By on May 18, 2015

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Exterior Front Quarter-001

Lincoln has been working to get their luxury mojo back for a while, but up to this point it has tried to sell models a half-step larger to luxury shoppers. That meant a major value proposition, but engineers often skimped on luxury to keep prices low. The MKC is an entirely different animal however. This Lincoln is essentially the same size as the Lexus NX and Mercedes GLK. Although the MKC is finally the same size as its competition, it marches to a different drummer, and after a week I finally realized something. It’s refreshing to have something different.

Exterior

Let’s talk competition first. The MKC is Lincoln’s answer to the X3, Q5, NX, XC60, and GLK. This seems to confuse some folks who assume the MKC and the Lexus NX were designed to compete against the X1 and Evoque. Looking at the specs, the MKC sits right between the GLK and Q5 in overall dimensions.

By now you’ve probably heard the MKC is the “Lincoln Escape”, but what does that really mean? The MKC shares safety systems and body structure designs with the Escape. However, it shares no sheetmetal with the Ford. Lincoln didn’t just re-skin the Escape, either. They widened the body and the track while they were at it, resulting in a lower, wider stance that’s more appropriate in the luxury segment than the perky upright character of the Escape. This is essentially the same formula that Lexus used to make the Lexus NX, which is a cousin to the RAV4. Like the NX and RAV4, parts of the Escape lurk inside the MKC, but you have to look fairly hard to find them.

The MKC receives Lincoln’s latest grille design, which is more restrained than the MKT’s odd-looking schnoz. Although pictures of the MKC seem polarizing, passers-by thought the MKC was attractive in person. If you think something about the rear looks a hair unfinished, you’re not alone. It’s the lack of a protruding bumper of any sort. Aside from the unfinished aesthetic, lacking any real bumper means mishaps with taller vehicles are likely to damage the rear hatch in addition to the bumper cover, increasing repair costs.

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Interior

Interior

The MKC wears the best interior Lincoln has ever created. Period. More than that, the model with real leather is arguably a nicer place to spend your time than the current Q5, GLK, QX50, RDX, or XC60. Opt for the Black Label package and things are taken to the next level. Lincoln shoppers have more ability to customize their crossover than most of the competition with four different upholstery colors that coordinate with three different dashboard and door colors and two wood veneer options (you can’t mix and match). Opting for the Black Label edition gives you an additional four “themes” to choose from. If you want this kind of selection, the MKC and Evoque are really your only options, and the Range Rover doesn’t allow as much customization on base models.

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Interior Wood Trim-003

Front seat comfort depends greatly on your body shape. I’m 6-feet tall and found the seat bottom cushions oddly short and lack thigh support. A 5-foot 4-inch tall person told me the seats fit like a glove. Despite being smaller than all but the Mercedes GLK, the rear seats proved comfortable and easily as accommodating as the XC60.

The cargo area is the biggest compromise in the MKC. It’s notably smaller than most of the competition with just 25 cubes of room behind the rear seats. You’ll find about 20 percent more room in the Volvo.

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Interior Center Console

Infotainment

MyLincoln Touch is oddly named for sure, and it’s received more than its share of bad press. Does it crash now and then? Sure. But I actually think MLT is a reason to put the MKC on your list, not take it off. Volvo’s Sensus Connect uses a smaller screen and, despite the new connected features, still lacks decent control of iOS/USB media devices. Audi’s MMI and Mercedes COMAND are attractive systems, but lack the voice command library you get in the Lincoln. iDrive is still my preferred infotainment option, but Lincoln may give it come competition with SYNC3, due out next year.

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Ecoboost Engine-001

Drivetrain

Under the hood, the order sheet starts out with a 2.0L direct-injection turbo engine good for 240 horsepower and 270 lb-ft of torque. Instead of a 6-cylinder engine filling out the top of the range like the Europeans, Lincoln opted to borrow the 2.3L turbo from the new Mustang instead. Five years ago, that would have been derided as insane, but Lexus has gone 4-cylinder only in the new NX and Volvo has committed to the demise of their five and six cylinder turbos as well. Sadly, the 2.3L engine loses some grunt in the translation, dropping from 310 horsepower and 320 lb-ft in the Mustang to 285 ponies and 305 lb-ft of twist. 2.0L shoppers can choose between front- or all-wheel drive while the 2.3L model gets all-wheel drive as standard.

Both engines are mated to the 6F35 6-speed automatic transaxle. The 6F35 transaxle is likely the reason for the power reduction from the tune used in the Mustang. Although Ford does not specifically list torque capabilities like General Motors, the Ford 6F35 is substantially similar to the GM 6T50 transaxle, topping out at 260 lb-ft. (GM and Ford designed their 6-speed transaxles together.) Since the engine cradle design in the MKC is largely unchanged from the Escape, the higher torque capacity 6F50 and 6F55 transaxles likely didn’t fit. In order to accommodate the 2.3L engine, Ford replaced the 6F35’s standard torque converter with a higher torque unit but no transmission internals were changed. This allowed the entire package to have approximately the same dimensions as the 2.0L drivetrain. I suspect this also explains why the maximum tow rating drops 1,000lbs when equipped with the 2.3L engine.

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Interior LCD Instrument Cluster.CR2

Drive

In an interesting twist, most MKCs on dealer lots will have a suspension with active dampers. This is a significant difference between the Lincoln and the competition which generally doesn’t have active dampers available at any price. This means we must have a quick suspension lesson since active dampers are a huge part of the MKC’s personality.

Springs and dampers work together to make a car ride and handle a certain way. Springs support the vehicle’s ride height and compress and rebound to conform to the road surface. Dampers control the movement of the spring in both directions. Spring and damping rates are carefully matched by vehicle engineers and in most cars they are fixed. In vehicles with dynamic dampers, the spring rate stays constant and the damping rate becomes a variable. In order for this to work, you have to start with a “soft” spring and when you want a firmer ride you attempt to compensate with “firmer” damping. While systems like this greatly improve the ride and allow the driver to customize the suspension within a particular range, they can feel quite different.

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Exterior -001

The first hint Lincoln had a different mission in mind for the MKC is obvious when you start driving. If the suspension is in comfort mode, you get the softest ride in this segment by a mile. The MKC is so soft in this mode that I initially assumed the baby Lincoln was 1,000lbs heavier. With the suspension in normal mode, the MKC feels more buttoned down, but there is still plenty of tip and dive and body roll. “Sport” firms things up but the feeling isn’t the same as you’d find in a traditionally sprung vehicle. The reason is that although the dampers can restrict motion, the springs are still pillowy soft.

Initially I was disconcerted by the soft suspension and assumed the athletic abilities would be harmed as a result. I was wrong. With a 0-60 sprint of 6.15 seconds, the MKC 2.3L beats most of the entries, matches the 325 hp XC60 R-Design and only lags the X3 xDrive35i and RDX in the non-performance category. It also stopped from 60 MPH in an impressive 112 feet in our tests and a respectable .83Gs in Edmund’s skidpad test. (TTAC doesn’t have access to a skidpad.) That’s all possible because the MKC is light for a luxury crossover, ranging from 3,791 in FWD 2.0L trim to to 3,989 lbs in the AWD 2.3L model.

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Interior.CR2-001

Pricing

As you’d expect from Lincoln, pricing starts low at $33,100, undercutting BMW by over $5,000, and we get about $500 of additional equipment in the base MKC. Adding AWD to the base model tacks on $2,495. That sounds steep but Lincoln bundles the dynamic suspension and a few other goodies with it. Our 2.3L AWD tester started at $40,145 and had $7,775 of options added to make an essentially fully loaded MKC.

The Black Label model is an interesting option. Black Label is about luxury and customization, not performance. This means you can get the 2.0L engine with front wheel drive in Black Label trim starting at $46,205. For the extra dosh, a “shopping assistant” will help you choose from four unique interior themes, five unique wood veneers and some extra paint options. The interior is further upgraded with faux-suede headliners and more standard features. In addition to the goodies, you get improved service with scheduled maintenance and wear item coverage (shocks, belts, etc), a loaner car when yours is in for service, lifetime car washes at a Lincoln dealer and annual detailing services.

2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Exterior Rear.CR2-001

I have to admit when I first took the MKC out on the road, I didn’t like it. The well-appointed interior is attractive, but the ultra-plush driving dynamics took some getting used to. Then an odd thing happened. A friend of mine who is in her early 30s said “I’m tired of the harsh ride in my X3 but I still want a crossover.” I had her drive the MKC and it was love at first tip and dive. I suddenly realized: from the Lexus NX to the Mercedes GLK, every one of the competition is trying to be the soft-roader that can lap the Nurburgring in under 9 minutes. Except the MKC.

The Lincoln can hang with the middle of the pack in terms of handling, but the handling feel is an entirely different matter. The soft suspension makes turn-in feel lazy, steering feel non-existent and the cabin hushed. The combination means the MKC is eminently capable with high limits, but the design of the vehicle makes it hard to determine where those limits are located. If that sounds like the kind of product Lexus used to be known for (before they too started chasing BMW), you’re right. Once I stopped chasing the X3, I realized how refreshing it was to have a competitive product without the “me-too.” Bravo Lincoln.

Lincoln provided the vehicle, insurance and one tank of gas for this review

Specifications as tested

0-30: 2.26 Seconds

0-60: 6.15 Seconds

1/4 Mile: 14.8 Seconds @ 92.5 MPH

Average economy: 20.3 MPG over 699 miles

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144 Comments on “2015 Lincoln MKC 2.3 Ecoboost Review (With Video)...”


  • avatar
    EMedPA

    Nice review as always, Alex.

    I have a 2013 Escape Titanium, and I’m not entirely sure that what I see here would be worth the extra money. I’m sorry to see that the bigger motor actually loses towing capacity. One of the things that sold me on the Escape was the fact that it can tow a small trailer without difficulty. As far as I know, the Jeep Cherokee is the only class competitor with a decent tow rating.

    • 0 avatar
      LectroByte

      > most MKCs on dealer lots will have a suspension with active dampers.

      In a few years, I’m guessing Escape Titaniums will have a higher resale, since there will be all these MKC’s needing expensive repairs to their “active dampers”. I also see nothing that Lincoln adds that makes it worth the extra money.

      • 0 avatar
        Dave M.

        I have to disagree – I really love the design of the MKC. To me, well worth the premium over the Escape.

        I would be worried about the zero-tolerance bumpers though…

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    “They widened the body and the track while they were at it, resulting in a lower, wider stance that’s more appropriate in the luxury segment than the perky upright character of the Escape.”

    For the 1,000th time, no. Lazy journalism.

    The MKC has the same exact chassis as the Escape – including exterior wheelbase & width externally – built on the SAME assembly line, in the very SAME St. Louis assembly plant.

    Lincoln may have dealt a sleight of hand and carved out an extra .5″ to 1″ of REAR seat interior room by scalloping some interior bits here or there, but THE WHEELBASE & WIDTH/TRACK ARE EXACTLY THE SAME AS THE MKC – BOTH BEING THE SAME CHASSIS/PLATFORM, PERIOD.

    “I have to admit when I first took the MKC out on the road, I didn’t like it. The well-appointed interior is attractive, but the ultra-plush driving dynamics took some getting used to. Then an odd thing happened. A friend of mine who is in her early 30s said “I’m tired of the harsh ride in my X3 but I still want a crossover.” I had her drive the MKC and it was love at first tip and dive.”

    Cool story, bro (as in painter suspicious that this really happened) but the X3 has a great ride, striking a very good balance between firmness and comfort,

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Ford Escape wheelbase: 105.9″
      Lincoln MKC wheelbase: 106.9″

      Ford Escape height: 67.0″
      Lincoln MKC height: 63.2″

      You were right about the width being the same. 1 out of 3 ain’t bad.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        2015 LINCOLN MKC 2.3-LITER ECOBOOST AWD

        Length/weight: 179.2 inches/3,963 pounds
        Wheelbase: 105.9 inches

        “The MKC—based on Ford Escape’s 105.9-inch wheelbase and occupying almost the exact same volume…”

        http://www.wsj.com/articles/lincoln-mkc-is-the-brand-star-struck-1416003196

        Assembly for both MKC & MKesCape is Louisville – not St. Louis, but both are EXACT SAME platform. AND THE MKesCape IS RIDICULOUSLY EXPENSIVE, too.

        “2015 Lincoln MKC: How to make a Ford not a Ford”

        http://www.stltoday.com/classifieds/transportation/reviews/lincoln-mkc-how-to-make-a-ford-not-a-ford/article_d1d58eef-37b4-587a-b339-b5408d280ee5.html

        2015 LINCOLN MKC

        TYPE: Compact luxury crossover SUV

        DRIVE FORMAT: Front- or all-wheel drive

        BASE PRICE: FWD: $33,995; AWD: $36,490

        PRICE AS DRIVEN: $49,265; MKC AWD with these major options: $6,935 Equipment Group 102A (Reserve trim, panoramic sun roof, navigation, blind-spot alert, heat/cool front seats, hands-free lift gate, more); $2,235 Technology Pkg. (Active Park Assist, Adaptive Cruise Control, Lane Keep Assist, more), $1,140 2.3L EcoBoost I-4

        ***WHEELBASE: 105.9 inches

        LENGTH: 179.2 inches

        CURB WEIGHT: 2.0L FWD: 3,791 lbs.; 2.0L AWD: 3,963 lbs.; 2.3L AWD: 3,989 lbs.

        CARGO (rear seat up/down): 25.2 cu. ft./53.1 cu. ft.

        WHERE BUILT: Louisville, Ky.***

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          This is absofrickinglutely ridiculous:

          “$6,935 Equipment Group 102A (Reserve trim, panoramic sun roof, navigation, blind-spot alert, heat/cool front seats, hands-free lift gate, more);”

          $7,000 USD for an equipment group on a near rebadge? I can buy whole cars for less. Also did you know heated (and I believed cooled) seats were standard through MY12 on Zephyr? Lincoln in the words of my sibling: suck less.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I checked and you can buy a lot of this stuff a la carte (except for the cooled front seats, which look like you can only get with the black label package). Doesn’tmake a lot of sense, though.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Thanks for checking.

        • 0 avatar
          Remford

          This is why a little knowledge, VERY little in this case, is so dangerous. People regurgitate what they’ve taken in elsewhere as gospel without even understanding if or what they think they know is true.

      • 0 avatar
        Chocolatedeath

        It wouldnt be DW if he didnt go head on to discredit Cadillac or Alex..
        I agree with him on Caddy but on Alex’s way of reviewing not so much. I too have driven an X3 and for me the handling is the best however the comfort level not as high on in my mind. IMO the X5 does both better ( I realize that they are in different cost brackets). Oh well. When is the next Cadillac article anyway.

        • 0 avatar
          VW16v

          Not to hard to discredit Alex. Just listen to his videos.

          • 0 avatar
            Chocolatedeath

            I have for a while now and to be honest he does come off as liking nearly everything. However with that being said he does a review that is inclusive of nearly everything I would want to know about a vehicle and I would recommend that anyone who is looking to know more about a car to look him up while they are shopping around.
            I for one care about the TCI and other things that he comes up with.

          • 0 avatar
            saabophile

            where are your videos? sounds like someone who can’t hang berating those that can.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Alex Dykes is a pioneer in auto reviews in that he makes John Davis from MotorWeek appear overly critical by comparison.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Per Ford and Lincoln’s websites:

      Ford Escape Lincoln MKC
      wheelbase: 105.9 105.9
      length: 178.1 179.2
      height: 66.3 65.2
      width: 72.4 73.4 (no mirrors)
      front track: 61.5 62.4
      rear track: 61.6 62.5

      So all but wheel base have been changed to create the MKC. The internet is your friend for info….

    • 0 avatar
      probert

      Whatta buncha punks.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Lazy journalism? You’re one to talk, DW.

      “THE WHEELBASE & WIDTH/TRACK ARE EXACTLY THE SAME AS THE MKC…”

      You’ve already been set straight on this rant, so I won’t repeat it. If you hadn’t been too lazy to check out Alex’s assertion on the Ford and Lincoln websites, you’d have seen that for yourself. But, of course, that isn’t the DW way – it gets in the way of a rant. To hell with that.

      And then there’s this: “…built on the SAME assembly line, in the very SAME St. Louis assembly plant.”

      Well, that’d be rather difficult, since a) Ford doesn’t have any vehicle assembly plants in the city of St. Louis, and the last one in the St. Louis AREA (Hazelwood, MO), closed in 2006.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Louis_Assembly_Plant

      Try getting your facts right before accusing Alex of getting them wrong.

      And maybe you should try an apology to Alex while you’re at it.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        @FreedMike. Spot on. I laughed outloud when I read his St Loius assembly plant line.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I confused St. Louis for Louisville – big deal.

          The actual, fundamental point remains the same, Ford Fan Boys; the Escape & MKesCape are built on the same exact line in the same exact building by the same exact employees because the MKesCape IS an Escape.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Well, DW, you know…as someone who actually has a journalism degree, yes, it’s a big deal to confuse St. Louis with Louisville. Why? Because facts are facts, if you don’t have yours in order, then don’t lecture anyone else.

            Or you can just choose to be a jerk. Your call. But don’t claim to be doing it out of some kind of quest for facts.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            The geography monster which lives in the storage closet at the end of the hall might eat you for such a mistake.

            @FreedMike

            Since you are a degreed journalist, what do you think of today’s journalism (in general), especially in the wake of Brian Williams and older scandals such as Jayson Blair?

            http://journalism.about.com/od/ethicsprofessionalism/tp/journalismscandals.htm

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            Yea it’s a big deal when you chastise others for having the wrong facts when you can’t even get it right.

            As far as the assembly line; you can have different platform dimensions or totally different platforms running down the same line.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Blah Blah Blah Blah

            MKC = Re-badged Ford Escape + $13,000 to +27,000

            Otherwise known as Idiots Buy It.

            They should have called it the IQEscape.

            /argument

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @DW

            Running a V6 would have at least been a nice touch in the “Lincoln” but it seems this was not feasible.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Running a V6 in the MKC would have helped differentiate it, I agree, but the essence of a vehicle in my opinion is the chassis, and the chassis determines what can or can be done in terms of driving dynamics, suspension settings, structural rigidity, interior room, and even NVH characteristics.

            I’ve always maintained that far too short attention is given to chassis/platform characteristics by new car buyers, and that there’s been a worrying trend to analyze vehicles based on gee whiz electronic toys and gadgets inside the vehicle, with price rising proportionate with the # of the gadgets.

            The necessary basis of any good car, just like a house, is a good foundation, and quality companies producing quality vehicles have to nail the chassis as the first of many hurdles, in order to produce a truly good or great vehicle.

            The Ford Escape has a good chassis. It’s not great, but it’s better than much of the segment competition.

            Putting a slightly bored out ecoboost 4 banger in it and a more compliant suspension, calling it a Lincoln, and trying to charge prospective customers an extra $13,000 to (and insane) $27,000 for it is the epitome of cynical badge engineering.

            Everyone whining about my calling this spade as a spade must have missed each and every time I’ve called out Acura (ILX), Lexus (ES350, especially latest edition which is worse in terms of NVH and ride quality, as well as interior quality than the last gen), etc., for doing the same (ruining goodwill and trying to cheat customers).

            But back to your differentiation of motors point, it would at least mitigate against the badge engineering job to offer a different powertrain in “premium” badges not available in their less “premium” siblings if such a unique, better powertrain were available (and sorry Lincoln, but going to a 2.3 from a 2.0 ecoboost is a weak effort to do even this – phoning it in).

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Nice post. Side note on the public, the Enterprise girl in VA Beach made the comment to me the Dodge GC they switched me into was from a “different company than the Chrysler TC we were switching from”. Now if there was ever a rebadge it is the Dodge GC and Chrysler TC, yet the erstwhile Enterprise employee had never picked up on it (I took time to explain how they were the same).

    • 0 avatar
      200k-min

      As I was reading the review my first thought was, I wonder how soon DW comments that this is an Escape in drag, Ecoboost sucks, it’s overpriced, X Y or Z competitor is better. You are a broken record.

      • 0 avatar

        And it is not a Cadillac yet. I can imagine fury x 10 if it was Cadillac. In fact BOF Cadillac and Lincolns are thing of past and it is 21 century so no matter how DW wish to roll history back it will never happen. And he would never buy or lease luxury car, any, there is always similar and cheaper option. So who cares what DW think. I’am e.g. do not care about McLaren and even Aston Martin because it is a waste of time thinking and talking about things not accessible to you.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          The two most successful models in terms of profit/desire for both brands in MY14/15 happened to be BOF and until recently they were both V8s.

          Personally I am not a BOF zealot, I do feel though for a large sum of money the product value should match the purchase price. In my mind big money = nice size car with a standard V6 at the minimum. Lincoln while nice isn’t even close from a cost to value POV and Cadillac is a complete disaster for this and a number of other reasons. The illusion Mullaly chose to create that Ford is a premium brand hurts Lincoln to the point where Lincoln has to become vulgar with pricing while not offering that much “more” vs its first cousin models. To compensate for this they reintroduced the high margin designer label concept used for decades prior, which is smart but it doesn’t make up for the fact you’re running standard FoMoCo underneath. For the right money I think its ok, but for too much money but lacking the right brand (snob appeal) I think it will be reflected in resale and used demand.

          • 0 avatar

            Mullaly did not make Ford premium brand. He introduced One Ford plan which made European quality cars available in USA. Any European product is considered as a higher quality premium brand in US than similar US product. So it was natural that Ford become premium brand what VW used to be. And it has higher margins too. When Ford was US specific Lincoln was not a paragon of luxury either and even not as premium as European Fords.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The MKC is an Escape in drag.

        While not optimal, not any different than the NX or RDX (it’s most direct competitors) or for that matter, Lexus’s best sellers, the RX and ES.

        While not a flop, Lincoln has to be disappointed in MKC sales.

        The MKC is being handily outsold by the NX, much less the RDX.

        The ad campaign where Lincoln shows the celeb much more than the actual vehicle didn’t help, but having less cargo room than the competition is probably the bigger factor.

        The design of the MKC is OK, actually looks better in its smaller package than the new MKX (which looks more bland despite having the same design language) which probably does not bode too well for the MKX (chances are, the Cadillac XT5 will outsell the MKX).

    • 0 avatar
      HotPotato

      The BMW X3, especially early examples, is famous for its flat-out ATROCIOUS ride quality: pointless and abusive levels of stiffness and head toss, in a jacked-up fashion statement that no one seriously interested in handling would buy in the first place. So I find the anecdote about this lady 100% credible, especially if she has had hers for a while. This segment’s customer is not a 6’3″ tall man with road-racing fantasies, it’s a 5’4″ woman with interior design sense who’d rather not be tossed around the cabin like a pinball, and Lincoln has built the right car for the customer. Now we’ll see if the customer is willing to give up the German brand cachet at the polo club.

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    I also drove the MKC recently, and am surprised that the elephant in the room wasn’t mentioned: The vehicle’s headroom has been seriously compromised by the lowering of the roof compared to the Escape. I could not sit in the back seat without canting my head to one side. Regardless of how tall I am or am not (6’2″), NONE of the other mid-size luxury SUV/CUVs we drove presented this issue. That took it out of the running for us, despite pretty decent driving dynamics (standard dampers) and attractive styling. And though there are indeed some very nice finishes in the interior, there are also some really down-market touches that take away from the impression of luxury.

    Ended up with a Q5 TDi, which offers a compelling blend of performance (0-60 in 5.8) and efficiency (31.8 mpg overall in 2500 miles).

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      So you spent 15 to 30k more on an Audi Q5 Tdi. Awesome. Prestige version Q5 tdi starts at over $55k.

      • 0 avatar
        ZCD2.7T

        List on the MKC I drove was just about $50K. List on our Q5 was $56K.

        Well worth the extra $$$$ for the performance, room, comfort and efficiency.

        • 0 avatar
          200k-min

          Well worth the extra $$$$ until your Audi ends up in the shop.

          • 0 avatar
            ZCD2.7T

            Wake up, Rip, it’s 2015, not 1996, and Audi is now behind only the big 3 Japanese makes in overall reliability.

            The current Escape platform has been ANYTHING but reliable, attractive as it is and as well as it drives. (MKC is too new to have any real empirical data, but there’s no reason to expect anything better)

        • 0 avatar
          VW16v

          Giving you a heads up. A friend of mine is an Audi mechanic at our local Audi Dealer. To replace a exhaust system on some TDI ‘s can run $10,000 to $12,000 and that. And it is not uncommon to repair or replace at 80-100k miles.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            12k for an exhaust? O_o

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            So after a few of these diesels are in car wrecks the cars could be totalled by the insurance company. The exhaust systems are so advanced to keep the diesels up to government regulations the prices to repair and replace are Out of control. Of course the BMW is probably most expensive. But Audi is right behind.

          • 0 avatar
            VolandoBajo

            OUCH!

            Though think of these conspicuous consumption points that can be amassed when sitting in Starbucks complaining about how you had to write a five figure check to get your exhaust fixed.

            That, or maybe they want you to trade it in on a new one, which could go a long way towards explaining resale value drops.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Good point on the headroom. I find it interesting people think its acceptable to mount car chassis six to eight additional inches off of the ground while including giant wheels but accept a noticeable loss of headroom to compensate for the bad styling.

    • 0 avatar
      ZCD2.7T

      @VW 16V: So let’s recap:

      You suggested that there was a 15-20K price difference between an MKC and a Q5 (or X3, by extension). Actual difference is more like 4K, comparably equipped. Strike 1.

      You suggested that the M-Sport line wasn’t available for the X3. Actually, it is, and it’s not even hard to find on BMW’s website. Strike 2.

      You suggested that an Audi would be in the repair shop a lot. Actually, Audi is among the top manufacturers these days in reliability, per ACTUAL DATA, as opposed to outdated opinions. Strike 3.

      You completely ignored the point of my original post, which was that the headroom is unacceptably lacking in the MKC. Strike 4.

      YOU’RE OUT!

  • avatar
    Chocolatedeath

    Alex with all due respect, it doesnt matter if you think that one would have to look for the shared parts between the Escape and this. Folk on the internet will always say that you cant hide the Ford parts from them. I have been in both the NX and this and folks seem more willing to find fault with Lincoln than Lexus. Its ok the the ES is based on in the Avalon that is based on the Camry but dont say that the ES is based on the Camry cause its WB is about 3 inches longer. ???

    Fact is you have some folks who will only be happy after GM,Lincoln,Mazda, Acura and some other just die. They feel like there should only be no more than a hand full of OEM’s. IMO they want to have something like this:
    BMW,MB,Toyota,Honda,Ford,VW, Nissan and maybe Subbie and Audi as an alternative.
    Like I said just the way I feel.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      That the MKC is the very same vehicle as the Escape, built on the same line, with same exterior dimensions, with only a .3 liter bump in engine displacement and active dampers available, yet can be optioned to $50,000, is insane.

      I think that even the Titanium Escape is crazy expensive, but at least they’re not doing the douchebag thing of slapping a used-to-be luxury nameplate on it and charging 20k more for it.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        I get your point on the Escape vs. MKC. But, they are very different vehicles. Kinda like saying the Impala is just like a Cadillac. Thought you would enjoy that one. Or the Ford Taurus to a Volvo. The MKC looks, feels, and drives like a different vehicle compared to the Escape.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          More accurate to say the Cadillac XTS is an Impala. The Ford Taurus is a mangled gen 1 S80 riding on a decontented Ford copy of the P2 platform. I’m not disagreeing in saying the two models in question are identical, but they are both Ford Kugas with the Lincoln model having a refined chassis interior and exterior but offering the same powertrain. Not much different than the Ep II Impala vs XTS.

      • 0 avatar

        DeadWeight, I swear, some of the axes you like to grind are so far outside the scope of what most people even *care* about, it’s not even funny. It seems to me that you don’t like any luxury-branded vehicle whose underpinnings are spawned from a plebeian, non-luxury model. Well…those are just economies of scale. And most buyers don’t really care, either. The MKC is not my favorite vehicle in the segment, but the chassis is certainly competent enough for a luxury compact crossover, and Ford did change the bodyshell, interior, suspension and several dimensions to keep it from being insultingly similar to the Escape…and I applaud them for it.

        It’s not the same vehicle at all, and for you to assume otherwise is a lazier assumption than anything you claim Alex has done.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @Kyree,
          I do support DW’s view regarding what deems a vehicle to be classified as prestige or luxury.

          These so called luxury vehicles that are based on sh!tter platforms are not really a prestige or luxury vehicle.

          A true prestige or luxury vehicle is designed from the ground up to be so.

          The reason is they do perform and function far better as they were should be.

          These so called plebian vehicles are just value added vehicles, like a pickup.

          As for the other debate concerning dimensions, you can alter a vehicles height quite easily by re-tuning the suspension and throwing on different rubber.

          My BT50 is a Ford Ranger if you take the skin and interior out. But, yet it is perceived as different.

          My view is I wouldn’t never buy an re-branded, re-hashed, re-etc sh!tter and consider myself as having something special.

          Just like the Siverado Station Wagon Escalade. It’s a pickup, mutton done up as lamb.

          These vehicles are compromise vehicles for nickel millionaires.

          A perception vehicle for many.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        Do you know what assembly plants do for Lincoln models? Probably not.

        I can tell you that the MKS for sure goes through another set of inspection gates before the car leaves the plant. EVERY SINGLE ONE gets driven beyond the plant to ensure there are no issues. EVERY SINGLE ONE gets a top to bottom inspection to ensure there are ZERO defects under bright lights.

        0-1 MIS warranty claims are reviewed twice a week with managers and suppliers. The Lincoln warranty process has the company automatically approving claims even if the dealers fail to upload photos into the warranty database.

        Ever since Lincoln re-launched “The Lincoln Motor Company”, the inspection and QOS for Lincoln has changed in assembly plants.

        Now tell me; what does RUNNING DOWN THE SAME LINE have to do with anything?

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          You obviously lack even a basic understanding of the most fundamental aspects of vehicle manufacturing 101 if you can’t concede that the Escape and MKC are the same vehicle.

          Full of sound and fury, you are.

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            You obviously lack any understanding on how the automotive business actually works. Try looking up the PL71 platform from VW: VW Touareg, Audi Q7, and Porsche Cayenne. Now tell me how awful the Q7 or the Porsche is because they’re based on the pedestrian “peoples car”.

            Are you that thick headed to believe that Ford is going to dedicate individual platforms just because it’s a Lincoln? If VW isn’t going to do it, you better believe that Lincoln won’t either.

            Ford is just now giving Lincoln the ability to use their own designs without having to stick them on Ford sheet metal. The Navigator is the last of that thinking, and it’s slated to be replaced within the next 2 years.

            Now back into the hole where you came from. People are tired of hearing on how right you think you are and your ridiculous rants on how awful Cadillac is.

          • 0 avatar
            Spartan

            You obviously don’t have a degree in Business. Do you think Ford was going to spend BILLIONS of dollars to dedicate platforms just to Lincoln? You have a pretty jacked up thought process. If they did, you’d complain that the cars are too expensive.

            You know who complains about things like this? People who can’t afford them in the first place, so they have to get on their soap box about platform sharing.

            Sit in an Escape then sit in a fully loaded MKC. You clearly see where your money is going. Some people like to have a nice cabin with nice materials. You can’t get that in a Titanium Escape. You can get it in a Lincoln MKC.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Why isn’t this being done with the Ford models being produced on the same lines (or is it)?

          • 0 avatar
            SC5door

            Scale.

            Ford doesn’t produce that many Lincolns in a day (It’s around 2% of the Chicago volume according to my last schedule, plus or minus 1%), everything else goes through normal testing and inspection with random samples pulled in FCPA/S&R/Wind/Water audits.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Thanks. I’m putting my software hat on when I say this, but I see this as an opportunity to develop some kind of real life automated quality testing.

            What kind of defects are being sought when inspecting the Lincolns?

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @SC5door,
          I doesn’t matter what factory it comes from. As DW has pointed out it is still an Escape, that is blinged with a softer suspension.

          It’s a value added vehicle, not for the customer, but Ford. I don’t any argument with Ford making additional money from unwary customers.

          I’d be my balls that a Korean manufactured Sorento we get in Australia is a better put together vehicle than this Lincoln.

          Many vehicles that are the “same” are made globally.

          I look at the US Focus, my mother has one. Made in Michigan by the UAW. It a poor quality vehicle compared to the Thai Focuses.

          Your Chev SS is nothing but a Commodore, that is more or less assembled in the HSV factory and not the Holden factory.

          It’s still a Commodore.

          Place of origin does affect quality. But it is more do with country of origin.

          • 0 avatar
            Spartan

            “I’d be my balls that a Korean manufactured Sorento we get in Australia is a better put together vehicle than this Lincoln.”

            You’ve obviously bumped your head on something today. Your anecdotal analysis of a US Focus compared to a Thai Focus is nothing without proof. You didn’t even provide any examples! “Oh oh oh it’s not built as well”.

            BMWs are made in South Carolina and have been so for nearly 20 years. No one’s complaining about us slack jawed yokels building German automobiles. 3-Series, Z3, Z4, with the X3, X4 ,X5 and X6 and upcoming X7 all being built in upstate South Carolina.

            Your argument is baseless.

  • avatar
    VW16v

    Mr.Dykes stated the MKC does not handle as well as a X3msport? What is a X3Msport? To get anywhere near the horsepower and torque of 2.3 ecoboost in an X3 you would have to get into the X3 xDrive35i. Which starts at over $46,000 and does not even come with standard heated seats.

    • 0 avatar
      Chocolatedeath

      Does it even come with real leather at that price?

    • 0 avatar

      How did we go from comparing handling to horsepower and torque? If—and I didn’t read the full thing—he said the MKC didn’t handle as well as the X3 M-Sport, that doesn’t necessarily correlate with how much power each vehicle has. Part of it may be the X3’s RWD bias, a trait it also shares with the GLK-Class and Q5 (the Q5 rides on a platform that is by default FWD with a longitude-mounted engine, but you cannot get the Q5 without Quattro, which is rear-biased).

      But yes, I agree that the X3 is overpriced for what it is, more so than most of its competitors.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        I cannot find a X3 M-sport on BMWs website. Q5 in all intensive purposes is priced well above the MKC. Sure if you compare a loaded MKC to a base Q5 it can compare in price.

        • 0 avatar

          I see what you mean. The Q5 is a lot pricier than the MKC.

          And that’s the rub. Alex mentioned that people think the compact NX and MKC compete with the subcompact GLA-Class, Range Rover Evoque, Q3 and X1. And in terms of price, they kind of do, especially at the low end. Likewise, the mid-sized MKX, SRX and RX compete with compact Euro crossovers…which means that Lincoln doesn’t have the price advantage it thinks it does.

          But space-wise, the MKC is closer to the Q5 and X3 than the aforementioned subcompact vehicles, so I think comparisons on handling are fair…especially since people are willing to pay the price premium to get into one of those Euro compact crossovers.

        • 0 avatar
          ZCD2.7T

          “for all intensive purposes” Literal LOL.

          Comparably equipped, the Q5 is less than $4K more expensive than the MKC:

          http://www.truedelta.com/Lincoln-MKC/price-1248-2015/vs-Q5-874-2015&tire_1=6157&audio_1=2867&body_1=14&pt_1=4455&tire_2=1168&audio_2=4014&body_2=14&pt_2=2068&price_feature=3&personal_feature=

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            And the MKC gives you an extra 65 HP at those price points.

          • 0 avatar
            ZCD2.7T

            Funny thing though is that those 65 extra ponies don’t result in better acceleration.

            Maybe Audi’s horses are Clydesdales and Lincoln’s are ponies?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Also the phrase is “intents and purposes,” which is an even bigger LOL.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          If you couldnt find the M Sport option on BMWs website, you weren’t trying very hard. You have a choice of no-line, M Sport, or xLine. It’s the very first thing you choose when you build your own.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You can’t take him seriously, krhodes.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            Khodes, found it. M sport $2700 option. Thanks. The maintenance and time waiting for your BMW and Audi to be fixed is not worth the hassle in my book.
            Corey you don’t always have to post like a child on this site. Everyone cannot always be as perfect as yourself.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            -So German cars are out because of maintenance and time wasted on repair.
            -And Japanese luxury cars are out because they aren’t “real,” and you might as well get a Hyundai or a Charger because it’s better value.

            So you’re left with Lincoln and Cadillac. The only two brands which suit your criteria and are luxurious. Unless something is wrong with those two as well.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            No, I enjoy the design and engineering of German autos. But you will spend some cash keeping them running past 100 k miles.

  • avatar
    slance66

    In about 3-4 years I may try to pick one of these up. It’s a good looking CUV and I think the segment needs something that focuses on ride quality. Really, I hope all manufacturers dial back these absurdly large wheels and low profile tires and build cars that aren’t so punishing on our broken pavement.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I agree! I very much like that it’s focused on quiet and soft. That’s what you need for everyday roads. And I’ll want a used and loaded up Black Label with the 2.3.

      I would also prefer if it said Ghia or Regency Elite on the back in script, but I will have to settle for Black Label (which just sounds like a whiskey).

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I agree.

    • 0 avatar
      brn

      It was nice to see Alex say the same thing that I’ve been saying for years. Not every vehicle in a given segment needs to go after the exact same audience.

      Everyone else is going after performance. Lincoln is going after comfort. That’s not a bad thing. It’s too bad that so many automotive journalists can’t see that.

  • avatar
    kosmo

    Good write up, Alex. I like that you don’t start out assuming the worst for the “off” brands in various segments.

    One note, however, is that whether or not the back seats fold completely flat should be included in every review of a vehicle in this class.

  • avatar

    I do agree that the MKC is a profoundly-competitive entry and that it should be considered by most buyers. However, my personal taste is that the interior is not up to snuff design-wise. In particular, I can’t stand that cheap-looking grid of buttons on the center stack.

    Me, I’d take an XC60 R-Design, especially at near to $50K.

  • avatar
    cbrworm

    I’ve got to say, I like Alex’s writing style. I have not watched any of the videos, but there have been several reviews of cars that I am not interested in that I have read due to being drawn in by the first paragraph.

    That being said, this is another car I was not interested in, but it looks like it is something I should keep in mind. The interior looks pretty nice and my main complaints about the Escape seem to have been addressed.

    It is probably still too small for me and my family and the lowered tow rating doesn’t bode well for the towing we do through the mountains with four people plus gear in addition to the trailer, but it seems to be a step in the right direction.

    • 0 avatar

      If you’re going to have four people *and* tow through the mountains, something like the Grand Cherokee sounds like a better bet…especially because one in the $40K-$50K range is going to be very well-equipped. And it’s civilized in town, but capable out of town and on the back roads. In fact, the Grand Cherokee is probably the best interpretation of a modern “SUV” that I can think of. I hear backseat room is a little tight, but you’d have to test it for yourself; I only sampled the front seats.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Going through the Mountains with 4 people and a trailer, better get the Hemi on that Grand Cherokee or step up to a Tahoe.

        • 0 avatar
          bunkie

          A nicely-equipped JGC with a Hemi is easily had for under $50K. You can probably even get one with the VM Motori diesel. I agree with Kyree, it’s a standout vehicle, competing effectively at various price points, especially at the low end where it’s a screaming bargain.

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          If you go through the mountains with four people and a trailer once in a year, the JGC/Tahoe are overkill the rest of the time. There’s limited parking at the divorce court downtown and the MKC is big enough for the McDonalds drive-up window and the liquor store at the strip mall.

      • 0 avatar
        slance66

        The worst thing about the GC backseat isn’t that it is tight, it’s that it is too low. Those seats need to be 2-3 inches higher off the floor. Several manufacturers are getting this right, including Jeep in the new Cherokee.

  • avatar
    saabophile

    love it that the haters complain about any positive reviews. I guess they think that all car shoppers ar the same, which apparently is what this guy is tryign to say. if you want something different here’s your ride, if not, then shop something else.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Its only a problem if the vehicle happens to be an American brand.

      I bet Lincoln could take a BMW 5 series, reskin it in Lincoln duds, let the “haters” (only term that really fits) test it or read a review like this one, and it would be “cheap this” and “parts bin that”. It would drive awful, the interior materials would be terrible, the engine would be noisy, slow and a gas guzzler. Of course, reliability would be horrible, too, since the badge on the trunk determines this.

      A lot of times, you can read some comments and tell that the writer worked very hard to find SOMETHING wrong to complain about, just to have a reason to say how bad the car is. A fault that would be easily overlooked if the badge was different.

      Its okay (toung-in-cheek example, dont get your panties in a bunch) that a big Lexus has driving dynamics comperable to a couch on roller skates, but a Lincoln? Or a Cadillac? Oh God! It should be able to keep up with a Ferrari in the curves, have the ride quality of a 96 Town Car, the power of a Ford GT, the interior of a Phantom and the MPG of a Sonic with an MSRP of $25k. If not, hell, they should just load them all up and crush them. And if they built such a car, the shape of the lower air dam or the warning label on the coolant resivor cap would be a deal breaker, of course.

      • 0 avatar
        otaku

        I bet Lincoln could take a BMW 5 series, reskin it in Lincoln duds, let the “haters” (only term that really fits) test it or read a review like this one, and it would be “cheap this” and “parts bin that”. /quote

        @JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N: Actually, as near as I can tell, the ‘real’ issue would then be that the Lincoln CUV committed the mortal sin of rolling down the same assembly line as the Bimmer, which according to DW, since it shares a platform with another vehicle, must automatically render it as a complete pile of crap. QED

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N,
        An American brand has already done that.

        The Grand Cherokee. And it isn’t as good as the MB.

        It is a good off roader, well priced, but somehow Chrysler managed to reduce the vehicle in terms of quality and reliability.

        So, yes your comment is correct. If Lincoln got hold of a German platform it would reduce the vehicle overall.

      • 0 avatar
        VW16v

        John Taurus, you right on point. I have been saying it for sometime now. Rebadge some of the American brands with a Lexus or BMW nameplate and the reviews would be whistling a different tune. Mr.Dykes is no different than a lot of other auto reviewers. He even took the engine cover off to just engine. Other brands the nice looking plastic pieces would have been kept on to show a nicer looking engine bay. To tell the real truth. I have shown a few of his videos to friends that are not in auto geek world. And they all thought it was a Saturday Night Live skit.

        • 0 avatar
          Quentin

          He pulled the beauty cover off the IS350 and posted that picture directly in the review.

          https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/05/2015-lexus-350-f-sport-review-video/

          Confirmation bias much?

          The review seemed generally positive to me.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    The MKC is a very important product for Lincoln. It’s what the first generation Cadillac CTS was. A turning point out of the doldrums. Lincoln is finally getting it together and starting to make decent vehicles.

    I like how the MKC isn’t a “Me-too” BMW. You can’t out-BMW BMW. Just ask Cadillac how well that endeavor worked out. Lincoln has the right approach. The MKC competes with the usual roundup, but is different in a way that plays to its strengths.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      I really liked the MKC I tested except for one important thing that Alex mentioned: the seat cushion is way too short for someone with a 36″ inseam. And I really like the notion of a more comfortable ride. The roads I drive are pitiful and I’d gladly sacrifice some handling so as not to be beaten up on a daily basis.

  • avatar
    MrGreenMan

    “For the extra dosh”

    I liked the review, but, could you please never use this phrase again? If you must, could you please put a topless footy girl on the click through as a virtual page three? The British affectation is just jarring.

  • avatar
    ajla

    I love that the console is narrow and relatively low.

    I hope this design finds its way into more Ford/Lincoln vehicles. One of my bigger concerns on the Continental is constricted knee or thigh room from a GIANT console.

  • avatar
    Steve-O

    Wow, tough crowd. I test-drove an MKC 2.3L when my Mustang was getting serviced and I have to say I really liked it. I concur with Alex, the interior was excellent. The leather and wood looked and felt appropriately expensive for the price point. I’m 5’7″ and found the thrones to be one of the most comfortable I have experienced. The ride was smooth, quiet and absorbed bumps really well. All of these items are what a ‘luxury’ vehicle is supposed to deliver and it did, in spades. Plus, it looks great in person.
    I think Lincoln is on to something here.

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      Hmmm, let’s see. Small SUV. Ride is plush. Handling is uninvolving. Interior is color-customizable. Badge is used to justify premium pricing. Rear seats are child height. Front seats are sized for 5’4″ to 5’7″ people… Nope, sorry. Just can’t imagine what gender they were targeting with this.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Take a look around the automotive landscape and realize nearly everything is designed for women, or at least designed not to greatly offend them.

  • avatar
    dwford

    Wow, the MKC sure has brought out the drama in the comments today!

    This seems more of a competitor to the RDX than the European models frequently mentioned in the reviews. How does it stack up to the RDX?

    • 0 avatar
      genuineleather

      Rdx has more room, better real world fuel economy, much better resale, and is practically guaranteed to break less. It’s also cheaper option for option and comes with a slightly less marginal luxury badge.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        Seems like the RDX is slightly larger than the MKC, but not really enough to be a deciding factor. Resale definitely swings the RDX way, no doubt

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

        Better real world economy, huh? How nice that youve owned and driven both enough to determine that. Will it need a serp belt at 60k miles, too? While we’re at it, how does the interior hold up after 10 years in the sun? How often do the brakes need to be replaced? Hey, if youre going to wildly ASSume things you couldnt possibly know, then lets have all of it.

        Or is it based on the observed fuel economy in this review, on a brand new car, in unknown conditions with practicly no basis in the “real world”? Or are you basing it on the economy of the Escape, which weighs different, is slightly taller, and has a different engine?

    • 0 avatar
      saabophile

      if we’re calling the mkc a x3/xc60 competitor, then based on size i’d call the rdx a rx/mkx/srx competitor. its huge these days

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    The biggest issue that goes unaddressed with this review is the true cost of buying a $50k compact Lincoln: depreciation. A Lexus ES or Acura MDX really aren’t that different from their prole cousins, but high residuals (and the resulting cheap leases) makes the additional outlay relatively modest. This Escape Extra is going to have the depreciation of a German without the snob appeal, fancy dealer, or driving dynamics, negating whatever “value” it’s bringing to the table.

    The Black Label option is especially sad: I can only imagine the sage color selection advice being dispensed by your expertly-trained, aesthete Lincoln salesman.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    This didn’t read like a normal Alex review for some reason – I forgot who wrote it because I read this a considerable amount of time after opening the tab.

    I thought it was Ronnie!

    But as usual with Lincoln these days, the real value will be picking one up used. The old lady who buys new can handle all the depreciation for you. I think the XC60 might pip this though, because it will have equal depreciation, but be better looking a few years down the road (IMO).

  • avatar
    AH-1WSuperCobra

    One thing I can’t get over with newer Lincolns is the front. I really don’t like the vertical lines or the shape of the grille. I get it that every maker wants a unique front that makes the brand instantly identifiable but I find that one a swing and a miss.

  • avatar
    pheanix

    “Best Lincoln interior ever created”??? WHAT??? To me this interior looks rather bland and unimaginative, from the steering wheel design to the door panels to the middle stack. And factory customization of Lincolns is nothing new. In the past, there used to be plenty of interior color and trim variations (plus designer editions), especially on the big Marks. Anyway, any of the classic Bill Blass designs destroys this euro-wannabe interior.

  • avatar
    STS_Endeavour

    I got to sit in an MKC at a car show I went to somewhat recently. It was really nice! The Max Wolff split-wing grill aside, the exterior looked sharp, and the interior looked fantastic. It was probably a Black Label interior, it was much more exquisite than the interior in these photos. It looked every bit as good as the Audi Q5 interior, and and dare I say better than the funky Lexus RX interior I looked at.

    Then Lincoln turns around and gives the MKC a choice of 4 cylinder engines. How underwhelming. Lincoln, you were so very, very close.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    Sorry but this vehicles does little for me. The sound of a Focus or Fusion underhood after plunking down nearly 45 large is rather disconcerting. The lower tow rating of the bigger motor is just plain weird. That center stack looks like something from a 20K vehicle not a 45-50 one and the front seats are just too darn short, narrow and not really that comfortable for my frame. The buttons for gear selection makes the center console look bland even if it does free up space (for what exactly), the mileage from Fords Ecoboost engines are always below expectations in anything I have driven and overall the exterior looks like something that was penned by Hyundai save the Oldsmobile inspired grille language.

    I also have to chuckle at the best interior Lincoln has ever created. For real! But then we live in a reduced expectations society where less somehow equates to more, bland is in and black colorless silver blah interiors are still sadly the “in”thing.

  • avatar
    Exfordtech

    Alex, the specs on the Ford transmissions are in the name, the 6F35 is a 6 speed Front wheel drive transmission with a torque rating of 350 Nm (or 258 ft*lbs).

  • avatar
    legacygt

    Lincoln deserves some credit for putting in the time to visually differentiate its vehicles from their Ford counterparts. The problem is they usually make their cars look worse (MKZ/Fusion, MKT/Flex). In this case they definitely made a better looking Escape and offer some features and powertrains that are unique.

    • 0 avatar
      VolandoBajo

      The new Lincoln grilles look like an escapee from a stylized poster for a revival of Cats! The Musical. At the risk of being accurately accused of being a Panther lover, I think the so-called waterfall grille of the Aero (92-97) Mercurys looks so much better.

      But then, hey, they paid a lot to have some styling by a big name stylist, so they need some big time styling innovations.

      Unfortunately, that is often the case…you pay for change, so you get it in spades. Unfortunately, styling done in spades seldom speaks of luxury or taste; instead it often screams “Look at me! I am new, and bold, and daring, and innovative, and unique! Pay for me, and you can be exclusive!”

      While much of the MKC interior looks like a winning art school interior design project, it sounds like the dimensions don’t quite add up the way they should, or could. And the grille is a living monument to the idea that first impressions are lasting impressions.

      Unfortunately, I don’t want to drive something, however good in other ways, that has a front end that looks like Jellicle Cat.

      As said above, a swing and a miss.

      Still, overall, it does show that there is still life in the Lincoln brand, and given some of the design freedom that seems to be inherent in newer technologies and underpinnings coming online in the next two to four years, there is a real possibility of even better Lincolns, instead of floundering or delivering just middling results.

      But I think a big data point on the long cycle analysis of Lincoln will be whether or not these new power plants will prove to have the kind of longevity that the cammers did (300-400K under severe commercial duty) or whether they will be Euro-like one (hundred K miles) and done.

      If they do, and they fully capitalize on the new more flexible frame (in the design sense, not the mechanical performance sense of flexible)…if they fully capitalize on that, they may very well turn out to have created a legitimate successor to the Panther platform in the hearts and minds of auto enthusiasts. But the big IF’s are going to be longevity and reliability (or the lack of same). And only time will tell.

      But I sure would like to eventually see a fully realized Mustang drivetrain in a Lincoln-appointed vehicle.

      I sometimes rant and rave that I want FoMoCo to bring back a Panther like vehicle with BOF and RWD as well as a V8. But the reality is I can dispense with BOF, and if the motor delivers the same kind of broad power and instantaneous throttle response of a V8, I don’t care if it has 5 and half cylinders. And the jury is still out on RWD. But the real characteristics that could link the future to the Panther and the love it gets would be the longevity and reliability, along with the reasonably strong performance and reasonably good economy. Not world-beater economy or performance, but a good handful of each, in a longlasting, reasonably priced platform. If FoMoCo does that, they will have pulled off another coup on a par with the three decade plus (I believe) run of the Panthers.

      I hope @bball40dtw sees this and has some input on this. What he has said so far gives me hope for the long range future of the brand.


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