iMatt

    I can’t stand the cheap looking digital gauges. The dinky tachometer on the new Fords and some Mazdas look downright chintzy, especially with whatever shadowy haze effect Ford uses.

  • avatar
    duffman13

    I don’t get the rage of an all LCD cluster – it just seems like one more thing to potentially fail to me. This solution seems to be more palatable to me, though ideally I’d prefer to have 2 mechanical gauges – revs and speed, and a digital display for the rest.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Someone in my in-laws neighborhood had a 2013 MKZ (leased I hope as fast as they turned it over) and just swapped it for a brand new Ford Edge (ecobost AWD according to the badges) in Guard green.

    Damn nice looking in that color but sadly you do have to look twice to tell that it is new.

  • avatar
    ajla

    You didn’t bring it up, but if you’re towing in this class, the Jeep has by far the best ratings.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      I admit, when it comes to “large 2 row SUV/CUV”, it’s hard to argue with the Jeep Grand Cherokee.

      • 0 avatar

        I mean…the Grand Cherokee is really more of a rugged crossover. It doesn’t put as much emphasis in being car-like as the Edge, Murano, Santa Fe, Sorento et al. do.

        • 0 avatar
          DevilsRotary86

          Each generation the Grand Cherokee looks less like a rugged crossover and more like a tall station wagon. I am not big in to trucks, so everything I say is strictly hearsay but my understanding is that the Grand Cherokee handles well for what it is.

          I stand by what I said. A loaded Edge pushes well past $40k, similar to the Grand Cherokee. While the Edge is competitive with the Grand Cherokee, it is nice that the Jeep can tow 6,200 to 7,400 lbs against the Ford’s 3,500 lbs. Assuming that the Jeep does handle as well as I have heard, I would have a hard time picking the Edge over the Grand Cherokee.

          • 0 avatar
            Dan

            “While the Edge is competitive with the Grand Cherokee, it is nice that the Jeep can tow 6,200 to 7,400 lbs against the Ford’s 3,500 lbs. ”

            Some stats from nearby Jeep inventory: 13 of 893 Limiteds and 3 of 317 Laredos have the off road group. 7 more Limiteds have off road II with the locker in the middle. 1190 don’t even have low range or tow hooks.

            298 out of 1995 Jeeps of all trims have the tow package. The other 85% are rated at 3500 lbs. A minivan can do that.

            They’re cars. Capability doesn’t matter.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    This is just a Lincoln with a less-nice interior and an inferior nose.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      This. For $40K+, just get the MKX.

      • 0 avatar

        I mentioned that last week. But upon further review, I’ve found that I really don’t like the MKX’s styling at all, especially the uninspired-looking center console.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I saw a new MKX pass by my house yesterday, as I was looking out the window. It was pearl white, and the first time I had seen a new MKX when not on the road, from a distance.

          I have decided it does not look new enough, or different in really many ways. There’s no stand-out quality to draw me to the higher price of the Lincoln model or brand name. And that’s unfortunate.

          If you told non-car people that the new MKX was a 2010 model, they wouldn’t doubt you.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The 2016 MKX isn’t out yet. The 2015 has the same sheet metal as the 2010 ($hit, it has the same sheet metal as the 2007), so it looks almost exactly the same.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Of course I meant MKC. The MKC looks dated!

            And the MKX will be very close to the MKC.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      fully equipped the MKZ is about $8000 more list than a Edge. Depends on the options customers want.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Adjusting for equipment and options (V6 and leather), it’s really a $5000 difference from Edge V6 with leather to MKX.

        Edge Sport AWD with the 2.7TT is only $2000 less than the MKX 2.7TT AWD.

        • 0 avatar
          wmba

          The trouble with the MKX, having just perused it on the Lincoln website, is that it looks utterly gormless, while the Edge is quite attractive. Some Scottish leather or another just doesn’t compensate for the grille and rear fender shoulder. It looks vaguely old-fashioned from some angles and just awkward overall.

  • avatar
    blppt

    Man, that 2.7EB continues to astound. 5.8 to 60 in this heavy vehicle—i’d be looking at the tailights of this rolling womb in my CC 2.0T. Oh, the shame….

    I’d love a stang with the 2.7 in it…although it might come too close to the GT for Ford’s liking.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    Our 2010 Edge Limited (110k miles) has underimpressed me. From the dual TV system that has never worked properly (replaced and serviced twice), to the need of TWO dual-fan replacements in the cooling system (it has the trailer package), to lousy mpgs (average 17.8 in a mix of driving), the Edge was our first ‘domestic’ brand in forever, and I don’t see us returning anytime soon. We’re back to Japan Inc. after this.

    Nice looking though, which is what snagged us to begin with.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      It’s funny how some people equate all US brands as being the same and how they equate all Japanese brands as being the same. To me, it makes more sense to judge each company by it’s own merits.

      Btw: 50K miles on my Taurus and nothing but oil changes. 27mpg combined with the V6. Kind of the reverse of your experience.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I understand what you’re saying. I guess we just picked the wrong vehicle to judge. My brother is a committed Mopar man and his Grand Caravan and Ram 2500 have been less than convincing as well.

        The one prop I can give the Edge is the leather – it’s wearing better than my MIL’s RX350. And to anyone looking for a roomy sedan, I would easily recommend the last gen Impala and Taurus – the cockroaches of the road that will give long service I’d bet. I’m also intrigued by the Focus….it’s a great looking car.

        I just expect longevity out of our vehicles since they cost so much.

  • avatar

    With the exception of that broad space around the MyFord Touch panel, I quite like the Edge. I think it’s a little sharper-looking than you give it credit for; it’s quite visually separated from the old CD3-based Edge. But…I’ve already decreed that my next vehicle (crossover or not) will be RWD or RWD-based…so the Edge is out.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Just realizing now that I’ve seen some new Edges with this full-width rear cluster here, and credited them as being a new Escape. I did this even this morning, as a new Edge was parked in the visitor spaces up front at work, in dark purple-blue. I thought, “Hey that Escape looks nice.”

      I’m both disappointed in my visual skills, as well as confused in the current size differential between these two models.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The Edge is less than a foot longer than the Escape, but most of that is in the wheelbase. It drives nicer than the Escape and has V6 power. It also has a bigger boot.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          It was definitely time for a restyling, after nipping and tucking the old one for far too long. I will just have to remind myself that the Escape has not (yet) adopted the full-width rear treatment. I expect that’s next year or so.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I expect it for the 2017 model year. I also expect it to get the Edge grille to further confuse everyone.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    Am I the only who think putting ANY 4 cylinder in a vehicle this big is idiotic?

    That said, I actually like the Edge. Good looking trucklet. My sister in law just got her second one. She LOVES it. She got the V6

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    The Edge appears to be getting some cachet around here as a hunting vehicle since the Ranger is dead and large parts of Michigan are still Ford Country since the AWD appears to be competent on bad roads and snow.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    What is up with Ford and all the Hankook tires on new vehicles? I seem to recall that Henry Ford II was opposed to using Michelins on new cars because they were French, he’d surely turn over in his grave if he saw Korean tires on Fords. I’m not saying I need Michelin,I doubt they are functionally better than other high quality tires, but I surely would expect to see what I consider a first-tier brand…Goodyear, Continental, Firestone, etc.

    When I buy a Korean car, I expect Korean branded tires…

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      I bought a Korean car once, way back when Korean meant half price. It came with Michelins, oddly enough.

      • 0 avatar

        Our 2012 Sonata came with Michelins too (17″). Our 2014 Soul has Nexen tires (16″), but I don’t really like the way that car drives or handles, so it’s kind of irrelevant to me.

        I expected to see Continental tires on my Golf SportWagen—like the 17″ ones I had on the Jetta SportWagen—but it has 18″ Pirelli tires that seem to be wearing fairly quickly.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      A Ford on Firestones, what could possibly go wrong?

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Only a few tire manufacturers make 20″ and 22″ crossover tires. Hankook makes a few all season versions with good treadlife. Most don’t.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      Honestly, as an autocross/track guy, the Korean tires have done the same thing as Korean cars. I’m on BFG Rivals now for my S2k now, but both mine and my wife’s daily driver vehicles are running on Kumhos, and the last 2 sets of fun tires I had on the S2k were hankooks.

      The price gap for all but OE special tires has closed, and something like the Hankook Ventus Evo2 is just as good of a tire as the Continental ExtremeContact DW or the Bridgestone S-04 Pole Position. If Jack’s recent viper review is to be believed, the new Kumho Ecsta V720 is just as fast as anything else in the Extreme Performance category as well. And honestly, I don’t feel like the BFGs I’m on now are any better than the Hankook RS-3s they replaced.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      The largest manufacturer of tires in the world is LEGO actually….

      For cars: Bridgestone is the largest and it’s Japanese so I’m sure HF II wouldn’t be anymore thrilled.

      As far as buying a Korean car and having Korean tires, that’s not true either. Mine had a set of Goodyear’s that were manufactured in Japan—worst tires I’ve ever owned as well.

  • avatar
    cpthaddock

    New Flex? Any more info? I distinctly recall hearing Flex was not getting invited back for another season.


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